YMMV / Marvel Cinematic Universe


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     A-D 
  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Thanos, of all people, as an Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain. Seven movies since his debut (appearing in three of them), he has collected exactly zero Infinity Stones, and in fact even has one fewer Stone than he started with (as Loki's staff had the Mind Stone).
    • Another is he's The Chessmaster playing the Long Game. He may not have the Infinity Stones, but he knows where most of them are (as well as figuring out the location to the Infinity Gauntlet). In the stinger of Age of Ultron, Thanos appears tired of relying on others to bring him the Stones, and resolves to retrieve them personallly.
    • Some fans speculate that the Infinity Stones have some level of sentience, similar to the One Ring. Most prominently, this would mean the Mind Stone was manipulating all sides so it could get a body. This would be similar to the original Infinity Trilogy from the comics where the Gems all have a level of sentience and a desire to be with the others.
  • And You Thought It Would Fail:
    • No superhero crossover film had ever been done beforenote , and Marvel's biggest super heroes were in the hands of other studios. All they had were mostly B-listers. Even the Nick Fury stinger at the end of Iron Man was inserted mostly then as a Mythology Gag. Great idea in hindsight, though, right? In fact, because of the MCU (especially The Avengers), said B-listers were elevated to near-Spider-Man status.
    • This has also affected every film since the Avengers. A third Iron Man and sequels to both Thor and Captain America? A film based on the Guardians of the Galaxy, with characters obscure even to Marvel fans? A film based on the much-mocked Ant-Man, especially in light of its well-publicized Troubled Production? Doctor Strange? And yet all of them have been (more or less) successful. Moral of the story: Don’t bet against the House of Ideas. Or the House of Mouse.
  • Arc Fatigue: Thanos's story in Phase 1 and Phase 2 consists of him sending flunkies to bring him Infinity Stones, which ultimately causes him to lose several of the Infinity Stones he already had, along with those he nearly gained. He also does not get a lot of characterization with his few appearances in these parts, coming across as a Generic Doomsday Villain. This is set to be rectified in Phase 3, in which he takes a hands-on approach to the situation and his motivations are explained. Related to this trope, Thanos' surprise appearance at the end of The Avengers was mind-blowing to comic book fans and intriguing to general audiences. By the time he shows up again in the post credits scene for Age of Ultron, viewers are more likely to roll their eyes.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • After fans objected to heroic comics characters like Alexander Pierce and Sitwell being made HYDRA agents, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. revealed that some of the people working for HYDRA really were loyal S.H.I.E.L.D. agents, and were actually brainwashed.
    • Fans of The Mandarin were naturally pretty upset when Iron Man 3 revealed that he didn't actually exist. This was fixed by a One Shot which showed there is a real Mandarin, who is just as angry as the fans at how his name was used. Another part was the writing team realizing the initial reveal caused a plot hole regarding the Ten Rings group in the first Iron Man film.
    • After years of legal right shenanigans, Marvel and Sony finally reaching an agreement to introduce Spider-Man into the MCU, with Sony co-producing films he appears in. Combined with reports that Fox and Marvel are working together to make two X-Men-related television series (since Fox want to make one, but their contract only gives them film rights, and so they would need Marvel to work with them to make it), which could easily be brought into the MCU as well, a united Marvel Cinematic Universe is closer to becoming a reality than ever.
  • With all the issues preventing a Black Widow movie from being made (whatever you think they are), her fans were thrown a bone with the tie-in novel series about her. The first book also takes the opportunity to make it clear that, whatever Joss Whedon says, the Avengers were told at some point that Coulson was still alive.
  • In general, Phase 3 seems to have a much greater commitment to diversity than the first two phases, likely in response to the frequent criticisms about the lack of women and minorities in the movies.
    • Civil War had Marvel's most diverse cast of heroes to date, Black Panther and Captain Marvel are finally getting their own movies, Pom Klementieff is playing Mantis in the Guardians sequel, the Ant-Man sequel features the long-awaited debut of the Wasp (and has her name in the title), Spider-Man: Homecoming features a diverse supporting cast (with major supporting characters like Liz Allen and Flash Thompson played by non-white actors), and Thor: Ragnarok not only features the debut of Valkyrie (played by a black actress), but also that of Hela, the MCU's first leading female villain. And on the TV side, Luke Cage single-handedly at least triples the amount of black characters in the 'verse.
    • There's also been a more subtle push for behind-the-camera diversity; both Thor: Ragnarok and Black Panther have non-white directors (and in the case of Black Panther the director, producer and writers are all African-American) while Captain Marvel has an all-female writing team and is seeking out a female director.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Loki. Originally an Ensemble Darkhorse and considered one of, if not the, best villain the MCU has to offer, over time he's moved into this trope. While his fans welcome the increase in focus on him, others have grown to consider Loki a Draco in Leather Pants, highly overrated by his fangirls, or a Spotlight-Stealing Squad who appears at the expense of characters who needed the screentime and development more (a frequent complaint about Thor: The Dark World).
