YMMV / King Crimson

  • Archive Panic: An extreme case. Their core discography isn't that big, but as noted on the main page, they have released literally hundreds of live shows in their entirety through their website and via massive reissues, which often get as large as twenty CDs.
  • Award Snub: King Crimson is one of the most requested bands to enter the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame but even though they have been eligible for years have never been nominated. Some have attributed this to the fact that they don't have the mainstream popularity of other well-liked Prog bands like Pink Floyd and Genesis. The fact that the Hall of Fame has become more accepting of Prog Rock recently as seen with them inducting Rush, Yes, and Electric Light Orchestra fans do remain hopeful that they will be inducted one day.
  • Awesome Music: Plenty of it — not surprising given the members' virtuosity and the sheer amount of Epic Rocking they do. Just about every fan will put "21st Century Schizoid Man," "Fracture," and "Starless" at the top of the list. They also have their own page.
  • Broken Base: Whenever the band has recorded new music, there are some fans who say "They Changed It, Now It Sucks," while others say "It's the Same, Now It Sucks."
    • There are also those who cannot stand Robert Fripp's heavy enforcement of Digital Piracy Is Evil, almost reaching Prince levels of bad. It makes it worse when he forced the website last.fm to remove album art and band photos of the band. And that's all we'll say.
  • Creepy Awesome: One of the best examples in music.
  • Cult Classic: In a similar vein to Velvet Underground, Roxy Music, and Can while they weren't unpopular during their time they definitely lacked the mainstream popularity other classic rock bands had. They were only really known among hardcore music enthusiasts and critics at the time. As the years have gone on however they have started gaining more attention among the general public from both old and young rock fans alike. Most of it has to do with how many of its members worked with more popular bands or artists and being referenced in JoJo's Bizarre Adventure certainly helped as well.
  • Dead Horse Genre: Seems to be averted, since even some normally prog-averse critics such as Robert Christgau have praised some of their albums (e.g., Red). Alongside Pink Floyd, they seem to be one of the few prog bands that even prog-sceptic listeners will admit to liking.
  • Ear Worm: For a Prog Rock band, they sure have a few. Try to get the chorus of "The Great Deceiver" out of your head. Or "Cat Food".
  • Ending Fatigue: "Moonchild" from In the Court of the Crimson King suffers from this big time, with ten minutes of ambient improvisation that goes nowhere. It's almost universally considered the low point of their otherwise beloved debut album.
    • "Starless" is undoubtedly a beautiful song, but damn if that instrumental section isn't long (about 8 minutes after the lyrical part has ended). Though for many fans it's also the best part of the song.
    • The ending of the In the Court of the Crimson King isn't overly long, but it feels like it since it's kind of repetitive.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Greg Lake only played on In the Court of the Crimson King and In the Wake of Poseidon and not even all of the latter and for older rock and roll fans is more known for his work with Emerson, Lake & Palmer. For newer King Crimson fans however his work with the band is easily where he shone the most. This was further solidified by him passing away in 2016.
  • Epic Riff: "21st Century Schizoid Man", "Larks' Tongues in Aspic (Part Two)", "The Great Deceiver", "Fracture", "Red", "Indiscipline"...
  • Executive Meddling: And how. The two executives who owned the label (E.G. Records) King Crimson was on, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties and used the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's of London. They also took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over the publishing rights of KC's catalog over to E.G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late '80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So, they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump-sum settlement (read: bribe), which included a clause to release E.G. for wrong-doing, to avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused to take the pay-off, and took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long (and expensive) lawsuit, Fripp managed to get his publishing rights back, and eventually control of the entire Crimson catalog, so now any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile (or will be licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for peer-to-peer sharing, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) was in part why he left public performance in 2009, not resurfacing until the whole matter was settled.
  • First Installment Wins: Their first album, In The Court Of The Crimson King, is arguably their most popular release, and generally regarded as their best. It is their highest-charting release in the US, and the only one of their albums to be certified Gold (500,000 copies) in the US and UK.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
  • Funny Moments: Have their own page.
