YMMV / God of War Series
aka: God Of War

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  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Kratos is NOT a nice person, that's undeniable. But people seem to be split as to whether he's a tragic Sociopathic Hero or an outright monster. There's a good amount of support for each (with another argument to be made that he drifts between the two from game to game).
      • The developers have implied that Kratos' position between sociopathy and monsterism depends on just how blinded by rage he is at the moment.
      • In an interview hyping the prequel in Game Informer, one of the developers was quoted as saying Kratos was "an asshole" and "unlikable" by the third game, and the prequel would try and humanize him.
    • Zeus' vindictiveness toward Kratos is because Kratos released fear from Pandora's Box, which infected Zeus. From a certain point of view, Zeus' actions are not his own and can't be blamed for wanting to kill Kratos.
      • By this interpretation, Kratos' death at the beginning of God of War II is a form of Hoist by His Own Petard in hindsight since he caused the fear which made Zeus stab him. It also creates an infinite regress of circular motivations because Zeus wants to kill Kratos because of the fear he unleashed and Kratos wants to kill Zeus because he killed him once.
      • Zeus might have been trying to connect with his estranged son Kratos through the Grave Digger disguise.
    • Interpretation of Zeus often depends on how one interprets Kratos. Some view Zeus as betraying Kratos, breaking his own rules, and deserves everything Kratos did to him. Others view Zeus as completely justified in attempting to stop a mad god and a more heroic than Kratos.
    • For that matter, does Zeus really want to stop the destruction that Kratos causes, or is he just terrified that he'll be killed and putting on a tough face? What was Zeus doing while Kratos was killing his entire family and destroying the world by proxy? It's pretty clear that he had a decent view of Poseidon being murdered, if no one else, and he did nothing to stop it. The King of the Gods only comes out to fight when Kratos either shows up on his doorstep or threatens the source of his power - situations where nonaction would lead to his own death.
      • As king, Zeus has to maintain the image of aloofness and impartiality. His primary purpose is to maintain the cosmic balance of the world. As long as Kratos was not a threat to it Zeus had no reason to directly step in. Kratos was still mortal and could have been stopped by Zeus easily if Zeus ever decided he went to far. All of his actions were small scale and repairable from Zeus' long (as in centuries) point of view. It was only when Kratos became a god and really started messing up the order of things that it required Zeus's intervention.
      • One can easily assume that Zeus does a Redemption Equals Death near the end of III. After having black smoke, which might be Fear, the evil that corrupted him, sent spewing out of his mouth, combined by the fact that he doesn't put up any sort of resistance against Kratos afterwards, it can be assumed that Zeus has finally seen the errors in his ways and chooses to die as an result.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: Many Rated M for Money games, like these, sell horribly in Japan. While God of War III was a massive hit in America, where it sold over two-and-a-half million copies, it barely made it past 100,000 copies in Japan. In Japan, the entire franchise has only sold 350,000 copies. It's a game that is based on Rated M for Manly, features a very violent Villain Protagonist, and extremely gory. Obviously it's doomed in Japan. Maybe Japan just doesn't want to play as Kratos. Likewise, Kratos is popular for Rated M for Manly and excessive Gorn, the things that wouldn't click very much on the Japanese although it'd be wildly popular for Americans. In the Netherlands, they are sold like Vanillaware.
  • Annoying Video Game Helper: The tutorials pop-ups in the first game are very... thorough in their controls assistance. Made worse by their tendency to appear a significant period of time after the player already figured out whatever they're mentioning and the inability to skip past them for several seconds.
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • Hermes in III. After bragging about his super speed and leading you on a chase through collapsing architecture to his fight, he's... not very fast, and his attacks are girlish slaps that do almost no damage. This fits his spoiled brat/schoolyard bully character, though.
    • Zeus in III. After the game threw some very well-liked bosses at the player throughout the game, minus Hermes, the boss battle with him the games tries setting up, turns out be little than a rehash of the fight with him II, minus the phases where he had the Blade of Olympus and when he was a giant, with some rather cheap gimmicks added.