    • Agent Coulson, to a lesser extent. He was an Ensemble Darkhorse like Loki in Avengers, and his fans campaigned to save him and get him his own show. Fans who didn't like him, however, now see him as an overhyped boring every man who gets given promotion in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. above canon comic book agents and other, more interesting Canon Foreigners.
    • Tony Stark is the most prominent figure in the MCU for obvious reasons, and his portrayal in the films is widely credited with turning Iron Man into a beloved character and rescuing him from the Scrappy Heap the comics had dug him into. However, over time he's become disliked by a significant portion of the fandom, especially comics fans, for being a Spotlight-Stealing Squad and who has a tendency to Kick the Dog due to his abrasive personality.
    • Many fans are unhappy that Hawkeye is a Happily Married man with kids living on a farm rather than a divorced schmuck living in an apartment with a dog, or that he's not romantically with either Black Widow or Mockingbird, as well as resenting his Ultimates-inspired backstory of being a SHIELD agent with a dark black outfit rather than a former Circus performer with a purple/blue outfit. Others like the changes to his character, or like his portraying in spite of the changes, while a third group like Hawkeye as he is but would like to see him wear a mask and/or have his backstory fleshed out to reveal his circus background.
    • Jessica Jones is either one of the strongest female protagonists seen in years, a pointlessly hostile unlikable asshole who arguably does more damage to her life of her own free will than she ever did under Kilgrave's control and damage the viewers' sympathy, or a damaged wreck of a person because of her trauma from Kilgrave's control keeps ruining her own life in a way that's uncomfortable to watch. Some viewers even hold the first and third view but gradually shift to the second due to the Arc Fatigue of the series dragged out Jessica's character development.
  • Broken Base:
    • With the exceptions of Guardians of the Galaxy and Luke Cage, many film music fans consider the soundtracks for the MCU to be rather dull and uninspiring. As this video explains, you can watch a Star Wars movies and hum the main theme after going out of the theater, you can watch James Bond and do the same thing, or Harry Potter just as well, but you cannot do this with MCU movies, because they do not have a memorable theme for the franchise. It doesn't help that a lot of the tracks are lifted from other movies (with few changes to avoid legal issues), they are not original in any sense. Similarly, film fans increasingly consider the MCU’s visual style very pedestrian with even the trippy Doctor Strange accused of retreading films like Inception and The Matrix.
    • Whether or not the more comedic approach of the MCU enhances or detracts from the films. Thor the Dark World and Age of Ultron are considered by many detractors to a bit too jokey for their own good, while Captain America: Civil War and Doctor Strange got flak for one-liners and jokes that felt out of place with their more dramatic (in the case of Civil War) and otherworldly (in the case of Doctor Strange) tones. Naturally, others think the humor works and staves off Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy.
    • Some feel that S.H.I.E.L.D. has too big of a role and steals the spotlight from the heroes, while others like the concept and are happy that S.H.I.E.L.D. gets some focus. This is also likely the cause for the split of opinion on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.. Pro-S.H.I.E.L.D. fans enjoy the show for showcasing the inner workings and day-to-day life of the agency, Anti-S.H.I.E.L.D. fans think it's pointless fat on the franchise. Then there's the fans who like S.H.I.E.L.D., but dislike the show for its various elements.
    • The absence of a Hulk sequel in Phase Two and Phase Three, particularly due to the latter omission. One side is upset that another solo movie with the not-so jolly green giant won't happen until after the fourth Avengers movie, especially after several statements from Feige and company that there was interest in making another movie after Age Of Ultron. Conversely, others are happy that Marvel's Phase Three lineup is focusing on lesser-known characters like Black Panther and Doctor Strange. It was later revealed that this wasn't entirely Marvel Studios's fault, as they have rights issues with Universal regarding solo films.
    • James Gunn's statement about Guardians Of The Galaxy 2 not being a prequel to Infinity War or denying a possible team-up between the Guardians and the Avengers did not bode well with several fans who felt that he wants to distance the Guardians from the MCU, (regardless of Thanos' appearance and the presence of the Infinity Stone in the movie) and that only Feige and company have the final say on how these movies will connect to Infinity War. Others supported Gunn that the Guardians should be standalone in order to explore the cosmic side of the MCU since the Avengers are more Earth-based and that there are several films before Infinity War, such as Dr. Strange and Captain Marvel, which could connect to the Infinity Stone subplot asides from the Guardians.
    • Generally speaking, James Gunn's attitude and various statements post-Guardians have been very divisive in reception among fans. Some feel that he is entitled to his creative vision due to the success of the film, or that the MCU has a problem with excessive Executive Meddling hampering the quality of some of its films, and others feel as though he's become arrogant and obstructive toward the grand plan for the setting. This was exacerbated by Joss Whedon showing a similar disinclination to play with others while making Age of Ultron.
    • Should Marvel acquire properties running in currently-existing film franchises?note  While there’s near-universal consensus that the Fantastic Four characters are better off back at Marvel, the X-Men universe is a bigger point of contention. A number of fans want the mutants back at Marvel Studios for the sake of finally having a unified MCU with all its most beloved characters side-by-side, while others feel that Disney’s more family-friendly approach (on the film side at least) would be detrimental to portraying Darker and Edgier characters like Deadpool and Wolverine.
