YMMV / Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA

  • Anti-Climax Boss: The final song that you need to clear before getting the staff roll in mirai DX, "Watashi no Jikan", does not stand out in terms of difficulty in any way. This can come off as a disappointment to those who have played mainline DIVA games and were expecting a cosMo song as a final challenge.
  • Author's Saving Throw: F 2nd introduced Scratch Links, which easily drove themselves into Scrappy Mechanic territory for often being inaccurate to the song's timing and being unwieldy to manage. X fixed this by removing both Wide Scratch Notes and Scratch Links, returning to the F formula.
    • Releasing Future Tone on PS4, due to having virtually all the songs from every other release, with no confusing unlock system and some modules which haven't been seen since Project Diva Extend, making up for Project Diva X having a much smaller song list and excessive grinding to unlock anything.
  • Awesome Music:
    • Being a rhythm game drenched in J-Pop and Ear Worm, this is inevitable.
    • For a DLC minigame, "Hello Planet" had some pretty cool music, including this badass tune.
  • Best Level Ever: "Secret Police," "World's End Dance Hall," and "Senbonzakura" are often cited as some of the best levels in F.
    • "Wintry Winds," "Two-Sided Lovers," "Kagerou Daze", and "Decorator" are all very popular in F 2nd.
    • "Urotander, Underhanded Rangers" gets a lot of love for being a lot more interesting and involved than most of the PVs in the game, having a very devilish chart that abuses a lot of Fake Difficulty for thematic purposes, and being the only non-medley song in the game that Kaito sings on. "Satisfaction" and "Amazing Dolce" are also popular for being really good Original Generation tracks, the latter also having an interesting and involved PV.
  • Breather Level:
    • I'll Miku Miku You (Foreals) is the penultimate song of 2nd, and it's far easier than what came before, and what comes after.
    • Continuing Dream in F, very merciful for a (non-Extra) final song, especially with the two hardest songs in the game coming before it.
    • F 2nd has the un-intensive The World is Mine and DECORATOR sandwiched between two particularly brutal duos (see That One Level).
      • Notably, All three games had a penultimate or final song by cosMo...
      • Also notably, Project Diva X's final medley is a medley of ALL the boss songs in the series, including Disappearance and Intense Voice, which brings it's last minute...
    • As far as high-level songs go, "Kimi no Taion" in Mirai is actually quite easy for being rated "9". Granted, the game is pretty easy anyways, but "Kimi no Taion" is rather simplistic.
  • Broken Base: For international audiences, the Super-Deformed style of Project mirai. Bottom line is that chibi isn't as widely accepted in other parts of the world as in Japan. Also, the fact that mirai is overall easier than DIVA is a dealbreaker for some people.
  • Contested Sequel: Due to a series of happenstance instances, F 2nd ended up being this way. After its predecessor F had been the first game since the original to have an entirely unique (i.e. with no songs reused from older games) setlist, F 2nd went back to series form and half of its songs were updated versions of songs from the PSP games. Series veterans either didn't mind (since this was par for the usual course for games other than F) or considered this lazy; making this even more divisive was that these were songs from games that had never made it outside Japan, so people who had played only the localized versions generally didn't mind at all and were even happy that they got to play songs they wouldn't have been able to otherwise, many of which were iconic fan favorites.
    • F 2nd also went under quite a bit of fire for having a slightly more difficult Normal mode.
    • X had a lot of fun with this trope.
      • X being explicitly concert-esque PVs for the sake of being able to change the stage. Detractors claim that the lack of the more elaborate cinematic PVs isn't as entertaining nor as memorable as past games and is just an excuse for SEGA to be lazy, while defenders claim that the concert PVs are a way for SEGA to experiment with new gameplay styles that had yet to be seen in Project DIVA. It doesn't help that nearly all of the non-medley tracks are new additions that are mostly very well-liked songs that many would have preferred to have gotten cinematic PVs.
