YMMV / Final Fantasy XII

  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Is Vayne a pro-active patriot doing what he needs to do to secure Archadia's future and free mankind from the control of Occuria, or is he a power-hungry autocrat out for world domination and willing to get rid of anyone or anything in his way? In the same stroke, did he kill Gramis to seize power and have pretense to dissolve the Senate that would have opposed him, or did he take drastic actions to stabilize Archadia's uneasy political climate in the face of impending war?
      • On the same note, carefully analyze the scene where Vayne and Gramis talk, the last we see of either of them not long before Gramis' death. One could take their interactions to imply Gramis knows Vayne will kill him and frame the Senate for it. Heck, we never see the end of the conversation — what if it was even his idea? After all, Gramis knows he's sick and dying anyway, he hates the Senate as much as Vayne does, and he agrees with Vayne that he should be the next Emperor. A plot to stage his own "murder" in order to get rid of House Solidor's enemies isn't entirely out of the realm of possibility.
      • Also on the same note, Vayne telling to his dead father "And so House Solidor lives on.", which is a Meaningful Echo of Gramis' own words. Is this a proof that, as mentioned above, Gramis' murder and framing the Senate for it were actually a plan devised by both Vayne and his father to secure the power of House Solidor? If not, was Vayne showing remorse for killing his father? Or was he only trying to keep up appearances?
    • On the subject of the Occuria, are they Well-Intentioned Extremist Gods who wanted what was best for mankind or royally Jerkass Gods who wanted to abuse their power over mankind and continue to keep them on a tight leash?
  • Angst? What Angst?: Let's recap, Basch's mother died, his brother turned to the Arcadians and framed him for regicide so the world thinks he's a long-dead traitor, he's had two countries he tried to defend conquered, everyone he swore oaths to protect are dead or in hiding, and he's been locked up for two years in Nalbina as a potential political pawn while Gabranth visits him to taunt him about his failures. While he's certainly carrying the burdens of these events, you can count on one hand the times the guy actually visibly mopes about them.
    • One could argue he focuses heavily on his duty to protect Ashe because he'd go insane otherwise. In doing so, he can't afford to show basically any emotion whatsoever, leading to this trope.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: Westerners despise Vaan. But in Japan, fan demand and outcry was so intense that he made it into Dissidia 012 as XII's representative hero.
  • Broken Base: Points of contention are the shift from turn-based to real-time combat, the removal of random encounters, the story, and the characters (especially Vaan, see above trope). While the gameplay shift is a matter of opinion, critics of the story claim there is no story and the party's efforts are largely a waste of time, while supporters note the story is just told more subtly than previous entries, and is one of political intrigue and moral ambiguity. The characters, either most of the cast are utter badasses with deep characters, or they're shallow and undefined.
    • The Gambit system itself is fairly divise for being too intuitive. Even a decent setup allows you to essentially run the game on auto-pilot. Some players love the sheer control and customization this offers, especially given usual party AI is such a crapshoot. While others feel it's a Scrappy Mechanic that bogs down the game.
  • Complete Monster: Judge Bergan is a ruthless, cruel man who decides, on a whim, to slaughter half the population of Mt. Bur-Omisace, including Gran Kiltias, who the in-game equivalent to The Pope. He enjoys killing anyone who would stand between him and his goals, including his ally, Judge Drace. His ultimate goal is to dominate everything with sheer physical might, no matter what happens to anyone else.
  • Contested Sequel: More so than most, and to a greater degree among the fandom than the critics— primarily due to the battle system and what some view as a lack of story,while others view it as more subtle.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: It's Final Fantasy!
  • Demonic Spiders: Scads of them.
    • The Abysteels from the Henne Mines, the highest-level bats in the game. Seriously, those things will bite you in half. The good part is, they give so much XP that the sections they appear in are ideal to grind to level 99.
    • The Baknamies from Nabudis. Their physical attacks hit damn hard for their level, they can use Fangs for elemental attacks on par with level 2 spells, parry too much for their own good, and when you find one two or three more tend to manifest nearby to gang up on you. It doesn't help that you can get to their territory completely by accident while at 10-15 levels below what the area requires.