    • The lack of crossovers with the TV shows characters on movies. There are fans that want characters like Daredevil, Quake, and Jessica Jones to show up in the movies, or for the movies to acknowledge Coulson's survival, while others are fine with the lack of crossover and think the shows should be kept as standalone stories within the greater universe and that introducing those characters and certain elements from the shows could confuse more casual fans. This got particularly bad when Joss Whedon stated that he more or less considered Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. non-canon while making Age of Ultron and stated that Phil Coulson is still dead as far as the movies are concerned.
      • Kevin Feige has explained that the films have been planned so far ahead that it's extremely tricky to try to integrate the shows into them as they're airing (and it's probably hard enough just making sure the effects of the films on Agents of SHIELD line up properly). Unfortunately, he later put himself back in the doghouse with a 2016 interview about the possibility of a future Inhumans film, where he seemed to have only the vaguest awareness that they'd been a big part of Agents for the past two years, adding more fuel to the accusations that the studio doesn't care about the TV shows.
      • The announcement that the Inhumans will get their own TV show instead of a movie. Some fans are extremely upset because they were looking forward to the movie, while those who comprise the Inhumans' growing Hatedom (largely due to the perception that Marvel is using them as substitute X-Men) are extremely happy with this development. Made even more complicated by the reports that Feige only added the film to the slate as a compromise with Ike Perlmutter to get Captain Marvel made.
      • On the flipside of this are at least the Russo brothers, directors of the last two Captain America films and the two upcoming Avengers films. They have stated on-record that they would love nothing more than to include a couple of the television characters in at least one of the Avengers films, especially the Netflix-bound characters such as the Defenders or Quake from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Whether this will or even can happen is too early to say.
    • While the announcement of an animated Spider-Man film that would not be a part of the MCU was met with generally positive reception due to the creative talent behind The LEGO Movie being involved and the rumors it would start Miles Morales, the announcement of a Venom movie that isn't necessarily planned to be a part of the MCU has been a cause for controversy. Some are in favor of it for having the potential to be R-rated (unlike the MCU, which currently exclusively target the PG-13 rating), while others see it as unnecessary to leave it out of a shared universe, along with the fears that Sony may do fans a disservice in adapting the character (which was a common complaint about his Executive Meddling-mandated inclusion in Spider-Man 3). The fact that Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach - the team behind the divisive The Amazing Spider-Man Series - are slated to produce doesn’t help, as the former individual is a touchy subject with fans.
    • The lack of a Black Widow movie has become a major one. Due to her popularity, Widow's lack of a film has been a sour point for many fans who feel its unfair that the most popular and prominent female character in the franchise doesn't have her own films or solo projects, which many have accused of being sexism on the part of Kevin Fiege. However, thank to the presence of the more extreme Vocal Minority of Black Widow's fandom (particularly the ones who harassed Joss Whedon due to Widow's handling in the second Avenger movie), there's been a growing sentiment calling for other female characters to get films before Widow, like Spider-Woman, She-Hulk, Kate Bishop, and America Chavez due to the belief that Black Widow's fandom are propping her up as the only female character that matters.
    • Should MCU actors be allowed to play more than one role? Some think this simply messes up with the idea that this is a shared universe, especially when it comes to the TV shows and films, as the most notable example of this is Alfre Woodard who plays Miriam Spencer in the movies, but Mariah Dillard in the TV shows. But there also fans that don't mind having actors playing multiple roles, pointing out that in most of these case their first roles were simply minor characters that are unlikely to even show in future stories and that its an case of Truth in Television that some people just happen to have an striking resemblance to someone else.
    • Whenever a new MCU TV series is announced for network TV or another streaming service, theres always some people that wishes Marvel aired all of their series on Netflix only and wonder why they didn’t air that show on Netflix, while there are others who are fine with other stations airing the series, pointing out that not everything has to be in Netflix to be good.
  • Complete Monster: See here.
  • Creator Worship:
    • Kevin Feige gets a lot of this from fans, some arguing that he's doing a better job with these characters than the comic writers themselves are. He's come under critical fire for unpopular decisions regarding diversity in the MCU (waffling on a Black Widow movie, the controversial casting decisions behind Doctor Strange and Series/Iron Fist) but his reputation has slowly returned after leaked Sony emails revealed Perlmutter, rather than Feige, was responsible a number of said controversies.
    • Joss Whedon as well for the first two Avengers movies and his involvement with the franchise as a whole, but that's par the course for Whedon. However, he did get a bit of flak for Age Of Ultron after its release.
    • The Russo brothers, for Captain America: The Winter Soldier and their involvement in Phase 3.
    • Black Panther directer Ryan Coogler gets a huge amount of pre-emptive worship for his genuine talent and his casting choices.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy:
    • Inverted, as some viewers find the MCU so light and humorous that it reduces the sense of stakes or drama, coupled with Contractual Immortality that ensures most of the big characters that are in supposed "danger" will live.
    • Played straight with the Netflix shows like Daredevil and Jessica Jones have been seen as being too dark for some due to their tone, the ugly subject matters they explore, flawed characters and the Trauma Conga Line both shows put their protagonists through.
