YMMV / Lilo & Stitch


YMMV pages for works in the franchise:

    YMMV tropes for the franchise in general 
  • Americans Hate Tingle:
  • Archive Panic: Lilo & Stitch has been one of Disney's most active franchises since its 2002 debut. Between all the animated material, there are four feature-length films, a short film... and 166 television episodes and specials so far.note  And they all fit in a single (albeit inconsistent) continuity.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Angel. Even though she is one of the more popular experiments in the franchise, becoming a major character a few years after her debut, there are Lilo & Stitch fans who do not like her because of her personality (the anime's characterization of her not helping matters) and/or for being a relatively Flat Distaff Counterpart to Stitch who was only introduced just to give him a love interest, with Angel's detractors saying that she gets a lot of Positive Discrimination from much of the fanbase. In fact, she is often compared to Lola Bunny as a result. The Series' producers can be given some blame for not knowing what to do with her (as with a lot of other characters, especially most of the experiments) in terms of characterization and not putting an effort to go past that.note 
      • Some fans also don't like how her popularity has drawn other fans' attention away from all the other experiments, especially considering all the merchandise she has compared to everyone other than the title characters themselves. It's worse in the West where she's the only non-Stitch experiment getting any merchandise released there to this day, with Disney seeming to have stopped acknowledging the rest of Stitch's "cousins".note 
      • No Such Thing as Bad Publicity: A Lilo & Stitch fan on DeviantArt posted a journalnote  where they asked The Series executive producer and writer Jess Winfield (who wrote Angel's episode) via email about Angel's controversial status at the time. He responded, "Judging by the controversy about Angel, she's a very successful character!" (Well, considering all the merchandise she gets today, he's not wrong...)
    • Stitch was also this to Disney Parks aficionados due to him being everywhere throughout the parks (including on merchandise with the Fab Five classic characters) during the 2000s decade, along with the Replacement Scrappy status of his American ride. Disney's poor marketing of him, emphasizing his negative traits more than his positive ones, did not help. That said, Stitch's Great Escape! being reduced to a seasonally operated attraction in 2016 (and its supposed replacement by a meet-and-greet in 2017), Stitch's reduced prominence in Disney's marketing in favor of more recent (and much more phenomenally popular) fare such as Frozen, the upcoming rise of 2000s nostalgia, and his still prevalent Ensemble Darkhorse status among all of Disney has helped him out in more recent years.
    • Lilo is also this for reasons described under Alternative Character Interpretation in the section for the first film below. East Asia is probably the biggest case for her fitting this trope, considering how they replaced her with more idealistic, less problematic local girls in their shows.
  • Broken Base:
    • For a franchise that's all about family, you'd think that the fanbase would agree with one another for the most part. Instead, the fanbase is mainly divided between those who like everything the franchise has produced (including the two TV series that were produced in Asia), those who like most everything made before those two shows (not liking the idea of Stitch separating from Lilo), and those who only like the original film (and maybe Lilo & Stitch 2). An even smaller subset of fans like the Eastern-produced TV series (or at least one of the two), but do not like the first TV series and its films due to their perceived Sequelitis.
      • Going even further, some of the franchise's fans are getting sick of the Lilo & Stitch fans who bash on the Eastern spin-offs, accusing them of overly Complaining About Shows You Don't Like or even watch. Yeah, this fan ʻohana is that broken.
    • Early reception for Stitch & Ai also appears to be mixed. One side of the fandom are happy that Stitch has a new TV series whose art style heeds closer to the original works in the franchise, and has better action and more likable characters (both old and new) compared to the Stitch! anime. The other side are disappointed and frustrated that Stitch is again separated from Lilo and given a new human girl companion, seeing that the show's premise is too similar to the anime (including the fact that it's a Science Fantasy series where "All Myths Are True"), and saying that Disney is completely missing the point of why people loved the original parts of the franchise in the first place. Tony Craig (one of the executive producers of Lilo & Stitch: The Series who has also worked on this new show) stating on his Facebook page that he and Jess Winfield believe Lilo's story is done and should not be continued any further has not helped matters.
  • Crazy Awesome: Stitch, the purest definition of this trope. He manages to escape by force, then hijacks a ship and crash lands on Hawaii, coming out with a maniacal cackle. In the original movie, even after a heavy chunk of Character Development, he rescues Lilo by using lava and diesel from a truck to skyrocket towards Gantu's ship, crash through the window, then proceed to throw him out of it. And let's not mention when he's on caffeine... Lilo regularly makes side-comments throughout the franchise when he's acting particularly hyperactive that she won't be giving him any more coffee.