    • Entites and Elementals. Most areas have one that appears and is entirely docile, they just float around casting buffing spells on themselves. But if something casts a magic spell in range of them, they go ballistic; they cast Silencega and Sleepga to incapacitate your party, Fearga to drain MP, Dispelga to remove your buffs, and they spam Level 3 magic attacks like Firaga, Thundaga, Aeroga, Darkga, etc. They also pack a lot of HP, are immune to all but one type of elemental damage, and they have a lot of passive Augments that afford them defensive buffs, immunity to most statuses and Technicks, Piercing Magick (spells ignore Reflect), and also cause them to deal counter damage anyone who attacks them. Elementals are less Demonic than Entites (lower HP, fewer Augments, weaker spells), but they'll still probably kill you if you provoke one unawares.
  • Ending Fatigue: It just drags before the end. This is not helped by the Pharos being one of the longest obligatory dungeons in the series, and before that the trek to and through Giruvegan and the Great Crystal also being very long.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Balthier seems to be the Breakout Character out of the main cast.
    • Larsa is extremely polite, tries to end his brother's war, and eventually has enough of Vayne's evil and stands against him. The infinite supply of potions that he carries as a guest definitely helps.
    • Al-Cid looks awesome and is extremely good-looking. He's brutally honest but not a dick about it, and serves as the sole representative from Rozarria, in addition to also attempting to press for peace. Being called "Al-Cid" also might have had fans declaring him the Cid of the game (Word of God is that it's Dr. Cid).
  • Evil Is Cool: The Archadian Judges wear plate mail with black capes and all wield a Double Weapon that can split apart so they can Dual Wield, Dr. Cid is a Large Ham Mad Scientist armed with BFGs, and Vayne is a Magnificent Bastard that single-handed causes a world war so he has pretense to conquer it, and fights the party using nothing but his bare hands and sheer willpower to bend reality. Then he goes One-Winged Angel and becomes a giant cyborg humanoid Bahamut with a BFS and BFG. Let's face it, we wish we could play as the Archadians in this game.note 
  • Fandom Berserk Button: No, Vaan's last name is not Ratsbane, "Vaan Ratsbane" is just a nickname Dalan gave him because he spends most of his time in the waterway fighting rats to train. No other character including Vaan himself ever calls him that.
  • Game Breaker:
    • Abusing a semi-exploit to spawn the rare monster Dustia repeatedly can bring your level to insane heights before you enter the Giza Plains. Most areas in FFXII are blocked off by Beef Gate, and the Dustia trick can allow you to increase your power even further with steals and rare drops from monsters you have no right to be able to fight. Among the crazy pieces of equipment you can get:
    • You can get the most powerful weapon in the game, the Zodiac Spear, as soon as you get the Dawn Shard. That's less than a quarter of the way through the game. It does take a lot of level grinding to survive the trip to its location (and even then you have to flee your way through the areas because attempting to fight the enemies would not go well at all), but once you have the spear, the rest of the game becomes ridiculously easy until near the end.
    • The Nihopalaoa, an accessory that when equipped causes all recovery items used by the character to have the opposite effect, can be this. Against several marks and bosses (an infamous example being Judge Bergan), throwing a remedy with it equipped will completely incapacitate the enemy by inflicting them with every single status effect they are vulnerable to, allowing you to hack and slash at them with no consequences. Against any mooks vulnerable to instant death, throwing a phoenix down will kill them instantly and has no chance of failing like an ordinary Death spell.
    • Quickenings (the game's equivalent of limit breaks/overdrives) can be this. You can easily get them early on and if you have atleast three people in your party they can be used to insta-kill most bosses for a large chunk of the game, made worse by the fact that you can use them the moment the boss shows up rather than having special trigger conditions like limit breaks in previous games. On top of that, If you get access to all 3 quickenings for a character, it TRIPLES their MP, allowing them to have a seemingly endless supply of spells.