    • And in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., where character deaths, betrayals, hidden evil agendas, Stupid Evil villains, and arguably Stupid Evil protagonists have become predictable staples.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Loki, a villain of three films, is adored by a certain section of the fan base. This has been acknowledged by Tom Hiddleston, who appeared in character at a convention and immediately had the entire room cheering for him. "It appears that I have an army."

    E-H 
  • Ending Fatigue: Barring Daredevil season 1, every season of the franchise's Netflix shows has been accused of not having enough story to fill their thirteen episodes, resulting in a good first half followed by the second half dragging as the characters run around not accomplishing much until the running time is filled. Daredevil season 2, meanwhile, had too many plots it juggled at the same time (Punisher, Elektra, the Hand, Karen becoming a journalist and Matt's straining friendship with Foggy). The news that The Defenders would be only eight episodes was met with a lot of relief, though there are still those arguing that with its having to juggle four heroes and all their supporting casts, a larger episode count would be far more reasonable.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Listed here
  • Epileptic Trees: Some popular fan theories include:
    • A popular, half-joking theory is that Stan Lee's recurring cameos are actually the MCU version of Uatu the Watcher, taking a human form/avatar to observe the events of the films. It would explain a lot...
    • Clark Gregg himself endorses the theory that Coulson is actually his character FBI Special Agent Michael Casper from The West Wing, having taken a new identity upon being recruited by S.H.I.E.L.D.

     I-L 
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • There's been a theory springing up that Marvel are sabotaging the X-Men and Fantastic Four franchises in order to weaken Fox's success with their films, noting their reduced presence in the comicsnote , Wolverine and Deadpool dying note , the Fantastic Four comic being cancellednote , lack of merchandise produced for X-Men: Days of Future Pastnote , their reduced appearances in recent animated seriesnote , and a memo apparently sent out asking for artists to not send them Fantastic Four artworknote . The theory itself makes little sense, but hasn't stopped people buying into it, including Rob Liefeld note .
    • Some fans of WB's DC Extended Universe and Fox's X-Men Film Series have accused Marvel Studios of sabotaging rivals by bribing critics to give non-MCU films negative reviews. As pointed by some commentators and BO numbers, this theory doesn't make sense in the slightest bit.
      • First, outright paying off critics would garner huge amounts of negative publicity and costly lawsuits if caught.
      • Second, many of the critical and audience opinions on non-MCU movies seem to line up with (relatively) little dissonance. note 
      • Third, many non-MCU films (such as Deadpool and X-Men: Days of Future Past) and TV series (such as the Arrowverse and Supergirl) have been well received by critics, sometimes more positively than MCU properties such as ‘’Thor: The Dark World’’.
      • Finally, the MCU wants to have its competitors make good superhero movies since bad ones would tarnish audience enthusiasm for superhero movies across the board, including the MCU.
    • Despite her popularity, Black Widow has yet to be given a film of her own, with Feige making vague and noncommittal statements about the possibility of one. Marvel got additional flak for not including a movie about her in Phase 3, with Feige explaining that the nature of the MCU made adding in movies on a whim very difficult…a statement promptly followed up by the Phase 3 slate getting shuffled up to make room for a third Spider-Man reboot once they got the rights to the character back. That said, Feige has gone on record that they had always planned on Spider-Man being in Phase 3 if the deal with Sony went through, and that what was initially announced was their plans for Phase 3 without Spider-Man.
    • The TV shows' treatment of black characters is starting to grate on people too. All four shows so far have killed off a black man: a popular recurring character in the case of Agents of SHIELD, Daredevil, and Jessica Jones; while Agent Carter, in its first season, killed off one of its grand total of two black characters it had, after only two scenes (the other survived, but only featured in one episode). The Civil War trailer (featuring a shot of Tony cradling an unconscious Rhodey) made matters worse, with people accusing Marvel of "pulling a “Walking Dead" and killing off black characters when there seems to be too many.
      • Related to the above, until Luke Cage and its predominantly black cast, the MCU's films had a grand total of one non-white leading lady, who played a green-skinned alien in an ensemble. The TV side of things at least has two Asian female leads in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., but that opens up another can of worms as they're the only prominent Asian characters in the entirety of the MCU. The lack of Asian representation, combined with the Mighty Whitey implications of both Iron Fist and Doctor Strange (with bonus white-washing in the latter) have left many fans pissed off at the MCU’s overall poor treatment of Asian and Asian-American characters.