  • Awesome Bosses: Okay, some of the boss fights are pretty god-damned awesome so take your pick. Just one example: Hades in III. He's got a great intro (just him chuckling at you in the darkness before emerging), his attacks are powerful yet nicely telegraphed so you don't necessarily die to his "infinite number of chains spiking the ground" move, you get into a tug of war with him when his chains and Kratos' chains get entangled, and you finish off the fight by ripping out his own soul!
  • Awesome Music: "Evil Ways" from a triler for Ascension multiplayer.
  • Badass Decay: The gods and titans suffer from this heavily as the series goes on. In the original game, Ares as a giant is presented as suicide for Kratos to take on without Pandora's Box, which by extension brings up how monumental a task fighting a god or titan is. By the second, Kratos is fighting Zeus human sized and starts hurting his giant form, but more and more, gods show up as bosses, and not even as a Final Boss in III and Ghost of Sparta, with Kratos killing them while human sized even if they're giants, along with the titans, causing the majority of the gods outside of Zeus and Ares to come off as Paper Tigers. Subverted as of the end of III with the revelation that the gods didn't exactly get weaker, rather Kratos still had the power of Pandora's Box, or rather Hope, sealed inside him throughout II and III.
    • At least the gods in the third game are shown to be capable of being able to put up a good fight against Kratos. The Titans, unfortunately are completely demoted into Fake Ultimate Deities as the gods despite being scared of them in the second game, are able to competely stomp the titans, whom despite having hints of magic previously shows no power beyond their size. This even applies to the greater titans like Kronos and Gaia, the former is Kratos just moving around the body and pelting parts of his bodies one by one while the latter would have gotten killed many times if it weren't for Kratos's help. By the time Kratos managed to escape from the underworld, only two titans out of the many managed to survive the initial struggle ( Perses and Gaia).
    • In Chains of Olympus,without Helios all the gods including Zeus are helpless to Morpheus who's not even a major god.
  • Base-Breaking Character: Kratos himself, noted under Alternative Character Interpretation, is this in later games where some of the fanbase still sympathizes with him while others feel he became far too unlikable a protagonist.
  • Breather Level: Pandora's Temple in the first game alternates between "maddeningly difficult" and "relaxingly easy"; the former describes most of the area's obstacle runs, the latter, most of the puzzles.
  • Broken Base: Kratos sure has some due to his Jerkass attitude but even fans who liked his behavior don't like his silent portrayal in Ascension.
    • 3 getting remade for the PS4. While it's not as controversial as The Last of Us Remastered (Namely because it's not being released less than a year after its original release) a few people feel that the game still looks good enough to not warrant the remastering (And based on what footage has been released, the change isn't that notable), and alongside that, why are they making the current Grand Finale of the franchise the first to be remade for the 8th Gen consoles?
  • Catharsis Factor: You know those Wraith enemies in nearly all the games that disappear into the ground and chop at you multiple times and there's no way to stop it save from some fancy dodging/blocking? Well III, you finally have the ability to drag them right back out of the ground while they're doing this.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: Kratos' villainous behavior can sometimes really make it hard to really care if he wins or loses. It sometimes becomes hard to say why you should care whether Kratos kills that god/saves himself/kills that other god and all the rest too. It's not as though Kratos being in charge would be an improvement given how he acts. As it turns out, the game does manage to make them all lose, leaving the victimized humans as the ones left. Shame Kratos messed up the sun, sea, seasons, and sky before he died. And even then, OR DID HE? The only consolation is that he decided to release Hope into the world, hope to give humanity a reason to continue on. The ending slightly implies that the world can start getting back on its feet. The prequels and interquels, most especially Ascension and Ghost of Sparta, attempt to rectify this by humanizing Kratos more. YMMV on how well that works since in the latter his actions are still worse than the game's supposed Big Bad.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • The puppy Cerberoi in the second game. Very maneuverable and hard to hit. Take too long to kill them, and they evolve into full-grown Cerberus mini-bosses, who will start spitting out more pups. (The Fuck-You Button is the most effective way to deal with them - not to mention the only way, at higher difficulties.)
    • Likewise the Satyrs, who don't evolve but are practically impossible to stagger, meaning you spend more time dodging their attacks than countering. If you grab them, it initiates a button-mashing grapple for the satyr's staff, which would be well and good except there's usually two of them per fight, and they show blatant disregard for the rules of Mook Chivalry.
