YMMV / Dungeons & Dragons Online

  • Alt-itis: The extensive character customization and the number of paths you can take tends to encourage this in players.
  • Demonic Spiders: Kobold Shamans on elite mode know lightning bolt spells. And use them a lot. Failing a reflex save means bye-bye to half of your health if you're a fighter, or all of your health if you're a wizard. At higher levels, you meet beholders, one of the game's nastiest monsters who tend to repeatedly use a Disintegrate spell from their Eye Beams, which is likely to kill you in one shot as well as damage or destroy all of your costly equipment.
    • Monster Champions, monsters with crowns over their heads that deal significantly more damage, have far more HP, and gain extra benefits like Deathblock and damage reduction on top of that.
      • Some Elite monsters cause extra damage or add a damage-over-time effect every time they damage you. Combined with spells or abilities that cause damage multiple times at once such as Magic Missile, or monsters that attack very quickly, this can very quickly kill an insufficiently-protected player.
    • Taken Up to Eleven with Reapers, which can spawn in any quest that's on Reaper difficulty, hit even harder than the aforementioned Champions, have 50% incorporeality, and slow down their targets when they attack. Try to range them from far away, or from a high ledge they can't move to normally? They'll just warp right up to you.
  • Goddamn Bats: As in any game with this wide an array of monsters, these are common and varied.
    • Actual bats are extremely twitchy and hard to land a swing on without using the slower, less efficient auto-target or an AoE attack because of their habit of constantly circling a player. Spiders, to a lesser extent, love to leap past you trying to attack.
    • Rust monsters and oozes for melee fighters since both severely damage metal equipment that hits them, which is almost everything melee fighters use. Wooden weapons (for rust monsters only), Handwraps, Muckbane, Muck's Doom, or Everbright weapons are the only things that avoid this.
    • Any monster that can CC the player, because no matter how high your saves are you can always roll a one. There are a lot of these, including spellcasters who cast Daze, Hold, Hypnotize, (Ir)Resistible Dance, or Soundburst, monsters with (Improved) Trip, and things like Grease or Sleet Storm that create slippery ground and remove the ability to jump.
    • Archer enemies have higher than average hitpoints, lower than average damage, and like to pop up in places melee fighters can't easily get to them.
  • Heartwarming Moments: Gary Gygax, co-creator of the original Dungeons & Dragons game, actually narrated one quest arc, Delara's Tomb. After Gygax's death in 2008, the developers of DDO created an in-game memorial in Delara's graveyard (which includes a twenty-sided die on the stone memorial). A similar memorial appears in the Threnal quest chain for D&D co-creator Dave Arneson, who narrated that quest series.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: Poison has become this after Menace of the Underdark. It used to function much like it does in D&D 3.5 and was not a serious threat to a veteran adventurer, much like on the tabletop. However, with this expansion and its focus on drow and poison, they redesigned the Poison system completely so Poison can also deal hit point damage as well as ability damage and there are multiple poison types with various conditions and protections and different saving throws for each type based on what type it is. This has led to a great deal of frustration and confusion over how Poison actually works and what protects you from what, since there's no easy way to tell anymore.
    • Taking any amount of damage will interrupt any action, such as throwing a switch or opening a door. This can lead to times where you have to kill everything in the room just so you don't get interrupted by constant plinks for trivial amounts of damage.
  • That One Boss: Numerous examples.
    • Gnarkill, Troll Butcher in the Waterworks area is the first troll parties are likely to encounter. His regeneration combined with heavy damage-dealing capabilities make him difficult for parties that do not know to use fire or acid. Considering that flaming and acid weapons are not common at low levels (Perceptive people might notice the very helpful flame trap with a pressure pad on the right side of the room)...
    • First General Horoth in the Tower of Despair raid has around 2 million health, hits hard, and regains 20% of his health if a party member dies. He also has a move that will literally BANISH those not wearing Boots of Anchoring,them back to Stormreach, denying them completion of the raid and the resulting quest loot and will stun those who are for a short time.