  • Drinking Game:
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Several of the experiments for sure, especially the mid six-two trio.
      • Even though he is the franchise's protagonist, Stitch (626) himself is one of Disney's most popular characters and receives lots of merchandise even to this day, especially on Disney's lapel trading pins. Being a funny, cute, fluffy, Crazy Awesome badass with good Character Development certainly helps.
      • Angel (624), for being a Cute Monster Girl and Distaff Counterpart of Stitch, becoming a Breakout Character for the franchise since winning a poll held by Disney Channel in Spring 2004 for the fans' top ten favorite experiments and episodes in The Series' first season. She is so popular despite her initial limited appearances in The Seriesnote  that she gets more merchandise than Lilo according to The Disney Wiki, later becoming a major character thanks to frequent appearances in the Stitch! anime. She is also the only experiment other than Stitch to have merchandise currently (as of 2017) sold in America, despite that she is a relatively obscure character in the country who has still yet to make a costumed appearance in either Disneyland or Walt Disney World,note  the Lilo & Stitch franchise has been practically dormant in North America since the end of The Series over a decade ago, and the majority of her appearances in the franchise are from the aforementioned anime that American fans tend to reject.note  Also, she was initially voiced by famed voice actress, Tara Strong.
      • Reuben (625), for his laid-back, snarky personality. Helps that, as a major character, he appeared in more episodes in The Series and the Stitch! anime than any other experiment besides Stitch himself. Like with Angel above, he was also voiced by another famous voice actor, Rob Paulsen.
      • Sparky (221), likely because of his role in Stitch! The Movie, his powers, and for being Ugly Cute. He was even popular enough to be a mandatory Boss Battle in Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep, received recurring appearances in the anime, and is even the only "cousin" to appear on this mural in Hanapepe—the town that inspired Lilo & Stitch's Kokaua Town.
      • 627, or "Evile" as the fans call him, due to the appealing concept of a tough experiment who's better than Stitch, and who would have likely become a rival to him had he received more appearances. He was number five on the aforementioned top ten poll.
      • Bonnie (149) and Clyde (150), due to their personalities and Outlaw Couple dynamic, although Bonnie is the more popular of the two with her more appealing design and Tomboyish personality. They are popular enough to be character selections for fanfics on Fanfiction.Net.
      • Leroy, despite being a Flat Doppelgänger of Stitch who only appeared in one television film, is also a popular experiment nonetheless, and has even received some merchandise including a Tsum Tsum plush.
      • Splodyhead (619) seems to also be one, considering his fight against Slushy (523) in that experiment's episode (and the extensive reuse of scenes from that fight in "Ace") and his cameo in Big Hero 6.
      • Other experiments who are noticeably popular include Yin (501), Yang (502),note  Felix (010)note  and, most peculiarly, Slushy (523) and Sample (258). Some of the experiments above also appeared as costumed characters in Tokyo Disneyland and (occasionally) Disneyland Paris alongside the main duo. (i.e. Angel, Reuben, Sparky, 627, Felix, and Sample.) All those same experiments appeared in this animated parody of "We're All in This Together".
    • Ice Cream Man. So much that he was the only Lilo & Stitch character other than Lilo, Stitch and Nani to be made into a Townsperson costume in Disney Infinity, where he costs 100,000 blue sparks in 2.0's Toy Store.
    • Lilo's doll Scrump is not even alive (save for that one time Phantasmo possessed "her") and only plays a small role to Lilo's character, but "she" gets a lot of fan art and merchandise, which even includes a couple Funko POP! vinyl figures modeled after "her".
    • Amy Hill as Mrs. Hasagawa is a very memorable character even if she appears only once in the original film. Thankfully, The Series gave her a few more appearances, including involving her in a B-Plot of the American Dragon crossover episode and even making her the focus of half of a Two Shorts episode.
    • The blonde lifeguard whom Nani briefly talks with for a job is extremely popular, for some strange reason.
  • Fanon: The many, many fan-made designs and descriptions of experiments that have still yet to be seen in the franchise. Even worse is the fact that the "Lilo & Stitch Wiki" on Wikia actually treats many of these fan designs and descriptions as canon by providing many articles about them, providing short descriptions on its full list of experiments, and using many fans' artwork (most likely without their permission) as the closest thing to these unseen experiments' official art.note  Fans who took these as canon even edited The Other Wiki's (now-deleted) list of experiments numerous times to add all this unprofessional non-canon information over there, which forced its users to clean up after them.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Stitch! and Stitch & Ai (primarily the former, since it's been around much longer) for separating Lilo and Stitch, replacing her with Canon Foreigner Expies of her, changing up the returning characters for the worse, and replacing all those characters' voice actors. The fact that Chris Sanders has zero participation with those shows certainly helps. That said, most of the Fanon Discontinuity is relegated to the West, especially in North America.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Despite that their canonical relationship is that of sibling figures, there are quite a lot of fanfics and fan art that pair Lilo up with Stitch. Squick or Squee!note  By comparison, Keoni Jameson (her crush in The Series) has virtually no stories involving him in a happy relationship with Lilo, and even Angel breaks up with or has already broken up with Stitch in some fics. (Although, at least several Lilo/Stitch authors do have her maintain a good friendship with the main duo, rather than have her completely reject them, probably because the rejection of family would go against the main theme of ʻohana and all that.)