      • X is also probably the most Miku-oriented DIVA game to date; out of the 30 songs and Medleys that launched with the game, only four of them don't have Miku whatsoever. Rin, Len, and Luka get solos, MEIKO gets a trio with Rin and Len, and KAITO especially gets the short end of the stick; he has one song, and it has Miku in it! Naturally, fans of other Vocaloids were extremely displeased.
      • The lack of an actual Edit Mode riled up the Edit Mode fans, since X got the concert editor in its place, which despite the name bears very little resemblance to Edit Mode, functioning more like AR concert mode from F and F 2nd.
      • X is also very heavily influenced by Magical Mirai; many of the songs that aren't Original Generation or Medleys use dances borrowed from the concert. Fans have taken this as SEGA being lazy and not bothering to create new dances for their game.
      • The medleys themselves are also a point of contention, as they tend to be Marathon Levels and include songs that fans would've liked to see as full levels on their own. Full versions of songs that debuted in medleys is a popular DLC request. The Ending Medley is the most contentious- fans are split on whether it's the best level ever, as it's comprised of the Final Boss songs from previous games (plus "Two-Sided Lovers"), or the laziest, as it borrows heavily from their old charts, is the game's only 10-star difficulty song (previous games typically had two), and doesn't include any new songs.
  • Counterpart Comparison: When "Brain Revolution Girl" came out with X, fans of F 2nd noticed right away how similar its dance is to "Blackjack".
  • Crack Is Cheaper: Getting all of the outfits in Arcade costs what is effectively a small fortune due to being an arcade game. You're better off just grabbing what you like as opposed to getting as many as you can.
    • Mikudayo costs a ridiculous sum or requires significant effort to acquire when it isn't a DLC item. In the console version of F, it is the most expensive object in the game, requiring 393939 DP to purchase. In Arcade, it costs 1500 VP. To put that into perspective, the Swimsuits, traditionally among the most expensive items in the series, cost 1000 VP. The Mikudayo Skins are also at the steep price of 24 DIVA Tickets, which amounts to nearly a month of playing Arcade once a day.
    • Project Diva Future Tone itself, being around 8000 yen in price for the entire package. Admittedly, it's still cheaper than if you were to try to get all it's content on the actual arcade machine...
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Gumi seems to be a popular addition to the series, judging by her Project Mirai reaction.
  • Ear Worm: Too many to list. We are, after all, dealing with a rhythm game drenched in J-Pop.
  • Fridge Horror: Miku may be a tyrant in Sadistic.Music Factory, but she's also doing what she does simply for the sake of survival and escaping the factory (not getting the Chance Time bonus) means leaving her to starve to death!
  • Genius Bonus:
    • In the mirai and Arcade PV for "1/6 -out of the gravity-", the moon segment of the song features strings of numbers flying in the background. There are two distinct strings among them; one is "6.673*10^-11*7.35*10^22/1738000^2 = 1.62m/s^2", or the equation that calculates the rate of acceleration for gravity on the moon. The other is "F=G*M*m/r^2", or the equation for Newton's universal law of gravitation.
    • In the mirai PV for "Kokoro", the lines of code that can be seen in the background when Rin receives a heart are written in Python.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: Project mirai DX received lukewarm reception in Japan due to being just an Updated Re-release of Project mirai 2; why buy an entire new game just to get a few extra songs? In the West, it's the first Project mirai game to get a localized release and therefore was much better received.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Miku uses a Fei-Yen costume in extend. Over a year later, and on a totally different system, Fei-Yen turns into a familiar idol...
  • It's Easy, so It Sucks: The lack of an Extreme difficulty level is one of the more common criticisms of the Project Mirai series. Even the addition of a "Super Hard" mode in DX fails to completely remedy the issue, since it only applies to 6 out of 48 songs and is still easier than the other games' Extreme difficulty.
    • X came under fire for this after F 2nd had given the series a severe Difficulty Spike; even those who felt that F 2nd was too difficult found that X was too easy even compared to f/F.
  • Les Yay: Miku and Rin have a lot of this in the bonus materials for the games.
    • In Project Diva F and F 2nd, many of the Miku and Rin duet songs are heavily on the shipping, with Summer Idol having them consider going out with each other, and singing about how they like the other in Colorful X Melody.