    • The treatment of the MCU’s TV side itself has been a sour point for some fans. While the shows frequently reference events from the films, the films themselves have yet to reference any event in any of the shows. The fact that Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. in particular goes out of its way to include elements, places, and characters from the films, while the films have yet to acknowledge that Coulson even survived has caused many fans of the shows to resent the favoritism given to the films over the shows. It got to the point where even Chloe Bennet, who plays Daisy/Quake on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., called out Marvel Studios for not acknowledging the show or allowing any of its characters to appear in the movies. In turn, there are fans of the films who don't care for the shows, even the critically acclaimed Netflix series, due to the perceived lack of importance to the rest of the MCU, with AOS in particular getting a lot of hate for its first season while ignoring the improvements the show underwent, to the point that many insist that they're 'not canon' and/or claim that Marvel themselves don't even like the shows. Both views ignore the fact that AOS and Agent Carter have gotten comics based on their premise since (while Mockingbird and Deathlok, both of whom are featured heavily in the former, have gotten/are getting their own comics as a result), and the fact that characters from both AOS and the Netflix shows have had their characters added into Marvel's mobile social games, indicating that Marvel do acknowledge and support the shows.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks:
    • Many fans feels that the post- Phase One films are getting a bit formulaic. The exceptions that stand out are usually Winter Soldier and Guardians of the Galaxy, the former of which gets major praise for strong writing and being a huge Wham Episode while the latter is appreciated for being a break from all the events happening back on Earth.
    • Some people have claimed this about the ABC shows (both spy shows with a balance of comedy and drama, focusing primarily on non-powered individuals fighting against terror groups), and the Netflix shows (both deal with a dark Anti-Hero suffering depression with tragic backstories). The similarities are limited, but some still call foul on them.
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks: After The Avengers became the 3rd highest grossing film of all time, 2014 being a huge year for comic book movies and the rise of proposed movie Shared Universes including but not limited to Universal Horror, Ghostbusters and Transformers, a lot of people are now over the novelty of shared franchise universes and frequently complain about the lack of original properties being made into films.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Everyone. See the main page for reasons and details. A few more specific example will be:
    • Type 1: Tony Stark, Mockingbird and Loki. The first two "specialty" are Ho Yay and the latter is Foe Yay.
    • Type 2: Darcy Lewis (whose specialty is Crack Ship), Adorkable Jemma Simmons, Black Widow (due to the sheer amount of Ship Tease with both male and female characters), Captain America (a lot of Ho Yay - especially after Winter Soldier, being the Token Good Teammate in the Avengers, a healthy Ship Tease with Widow and the whole case with Peggy, two of the more popular heroines) and Wanda Maximoff (for being such a massive Woobie even comparing to the rest of the Avengers that people just want something goes right in her life for once).

     M-P 
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Loki thinks circles around everyone, and the only reason he didn't conquer the Earth was down to the the staff Thanos gave to him wasn't as powerful as he was lead to believe. At the end of Dark World, he convinces Thor that he died a heroic death and then takes over Asgard by impersonating his father.
    • HYDRA leaders in general seem to be this:
      • The Red Skull wants to overthrow HITLER and create his own empire, and WOULD HAVE had Cap not stopped him. For reference, Hitler sent him away after his face was ruined, which Skull turned as an opportunity to privately develop weapons that would undermine the Nazis and overpower anything the allies could throw at him.
      • The Skull was upstaged by his own henchman, Dr. Zola, who secretly rebuilt HYDRA within S.H.I.E.L.D., and just seconds away from conquest of the world.
      • Garret, AKA the Clairvoyant, is able to divert resources from SHIELD and gather groups who serve him under the illusion he's a psychic, while Gideon Mallick is able to manipulate Grant Ward, himself a gifted Manipulative Bastard, into abandoning his own revenge plan and work under him through a pep talk to inflate his ego and trick him into buying into a greater purpose, and that's without getting into how he was able to corrupt the agency designed to replace SHIELD by just being friends with the person in charge of overseeing it. As HYDRA is revealed to be a centuries old death-cult who worship a body-jacking Inhuman monster, its likely that there's been many of these leading them.
    • Thanos, considering he's the one behind all the other villains. One could argue that Loki was his Unwitting Pawn.
    • Nick Fury is a heroic example; he constantly lies and manipulates everyone around him, and he's good enough at it that even when they don't like working with him, they still end up helping him in the way he wants them to.
  • Memetic Badass: Nick Fury and Heimdall. Agent May, Black Widow, and Captain America seem to be In-Universe ones.
  • Memetic Mutation: Now with its own page.
  • Misblamed:
    • A lot of people were mad at Marvel Studios for not announcing a Hulk movie for either Phase 2 or Phase 3. However, the character's film rights are tangled up with Universal; while Marvel Studios owns the character and can freely use him, Universal still owns the distribution rights for any solo film that the character appears in. Therefore, Marvel Studios and Universal are at an impasse with the Hulk unless a cross-studio deal is reached in time for Phase 4.
    • Thanks to his status as the “face” of Marvel Studios, Feige’s something of a Scapegoat Creator for fans displeased with the direction of the MCU:
      • Feige’s frequently the biggest target for criticisms of the MCU’s lack of diversity, but the Sony email leaks, as well as subsequent articles from sites like Bleeding Cool, revealed Perlmutter responsible for much of the foot-dragging in this arena.note 
      • Fans also held Feige responsible for the Executive Meddling that led to Edgar Wright leaving Ant-Man and Joss Whedon being unsatisfied with Avengers: Age of Ultron. Again, it turned out Perlmutter was responsible.
