YMMV: Downton Abbey


  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Isobel Crawley in the 2012 Christmas special. Interpretation 1: She literally had no idea what Dr Clarkson was getting at. Interpretation 2: She knew exactly what Dr Clarkson was getting at, but pretended she didn't because she didn't want to upset the status quo and/or she's really not interested. Which of these is true remains to be seen.
    • Did Thomas hate the nanny's attitude? Or did he get rid of her because he was genuinely concerned for the children (especially baby Sybbie)?
    • Did Rose really care about Jack, or was it all just about shocking her mother?
    • Given Elizabeth McGovern's spacey performance in the last few episodes of season 4, some fans suspect Cora has turned to drugs to dull the pain of losing Sybil.
    • Susan MacClare: On her initial appearance, she can be viewed as either a needlessly cruel mother or more sympathetically as a troubled woman who was forced in an unhappy marriage to a man that never wanted her. By season 5, however, she has descended into cartoonish villainy.
  • Arc Fatigue: Bates and his various murder plots. Many fans are now clamoring for him to just be revealed as a psychotic serial killer.
  • Ass Pull: In the 2014 Christmas episode, the revelation that Anna was sexually abused by her stepfather as a child came completely out of left field. It appeared to have been weaved into an otherwise credible (although previously non-existent) backstory, and all for the purpose of strengthening the prosecution's case against her, which barely had a leg to stand on otherwise.
    • Mrs. Hughes' sudden backstory has a distinct whiff of this as well, which seems to have been added to generate some conflict to push the proposal to the end of the episode. Although she did mention once in one episode that she had a sister who lived in Lancashire, we've never been given any more details about her or been led to believe that she had this financial millstone around her neck the whole time, especially given Fellowes' particularly heavy-handed brand of foreshadowing.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Branson is a major example, and whilst he has his legion of fans, there's an equally vocal section of the fan-base that isn't so keen. The anti-aristocratic and radical views he keeps trumpeting make him less endearing, because he doesn't understand the severity of what he's preaching. For example, at one point he expresses admiration for the Russian Revolution, and the fact the Tsar and his family were captured by the revolutionaries, all the while thinking they would end up all right (in fact, they were murdered). This attitude is especially egregious since the Crawley family is one of the most lenient and tolerant to work for, and really don't do anything to earn his scorn — it's a miracle he wasn't sacked on several occasions. He's also a bit of hypocrite and whilst he may not like aristocrats, he has no problem marrying them (albeit one who shares his radical views, and it's not for the money). Even after he marries Sybil, he still acts like this, if for no other reason than to just annoy his in-laws. He takes it to the extreme when, during the Irish Revolution, he burns down the castle of an aristocratic Anglo-Irish family, or at least is seen at the scene, and leaves a pregnant Sybil behind when he flies back to Downton for sanctuary and also manages to escape prosecution due to Robert pulling strings, with the provision if ever goes back to Ireland, he'll be arrested on the spot. Is it any wonder why Robert wanted Sybil to stay away from him?
    • Miss Bunting. Is she a victim of Die for Our Ship and simply providing an alternate point of view, or is she a nasty shrew who needs to learn to shut up?
    • Lady Mary. Either she's the best thing about the show, or she's a Black Hole Sue stealing valuable screentime from other, more interesting characters. There is no middle ground.
  • Broken Base:
    • Team Mary vs. Team Edith. Everyone seems to love one and despise the other; there is no middle ground.
      • Team Sybil FOREVER!
      • This grew especially heated in Series 5, where Mary suddenly reverts back to her Series 1 self regarding Edith, seizing every opportunity to viciously insult her. And since Edith is currently going through perhaps her most Woobie-ish plot yet, many fans turned on Mary for being incredibly cruel (and the rest of the family for not commenting on this at all).
    • Series 2 has been pretty divisive: a fairly vocal side of the fandom see it as Seasonal Rot, while others consider it even better than the first season. And of course, some fall in the middle. No matter where you are, it amounts to quite a lively discussion.