    • Tying in with the above, Lilo/Stitch shippers usually pair Angel up with Reuben to form a Beta Couple to go with the title duo, even though it makes almost no sense based on how she acts around him in the official canon.note 
  • First Installment Wins:
    • As with most Disney franchises based on films in the Animated Canon, the original film is easily the most fondly remembered and the best-written part of the franchise, while the rest have mostly been left behind and forgotten (Japan's fondness for the franchise being the exception). In the West, especially North America, most marketing of the franchise's characters nowadays appear to be mostly Stitch, a surprising lot of Scrump,note  and some Lilo and Angelnote  here and there. Also notable was when the franchise was added in Disney Infinity in 2.0, where Pleakley was still working for the United Galactic Federation in Stitch's Tropical Rescue Toy Box Game, the Pelekai residence appears in the Lilo's Tropical Sky skydome in its original appearance (before it was destroyed by Jumba and Stitch) and, ignoring any player-made Toy Boxes, there's nary a reference to any part of the franchise post-original film in sight. Perhaps most notably, Splodyhead was erased from the red pillow on Fred's "Blue Ninja Bed" when it appeared in Disney Infinity 3.0, while Stitch's face remained on the blue pillow.
    • If you expand it to general continuities—the original 2002-06 Western continuity (Stitch on Hawaii with Lilo), the anime continuity (Stitch on Okinawa with Yuna), and the latest Chinese continuity (Stitch on the Huangshan mountains with Ai)—most of the fanbase prefer the first one (Stitch with Lilo).
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • Mainly with How to Train Your Dragon for sharing Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois as directors/writers, especially since Toothless takes a lot of traits from Stitch. Lots of crossover Fan Art of Stitch and Toothless can be found on the web.
    • Also with Moana since it is also a Disney animated film set in Polynesia.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
    • Japan Loves Stitch. This really cannot be understated. Stitch often features more prominently than the likes of Mickey Mouse on Disney merchandise and publicity. They love him so much they got an anime adaptation of him! Also, Angel is extremely popular over there as well, where she has something of an Ascended Extra status.
    • This has apparently extended to China as well with the production and release of Stitch & Ai, which is set in the Huangshan mountain range over there.
    • There's actually a gift shop in Malaysia which sells almost nothing but Lilo & Stitch merchandise. No, seriously.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Let's see: it's a franchise about a girl and her alien buddy in Hawaii, with said alien being the 626th of such creatures which the TV series is dedicated to capturing, the creatures are tamed with The Power of Friendship, and Japan utterly adores that alien. When news broke out that Pokémon Sun and Moon would be set in Alola, a Hawaii counterpart, and that the plot would revolve around alien life-forms the likes of which the franchise has never seen before in the Ultra Beasts, it may as well have been free publicity for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Ho Yay: Jumba and Pleakley. See the YMMV pages for The Series and Stitch! for more info.
  • Hollywood Pudgy: Averted; the chubbier characters are more a reflection of Chris Sanders' own drawing style, but do not have unrealistic body types.
  • Magic Franchise Word: The film popularized ʻohana outside of Hawaii, and the word remains strongly tied to the franchise to this day.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • The ʻohana motto: "ʻOhana means family; family means nobody gets left behind — or forgotten."
    • "Happy 626 Day!" Explanation 
    • The scene with Lilo using Stitch to play a record, using his open mouth as the speaker.
  • Sacred Cow: Lilo Pelekai is slowly attaining this status thanks to the Eastern-produced shows that replace her. That said, this is more towards the part of the fandom who do not approve of the Eastern spin-offs.
  • Self-Fanservice:
    • Most fan art of an adult Lilo tend to portray her as a fit, attractive young woman with a slim body and full lips much like her sister, usually wearing midriff-revealing clothing or a bikini. Contrast the canonical depictions of the adult Lilo in The Series episode "Skip" and the anime episode "Lilo" which portray her more modestly, wearing clothes that make her look like a responsible adult and having the same mouth that her younger self has, never developing fuller lips.