    • Masamune + Genji Gloves + Buffs = You pretty much made weapons obsolete.
    • Reverse. Having it on an auto-cast Gambit means that any enemy that isn't Ultima will hit you with Healing Shivs, and their attacks won't have any knockback. Combine it with Bubble, and even if a powerful enemy manages to sneak a hit in while Reverse's not running, the fighter can tank it easily and subsequent strikes will heal them back up to full anyway. After the spell becomes available, only three or four battles require a change in strategy, and even then only against bosses; mooks stand no chance.
    • Bubble. If you can already kick ass with normal health, imagine how easy it gets with DOUBLE that.
  • Genius Bonus: The Occuria speak in iambic tetrameter. The rebel of their number speaks in iambic pentameter. This may be a reference to Shakespeare's Macbeth, in which the Witches speak trochaic tetrameter (four feet, alternating stress, starting with a stressed syllable) to help illustrate their otherworldly nature.
    • Giruvegan has other examples, especially one at the very end of the map - the Way Stone which teleports you to the Occuria's realm is described as "Empyrean", which, either as either a noun or an adjective, refers to the sky or heavens. Any time after the storyline event, that same device becomes "Tellurian", which is an adjective meaning "of or relating to, or inhabiting the earth." Fridge Brilliance kicks in when you see where it takes you.
  • Goddamned Bats: Anything if you're far enough above their level. Level 5 enemies will continue to throw themselves at your Level 50 party as you backtrack through areas in search of rare game and treasure. Fortunately you can hold R2 or turn off Gambits to ignore them, and most enemies give up and run away after you leave their zone of aggression.
  • Goddamned Boss:
    • The Trickster mark isn't particularly difficult, especially if you put it off until later in the game like any mark can be. The catch is getting it to hold still because it continually runs around the area leaving your party to run after it and get in a single hit as it turns and comes back.
    • Any boss that uses palings, which make them immune to magick or physical damage for a considerable duration. Almost invariably the bosses that use them throw them up at critical health, making the last portion of the fight drag as you're forced to change your strategy.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • A certain undead rare enemy that is in an area accessible very early in the game can be killed continuously with one Phoenix Down and made to respawn by leaving the area before the EXP numbers appear from the defeated enemy. This can be used to level up Vaan (who is the only character at this point in the game) very quickly, as well as make a lot of money from its item drops.
    • Using the Break spell on enemies in certain areas can cause them to respawn indefinitely, leading to power-leveling and making a lot of money.
    • Using Break also lets you avoid breaking your chain-level when an enemy of the wrong type butts its head into your killing spree.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Vayne Solidor. His various coups are at the heart of the story, and even in death he managed to free mankind from the Occuria.
    • Vayne's partner in crime or Woman/Man Behind Him, Venat, also qualifies. Freeing humanity from the Occuria? It was Venat's goal all along, and he/she succeeded in it, even if not exactly in the way he/she wanted.
    • Gramis Solidor may be, depending on Alternate Character Interpretation, if you believe that he planned his own death with his son Vayne in order to frame the Senate for it and secure the power of House Solidor.
  • Memetic Mutation: "I'm Captain Basch fon Ronsenberg, of Dalmasca!" "Don't believe Ondore's lies!"
    • "I play the leading man, who else?"
    • "I know something of cages."
    • "A TRIAL FOR ASHELIA B'NARGIN DALMASCA!"
  • Moral Event Horizon: Judge Bergan's ruthless massacre on Mt Bur-Omisace — he kills civilians, refugees, and even the Gran Kiltias Anastasias. Partly to assert his and Vayne's strength, and partly because he can. Though it's somewhat implied that he was being possessed by Venat (to strengthen Ashe's resolve against the Empire), so YMMV.
  • Most Annoying Sound: Although the voice acting is generally superb, 'Marquis' is regularly and consistently mispronounced by every character that utters it, and it gets to be pretty grating.
    • Though considering the quality of the script, how specific this "mistake" is, and that the pronunciation used in the game is an accepted way of pronouncing the title, it's more likely a stylistic choice than an actual error.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • Zalera's Evil Laugh. Unless you're on the receiving end.