    • And of course there's Luka and Miku in Magnet.
    • "Reverse Rainbow" has Miku kissing Rin (or Luka).
  • Love It or Hate It: Due to the design choices in X, PVs can be very hit or miss for a lot of fans.
  • Market-Based Title: mirai Deluxe is mirai DX outside of Japan. Despite this, all versions of the game have Miku saying " Project Mirai Deluxe!" when you highlight the game's icon on the 3DS's Home Menu.
  • Misplaced Nationalism: Due to some Unfortunate Implications of Japanese imperialism in "Senbonzakura", the song was removed for the Korean localization of Mirai DX.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: "PAAFEKUTO!", and to lesser extent "EKUSELENTO!".
  • Narm: Gumi and Rin's "swimming" in Invisible in Project Mirai DX.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • The music video of Sadistic.Music Factory in F. The song itself could be pretty scary if one takes into account the lyrics (which are about being trapped in a factory and forced to make music for a mechanical tyrant for the rest of one's life) and the frightening robotic monotones, but combine all that with the Chance Time ending...
    • The Disappearance of Hatsune Miku, which has the song become garbled, as well as there being interference and odd glitches in Miku's movements, constantly. According to Word of God, Miku is being deleted while attempting to complete the song. The end of the song is when she finally crashes due to it.
    • Toward the end of Disappearance, Miku can be seen banging at the screen with her fists as though begging the player to help her. And at the end, she says a cheery goodbye before just...freezing up with a sad smile on her face as her voice speaks eerily in the background.
      • Thankfully averted with its answer song, The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku, where the full length version's opening lyrics have Miku celebrate being alive, and she promptly finds a solution to the bad ending of Disappearance with one of the fastest denouements in Vocaloid history!
    • Yubikiri/Pinky Promise from F 2nd is a subtly off-kilter song with an equally off-kilter video. Its creepiness is mostly due to the weirdness of the visuals and implications of the lyrics until the end of the video implies that Miku has not only cut off her pinky finger as promised in the lyrics but has incorporated it into the bento she's shown making for her crush.
    • The Mikudayo head/costume is either hilarious or this, depending on taste.
    • The entire video of Kagerou Daze wherein Miku stumbles onto the site of an accident and repeatedly gets killed or injured trying to avoid the domino effect of everything that goes on. Sure, it's a Catapult Nightmare for each event so she knows how to avoid it next time, but the video still ends with an accident on stage and Miku vanishing completely.
    • The video of NegaPosi*Continues may definitely startle people the first time they see it as the game Miku is playing appears happy and normal at first, but when repeated continues occur, the game seems to be slowly corrupting, as the music slows and the colors become inverted, with Miku herself appearing to glitch, especially in a certain section that can come unexpected as static shows and Miku's head moves completely erratically.
    • "LOL-Lots of Laugh" in Mirai DX features a figure in a giant rabbit costume. The way it just suddenly appears in a deep close-up and just stares at the player for several seconds is just jarring.
      • Arcade's version of the PV adds a comical "boing" effect to the bunny's reveal.
    • Also in Mirai DX, the PV for "Matryoshka" features some creepy parts such as X-ray photos showing blood spreading through a person's lungs and wrists, a moment where a butterfly's wing is being cut off with a pair of scissors, and black-and-white pictures of the Nendoroid characters, each sporting a Slasher Smile, splattered with paint that makes it look like they are covered in blood.
  • Pandering to the Base:
    • Project Diva F 2nd is full of it, from English lyrics for all but one of the songs on the localized version to the return of some of the most famous (and infamous) songs and costumes from the PSP games.
      • Only to be averted in the next game, Mirai DX, which goes back to romaji lyrics and even the Japanese judgements of Cool/Fine/Safe/Sad/Worst over the western Cool/Good/Safe/Bad/Miss
      • The trope is re-invoked in X, with songs once again being translated to English.