    • Feige has also been blamed for the marginalization of the X-Men and Fantastic Four franchises in the comics, in adaptations, and in merchandise due to the fact that 20th Century Fox owns those film rights. In actuality, he has no control of what goes on outside of the projects he works on, and the blame once again falls on CEO Perlmutter's shoulders (as he and Fox have a notoriously toxic relationship; Feige, conversely, got his start in Hollywood as helping Fox with the X-Men trilogy and the Fantastic Four duology). Feige has noted that he'd like to work something out with Fox if it were possible, though he has noted that it's not on the cards right now as both companies have fairly elaborate plans for their franchises.
    • Channing Dungey got a lot of hatred for, among other things nixing the Most Wanted series in its crib upon being promoted to the head of ABC. Kevin Feige later clarified that it was a mutual decision between ABC and Marvel after the series pilot ended up severely underwhelming them all. Fans also act like Dungey is a monster for canceling Agent Carter and moving Agents of SHIELD to a later time slot, but the fact is that SHIELD wasn't getting good ratings in its current time slot (and had been losing viewers for quite some time), while Agent Carter wasn’t do any better.
    • As mentioned in the Internet Backdraft section, there are a number of fans who complain about favoritism towards the movie characters vs. the TV ones, particularly where merchandising is concerned. While it is true that the movie heroes get way more merchandise than the TV ones, Marvel generally does not make its own toys. The vast majority of the MCU products are made by other companies that have licensed the properties from Marvel, usually meaning they are the ones deciding who gets a toy and who doesn't. Additionally, a major reason why the movies have so many toys is because a significant portion of their audience consists of children, while the TV shows (especially the Netflix ones) are generally aimed at older, more adult viewers. Compounding the issue even further is that toy companies have a noted tendency to prefer characters with distinctive, eye-catching costumes, while, with the exception of Daredevil, the TV shows usually tend to eschew traditional superhero costumes.
  • More Popular Spin-off: More like More Acclaimed Spin-Off, but the near-universal praise given to Netflix series so far has started to cause this, with many finding them to be the best works in the MCU.
  • My Real Daddy: The common reaction of fans to the various characters who have previously appeared in non-MCU movies is that while the other movies brought them to life, the MCU got them right. (Which itself proves to be a reason why many fans want creative control of all properties to revert to Marvel, believing that Only the Creator Does It Right.) A few examples include Hulk, Captain America, Daredevil, Punisher, and Spider-Man.
  • Only the Creator Does It Right: Disney's films made under Marvel Studios almost always receive better reception from fans and critics alike over Marvel movies made by other studios after the beginning of the MCU. The sole exceptions seem to be the critically-acclaimed X-Men: First Class and X-Men: Days of Future Past (particularly the latter), both of which were made by Fox - though even these are cause for a Broken Base among viewers, and their quality is frequently credited to Matthew Vaughn and Bryan Singer rather than Fox itself. Deadpool was similarly exempt from this rule (with some even arguing that Disney wouldn't have produced an R-rated movie), while X-Men: Apocalypse was not.

     R-T 
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • His role in the MCU, combined with Matt Fraction's epic-length Invincible Iron Man run, rescued Iron Man from the horrendous Dork Age he had been in since Civil War. On a larger scale it lifted him from the B-list to being one of Marvel's flagship characters like Spider-Man or Captain America.
    • The same thing has happened for Maria Hill; originally hated in the comics for her Jerk Ass behavior towards the heroes and actions during Civil War, the MCU version has redeemed the character by making her a likable and badass S.H.I.E.L.D. agent that treats the heroes with respect. In the comics, Matt Fraction's Iron Man run also did work to redeem her in some fans eyes as well.
    • The Hulk did this twice. After Ang Lee's Hulk underperformed and was criticized as boring and pretentious, Marvel's The Incredible Hulk sought to make him badass and popular again. It only softened public opinion of the Hulk, but then The Avengers completely redeemed him by recasting him with the acclaimed Mark Ruffalo and giving him new relationships with the other heroes, most notably Tony Stark.
    • Black Widow was a controversial character after Iron Man 2, as some liked her for being badass and others thought she wasn't important and showed little personality. That started to shift with The Avengers, which gave her a tragic and motivating backstory and made her central to stopping Loki and ending the final battle. The Winter Soldier further continued that by making her the Deuteragonist and further displaying her skill, to the point that it's now not unheard of for fans and the media to demand a Black Widow movie.
    • While not a true scrappy, Scarlet Witch had a Never Live It Down moment to some fans due to her mental breakdown in House of M causing the mutant population to decrease significantly. Her portrayal in Age of Ultron gave her a well rounded personality, an excellent relationship with her brother, and being the first hero in the MCU to have powers like telekinesis and mind manipulation is definitely allowing her to regain her former popularity. It helps that this is one of the few portrayals that focus on her Avengers career rather than just being the daughter of Magneto.
    • Captain America; his treatment during the team-up for the first Avengers outing was given a pretty handy dose of flak by many - including Chris Evans himself. Considering that a majority of the best action sequences got handed off to everyone else, resulting in him looking rather plain or just not quite as useful make it understandable. Then Winter Soldier happened. Suddenly, Captain America is sharing center stage in promo materials with the franchise golden boy, Iron Man; and in the Avengers 2 itself, he gets to show off quite a lot more than he ever did in the first film.