    • The iconic Victory Fanfare, which is reserved for major bosses this time around.
  • Nightmare Fuel: There is an Optional Demon Wall boss, which is much stronger and just difficult to beat altogether in case the last Demon Wall boss bored you, with very little time in store. If you haven't finished this Demon Wall before the time runs out, it'll give you a terrifying Game Over by crushing your party into the giant wall behind them. The way the game decides to show the player this scene is just plain freaky as well; the screen will cut to the other side of the wall, so you can't see what's happening on the side with your characters and the boss, and said wall shakes once the Demon Wall slams your party toward it, finishing off with a black fade.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Judge Drace, who stars in exactly one heart-wrenching Tear Jerker of a scene.
  • Padding: A common criticism of the game. Not only does the middle act between Raithwall's Tomb and Archadia drag, but the developers dragged it out longer than it needed to be. First you cross the Giza Plains to the Ozmone Plains to reach the Jahara, only to find out the reason you went there is pointless. Fortunately you have a new plan that needs you to head to Mt. Bur-Omisace. So you backtrack over the Ozmone Plains, enter the Golmore Jungle, and find your path blocked, to clear the way head back to the Ozmone Plains and complete the Henne Mines dungeon. Traverse the jungle, traverse the Paramina Rift, and welcome to Mt. Bur-Omisace, where it turns out once again, your reason for coming is rendered pointless. You then get to get to head south through the Rift to the Stilshrine of Miriam dungeon, head back to Mt. Bur-Omisace, fight a boss, and finally get to head to Archadia. Your path to Archadia takes you through the Dalmasca Estersand, Mosphoran Highway, Salikawood, Phon Coast, Tchita Uplands, and finally the Sochen Cave Palace dungeon to get into Archadia. But don't celebrate yet, because before you can get to your destination in the city, you need to do a tedious sidequest, and your destination is yet again another dungeon. And at the end of that dungeon, your target escapes, once again rendering your quest pointless. By this point one must look back at the last 10-15 hours of gameplay and wonder if they've actually accomplished anything.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: As the game has no Official Couple, there's a bit of inconsistent Ship Tease.
    • Vaan and Penelo are introduced acting very much Like Brother and Sister - Vaan and his brother having been raised by Penelo's family. Likewise Penelo's role is almost like The Not-Love Interest to him. But the end has a line from Penelo - "every sky pirate needs a partner" - which hints that there could be a romance between them.
    • Fran and Balthier isn't helped by the latter being The Charmer and The Casanova. But many of Balthier's Pet the Dog moments involve Fran, and she makes a throwaway comment in the sequel about him trying to woo her.
    • Penelo's letter to Larsa at the end has a curiously worded line about how Ashe misses Basch - the wording implying it could be romantic rather than platonic.
    • There's even some between Vaan and Ashe, given that their first meeting has him catching her when she falls. And most of Ashe's Defrosting Ice Queen moments involve Vaan in some way.
  • The Scrappy: Vaan. A stereotypical RPG hero who doesn't have much of anything to do with the actual plot, which means he takes time from other more popular characters.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • AI party members hold still when charging spells, thus if you try to move through an area while gambits for your party members to cast spells are active, they'll get spread out behind you and have to run to catch up. Characters can move while charging spells, they only need to hold still once they actually cast the spell, but the AI still stays put.
    • No one likes the Chops sidequest in Archades. For some reason pieces of wood are considered a status symbol in Archades, and people tend to pass around chops as thanks for aid, so you have to do enough good deeds to earn enough chops to take the air cab, which will refuse to take you anywhere without chops. Thus you have to run back and forth talking to people, relaying specific messages to specific people, getting chops in thanks. With a guide it can still take half an hour, and without a guide it'll probably take double that time, since it's often counter-intuitive to figure out which messages have to be relayed to whom.