    • There are several of these in the PSP version - or perhaps they just get introduced into gameplay more quickly. The worst ones are guys who are Dual Wielding: you can't block their attacks, they have five-second-long combos, and they always come in packs. So: Dodge, dodge, dodge, dodge, dodge, dodge, land one hit, Lather Rinse Repeat. (Actually, if you're quick, you can stagger them out of their attack patterns, but if you miss that first dodge, it's them juggling you.)
    • The Goddamn Satyrs and Wraiths in III.
      • Satyrs in III suffer from the same problems described above. The only consolation is that they're rare, with there being a maximum of seven in the entire main game. This is offset, however, by the fact that they never travel alone.
      • Wraiths are annoyingly fast and can attack from far away. They are also hard to stagger and can't be grabbed. Their worst aspect though, is the fact that they can sink into the ground on a whim. This makes them invincible until they decide to knock it off, but they can still hurt you by diving at you from underground. You can just drag them out with L1 and Circle, but it's not exactly easy to land a grab on them...
    • The Keres Wraiths in "Ghost of Sparta" are perhaps the worst of them all. Like the wraiths in II and III, they sink into the ground when they land after a knockback, only when they leap out of the ground, only if one's attack successfully connects, instead of merely hitting you, it forces you into an action sequence where you take continual damage until you manage to get it off. This wouldn't be too annoying on its own, except the lunge is ridiculously fast, tracks you, and is one of two attacks in the game (the other belonging to armored cyclops) that can knock you out of your block + attack invincibility frames, did I mention there's a part where you have to fight three of them and an armored cyclops at once? Good luck getting an attack in before you have to mash L and R.
    • The lightning Sirens from God of War Ascension, who wield a wide variety of various electrical attacks and tend to attack with other monsters, staying back to snipe you as their more close-combat oriented partners keep you busy. Combining with gorgons, they single-handedly made the Trials of Archimedes much more difficult that the other sections
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Kratos gets this a lot for his badassery.
    • And again, this is probably how Greek mythologies want us to react to the story. They have an entirely different concept for heroism from ours in modern days.
    • Zeus gets some of this since Kratos became so unlikable after the first game, and even though he was corrupted by the Evils from Pandora's Box, and the actions he had under its influence were still not as bad what Kratos does, it's still made clear that not everything he'd done was because of that, such what he did to Prometheus and Kratos' mother.
  • Ear Worm: God of War II's theme. "Hold Devil's Pot of Tea, Hold Devil's Pot of Tea, Hold Devil's Pot of Tea Mulan!"
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Poseidon in III managed to be one the most popular boss fights despite only be a tutorial fight due to the amazing visual effects of the body and horses he creates out of water.
  • Epileptic Trees: As pointed out on the WMG page, there are 3 murals showing different parts of history in the Halls of Time. The first one is the events of God of War I & II. The second is Kratos and the titans triumphing over the gods. The third one? Three kings men following a star in the desert...
  • Esoteric Happy Ending: Yes, Kratos kills the evil gods and releases hope into the world, but look at the state the world's in. It's not great.
  • Even Better Sequel:
  • Fake Difficulty: Every time you received a new weapon or magic, you will often fight against first level mooks with and temporarily giving you unlimited in order to demonstrate your newfound powers against them. However, when you receive a new upgrade in Ascension, you will receive a new weapon element. While that sounds good enough, the problem is you will only utilize their powers if you either max your rage level which requires you not get hit (Which in this game, is incredibly difficult), or if you waste your red orbs just to level the weapon to its maximum with the sole exception of the fire element where you will receive the magic. Essentially, when you first received it, it's no better than an ordinary weapon and since you couldn't even switch the element, the showcase sections has turned from feeling badass about your new powers into one of the most tedious enemy sections in the game in one of the worst level designs possible.
  • First Installment Wins: Story wise, the first game is best remembered, by fans that care about the plot, with the later games being divisive.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • Harpies. Fairly easy to kill on their own, but they tend to show up while you're fighting tougher enemies or bosses, and often disrupt your combos or distract you enough to get clobbered. They also like to knock you off narrow beams.