    • Project Diva has been on a handheld and the PS3 ever since it was first released. When the series migrated to the PS4, with Project Diva X, however, it stayed true to its roots, and it's fanbase, by announcing it will be releasing first on Playstation Vita.
      • Averted for the US release of X, which was released on Vita and PS4 simultaneously.
    • The Ending Medley in Project DIVA X has, for Intense Voice Of Hatsune Miku, purely the fastest part of the song.
    • Project Diva Future Tone is a complete version of the arcade game as of mid-February 2016, missing only Ageage Again and it's associated module, which released in the last week of that month, with a grading system and other features that would be impossible on any other release.
      • Notably, Ageage Again, along with a handful of very popular Mirai songs, was added with the very first Additional Song Pack.
  • Periphery Demographic: The games are, for the most part, aimed at existing Vocaloid fans, as they expect you to have at least some tangential knowledge of the Internet culture surrounding them - how would you know that Rin likes oranges or Kaito likes ice cream unless you're aware of the memes associated with them beforehand (or following a guide)? Following the localization of f/F into English, however, it gained a small fanbase among non-Vocaloid fan Vita owners due to the lack of games on the console along with the series's collection of indie music, extensive costume system, and aversion of The Problem with Licensed Games in terms of its quality as a series of rhythm games.
  • Play the Game, Skip the Story: Pretty much no one plays X for the included story mode, which gets a lot of focus as being one of the game's highlights. Players who imported the game but are unable to read anything are thus subjected to cutscene padding interspersed between songs during cloud and event requests. Some players who didn't import it also ended up skipping it, due to it ending up being an Excuse Plot.
  • Scrappy Level: "Glasses," "Nyanyanyanyanyanyanya!" and "Stay With Me" are among the most-disliked songs in F.
    • F 2nd has less but "Clockwork Clown" is fairly panned by the players.
    • "LOL -lots of laughs-" in X gets a lot of flak for being pretty bland. This stands in particular contrast to its earlier appearance in Mirai, in which it had one of the more detailed and entertaining PVs in the game.
      • This was made even more insulting for the fanbase when Future Tone released a 1:1 recreation of the Mirai PV, right down to the same module. Especially since that means it is very likely to come in one of Future Tone PS4's DLC packs.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The star links in F 2nd weren't popular in players. Their timing is often inconsistent with the rest of the song, either much faster or much slower, which throws a lot of players off on their first try. As well as many, many tries after that. It was removed in X along with the wide star notes.
    • Chance Time in the original PSP game can feel like this at times as missing a single note on it in several songs is what could very easily separate a Standard and Great score. It's still this in later games due to heavily weighing one particular late-song section over the rest of the song.
      • Brought back for Future Tone on Easy and Normal charts. Now fixed as during chance time, difficulty is increased and missing doesn't decrease the life bar, similar to F and F 2nd, so you can still finish the song. It serves its purpose of helping you learn to play on higher difficulties. And it's not present on Hard and Extreme charts, where it has no business being.
    • Unlocking the Hard and Extreme charts for a song require clearing its Normal and Hard charts, respectively. This is a source of frustration for players who have played previous games in the series and are more than capable of playing Normal charts. It's also frustrating for players who find the two-button Normal charts bland in comparison to the four-button Hard and Extreme charts.
      • Notably, Project Diva Arcade and Future Tone both have four-button charts for Normal... And also has some songs missing Easy and/or Normal charts completely.
    • X's cloud and event requests forces you into a repetitive cycle of Level Grinding in order to gather crystals and unlock all the modules and gift items, most of which are Random Drops. Needless to say, its execution has proved near-universally unpopular.
  • Screwed by the Lawyers: Subverted, in increasingly epic ways, ever since Project Diva F. The most epic subversion being the January 2017 release of Project Diva Future Tone. 50+ producers, none of which work for CFM or Piapro directly, whose 200+ songs were all licensed for Western distribution. No upcoming Project Diva release, ever, is likely to require anything NEAR this amount of licensing.
  • Sequel Displacement: The first game is often ignored as far as talking about the series as a whole goes. It started to pick up when 2nd came around, or for a more extreme example, F due to it being the first worldwide DIVA game, so both Project DIVA and its differences from practically the entire rest of the series are rather overlooked.