    • The way treasure boxes are coded sparks a lot of ire from people once they figure out (or are told) how it works (random contents, some chests make others disappear, some randomly don't appear). This is the source of the infamous "Zodiac Spear" problem. In addition, the Bazaar (where loot obtained from enemies is sold to produce packages full of discounted or unique items) is no one's friend as well. Both of these systems hide all the relevant information from the player, and actively attempt to fool the player into making the wrong choices. The exact systems are too complicated to explain here, but here is a useful writeup that explains the most important information.
    • Effect Capacity. Every action save for normal attacks and some enemy-exclusive Technicks has a hidden value of 1, 2, 4, or 8 Effect Capacity. Effect Capacity basically determines how many actions can be used at once: if enough actions are being taken that the Capacity hits 8, no other actions with Capacity can be performed. Say the enemy is casting Flare or some other end-game spell with 8 Capacity by itself; your party members cannot cast spells or use items until Flare's animation ends. While this was ostensibly done to limit how many attacks animate at once to ease strain on the PS2's hardware, the developers rather obviously use it to introduce some Fake Difficulty, as spells and items with every simple animations have high Capacities. In the late game thanks to this mechanic, get used to seeing party members charge spells, and then sit there doing nothing for several seconds while they wait for someone else's spell to finish casting. It also makes enemies with Level 3 spells deceptively difficult, as one of them casting something like Darkga can lock your party from using healing spells and items while the enemy's friends keep attacking you normally.
  • Sidetracked By The Golden Saucer: Tracking down Marks and Rare Game can be very time-consuming, but it's entirely optional.
  • Spiritual Licensee: There have been many comparisons to Star Wars.
  • Squick: Guess where Cúchulainn, the Esper of Poison and Filth, is found? The Garamsythe Waterway... as in the sewer/aquaduct system for a major Ivalician city. Eeew...
  • That One Attack:
    • Zodiark's Darkja. Not only does it do heavy Dark-elemental damage to the entire party, and is a cinematic attack so it cannot be avoided or interrupted, but it has a chance to inflict Instant Death. Unfortunately, this is one of the few times in the series where there is no equipment piece to block Death attacks! Shell lowers the chance for Instant Death to take effect, but it can't block it entirely, and even if you survive you're taking damage and probably being inflicted with Blind, which Darkja also inflicts. Zodiark opens the fight with it, uses it periodically, and when he's low on HP begins to spam it constantly. In summary, Zodiark's Signature Move lets him inflict a Total Party Kill, and there's very little you can do to stop it.
    • "Curse" for normal enemies and some bosses. Inflicts Confuse, Poison, Sap and Disease on all characters at the same time. Many Game Over screens were seen when trying to get to the last of the Pharos' Subterranean Levels, where there's a chance that an enemy which has this ability will rise from the corpse of a recently slain foe.
  • That One Boss: Demon Wall, Tiamat and the Elder Wyrm.
    • Demon Wall will use Blindga to Blind all your party members, Annul to sap their MP to 0, Telega to instantly kill them and render them unable to be revived until the battle is over, and will Silence them and put to them Sleep. The real challenge comes from the fact it's a timed battle; the Demon Wall slowly advances down the path pushing your party to the rear wall, and if you can't kill it before it crushes you, it's an instant Game Over.
    • Tiamat will use Breath to damage over a wide area and inflict Sap, cast Reflect on itself, and most damning of all, it can use Disablega, which will inflict Disable on all characters in range, preventing them from taking any action. Tiamat will teach players who don't spread out their characters to do so, because getting the whole party caught in Disablega is pretty much a death sentence.
    • The Elder Wyrm can inflict a slew of status ailments, including Slow, Confuse, Sleep, Sap, and Oil, the latter of which boosts the damage its Fireball attack does. It also inflicts these statuses with its cinematic attack, Sporefall, which cannot be interrupted and hits over a large area. The Wyrm also has quite a lot more HP than other bosses up to that point, over 70,000, when the next several bosses in the areas after it have about half that. Some walkthroughs actually advise players head south through the Jungle to get to the Paramina Rift through the Feywood, because dealing with the Beef Gate enemies in the Feywood is easier than fighting the Elder Wyrm.