    • Also in the Tower of Despair, the Shadowmaster is not a very strong foe by himself, but has minions that attack during the fight and deal around 300 cold damage just by being near you. If they are not kited properly, they will quickly wipe the raid.
    • The Black Abbot, raid boss of the Ascension Chamber, is a powerful spellcaster with 400-damage disintegrates, a move that sets the arena on fire and drains the casters' mana, a move that traps one person, deals damage, and drains their mana, and can summon invisible enemies that, you guessed it, drain mana. In addition, the battle takes place on a platform floating on a lake of death. Oh, and you need to complete puzzles to finish him off.
    • The Lord of Blades. He is a handful on the lowest available difficulty setting and harder than hard on Epic. On Normal, he has ~200k hitpoints (about as much as several raid bosses have on Epic), 80% fortification with a such a massive fortitude save that he is pretty much sunder proof, has several devastating AOE attacks which are capable of instantly killing almost any character if you do not evade them (requiring twitch skills), and the fight goes in several phases which involve periodically clearing minibosses while still enduring LOB's powerful attacks.
  • That One Dungeon:
    • "Proof is in the Poison" is very much a nightmare for any low-level party that does not know what they're doing, mainly due to the many casters in the dungeon that like to throw nasty spells on you. The Quickfoot Caster ambush on the bridge at the beginning has led to many a Total Party Kill.
      • Also, there are 3 rooms almost completely filled with acid, and you either need to navigate across pipes on the ceiling or jump on small platforms to the other side to pull a lever, causing walls to go up IN THE POOL, making it so you need to return a certain way.. Also, there's a room with acid in front of the staircases, as well as an earlier room where you will likely need to walk across a pool of acid, so your hireling will probably walk into the acid, killing him/herself.
      • The third pool of acid has spinning blades in it.
    • "Kobold Assault" gets this for being the first Challenge Dungeon most players meet, It's a massive Zerg Rush of Kobolds, including their spellcasters. You have one rest shrine. It is also out in the open, this tends to involve players getting hopelessly overwhelmed even on casual.
    • "In The Demon's Den" on elite difficulty. A base level 18 quest, you must kite an invincible six-armed 30-CR red name boss while wearing down and simultaneously killing three other 29-CR red name bosses just to remove the first one's invincibility. Even worse, dispels are going to hit you left and right, so spells like Haste and Greater Heroism can't help you. Nowadays, six level 20's with strong builds and maxed epic destinies can expect to breeze right through. Back when it was first releasednote , or with weaker groups who are expecting difficulty comparable to other level 18's, this quest will murder you.
    • The entire Threnal adventure pack, not for its difficulty but for its hair-pulling frustration - It blends Guide Dang It!, Escort Mission, and Goddamned Bats in equal proportions on top of being incredibly long and not particularly worthwhile except for the end rewards. What makes this quest chain so bad? For starters it's extremely long, having three quest arcs of three quests each to finish it, and those quests are not short (except for, ironically, the finale), not worth a lot of experience, and don't have great loot apart from the reward for finishing the whole nine-quest arc. Of those nine quests, three of them are escort quests where you have to lead NPCs around or protect them, or both. Two more of those quests involve hunting down keys in a winding network of tunnels unless you have a lockpicker, and one of them requires you to shoot a target lever at the very end when you're most likely to have run out of ammunition (and unlike in quests produced or retouched later, none is provided). Assuming any of you were carrying a ranged weapon in the first place. And if you're solo, it's possible the quest might reset while you're leaving to get one, making you do the whole thing over. The quests are a melee fighter's nightmare on top of all that, featuring monsters with high damage reduction you probably can't overcome at the recommended level as well as tons of weapon-destroying oozes and rust monsters in addition to aforementioned target lever. Later on you'll begin to find beholders, including a CR 17 elder beholder (in a level 9 quest on Normal!), which can nullify all your buffs or even kill you instantly. If that weren't enough, it's also possible to bug out the quest-givers, forcing you to repeat parts you've already done unless you speak to the right people in the right order.
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