    • Series 3 is Flame War-inducing; Series 2 at least had the excuse of World War I and the Spanish flu for all the added drama and character deaths, but Series 3 is supposed to be a return to normalcy - and yet, it's even more like a Soap Opera, although not all of it's the writers' fault (as with the two characters who were McLeaned).
  • Canon Sue: John Bates. He is a mix of Purity Sue and Sympathetic Sue. Every other character who has interacted with Bates is either in love with him beyond reason or turns into an archenemy with little to no provocation. He is regarded as a saint with most and acts the role frequently refusing to do anything that will hurt his enemies (who are going out of their way to hurt him). And if there is something that can go wrong for him, it will go wrong, even when it makes no sense and has the characters who are going out of their way to cause problems for him look cartoonish.
    • This has been somewhat rectified in season five, now that his and Anna's storylines are pretty much wrapped up, they live farther away from the Abbey and thus have less to do with the plot.
      • This lasted until the end of the second episode, where the old "Did Bates Kill Green?" storyline started up again. Many people are complaining of Arc Fatigue.
  • Colbert Bump:
    • Saturday Night Live's surprisingly accurate summary of the show: "There's a MILF and a dad and they've got three daughters named Hot (Mary), Way Hot (Sybil), and The Other One (Edith). And they all hang out with this old lady that looks like a chicken. We hated her at first, but then we got high and she made us crack up! [...] There's also a whole bunch of tuxedo people who live in the basement and their lives suck! Get this: They always have to stand up at the same time. Their names are: Nice Guy (Bates), Mean Guy (Thomas), Mouse Girl (Daisy), and Super Bitch (O'Brien).
  • Creator's Pet: Mary flirts with it throughout the show, but she definitely qualifies in Series 5, where Fellowes seems absolutely convinced that her constantly making random and utterly unprovoked insults towards Edith will just make people love her more. Plus, the horse race where she goes sidesaddle that looks for all the world like a setup for a horrible accident, but no, she somehow wins because she's just that perfect in every way.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Thomas is this for a portion of the fanbase.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • John Bates.
    • And chauffeur Tom Branson, who has a surprisingly large place in the fandom considering that he showed up halfway through the first series and was never considered a regular character until series 3.
    • But probably the most popular character is the Dowager Countess, for being one of the all-time champion Deadpan Snarkers.
    • As of season five, Mr. Molesley, the Butt Monkey and Chew Toy First Footman is gaining quite a following. As one review put it, "Molesley will spend all day being feted by the greats of Hollywood when he receives the Emmy-winning spinoff series he so richly deserves. [...] One step closer to his breakaway HBO pilot, The First Footman."
    • Timothy Drewe (the farmer who is caring for Edith's illegitimate daughter).
    • Charles Blake (for being a more down to earth and interesting suitor for Mary).
    • Lavinia Swire for being one of the kindest characters on the show and for her tragic death. Bonus points that her and Mary aren't rivals to each other and treat other rather friendly.
  • Epileptic Trees: Not quite as erratic as most, but when Rob James-Collier showed up to an event with a shaved head, despite other actors saying they were only about halfway through filming for Series 4, fans started letting the in-show speculation fly. The two most popular seem to be either he's being somehow written off (or, considering Julian Fellows's track record, killed off,) or that Thomas was going to be in jail for part of Series 4 (which, considering how Series 3 ended, isn't entirely impossible.)
    • Despite the show's strong indications that Bates killed Green, many fans suspect that Anna or even Mrs. Hughes did it.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Quite a few fans like to stop watching halfway through episode 3x05, before Sybil, having had her baby, wakes up a few hours later and dies from eclampsia. The split has led to an entire 'Lady Sybil Lives' Alternate Universe on tumblr and in fanfiction. A lot of Matthew fans joined them after his death in the Christmas Special.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Mr Carson and Mrs Hughes, who according to Word of God have no romantic interest in each other but who are shipped voraciously by a significant segment of the fandom anyway. Jim Carter (Carson) has made no secret that he is a Shipper on Deck while Phyllis Logan (Hughes) is more undecided. Upgraded to canon as of the Series 5 Christmas Special.