    • The Feral Hounds in III may just have the harpies one-upped in terms of sheer goddamn-ness in that they render you a total sitting duck for other stronger enemies if even just one latches onto you.
    • The satyrs in are a source of eternal frustration for many a player, thanks to their seemingly immaculate ability to dance away and smack you whenever you dare to contemplate hitting them.
    • Wraiths and Harpies, especially after they've learned that Firebomb attack. Their death animations are too perfect. It's like the designers came up with that first, then said "What attacks can we give them that will make the player want to do just that to them?"
    • In God of War II there is a level where the player must climb a long chain to get to the top of the level. Along the way there is an endless supply of Bats that you can not attack from the rope and can throw you from the rope.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • Due to the way the game is designed, some Game Breaker bugs exist that allow you to have - among other things - infinitely regenerating magic and maxed out weapons early in the game. Also, holdover features remain from when the game was in "test" phase, including invisible ledges, which can lead Sequence Breaking. There are a whole bunch of gamers dedicated to finding and refining them in order to perform better speed runs.
    • The "New Game+" glitch in the third game.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: In the Japanese dub of the games, Kratos is voiced by Tessho Genda, who is also the voice of Kurama, the Nine-tailed Fox. Kurama is the kind of monster Kratos would enjoy to kill before breakfast. And that without going into the point he also voiced Zeus in the Japanese dub of Percy Jackson and the Olympians and its sequel. Take a good guess which god Kratos wants to kill the most...
  • Idiot Plot: The massive amount of mistakes Kratos makes seem necessary just to have a longer franchise. The God of War Ares forces Kratos to kill his family and Kratos finds it okay to trust other Gods if it means he will lose his angst of killing his family. He doesn't lose anything. Futhermore, Kratos accepts Athena's proposition to replace Ares even though he will cause the loss of even more families. It gets dumber in the sequels when Kratos starts trusting every God he sees only to be betrayed five minutes later with Kratos not being able to believe it. As GameSpy puts it, "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me three times and I must be a complete god damn buffoon"
  • It Was His Sled: Kratos having accidentally killed his family was a big revelation halfway the first game. It's has become common knowledge and other games, even prequels, outright spoil that incident in the opening.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Kratos himself would've been a completely sympathetic character, had it not been for his sociopathic behavior.
    • Hades. His sadomasochism is not surprising, considering him being hated by everyone and losing his wife, brother and niece.
  • Memetic Badass: The reason there are no more Greek gods, deities or mythological creatures anymore? Kratos killed most of them.
    • Ironically, he didn't touch most of the gods; but then again, the series couldn't possibly fit in ALL of them.
    • Now he's done with the Greek gods, he is going to kill ALL the Norse gods.
  • Memetic Mutation: Kratos plays the lottery and loses. ("Rage of Sparta" begins to play in the background) Explanation 
  • Moral Event Horizon: The game makes it clear that you're put in control of a character who starts as a Sociopathic Hero only to evolve right into class-A douchebag. For almost all players, Kratos will eventually cross the MEH; the only question is when.
    • The developers have stated that they originally wanted to give Kratos a cute little dog to follow him around, as a way to give him some humanity and remind him of better times. He would then have to kill the dog before it turned into Cerberus. They eventually decided that was too cruel even for the series.
      • The concept lives on in the Cerberus monster. Little Cerberus pups quickly grow into mature Cerberus, and the easiest way to deal with them is to grab the puppies before they mature and grind their skulls into the ground.
      • For many players when Kratos decides to destroy Olympus regardless of the consequences on the world is the point where he goes from Nominal Hero to Villain Protagonist.
    • Zeus crosses this when he destroys Sparta. Whereas before he was simply concentrating on Kratos, he decides to rope an entire city into his wrath.
    • Ares crossed it when he tricked Kratos into killing his family, all because he wanted Kratos to be a perfect warrior.
  • Most Annoying Sound: In the first game. "What are you doing? Athens crumbles as you waste time!"
  • Narm:
    • There's a scene in God of War II where Kratos screams "ZEUUUUUUUUUUUS!" in a manner that's reminiscent of Boris Badenov cursing out Bullwinkle.