    • Project Diva f is often forgotten in favour of the PS3 version, which includes every song and properly attributes several modules to their correct song.
    • Project Diva Arcade's early release is practically forgotten, even by SEGA, with the Arcade and PS4 version both being solely referred to as Project Diva (Arcade) Future Tone.
  • Special Effect Failure: Whenever someone wears the Mikudayo head, but not the Module, their hair clips through the accessory if they have a hairstyle larger than it. Averted with the Module, which flat out replaces the character.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: The Project Mirai spinoff series is basically Groove Coaster with Vocaloids.
  • Surprise Difficulty: "Nyanyanyanyanyanyanya!" starts off with the memetic tune everyone knows and loves. Then the song starts to change in both style and tempo, at which point a lot of players' runs crash and burn.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes:
    • The inclusions and actions of the chibi Vocaloids in "God-Tier Tune" make it the most adorable apocalypse ever.
    • Love-Hate in F 2nd is made of this.
    • The Project Mirai games are done entirely in the chibi style. Their cuteness can be downright lethal!
    • Everything about "LOL -Lots of Laughs-" in mirai.
    • The "Cute Medley" in X.
  • That One Achievement:
    • Several of the F/F 2nd Trophies can become this not due to difficulty, but because of grinding. For example, both of them have a trophy requiring you to view all loading screen images... with over 100 different pictures this can make it really annoying waiting for the one final picture to show up. Another one requires you to view every single music video in the game, and using the playlist to play them automatically after each other doesn't work - you have to manually start each of them.
    • So many in mirai, due to a combination of vague Stamp descriptions and how reliant some Stamps are on factors beyond your control, such as Stamp #59, which you can kiss goodbye if you don't know anyone with the game or aren't online Friends with anyone who also has the game, or most of the Mirai Room Stamps, which are heavily based on random chance.
  • That One Boss: The Sphinx in "Hello Planet" for foreign players. It's a minor Puzzle Boss that asks a question, then allows the player to select from three answers; the right one will defeat the Sphinx and allow you to pass. If you mess up, the Sphinx laughs at you and throws you another question. Foreign players of 2nd and Extend will run into trouble due to the fact that being unable to read anything makes it significantly harder, and the order of the answers are randomized each time, preventing players from learning repeat questions and answers easily without the use of a translation guide.
  • That One Level: Every game has a handful of songs that can be absolute devils to play.
    • Whole series:
      • "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku", full stop. Its 2nd incarnation has gained infamy among fans for being one of the hardest official charts in the entire series. It also appears in Arcade and F 2nd, but it was nerfed slightly in the latter. The last twenty seconds also makes an appearance in X using a variation of the F 2nd chart.
      • cosMo music in general. In fact, a cosMo song has been the Final Boss of every game in the entire main series except F 2nd.
    • F:
      • "Sadistic Music Factory". Everything you want about a hard song: rapid tempo, drumming, and by the time you get to the end, the entire rhythm just completely falls apart.
      • "Nega*Posi Continues". The tempo is so fast that mere button pressing won't suffice; you have to master a slow form of drumming because the normal notes are too fast to push normally but also too slow to drum normally.
      • "Rin-chan Now!". Extremely quick tempo that utilizes a very repetitive note chart that quickly ramps up in difficulty as you push on through the song.
      • "Nyanyanyanyanyanya!". This one takes some time to get used to due to the sudden tempo shifts that can easily throw off unaware players.
    • F 2nd:
      • "Envy Catwalk". While the tempo isn't too fast compared to other difficult charts, this chart has a nasty obsession with drum chains and Star chains, and it lets you know it.
      • "Two-Faced Lovers". It has the same drum chain problem that "Envy Catwalk" has, but worse. The Star Links are of no help either.
      • "2D Dream Fever". In addition to a particularly rapid tempo that has a tricky speed-up portion in the middle, the accompanying video is a nightmare for players sensitive to explosive colors, which can make it difficult to watch for incoming notes.