  • Growing the Beard: Not the band as such, but John Wetton; he was a great bass player but at best a capable singer. However, Fripp said that he regarded Wetton's singing on "Starless" as being the moment when Wetton came into his own as KC's singer. Unfortunately it's the last track on the last studio album Wetton appeared on, but better late than never.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Some of the band's early lyrics (particularly "Epitaph") have been cited as feeling uncomfortably relevant again in the wake of the events of 2016 and 2017. Lake's death in 2016 has further contributed to this.
    • The fact that King Crimson's fourth lead singer John Wetton passed away on January 31, 2017 not too long after Greg Lake's death in December, 2016. Made even worse that much like Greg, Wetton died of cancer.
  • Limited Special Collector's Ultimate Edition: Starting in 2012, there have been six massive boxsets produced, each limited to a single production run of between 3000 and 7000 copies:
    • A 15-disc boxset commemorating the 40th Anniversary of Larks' Tongues in Aspic in 2012;
    • 2013's The Road to Red, A 24-disc collection of material of the three-piece (Wetton/Bruford/Fripp) 1974 lineup;
    • 2014's Starless, a 27-disc collection of material of the 1973-1974 lineup that released Starless and Bible Black;
    • 2015's THRAKBOX, is a 17-disc collection of material of the 'double trio' lineup of the mid-1990's.
    • 2016's On (and Off) The Road 1981-1984, a 19-disc box documenting the Fripp / Belew / Levin / Bruford years.
    • 2017's Sailor's Tales, a 27-disc boxset that covers the 1970 to 1972 lineups that recorded and toured behind the albums The Wake Of Poseidon , Lizard & Islands.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Have their own page. And boy, have they ever earned it.
  • Paranoia Fuel: "Sleepless", from Three of a Perfect Pair — it's about fear, paranoia and nightmares, so it naturally counts as this. Don't listen to it with the lights out. Several of their instrumentals evoke this feeling, too, with the aforementioned "Fracture" and "The Bermuda Triangle" being particularly creepy examples.
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel: "Prelude: Song of the Gulls", "Islands", "Trio", "Matte Kudasai".
  • Tear Jerker: Crim has a bunch to these, but the saddest probably has to go to "Starless". It starts sad, then it gets frightening, and it ends up as tragedy.
    • Also "Epitaph", the song portion of "Moonchild", "Prelude: Song of the Gulls", "Islands", "Exiles", "The Night Watch", "Trio", "Fallen Angel", "Requiem".
    • The deaths of Greg Lake and John Wetton at the end of 2016 and beginning of 2017 respectively. With Greg's death and reveal that he had been fighting cancer coming as a shock to many and Wetton hoping that he would be able to play with Asia again not too long before his death. With Boz Burrell's passing in 2006, this leaves Gordon Haskell as the only living vocalist of King Crimson from the pre Discipline era, and he wasn't very fond of being with the band much at all.
  • True Art Is Incomprehensible: "The Deception of the Thrush", which even Adrian Belew says he doesn't understand.
    • The lyrics of Peter Sinfield.
      • Peter Sinfield may actually be a case of World of Symbolism: He has an entire site dedicated to explaining the elaborate, obscure tapestry of historical, religious, and mythological references in his lyrics. Doesn't make the lyrics themselves any less mind-boggling, though.
  • Ur-Example: Heavier moments make them overlap with Progressive Metal, especially on the album Red. "21st Century Schizoid Man" and "Larks' Tongues in Aspic (Part Two)" are also good examples of this, and are frequently covered by progressive metal groups.
  • Values Dissonance: "Ladies of the Road" from Islands is a paean to groupies. Okay, it was 1971. Still... There's a verse about seducing a schoolgirl and another that goes as follows: "High diving Chinese trender / Black hair and black suspender / Said, 'Please me no surrender'/ 'Just love to feel your Fender'."

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