  • That One Level:
    • Giruvegan and the Great Crystal. The former is a long Magical Mystery Doors puzzle full of powerful enemies leading up to a boss. The latter is also a Magical Mystery Doors puzzle full of powerful enemies leading up to a boss, except this time the area is larger, has a very confusing layout and no map, and the Mystery Doors have time limits.
    • Pharos, which isn't the final dungeon but might as well be. It's a hundred-floor tall tower with several bosses along its length, a lot of puzzles and gimmick-based areas to get through, and naturally is full of the most powerful enemies in the game up to that point.
  • That One Sidequest: Some of the Hunts can be very difficult.
    • The Shadowseer mark, which requires you to venture into the Subterra optional dungeon. The area is a three-floor Blackout Basement level where you not only need to navigate darkened rooms that all look the same, but it has lots of strong enemies. To proceed to the lower floors you need to collect special "black orbs" that only appear in this dungeon and place them in altars. These orbs are randomly dropped by enemies, and thus you need to patrol each floor fighting and hoping the enemies drop more orbs until you have enough to continue. When you finally get to the bottom you of course have to fight Shadowseer, who fortunately is not one of those bosses that could be considered That One Boss, but he's still an irritating boss to fight due to an abuse of status-attacks and Fearga, which saps your MP to 0. As a saving grace, after completing each level of the Subterra, you can go back up and save.
    • The second round with Gilgamesh. He has a lot of HP, just shy of 475,000 to be precise, powerful cinematic attacks, buffs himself each time he pulls out a new weapon, will erect a paling when weak to become immune to damage for a period of time, and he and Enkidu hit hard with their normal attacks, doing well over 1000 damage, possibly over 2000. However, what really makes him this trope is that he comes with Lv 2 Sleep, Lv 3 Disable, and Lv 4 Break, the first two incapacitating your entire party if their levels are a multiple of 2 or 3, respectively. If their levels are a multiple of 2 or 3, and if you lack accessories to block Sleep and Disable, god help you. This is also not taking into account the player going out of their way to stall and steal the last two pieces of Genji Equipment, which you want to do because they are Lost Forever if you don't get them.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Naturally, the game being a Final Fantasy title is going to attract people hating it for any changes it brought. XII introduced a more streamlined battle system where enemies spawn on the map and engage you in real time rather than the game loading another screen to have the battle in. The gambit system also gathered hate from people who felt that the game "played itself" and took control away from the player, even though it's extremely rare that you can be in a situation where you don't have to do anything (outside of level grinding and fighting low leveled enemies). Some also hated how the story barely contributed to Character Development and focused more on the story's central themes rather than the characters behind the scenes.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Judge Drace, we hardly knew ye. It helps that she was one of the least antagonistic Judges.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Especially when compared to X, the facial expressions and body movements of the cast are quite fluid and realistic. However their faces look like they haven't slept in a couple days, or else they really need to wash their faces, and their eyes don't always look very natural.
    • The worst is the penultimate boss. Vayne Novus falls right into the Uncanny Valley, not only having a freakish looking face but also skin that looks like it's decaying right in front of the player. There were a couple players thinking "Kill it! Kill the demon!" at that almost Nightmare Fuel looking boss.
    • There's nothing wrong with the main characters' eyes. What do I mean? Zoom in on an NPC's face and you'll see that they didn't bother to let NPCs blink. Now's that unsettling.
    • Vaan's torso was rendered rather weirdly. Due to how Vaan's abs and chest were shaded, he looks like he is anorexic rather than in shape. Plus, his abs look more like they're drawn on him than anything else.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: The sheer amount of people that have confused Larsa for a girl is truly amazing. It doesn't help that his voice is a bit gender-neutral and he's initially introduced as "Lamont," not the most masculine name there is, so a couple hours later when players clue-in "wait, Vayne's brother?" they've probably been used to thinking of him as a girl. Another amusing (though unintentional) factor is that the Elite Mark Orthros, who only appears when the party is all-female, still comes out if Larsa is present. It's because Orthros is scripted to ignore Guests and most players just happen to go hunting it when Larsa is in the partynote , but still.