    • X:
      • "Raspberry*Monster". This one can be a bit unusual because while the chart itself is pretty lax for an EXTREME, if you play on the accompanying stage, it can really hurt for people sensitive to bright colors.
      • Urotander, Underhanded Rangers. It's an invoked instance of Fake Difficulty (the song is about a team of superheroes who use dirty tricks to win), so naturally it uses every dirty trick to screw with the player. It goes to show that you will not get a Perfect on it the first time you see the chart, and that's a guarantee, not a challenge. It also drops 12 different modules that can't be obtained from any other song, so prepare to grind it a lot if you want to unlock everything.
      • "The Final/X Medley". This is somewhat befitting of a medley that is made of That One Levels. Shifting, rapid tempos and drum chains abound with lots of Wide Notes spliced into seemingly random sections, in addition to a cameo appearance by "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku."
    • mirai subseries:
      • Despite only having Hard as a max difficulty, "Gaikotsu Gakudan to Riria" on button Hard Mode is significantly harder than even the six Super Hard charts, comparable to the main series' EXTREME difficulty in terms of being That One Level. The song's pace is fast and relentless, throwing drum chains and button switching at you every opportunity it gets, as well as being difficult to read. A specific middle section has a brief speed-up thrown in there just to screw with you, and in an SP Zone at that.
      • "Matryoshka" on Super Hard Button Mode can devolve into a battle for stamina, due it being both long and intense.
      • "glow" doesn't hide the fact that its middle section has to be flat-out memorized to do it without screwing up.
      • "Ageage Again" on Button Hard is surprisingly hard for a level 8 song, due to many two- and three-button patterns that have to be read as they scroll upwards or to the left, which can disorient players.
      • "1925" on Hard Mode loves throwing half-notes in your face. If you haven't picked up drumming yet, this is a crash-course lesson in it.
      • "Invisible" on Button-Super Hard is both fast and chaotic with little breathing room.
    • Arcade/Future Tone:
      • If it's on this list, it's also a That One Level in Arcade/Future Tone.
      • The console release of Future Tone also has a special treat for the really sadistic players: The 10★ Master Course in Survival Course Mode. "Two-Sided Lovers", "2D Dream Fever", "Nega*Posi Continues", and "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku" on EXTREME difficulty, capped off by "The Disappearance of Hatsune Miku" on EXTRA EXTREME difficulty, the latter of which is considered by-and-far one of the hardest official charts ever made, period. This in a mode where LIFE recovery is halved and you carry one health bar between every song, back to back to back to back to back. If you think you're up to the challenge, God bless your soul.
    • Miscellaneous:
      • Don't try to do any of the Motor Mouth songs on BREAK THE LIMIT difficulty in Miku Flick. Getting a Perfect is actually, literally impossible.
      • A favorite pastime of Edit Mode users is to make custom charts that border on "virtually impossible".
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Present in many, many of the PVs, especially in F and F 2nd with "World's End Dance Hall" and "Meteor" being some of the best-looking videos in the series.
    • Where possible, these new PVs have been ported to Project Diva Arcade Future Tone. In at least one case, despite the fact the song was already in the game.
  • Woolseyism: Several instances of this in F. For example, one song that would literally translate to "Left-Behind City" was named Urbandonment, and Remote Control became Remote Controller, which is appropriate given the video has the Kagamines controlling each other through their devices.
    • In F 2nd, Narisumashi Genga, normally translated as "Spoofing Genga", became the punny-named Doubleganger, due to what everyone associates Gengar with nowadays. The "Hatsune Miku" outfit from DIVA, which is different from "Hatsune Miku Original", was also translated as "Ha2ne Miku" to avoid confusion and make them distinct, since the original way to tell them apart is impossible in English.
    • In X, Pink Stick Luv is translated to Pincostique Luv in an attempt to be subtle.
    • X has a brief scene where Rin and Len get into a fight, in which the localization has them start slinging pun-related insults at each other. Apparently, the original draft for the localized text was a lot less punny but a lot more savage.

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