    • Hawkeye took a lot of flack in the first Avengers film for being severely Overshadowed by Awesome and having little apparent point on the team. Age of Ultron responded by giving him much more focus as The Heart of the team, along with a healthy dose of Self-Deprecation for his apparent uselessness compared to the others, while contrasting it with scenes showcasing his usefulness to the team without being heavy handed about it.
    • Betty Ross from The Incredible Hulk, while generally the least remembered and dueling Jane for the position of least liked heroine, has gained a new following for being one of the kindest characters in the franchise, the performance by Liv Tyler, and (the main reason) her relationship with Bruce being seen as better than Bruce's with Natasha in Age of Ultron. Many fans want her brought back into the films even if it meant a recast.
    • Ant-Man is regarded by some comic fans as a lame superhero with boring superpowers and they much prefer Giant-Man instead. However, the movie proves that Ant-Man can kick your ass regardless how small he is and even defeated the Falcon. And then there's him becoming Giant-Man in Captain America: Civil War...
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat:
    • All the corners of the slash shipping tend to argue quite a bit. Tony/Bruce, Tony/Steve, Tony/Loki, Tony/Coulson, Tony/Rhodey, Steve/Bucky, Steve/Sam, Steve/Clint, Clint/Coulson, Clint/Loki, Thor/Loki, etc. Any two of these that aren't compatible with one-another tend to argue a LOT. Then there's the inclusion of their respective lady friends...
    • Since even before she was cast and brought in, Mockingbird has been in one with Natasha over Clint. As Clint's most prominent relationship in the comics, Clintasha shippers who've read up on the comics knew Bobbi would come in between Clintasha, and so have made a frequent point to argue over her, while Bobbi/Clint shippers from the comics have responded in kind. With Bucky being present, it leads to a three-way shipping war between Hawkingbird, Clintasha, and Bucktasha. Then Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. came and gave Mockingbird a lot of ship teasing with Lance Hunter, including making him the ex-husband she has unresolved issues with, instead of Clint. Now, Huntingbird has gained support, and detraction, because of this. Further complicated when Age of Ultron revealed that Clint is actually Happily Married to a civilian woman, and Natasha is his kids' honorary aunt.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night:
    • Hawkeye and Coulson have never interacted outside of a single brief exchange in Thor, but somehow spawned an enormous following with over 9000 fanfics on AO 3 alone.
    • Scott Lang/Peter Quill is a surprisingly popular ship in Asia even though the two have never met and don't even live in the same solar system. May have to do with both actors appearing on Parks and Recreation beforehand.
    • Despite their not having met yet, Stephen Strange and Tony Stark quickly became a popular pairing due to their similar story arcs across their respective first films. It also helps that both actors have played Sherlock Holmes, one of the oldest gay ship fandoms.
    • On a similar note there’s also Stephen Strange and Everett K. Ross, due to the latter being played by Martin Freeman.
  • Spiritual Successor: To Ultimate Marvel. Both the MCU and Ultimate Marvel are modern takes of the classic Marvel Comics and some of the MCU's concepts were inspired of the Ultimate Marvel Universe such as a race lifted Nick Fury. However, the MCU takes their characters into a more idealistic approach rather than following the more cynical standards of Ultimate Marvel.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks:
    • Some people object to the race changing of Heimdall and Nick Fury. This mostly stopped when the films came out and the two became Memetic Badasses.
    • Generally averted by many cases of Adaptation Personality Change that many characters, specifically minor S.H.I.E.L.D. agents, go through in the MCU. Pierce, Sitwell, Koenig, Hunter, Mack, and many others are largely minor Nick Fury supporting characters, so for the most part the general audience has no idea they're even a case of this.
  • Tough Act to Follow:

     W 
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: Unlike the movies the Netflix series are not family-friendly in the slightest. They are both extremely violent and deal with very heavy themes such as moral boundaries, alcoholism, PTSD, rape, and racism. A Lego Avengers game based on the MCU actually left Daredevil and Jessica Jones out due to their adult content, while Disney Infinity wasn't allowed to use Daredevil or Jessica because the higher-ups didn't think either of their shows were appropriate for the game's family audience.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • After the disappointing performance of The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Marvel has to work in order to renew faith in the film franchise with the solo Spider-Man movie, along with whatever movie the character appears in beforehand. Judging by fan reactions to his role in Civil War, they're off to an amazing start.
    • Thor: The Dark World generally got mediocre reception and earned far less money than the film that it followed (which itself was rather divisive with audiences), so Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Guardians of the Galaxy won back a lot of fans cynical about the franchise's continued success. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. also contributed to this, as the first half of the first season was similarly divisive, while what followed on the show has solidified a fanbase for itself.
    • A lot of the casting and character announcements for the Phase 3 films have won over some fans who had grown disillusioned with the lack of diversity in the MCU.
  • WTF Casting Agency: Nearly every film has incurred some sort of Internet Backdraft for at least one of its casting choices, though the specific reasons differ across roles. And nearly every one of these choices ended up being extremely well-received once they were actually seen in action:
    • Robert Downey Jr.'s well-publicized history with drug abuse, making him a liability on-set and box-office poison once his films were released, were still fresh in everyone's mind when he was cast as Tony Stark. It was assumed his drug-fueled antics on and off screen would continue.
