YMMV: Frankenweenie

  • Ass Pull: It's one thing to use the power of lightning to bring back a dead dog and a dead hamster to life, or even bring back the soul of a dead fish while vaporizing its body. But turning cereal monsters into mischievous gremlins, an alive cat holding a dead bat into a winged vampire cat, a dead rat into a much bigger wererat, and especially an average turtle into a freaking Godzilla monster?
  • Award Snub: Losing to Brave at the Golden Globes and Oscars.
  • Broken Base: Despite the positive critical reception, most moviegoers seem split on this movie. Is it a return to form for Tim Burton and his best movie in years or an unnecessary padded-out example of style over substance? Or both?
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Nassor, apparently.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Mr. Whiskers.
    • Colossus, especially seeing as he only has a few seconds of screen time.
    • Mr. Rzykruski, in all his glorious hamminess.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: It's okay to be "weird" — as long as it's the right kind of weird.
    • Also, you don't need to accept death as a reality — you can always just reanimate your lost loved one.
      • Perhaps a Fantastic Aesop. You should be prepared to accept death and let go of loved ones, but if you're capable of re-animating the dead, go right ahead!
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Would you believe that the original short is what got Tim Burton fired from Disney?
  • I Am Not Shazam: The dog's name is "Sparky" and the owner's name is "Frankenstein." There's no "weenie" in the movie.
  • Marty Stu: Victor. May make sense, since he's sort of a Tim Burton expy.
  • Stoic Woobie: Victor.
  • Ugly Cute: Sparky.
    • Some consider Edgar to be this.
    • Creepy Cute: Some think this of Weird Girl.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: An Animated Adaptation of a short film that Tim Burton made back in 1984, has some very horrifying, violent, and disturbing scenes. Yes, that is expected in a Tim Burton movie, but none of his other animated films are anywhere near as violent as this one. And it got a PG rating from the MPAA, and is being marketed toward kids at Subway through mainly making it about A boy and his undead dog.
  • The Woobie: Admit it, you felt bad for Victor at least once.