YMMV / King Crimson


  • Awesome Music: Plenty of it— not surprising given the members' virtuosity and the sheer amount of Epic Rocking they do. Just about every fan will put "21st Century Schizoid Man," "Fracture," and "Starless" at the top of the list. They also have their own page.
  • Broken Base: Whenever the band has recorded new music, there are some fans who say "They Changed It, Now It Sucks," while others say "It's the Same, Now It Sucks."
    • There are also those who cannot stand Robert Fripp's heavy enforcement of Digital Piracy Is Evil, almost reaching Prince levels of bad. It makes it worse when he forced the website Last.FM to remove album art and band photos of the band. And that's all we'll say.
  • Creepy Awesome: One of the best examples in music.
  • Dead Horse Genre: Seems to be averted, since even some normally prog-averse critics such as Robert Christgau have praised some of their albums (e.g., Red). Alongside Pink Floyd, they seem to be one of the few prog bands that even prog-sceptic listeners will admit to liking.
  • Ear Worm: For a Prog Rock band, they sure have a few. Try to get the chorus of "The Great Deceiver" out of your head. Or "Cat Food".
  • Ending Fatigue: "Moonchild" from In the Court of the Crimson King suffers from this big time, with ten minutes of ambient improvisation that goes nowhere. It's almost universally considered the low point of their otherwise beloved debut album.
    • "Starless" is undoubtedly a beautiful song, but damn if that instrumental section isn't long (about 8 minutes after the lyrical part has ended).
    • The ending of the In the Court of the Crimson King isn't overly long, but it feels like it since it's kind of repetitive.
  • Epic Riff: "21st Century Schizoid Man", "Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Part Two", "The Great Deceiver", "Fracture", "Red"...
  • First Installment Wins: Their first album is by far their most popular release, and generally regarded as their best.
  • Funny Moments: Have their own page.
  • Hell Is That Noise: John Wetton's bass around the 4:02 and 12:27 mark of "Larks Tongues In Aspic, Part 1".
    • Also the screeching at the end of "Talking Drum"
    • And the intro to "Fallen Angel"
  • Nightmare Fuel: Have their own page. And boy, have they ever earned it.
  • Paranoia Fuel: "Sleepless", from Three of a Perfect Pair- it's about fear, paranoia and nightmares, so it naturally counts as this. Don't listen to it with the lights out. Several of their instrumentals evoke this feeling, too, with the aforementioned "Fracture" and "The Bermuda Triangle" being particularly creepy examples.
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel: "Prelude: Song of the Gulls", "Islands", "Trio"
  • Tear Jerker: Crim has a bunch to these, but the saddest probably has to go to "Starless".
    • Also "Epitaph", the song portion of "Moonchild", "Prelude: Song of the Gulls", "Islands", "Exiles", "The Night Watch", "Trio", "Fallen Angel", "Waiting Man".
  • True Art Is Incomprehensible: "The Deception of the Thrush", which even Adrian Belew says he doesn't understand.
    • The lyrics of Peter Sinfield.
      • Peter Sinfield may actually be a case of World of Symbolism: he has an entire site dedicated to explaining the elaborate, obscure tapestry of historical, religious, and mythological references in his lyrics. Doesn't make the lyrics themselves any less mind-boggling, though.
  • Ur-Example: Heavier moments make them overlap with Progressive Metal, especially on the album Red. "21st Century Schizoid Man" and "Larks' Tongues in Aspic (Part Two)" are also good examples of this, and are frequently covered by progressive metal groups.
  • Values Dissonance: "Ladies of the Road" from Islands is a paean to groupies. Okay, it was 1971. Still...there's a verse about seducing a schoolgirl and another that goes as follows: "High diving Chinese trender/Black hair and black suspender/Said, 'Please me no surrender'/'Just love to feel your Fender'."

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