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Vaan's role is a Enforced Trope. Basch was originally going to be the viewpoint character but this changed in favor of a more Audience Surrogate approach. Thus, he has a minimal impact on the plot once the player leaves Nalbina Dungeon. Between Ashe's quest to retake her throne, Basch aiding her to atone for his failure to defend Dalmasca, and Balthier discovering the secrets of Cid's experiments and coming to terms with his past, Vaan is just along for the ride. It's Played for Laughs when he accuses Gabranth of murdering his brother Reks, and no one (including Gabranth) seems to even hear him because they're more concerned with Gabranth's murder of Ashe's father and why he's there now.
  • Villain Decay:
    • A rare one in game. Marilith, known by many as one of Final Fantasy's trademark four fiends, is mentioned in the bestiary as a flame spirit in bestiaries of yore, but modern bestiaries generally refer to it as a snake with a nasty bite.
    • Ba'Gamnan is so tough that you're recommended to run from him rather than fight him during your first encounter. It all goes downhill from there....
  • Vindicated by History: When the game came out, it suffered from the Broken Base from those who didn't like the widespread change. In recent years, thanks to the mature story that has been likened to Game of Thrones, people have grown to tolerate it more, similar to what has occurred to appreciation of FFVIII. It helps that Final Fantasy XIII took its place as the most controversial entry.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: To this day FFXII's aesthetics, which run on the now outdated PS2's graphics hardware, still hold up today as visually awesome thanks to a meticulous art direction.
  • The Woobie: Oh Larsa, you poor, poor thing. First, he gives a pretty trinket to a girl he seems to have a crush on, which turns out to be nethicite, which could have possessed or killed her. Then, his brother kills his father, and becomes a bloodthirsty dictator in search of power. This means Larsa to help kill his own brother for the greater good. Near the end of the story, while the other character are looking towards the sky in hopeful poses, Larsa is inside in the dark crying over Gabranth's nearly-dead body.
    • Whether or not Larsa remembers it is debatable, but Vayne also killed their two brothers as well.
  • Woolseyism: Thanks to the modern champion of the trope, Alexander O. Smith. The English script, as to be expected of the Ivalice spin-offs, is spectacular, with a distinctive cultural flare via the use of Old English sentence structure and words. The voice cast of the game also reflects the various cultures of the world, the different regions having particular accents, Archadians for example being British. The only complaint most people seem to have about the scripting and voice acting is the quality of the sound itself due to the compression done to fit it on the disc.
    • This trope serves to provide some clever Foreshadowing, that Balthier has a British accent...
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: Ashe's hot pink miniskirt-hotpants. Balthier's candy rings. Basch's potholder... just to name a few questionable fashion choices. Not to mention the Dalmascans' general proclivity for Stripperific gear when this is actually a horrible clothing choice for the desert. Sure, the world has a messed up environment because of Mist, so perhaps their deserts are not the same as Real Life deserts. Or maybe it's just the world's ready access to healing magic.

The manga adaptation provides examples of:

  • Crowning Moment of Awesome: Since the game showed us the events of the opening sequence from Reks' point of view, we now find out the game had an Offscreen Moment of Awesome: Basch didn't just run into the room and get captured while Gabranth walked in to pose as him. Basch tried to get the king to safety and had a duel with Gabranth in front of him. Even though the battle is a Foregone Conclusion, it is awesome.
  • Pandering to the Base: Characterizations are more in-line with the fandom's perception of the characters rather than how they are in-game (Vaan is an Idiot Hero, Balthier is a Chivalrous Pervert, Basch and Fran are total badasses), a lot more time is spent on the subplots concerning Vossler and Arcadia than the party's adventure, and most of the new or changed scenes exist to serve that purpose. The manga essentially foregoes being a faithful adaptation to instead focus on Rule of Cool and this trope.
  • Squick: The backlash of Ashe summoning Belias causes her right arm to rot off from the elbow down. We get to see it happen.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/FinalFantasyXII