    • Stitch has also been drawn with a humanoid body shape of either an athletic young adult or a bodybuilder, while still maintaining his overall alien genetic experiment looks (blue fur, claws, head, et cetera). Some of the other experiments have also been drawn like this, but they're much rarer.
  • Sequelitis/Contested Sequel: Some people see Stitch! The Movie, Lilo & Stitch: The Series, and Leroy & Stitch as the former trope due to their executive-mandated Lighter and Softer tone compared to the original film, resulting in weaker writing, while the Stitch! anime gets that response even more so for replacing Lilo with Canon Foreigner Yuna, changing the characterizations of much of the returning characters for the worse, and being a Time Skip Sequel Series to the rest of the franchise, among other things. It's yet to be fully seen if Stitch & Ai will follow suit. Like the anime, Stitch & Ai separates Stitch from Lilo and makes him best friends with another Canon Foreigner, although the general consensus towards that show so far is, at the very least, "It's better than the anime." Nevertheless, all three shows—even the anime—have their fans and separate fanbases, hence why Contested Sequel also applies here.
  • Ugly Cute: Stitch, most of the aliens, and even some of the humans could qualify. Chris Sanders loves this trope.

    YMMV tropes for the original film 
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Was Lilo just a lonely little girl with some emotional problems, or a brat whose big sister failed to discipline her? Or both?
  • Awesome Art: It's a Disney Animated Canon film, so of course it would feature this, but what makes this film stand out is its art style with interesting character designs, unique yet fluid animation (including what has to be the best water in traditional animation), and gorgeous watercolor backdrops.
  • Awesome Music: The two original songs made for the film, "He Mele No Lilo" and "Hawaiian Roller Coaster Ride", both encapsulate Hawaii very well. Not to mention the Elvis Presley tunes used in the film and soundtrack, Wynonna Judd's cover of his "Burning Love", Alan Silvestri's score, and Tia Carrere's (the voice of Nani) sorrowful performance of "Aloha 'Oe".
  • Ear Worm: A bit of a guilty pleasure, but the A-Teens cover of Elvis Presley's "Can't Help Falling in Love" played in the beginning of the credits post-montage is pretty fun to listen to and very catchy. Don't believe so? Here you go.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: This film is this for the Disney Animated Canon. While its success is seen today as being rather modest when compared to Disney's bigger blockbuster films, it was Walt Disney Feature Animation'snote  biggest critical and commercial success during their post-Renaissance lull until the Disney Revival. As a result, it is easily Disney's most recognizable animated work from the 2000s.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: In the ending montage, one scene shows Lilo, Stitch, and the girls dancing. In the background is a sign advertising the fictional airline Tsunami Air. A little less funny after the "Boxing Day" tsunami of 2004.
    • In-Universe: Lilo feeding Pudge the fish peanut butter sandwiches every day because she believes he controls the weather seems like a throw-away gag at first glance. Then you find out that her parents died on a rainy night's drive.
  • Girl Show Ghetto: The film was able to avoid it and make a big profit during an era in which Disney movies weren't normally doing so well. But to do so, the marketing focused on Stitch, the male lead character (notice the distinct lack of Lilo on the poster at the top of the main page).
  • Harsher in Hindsight: This line Lilo says when Stitch leaves after the "Aloha 'Oe" scene: "ʻOhana means family. Family means nobody gets left behind. But if you wanna leave, you can. I’ll remember you, though. I remember everyone who leaves." Stitch would do just that later in her life.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • The scene in which Stitch acts like a giant monster in a model scale of San Francisco. Legendary Pictures made a movie of a certain well-known Kaiju fighting in both Honolulu and San Francisco with other monsters in 2014.
      • Doubly so when Stitch & Ai shows that Stitch was actually meant to become a giant monster when he's in a large city and does so in that series.
    • In one scene, Pleakley indignantly yells "Educate yourself!" to Jumba when explaining the endangered status of the mosquito species. In The New '10s, "Educate yourself!" has since been adopted as a Catchphrase by politically active bloggers on websites like Tumblr, and it is now something of a Stock Phrase associated with the "Social Justice Warrior" stereotype.
    • Jumba says he would "never make... more than one" creature. In The Series, he's got a lot of them. This also applies to Pleakley asking if Stitch has a relative who could be tasked to hunt him down.
    • One version of The Lion King "Inter-Stitch-al" showed Timon—in the crowd below Pride Rock riding on Pumbaa's back—pointing out that Simba wasn't the one being lifted into the air, even though Those Two Guys were not shown to have been at Pride Rock during the beginning of the 1994 original film. Come 2004, however, and it turned out that the meerkat-warthog duo were at Simba's unveiling after all.