    • Isobel Crawley/Dr Clarkson was this for quite a long time. Upgrading it to canonical was set into motion during the 2012 Christmas special.
    • There is a large portion of the fandom that ships Mr. Molesly/Miss Baxter after the events of season 4 and the season five premiere.
    • Oddly enough, following Matthew's death, Evelyn Napier seems to be a favorite (though highly unlikely) choice for Mary instead of either of the two new suitors introduced.
    • Atticus and Rose are much more preferred by fans then any of Rose's other pairings.
  • First Installment Wins: The first series, is generally considered the best.
  • Foe Yay: Thomas and William.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: In Galavant, Sophie McShera plays a mousy handmaiden...who ends up singing a lively song with her boyfriend about how they're going to poison all the nobles making their lives miserable.
  • Hollywood Homely:
    • Though not a dark beauty like her sisters, Edith really is rather lovely in her own way. The way the family talks, though, you'd think her face would send would-be suitors running for the hills. The actress was deliberately cast to still be attractive, but in a different, less-obvious sort of way compared to Mary and Sybil (allowing fans to sympathize with her and assume she had more inner beauty- Word of God states that "Just as you wouldn't hire a boring actor to play a bore, you wouldn't hire a plain actress to play a plain woman") — it drives her character arc. It's likely down to her aquiline nose (rather nice if you like that sort of thing), her very beady eyes and rather narrow face — as well as the fact that her shrewish personality makes her seem less attractive.
    • The pretty cute Lavinia, who wouldn't need to be such a meek doormat.
    • The maids are all severely glammed down, especially considering bevy of gorgeous actresses playing them.
    • Bates' ex-wife whose played by the lovely Maria Doyle Kennedy.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Lord Grantham is devoted to his valet and comrade in arms Bates. Sybil even called their relationship romantic in the pilot.
    • Rob James-Collier and Allen Leech's very close friendship in interviews - even reaching Bromance levels at times - has made Thomas/(Tom) Branson a popular couple among some fans.
    • Matthew and Tom's close friendship in Series 3 also shows signs of this.
  • Idiot Plot: The investigation of Green's death in Series 5. The police suddenly start pursuing it with a single-minded vengeance that would make Javert blush, yet still stretch it out absurdly by only asking one question or so per visit. Also, after months the witness suddenly remembers the person he saw arguing with Green was a woman.
  • Itsthe Same Now It Sucks:
    • a common complaint about the Series 5 when Bates is again suspected of murder, Branson is again trying to find his place with his aristocratic family and Mary is again involved in a love-triangle with her suitors
  • Jerkass Woobie: Thomas.
    • Branson, can count too. He may be exiled from his beloved Ireland, but it's because he was involved in the burning and looting of an aristocrat's castle.
  • Les Yay:
    • Sybil and Gwen.
    • Cora and O'Brien as well.
    • Mary and Lavinia share what seems almost like a Romantic Two-Girl Friendship, despite the fact they are both in love with Matthew.
    • Martha Levinson towards the Dowager Countess while performing a romantic song for the family (she even kisses her hand!), in order to make the latter uncomfortable.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Bates actually being guilty of murder
  • Magnificent Bitch: The Dowager Countess.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • Judging by the gifs on Tumblr, Thomas is headed this way after his behavior toward Jimmy in ep. 3x06.
    • There was also the "Creepy Crawley" meme for Lord Grantham in Season 2, largely due to his romance with Jane.
    • Tony Gillingham, largely thanks to his valet actually being a rapist. It reached new heights in Series 5 when he and Mary go on what can only be described as a Sex Holiday.
  • Memetic Mutation: The Series five premiere features Mary's now infamous line "I'm going upstairs to take off my hat," which became quite popular at home and abroad for being such an oddball concept (in these modern times when women's hats are no longer held in place by large pins which made them an utter pain to remove), with many jokes that it must be a euphemism for some less savory activity.
    • After season after season of Bates being suspected of murder, many fans have started accusing him of being a serial killer with varying levels of seriousness.
  • Moe: Daisy.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Some fans consider O'Brien to have crossed this by deliberately causing Cora to slip and lose her unborn baby. She did seem remorseful about it, however.