    • Chris Evans was considered too silly to play Captain America, and his base-breaking previous stint as the Human Torch in the poorly received Fantastic Four (2005) movies (a franchise outside the MCU) was still a fairly recent memory when he was first announced.
    • Chris Hemsworth was either not big enough for Thor (he's 6'6", while Hemsworth is a measly 6'4") or a no-name outside of Australia. Tom Hiddleston was seen as similarly random. See here.
    • Scarlett Johanssen wasn't Russian or a natural redhead, and didn't do an accent, so she was initially dismissed as being cast purely for Fanservice reasons.
    • People were initially opposed to Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner due to not being Edward Norton or looking anything like him, and being more famous for serious dramas than blockbuster films.
    • Samuel L. Jackson and Idris Elba were black actors playing traditionally white characters, the latter of whom is based on a Norse deity described in one poem as "the whitest of the gods". However, Ultimate Nick Fury is black and explicitly based on Jackson, while the Norse gods in the MCU are Sufficiently Advanced Aliens.
    • Jeremy Renner as Hawkeye disappointed many fans hoping for Josh Holloway. Others considered him too old or ugly for the role and not looking anything like the character from the comics.
    • Chris Pratt and Paul Rudd were primarily known for their comedic roles, not their ability to be action leads.
    • Dave Bautista was a wrestler with no acting experience.
    • Charlie Cox as Daredevil disappointed those who wanted Michael C. Hall. Others were skeptical as he was fairly unknown, and those who did know him knew him best as pretty-boy Tristan Thorn in Stardust.
    • Krysten Ritter as Jessica Jones originally got this reaction for not looking much like the character and being considered too skinny and unimposing to play a superheroine.
    • Not as extreme as the other examples, but there was some backlash against Chadwick Boseman being cast as Black Panther, as Chiwetel Ejiofor was an extremely popular fan pick for the role. Others thought Boseman was too obscure, didn't look regal enough, or was too young to play the character, even though he was approaching 40 at the time he was cast.
      • Ejiofor as Baron Mordo also caused its own share of baffled WTH reactions due to being a Race Lift.
    • In addition to the aforementioned Broken Base over whether Iron Fist should've undergone a Race Lift or not, Finn Jones' most famous role is as the controversially Camp Gay Dandy Loras Tyrell on Game of Thrones. There's also the question of whether he has the necessary martial arts and multilingual backgrounds expected for such a role.
    • The public has become so used to Dawson Casting that when Tom Holland was cast as Peter Parker many people complained about him looking too young and wanting someone more mature-looking, even though at 19 he's still older than Peter is supposed to be.
    • Ironically flipped on its head with Benedict Cumberbatch as Doctor Strange, with people complaining that Cumberbatch is too conventional and that Marvel is playing it too safe rather than taking any risks with the casting (in particular going with yet another White Male Lead).
  • The notoriously controversial decision to cast the white Tilda Swinton as the Asian Ancient One.
    • Brie Larson is significantly younger than Captain Marvel is portrayed as being in the comics, leading some fans to accuse Marvel of ageism. Like Boseman as Black Panther, Larson was also chosen over some popular internet fancasts like Katee Sackhoff and Charlize Theron (neither of whom were officially in the running with Marvel to begin with).
  • The Woobie: Has its own page here.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?:
    • With the sole exception of his suit in the first film, Captain America's various costumes have drawn criticism from some areas of the internet, either for being too camp and colourful, or for the cowl looking odd (The Avengers), abandoning the traditional stars and stripes (Captain America: The Winter Soldier), or for just looking ugly (Age of Ultron). Obviously, many disagree (in particular, pointing out that Cap's SHIELD-ized uniform in TWS was a subtle indicator that something was seriously wrong at the start of the film), but it's a popular sentiment.
    • Hawkeye's suit in The Avengers drew criticism for being his original Ultimate Marvel uniform (which is largely considered 'pragmatic but boring'), and got criticism for not being like his classic Marvel outfit. The creators listened and in the second film he's gotten an awesome new outfit that's a mishmash of his various costumes from the comics, complete with Badass Longcoat. Then, for Captain America: Civil War, his look has been revamped to what can best be described as his classic outfit with MCU aesthetics, with the only detail missing being his mask.
    • Deathlok and Mockingbird also got criticism for their suits in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.. The problem with Deathlok was mainly that his cybernetics are internalized rather than on the outside like his mainstream counterpart, with the result that his armor looks cheap rather than intimidating. Mockingbird got complaints just for not initially looking like her comic self, though this was corrected by her second appearance (her hair is shown to be blonde like in the comics and her outfit is a more muted version of her normal costume with the same kind of extra armour and padding that Black Widow and Captain America had for their costumes).
    • Daredevil's costume got some wary comments though in his case it's justified; the black ninja-esque outfit is the one he starts out with before upgrading to his actual costume. Though now there are fans who complain about his red suit and wish he'd go back to his homemade black one, in large part because they feel it looks too much like Captain America and other MCU heroes.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/MarvelCinematicUniverse