YMMV / Megaman Legends

  • Anticlimax Boss: Juno, the Final Boss from the first game, big time. You can literally run around in circles shooting and dodging all of his attacks easily, and this was even worse if you used the fully charged Shining Laser in the fight.
    • Justified as Juno himself points out: he's not designed for combat while Trigger is. Of course he's going to be rather easy.
  • Author's Saving Throw: Capcom re-releasing all three games in the Legends subseries on PSN seems to be an attempt at this after all the negative publicity, or possibly to gauge the public's interest in the third game by tracking sales.
  • Awesome Music:
  • Best Level Ever: The Main Gate and Elysium.
  • Contested Sequel: On the one hand, Legends 2 had a deeper and more involved storyline that revealed a lot about Mega Man's past and the lore of the world as a whole, and also had a wider variety of weapons and equipment with tweaks to the controls to streamline combat and movement. On the other hand, it also had much fewer optional side areas and sidequests, and its dungeons were smaller and less complex, making for much more linear and constricting gameplay. It's up for opinion which game is better.
  • Cowboy BeBop at His Computer: Found surprisingly in the English instruction booklet. Among other things, Tron's bio describes her as Tiesel's daughter instead of his sister (and eldest daughter, at that!), and it claims that you use the Square button to adjust the camera while running instead of the Circle button (the Square button is actually used for firing your Mega Buster).
  • Cult Classic: At the time of its release it didn't sell very well and had mixed critical reception. These days it has a decent fanbase who love the series and are calling for re-release of the first two titles and/or Legends 3.
  • Demonic Spiders: Sharukurusus, the humanoid Reaverbots, in both games - they run fast, hit hard, and can leap to avoid shots. They also appear in packs, so you may be blasting away at one and fail to hear the clanking footsteps until its friend impales you. And in the first game, there's even an invisible version that only reveals itself when it's just about to impale you.
    • Firushudot— the crocodile-shaped Reaverbots from the Lake Jyun Gate— are exclusive to one corridor in the first game, but they have a long-range sonic beam attack and are horrendously powerful even against beefed-up armor and firepower. And, again, they tend to pop out of the walls in groups. Your best bet is to either walk slowly or run like hell.
    • From the second game, Shoebafun. Only found in two levels in the second game, but easily the most paranoia-inducing reaverbots. They are floormasters that pop out at random and eat you alive, and the only way to escape them is either jumping at exactly the moment you see one coming up or through some serious button mashing once it's got you.
  • Ear Worm: The Servbot/Kobun Training Theme in Misadventures.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: The Bonne Family Pirates, especially the Servbots. To wit: they got an entire Gaiden Game starring them (namely Tron and her cadre of Servbots) and Tron and the Servbots made the cut twice for the Marvel vs. Capcom series, first in 2 where Tron and a Servbot are playable, and then in 3, the Kattelox Island stage features Teisel, Tron, and a lot of Servbots. Heck, Tron was announced as playable for Marvel Vs Capcom 3 before any other Mega Man character, and, along with Zero, another fellow Ensemble Darkhorse, they are the only representatives in the game.
    • Tron and the Servbots (along with X and Zero) are set to appear in Project X Zone. Tron has now officially made more appearances (outside of cameos) than Volnutt has.
  • Fashion-Victim Villain: The metal plate Tron Bonne has bolted on her crotch is unbelievably distracting.
  • Foe Yay: Mega Man Volnutt and Sera, in spades.
  • Fridge Brilliance: Why do you go to Data to save your game? Because his original purpose is to hold Mega Man's memory.
  • Game Breaker:
    • The Active Buster in the first game, and its successor, the Homing Missile, in the sequel. Absurdly expensive to upgrade, but if you do so you end up with a long-range, fully automatic missile launcher that homes in on enemies, does a lot of damage, and can hit multiple enemies to boot.
    • The Shining Laser is described as a weapon so powerful it frightens Roll, and it lives up to that reputation, killing anything it hits in seconds, having long range, and being upgradable to infinite energy. Once again, though, it needs a lot of money to reach that point.
  • Genius Bonus: The Gesellschaft and Gemeinschaft share names with sociology terms, meaning 'society' and 'community' respectively. The former is larger and more expensive than the latter, mirroring their actual definitions.
  • Good Bad Bugs: In the second game. There is an oversight where holding down the fire button and pressing forward repeatedly (causing Mega Man to enter and exit his walking animation) allowed you to bypass the buster's rapid stat and fire very rapidly via cancelling the animation that occurs between shots. This is very useful for the S Class Digger Test.
    • Also in the second game, skipping the cutscene before the Final Boss's second form will start the fight with the boss missing a small sliver of health.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Legends never die...
    • Or what Data says at the end of Legends 2...It might take a while for Mega Man to get home, indeed.