    • In God of War: Chains of Olympus, after killing the Basilisk, Kratos yells at the sky cursing the gods once again (around 4:48 in the video). There is a Beat during the shot of the sky, making Kratos look less like somebody yelling at the heavens and more like, well...
  • Nausea Fuel:
    • The Chronos Boss fight in III. Tearing off his blistered fingernail, cutting open a scab, getting swallowed and then graphically cutting your way out of his stomach with the Blade of Olympus? Disgusting.
      • A skinless cyclops busting out of a wound on his shoulder? Odd. Also disgusting.
    • The Hades boss fight has pieces of his flesh break off and you have to chase them around. yuck.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • Clotho, the giant boob monster.
    • Kratos ripping off Helios' head... * shudders*
    • The first-person beatdown of Poseidon, from HIS perspective, ends with HIS EYES GETTING GOUGED OUT.
  • Nightmare Retardant: Some gamers think Hades in III looks more like a sumo wrestler than an intimidating God of the Underworld.
  • Player Punch : Brutal, and possibly the most poignant and well-written part of the game it appears in. Toward the end of God of War 3, Kratos retrieves Pandora from the Labyrinth. Kratos needs Pandora because she is literally the key that will get him past the Fires of Olympus and open the box that bears her name. To serve her function as the key, though, Pandora has to die in the Fires of Olympus. She willingly goes with him, and as they journey together, for whatever reason, Pandora speaks with Kratos as though he is someone she trusts. She bares her heart (figuratively) to the guy who has been going around butchering the world by proxy. And you start to see just a hint of decent human being re-emerge in Kratos: she clearly reminds him of his own lost daughter. Enough that when they finally reach the Flame of Olympus, as Pandora is walking toward it, Kratos grabs her arm and refuses to let her continue. Pandora struggles with him, pointing out this is what he brought her there for. Which means all the soul-baring she did, all the things she said to him were words said to the man she knew was functionally her executioner. She then yells "Let go, you're hurting me!" at the guy who has spent the whole game murdering helpless opponents, slaughtering friend and foe alike, and killing the world by proxy. And his hand snaps off her like he's been burned. And then Zeus shows up, and it just gets worse...
  • Rated M for Money: Everything bleeds. A lot. Also, the nudity is mostly irrelevant and mostly seemed as a ploy to boost the rating. However, give Greek mythology a read sometime and you might be surprised at how accurate (or even tamer) God of War can be.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: The new God of War title appears to have an Older and Wiser Kratos who, while somewhat cold and distant, seems to be much nicer and more reasonable, and actually cares for his young son, which has been received positively by a lot of people who thought he'd long since become insufferable.
  • Rooting for the Empire: By GOWIII Kratos is such a douche bag by blaming his problems on everyone else, killing innocents and destroying the world all due to his selfish desire for revenge that some people start rooting for Zeus who is defending the world from Kratos. Not mention even on the individual level, Kratos has Kick the Dog moments that fans found more horrifying than what Zeus did.
  • So Okay, It's Average: God of War: Ascension, compared to its predecessors, is get mixed to mostly positive reviews.
  • Shocking Swerve: Chains Of Olympus builds up Morpheus as the villain for most of the game, then you meet Persephone, and five minutes later, out of nowhere it's revealed that she's behind everything.
  • Squick:
    • The sacrifices in the second game.
    • The fight with Kronos in the third game has Kratos slashing open blisters and ripping out fingernails. Not to mention slicing open his stomach - allowing the guts to start falling out - and driving a crystal shaft through his chin.
  • That One Boss: The series has a handful of these, but the final fight in the original game against the eponymous God of War is a nightmare on any difficulty other than medium, plus it's a two-parter with an extremely difficult War of the Clones wedged in between. Pure evil.
    • The War of the Clones part deserves elaboration. You're fighting a Battle in the Center of the Mind against Kratos doppelgangers who are trying to kill your wife and daughter. You can restore their health by hugging them to transfer your health to them, but that leaves you vulnerable to attacks which will also damage your family. At any given time, there are seven clones on-screen, and they respawn a LOT. If you get hit by any one of them, it breaks your combo. If you get grappled or knocked down even once, it wastes precious seconds, during which the clones quickly slaughter your family. Even on normal difficulty its easy to lose this fight if you're not paying attention to Kratos' family's health bar. On God mode it's nearly impossible.