    • David's line: "So you're from outer space? I've heard the surfing's choice." Come later in 2002...
  • Ho Yay: Jumba and Pleakley start their "relationship" in the film. They pretend to be husband and wife after reaching Earth while wearing poorly-crafted disguises, although they initially treat all this as nothing more than just an act. They decide to move into Lilo and Nani's house and live together at the end of the film.
  • Nausea Fuel: The handful of scenes that feature Stitch playing with his own saliva. And, later, sticking his tongue up his own nose to eat a booger. Yech!
  • Older Than They Think: Did you think this movie was the first animated work to have a girl befriending an alien as a plot? Meet Katie and Orbie, created (as a series of books) over a decade before the movie was released, and which incidentally was seen on Disney Channel in the United States (and ended production in the same year the movie was released). However, as that series is aimed at a preschool audience, is Lighter and Softer, and doesn't have anything in common storyline-wise.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: As with many other animated films of its time, Lilo & Stitch had some tie-in platform games made:
    • Disney's Lilo & Stitch: Trouble in Paradise was just a basic Crash Bandicoot clone for PlayStation and Windows whose only interesting feature was Lilo being a playable character with voodoo powers.
    • Disney's Stitch: Experiment 626 was the most ambitious of the tie-in games at the time, being a prequel to the events of the film and also being one of the first works to introduce one of the other experiments. However, it had rough gameplay, camera issues, and its graphics were also criticized as not being as good as other PlayStation 2 titles of the time. The events of this game were also later Retconned by the events of Lilo & Stitch 2: Stitch Has a Glitch.
    • No Problem with Licensed Games: On the other hand, Disney's Lilo & Stitch for Game Boy Advance was a surprisingly well-made and reasonably difficult 2D action-platform game, with Run-and-Gun gameplay similar to Metal Slug and very good animation. As a result, it got a sequel (albeit made by a different developer and based on The Series) called Lilo & Stitch 2: Hämsterviel Havoc.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: As this film's fans are fond of pointing out, it did several things that were considered pretty daring and unconventional for a Disney film back in 2002—but most of those things have since been done by more successful Disney films, making it a bit harder to appreciate this one in hindsight. Case in point: it featured a modern working-class protagonist of color before The Princess and the Frog did, it featured a female protagonist without a love interest before Brave did, it focused on the unconditional love between two sisters before Frozen did, it did an entirely science-fiction plot before Big Hero 6 did, and it featured a central cast of native Pacific Islanders before Moana did.
  • Signature Scene:
    • The end of the "Hawaiian Roller Coaster Ride" sequence where Lilo, Stitch and Nani ride through a huge wave, all smiling. It's this scene that's represented on the original DVD and VHS releases' (and later digital releases') Detail-Hogging Cover. There are also some Signature Scenes for the comedic and dramatic sides of this animated Dramedy:
      • On the comedic side, Lilo and Stitch's fourth wall-breaking dance at Mrs. Hasagawa's fruit stand, which is the image on our Funny Moments page for the film.
      • On the dramatic side, either the "Aloha 'Oe" sequence or the subsequent scene where Stitch gets "lost". We've used screencaps from both scenes on our Tear Jerkers page.note 
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel: "Hawaiian Roller Coaster Ride" captures the joys of "lingering in the ocean blue" so perfectly.
  • The Woobie:
    • Lilo. The poor girl has no friends, has lost her parents, she's about to be taken from her sister, and her "dog" runs away. And she just copes with it all somehow. Why does she get cursed so badly?! It doesn't stop there, though, as Lilo gets captured by Gantu and before Stitch rescues her, she starts crying because she thinks she'll never see Nani again.
    • Nani, who's forced into parenthood after her parents' deaths, can't hold a single job to support her and her little sister and now suddenly had to deal with Stitch and the threat of Lilo being taken away by social service. The way she sobs when Lilo is captured by Gantu is simply heartbreaking.
    • Stitch himself, after he is unable to fulfill his programming. Jumba comments at one point that Stitch must be so lonely without friends or family or even memories to look back on. The only person who is kind to him when he makes an effort to help out is Lilo, which also means that Stitch later deals with the guilt of knowing that his antics and presence is putting a ton of strain on the family and leading to their breakup. It gets even worse for him in the sequel, Stitch Has a Glitch, where he starts to revert back to his old destructive programming and will eventually die. Of course, he gets better at the end.
    • That one guy who's never able to eat his ice cream because of something Stitch is doing.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/LiloAndStitch