  • Internet Backdraft: Within mere seconds of the news of Mega Man Legends 3's cancellation, the announcing blogpost was filled to the brim with angry fans. Many of them swearing to never buy a Capcom product again.
    • Worth noting that not only did Capcom give the fans false hope (They hyped the game up quite a bit, and in a rare move, encouraged fan participation in its construction), they didn't really explain why it was canceled (just that it "didn't meet criteria"). Then, there's the Prototype version that was meant to test sales? Also canned, despite being completely finished. It only got worse when it was revealed that Inafune offered to help finish the game, and was shot down.
    • One of the first casualties resulting from the backdraft was Capcom's livestreaming of Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 the day before the San Diego Comic Con. The stream's chat was instantly flooded with people chanting "LEGENDS 3! LEGENDS 3!" to the point that Capcom had to shut down the broadcast due to the spam.
    • It's also not exactly the first strike for many Capcom fans in recent days.
      • Let's not forget it also wasn't the first game they radically changed, in poorly-received ways, and then abandoned after the changes drastically reduced sales of its last installment.
      • Finally, Mega Man Legends 3 was cancelled around the time another game called Mega Man Universe was cancelled; which was a de facto revival of a series just starting to go dormant, and was literally billed by Capcom as a celebration of the Mega Man franchise as a whole, making both cancellations feel like kicks to the teeth for the fandom. Now it felt like Capcom was intentionally trying to kill the franchise; indeed, since the cancellation of Legends 3, the only Mega Man-related media released has been Mega Man's appearance in the latest Super Smash Bros. game and the ongoing Archie Comics series. Even worse as Inafune's attempted Spiritual Successor to Mega Man, Mighty No. 9; utterly crashed and burned on release in 2016! Thankfully, things started to turn around when the first six games of the classic series were re-released that same year on PS4, Xbox One, the Wii U and 3DS, and Steam; with new HD 8-bit graphics, a challenge mode, and a museum featuring an exhaustive collection of sketches. Months prior, a new animated television series by Man of Action (the creator of Ben 10 and Generator Rex) was announced, with a projected premiere date of 2017 on Cartoon Network.
  • In-Name-Only: Much like with the Mega Man Battle Network and Mega Man Star Force series, it could be very easily argued that this series has little, if anything, to do with any of the other series in the main timeline in both gameplay and story. Mega Man X7, regardless of quality, could be seen as a more faithful transition to 3D than the Legends games. Of course, this is a handy example of Tropes Are Not Bad, as Mega Man X7 is usually viewed as awful, while the Legends series is considered a string of classics.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Mega Man Volnutt. He is shipped with any girl in the series, even very minor ones.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Teisel has shades of this. The Bonne's are utterly devoted to him, and many, many times in Misadventures of Tron Bonne, the Servbots talk about how inspiring and charismatic he is. While he's prone to becoming angry when something gives him trouble, when he is defeated he tends to either become relatively quiet (when Mega Man defeats the Marlwolf), accept it with surprising grace (when Megs defeats the Focke Wolf), or smoothly improvise a way to salvage victory from defeat (after Mega beats Bruno) by not only convincing Mega Man to not turn the Bonnes in, but also noting to Tron that since Mega Man is such a good digger, he will eventually find the Mother Lode, and when he does, they can take it first. Cementing Teisel as this trope: This plan goes off without the slightest hitch (presuming that the massive refractor in the Main Gate is the Mother Lode anyway; the games themselves are ambiguous at best about that.
    • He also claims at the end of the Misadventures of Tron Bonne that he let Loathe capture him on purpose, knowing it would compel Tron to crush Loathe, and put the whole family in a position to claim Loathe's riches, including the Colossus, for themselves. This, again, goes off without a hitch. But it's unclear if that's true or if he's just claiming credit after the fact.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Teisel Bonne, whose most prominent role in Legends 1 and 2 is basically to get his ass kicked by Mega Man over and over. He also spends most of Tron's spinoff game captured and in-distress. Dialogue makes it clear that off-screen he is a feared, capable, and respected leader of pirates, but that's, well, off-screen.
    • In-universe there is Denise Marmalade from The Misadventures of Tron Bonne. She repeatedly gets her ass kicked by Tron (and shows up late to Tron's first robbery, due to having overslept and needing to be woken up by her mother), and is constantly chewed out by her superiors for it (never mind that plenty of other police officers fail to stop Tron over and over too). Eventually, Tron actually feels bad for her, and arranges it so that Denise will be credited with capturing Loathe and Glyde. Though, when Teisel points out she's acting out of a concern for a friend, Tron denies it up and down.
  • Memetic Mutation: Not as prominent as some memes, but there's a joke among fans of the series that Mega Man underwent "reverse puberty" between games 1 and 2, due to a change in voice actors making him suddenly sound younger.
  • Most Annoying Sound: Appo and Da shouting "This way!" and "Over here!" at you in one segment.