    • God of War II. First Titan-mode rock minotaur? Not much of a problem. Number 2? A resilient boss with few openings AND infinite respawning harpies that can 3 shot KO you on titan. There's a reason most guides for this fight use the phrase, "metric assload of luck" liberally.
    • Theseus on Titan, who serves as a huge difficulty spike, even compared to the Nintendo Hard opening act. He can combo Kratos to Hades and back in his first form, proving to be more of an unpredictable opponent than the Mooks you've been facing so far. And then comes his second form, where he starts spamming projectiles at you from safety, starts summoning two Minotaurs at once to fight you at the same time, and causing large crystal spikes to pop up from the floor which, on Titan, one-shot you. Add all of this on top of the fact that the only way to hurt him in his second form is to shoot him with your incredibly weak bow. And your magic is limited, so the only way to restock it is to run around dodging attacks and killing the Minotaur for blue magic orbs. And it'll take several cycles of this before you even get the chance to finish him off. If you die, you go back to the first form. He also gets a cheap shot that wipes half your health if you're not blocking when you choose Restart. Have fun.
    • The Cerberus Breeder in God of War III. He spits out kamikaze dogs at you that explode. Sure you can kick them back at him but they don't do a lot of damage. What makes it worse is the Satyr Generals that come to back it up after each time you take off one of its heads. On harder difficulties, you need to turn dodging and blocking into an art form to survive.
  • That One Level:
    • Hades from the first God of War is a rare That One Level that's actually Hell.
      • There's very little combat, and Kratos has to carefully tiptoe across long, rotating beams with blades. Getting hit by said blades will send Kratos straight into a Bottomless Pit. And once you manage to make it across those, there's the same thing, vertically. It's not quite as bad, since getting hit by the blades doesn't instantly kill you, but it does send you all the way back down to the bottom. This level wasn't actually tested before the game was shipped.
      • Hades felt like Filler and raised some serious Fridge Logic issues regarding Kratos' suicide.
      • The extras disc for God of War II reveal that the Hades level was the only one that wasn't play tested, hence the difficulty.
    • Some people find every obstacle course and puzzle sequence in that game to be an irritating sequence. They worked fine and all, but they were damn hard/annoying. Especially outrunning those spike walls, and dragging that cage up the mountain.
      • The worst was where you had to move a box along a floor in a certain time limit, or else spikes would come out of the floor and instantly kill you. Even some players declare this level even harder than the above Hades sections.
      • The above was lampshaded in the Collection edition with the achievement: "Kickboxer"
    • The first God of War also had one major Scrappy combat section: a confrontation with three Cyclopses early in the Athens Town Square map. On easier difficulties it's merely annoying, but on Hard and Very Hard, it becomes ridiculously frustrating and unfair, unlike the rest of the game which is hard but fair.
    • The "final" final boss fight in the original God Of War is a nightmare. You are stripped of your weapons and magic and given a thoroughly useless one which appends unnecessary flourishes to everything, whilst fighting a boss who hits fast and hits hard.
    • In God of War II, there's the part where you have to protect the Translator. It basically involves carrying around the ultimate Squishy Wizard on your back and trying to protect him from the game's most frustrating Demonic Spiders, the Satyrs and the Minotaur Priests, enemies you would be lucky enough to survive against yourself! It's only moderately difficult on some of the more human difficulty levels, but on Titan, it can be seemingly impossible. If you haven't upgraded just right up until this point (usually by exploiting infinite respawn and / or magic areas for experience orbs), you could be stuck in an Unwinnable situation. To add insult to injury, you can totally see the final boss lair from the balcony!!! At least when / if you ever get past this part, you immediately get to smash the fragile little bastard's face into a book to vent your frustrations.
      • That translator, especially on Titan mode. You have to carry his lazy ass across a narrow bridge while enemies attack you. You can't attack back while you're carrying him, so you have to drop him to deal with the enemies, whereupon the enemies will target him. He just kneels there and prays instead of, you know, running for cover or getting out of the way. When you finally get him to the book he's supposed to translate, you have to protect him from multiple waves of powerful enemies before he can read it. Your most effective attack (the grab-and-throw) is neutered as well, because if you accidentally hit the translator with a thrown enemy, you take off half his life bar. At no point does the stupid bastard make any attempt to preserve his own life, even though he keeps whining that he doesn't want to die. All this makes it very satisfying at the end of the mission when you smash his face into the book for a blood sacrifice.
    • On Titan Mode, every part of the game that's merely tedious turns into That One Level/Boss. One notable example is at the end of the first Pegasus segment, right after the prologue. The Dark Rider portion, specifically: he traps you in a draft and shoots bursts of dark magic at you that you have to dodge, the last of which is unavoidable and ends up railroading Kratos into the next section of the game. The problem is that now, each hit takes off over half of your life bar, so you have to avoid everything up to this point or you're dead. The only problem is figuring out how to dodge THAT DAMN PENULTIMATE DARK BURST! Even when you go on the opposite side of the draft from where it'd logically hit you, you still get damaged by it!
    • By itself, one of the late-game sections is tedious. You're basically grabbing the chains in a pillar and pulling them to make the elevator move down, but a ways down, the ceilings sprouts spikes and starts coming down, so it turns into a race to get to the bottom and open the door before you're impaled and crushed. Problem is, the skeletons you saw just lying on the ground since you entered start coming to life and attacking you. Not only do you have to keep them off of you while you move the elevator (which is easy enough with a cast of Cronos' Rage), but the skeletons will occasionally grab hold of the gears actually moving the elevator and stop them entirely, so you have to stop and kill them anyway. The whole thing is more tense than anything.
    • And of course, who could forget the gauntlet of enemies preceding Clotho's Chamber in the end game? Little-to-no health/magic recovery from beginning to end, and you have to face several rounds of almost every enemy you've ever seen in the game, from Satyrs to Cyclopes. A tough slog through wave after wave of enemies as you make your way down the corridor, with only one pair of refilling chests halfway through, and finishing up with a pair of Cyclopes in tight quarters. Oh, and no checkpoints. So if you die, you have to do the whole thing again. Hope you mastered using The Golden Fleece, or you're not walking out of this with minimal damage.
    • The Cavern from God of War III. You're on a moving platform in the form of a giant box held up by a chain. The basic minions attacking aren't difficult, but then two minotaur appear, determined to break the chain, which is followed by another mook rush. Followed by two more with archers sniping at you. More mooks follow, and then SEVERAL more attack. And if you fail at any point, you have to start over.
    • The Trials of Archimedes from God of War: Ascension is another contender. Basically you must endure three waves, each with powerful enemies consisting of lightning sirens, gorgons, harpies and other powerful enemies. The real kicker is that there is little to no health powerups and if you die, you have to start from the first wave all over again. It becomes so bad that a patch is later released so that you regain health and magic for each waves cleared.
  • Values Dissonance: Even before going off the deep end in the sequels, Kratos is very morally reprehensible by our standards. But to Ancient Greeks, he would've been hailed as a mighty warrior, to Spartans a legendary hero. The first game in the series could very well have been an actual Greek mythical tale, and nobody of that time would have batted an eye.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • In Chains of Olympus, you have to find Helios, the sun god, and restore him to the sky to fend off the assault of Morpheus. Not only do you not fight Morpheus in the game, but it turns out the real Big Bad is Persephone, and Morpheus just took advantage of Helios' disappearance without ever knowing why the sun vanished.
    • Typhon In II could have made for some much more of an epic boss fight, an instead he's just a lame giant that barely attacks you.
    • II spends far more time setting up for the encounter with the Sisters of Fate than it does building up to Kratos fighting Zeus, yet the game itself largely treats them as stepping stones when they could have easily worked as the main villains considering they are effectively responsible for everything that's happened to him in his life.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Poseidon in III may well be the most visually spectacular boss in gaming history.
  • The Woobie:

Alternative Title(s): God Of War

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/GodOfWarSeries?from=YMMV.GodOfWar