    • Appo and Da also laugh inexplicably during most of their spoken dialogue.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Pretty much all the ruins in the first game, as well as all the Bonne's strongest robots (Tron's giant spider robot, the Feldynaught is a standout example). The second game's ruins are pretty scary too, although special mention goes to the Saul Kada Ruins.
    • This article would be remiss if it did not mention this music:
    • That horrible buzzing sound your alarm makes when Reaverbots are nearby is guaranteed to make you jump. Every single time. Thankfully, it was removed in the sequel.
    • The Old City in the first game is a more mundane example. It's a sector of Kattelox that's mostly abandoned. Unlike the rest of the island, it's bleak, gray, and dirty. There's no music whatsoever, and the streets are completely empty...aside from the packs of feral dogs that noisily (if ineffectually) attack intruders.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: The fanbase is split almost directly down the middle on whether Megs should be with Roll or Tron.
    • And lord knows what he's been up to with Yuna and Sera in the real time following the ending of Legends 2. Suffice to say that some of the Ship To Ship Combat in the fandom revolves not around which girl Mega Man should take, but whether or not he should take all of them.
  • Spiritual Licensee: Until an actual one came out, these games were as close to a 3D Metroid game as one could get at the time. You take control of an Ambiguously Human robotic hero with an Arm Cannon to explore ancient ruins in an over-the-shoulder third-person shooter style, completing a dungeon usually results in a power-up or MacGuffin that unlocks the next dungeon, and along the way you find various power-ups that give you new secondary weapons and movement abilities, which let you access optional areas and explore previous dungeons in new ways.
  • Strawman Has a Point: There's a scene in Manda Island in Legends 2 where Tron is trying to break Mega Man's trust in Roll by telling him she overcharges him for weapons and effectively steals money from him. This is treated in-game as nothing but Tron making stuff up, but many players have pointed out how ridiculously expensive it is to fully upgrade several weapons in both games, with it requiring an elephantine amount of grinding.
  • Superlative Dubbing: While it may seem a bit odd in this day and age, back during the PS1 era of games when voice acting was often cringe inducing at best, the voice acting in the first game in many regards managed to do two things that shocked a lot of people. 1; being a surprisingly good dub and 2; having good voice acting for a Capcom Mega Man game. (Which, thanks to a certain other Mega Man game, Capcom is rather infamous for their voice selection.)
  • That One Attack: The green orb attack most Bonne boss robots use in Legends 1. It's large and tricky to avoid, homes in on you, does a lot of damage, and breaks your shield so you take increased damage from normal attacks. Oh yeah, and the Bonne robots usually fire two of them in succession.
  • That One Boss: Yakuto Krabbe, Tron's crab-like machine in Legends 2. And considering it's one of the earliest bosses where you will have little in terms of upgraded weaponry, it's a hell of a Wake-Up Call Boss.
  • That One Level:
    • The Clozer Sub-Gate in 1 becomes this if you don't know the Guide Dang It. At a particular part in the dungeon you find a cracked ceiling that has to be demolished using two specific special weapons. The problem is that 1, you may not have those weapons if you haven't gone exploring the dungeons well; 2, it isn't immediately obvious you can break that ceiling because this is the only time in the game you encounter a destructible ceiling; and 3, there's only a single hint in the game that you have to use a certain special weapon to break the ceiling, given in the description of the Grand Grenade. Players who don't know what they're supposed to do here can get stuck forever pondering how to proceed.
    • Glyde's base in 2. Several areas of powerful enemies that unleash Bullet Hell, the walls are lined with regenerating turrets, and running away to Data to recover your energy and save is a bit of a trip.
    • The Nino Ruins in 2, which isn't suprising considering it's a Down the Drain area and has all of its trappings: most of it has you moving veeeeery sloooooowly through water (which also messes with your jumping physics, making it harder to dodge enemies), is labyrinthine and very, very long, and it's packed to the brim with some of the more tedious and/or annoying Reaverbots in the game. At least it's got some good music for you to listen to. By extension the Kimotama Caverns fall into this category as well, just without the cool music (you instead get the Clozer Woods ruin music from the first game, which is more Nightmare Fuel / Hell Is That Noise than anything).
  • That One Sidequest: The S Class Digger test in the second game.
    • The Technical Course racing minigame in the first.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: This happened to the series in general at the time. When Mega Man was best known as a franchise of 2D platformers with distinct stages where you fought bosses to acquire their weapons, this game was an over-the-shoulder third person shooter with wide-open exploration and Action RPG elements. While the series has been Vindicated by History, at the time this was not what Mega Man fans were expecting.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: Juno from the first game and The Master from the second game are both very feminine looking males.
  • Vindicated by History: In 1998, the game had poor sales, and fans of Legends were rare. Now, it's a beloved Cult Classic.
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