    • In series 4, you know that Lord Gillingham's valet, Mr Green, is truly and irredeemably evil when he rapes Anna.
  • Narm:
    • The similarity between the deaths of Sybil and Matthew, giving the impression that if Edith ever has a baby, she and the father will have a 50/50 chance of surviving the next 24 hours. Some fans also wondered why Fellowes didn't have Sybil survive her daughter's birth, so they could both die in the accident.
      • Followed by Edith having a baby whose father dies during the Beer Hall Putsch of 1923. Fellowes does know it's possible to do a birth storyline where both parents survive, right?
    • Sybil and Branson's storyline in series 2 gets there at times, as you start wondering if they have a set time each year to pick up their ongoing conversation where they left off.
    • The possibility of having to move into a smaller but still extremely nice-looking house in early series 3, which everyone Wangsts about like it's an inner city rathole.
    • Bates' prison storyline, due to being quite hard to follow without subtitles. This is the peril of setting a story in a place where people have to mumble all the time.
    • Mary's breakdown upon seeing Matthew's gramophone. Where exactly did she think the music was coming from?
    • The romance between Rose and Jack can be hard to take seriously when you realize they share their names with a certain other romantic couple who faced a disapproving society. Especially considering the event the show started with.
      • Plus, the oddity of Gary Carr's casting; he's an English actor playing American and his accent is pretty bad — oh, and he can't sing, despite him being cast as a jazz singer.
    • The moment in Series 2 when Matthew turns up out of the blue at the concert for the convalescents, and starts singing in a slightly camp manner as he walks over to greet Mary is ball-shrinkingly cringeworthy.
    • In fact, quite a few of Matthew's mannerisms are narmy — the weird, wobbly head motion he does as he nuzzles up to Mary for a kiss is another good example.
    • The overly dramatic way Robert turns his face to the screen in the season 1 finale.
    • Mary's new hairstyle in Series 5. Many fans commented that it looks like Lego hair, or Johnny Depp's Willy Wonka, and it's a good thing the hairdresser said it looks good or we'd never know it was supposed to.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Branson's vocal support for the Russian Revolution, and later burning down a castle in Ireland.
    • Mary getting a new hairstyle and holding a picnic right after Edith learned that Gregson really is dead, and accusing her of ruining everything she touches when called out on it. Especially since none of the rest of the family seemed to consider this less than perfectly acceptable behavior.
    • The show itself has gained a largely undeserved Anyone Can Die reputation, (it's even been compared to Game of Thrones!) ever since Series 3 Killed Off for Real two of the most popular Regular Characters, Sybil and Matthew. In reality, as of Series 5, only three regulars (the third was William) and eight recurring and guest characters have died. For a show with Loads and Loads of Characters, that's actually a fairly small percentage, especially with some of the Real Life events (World War One and the 1919 Influenza pandemic) the cast has lived through. Both dogs have also died, but since the show has spanned twelve years in five seasons, that isn't exceptional.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Mrs. Gaunt, the telephone operator from season 1.
    Carson: I was just practicing my answer.
    Mrs. Gaunt: Sounds stupid to me.
    Hairdresser: At least she can carry it off — most of them look like bald monkeys.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • Edith learning to drive and looking after convalescing soldiers in series two leads her to become kinder and less concerned with marriage and one-upping Mary. After the end of the war hits the Reset Button on her character, her sudden interest in women's suffrage in the wake of Sir Anthony abandoning her at the altar could be seen as another attempt at this.
    • Thomas in series 3 as he transitioned from straight-up Jerk Ass to Jerkass Woobie. His falling-out with O'Brien put him on the receiving end of the worst schemes she has to offer, he ends up being outed and almost sacked (or worse, arrested). The moment when he tells Bates the one thing that will make O'Brien back down is a Crowning Moment of Awesome. Furthermore, he acts a lot nicer to everyone in the series 3 Christmas Special, hopefully foreshadowing a kinder, gentler Thomas.
    • Rose, for some. Her character development went from a whiny, rebellious, and socially inept party girl to lovably naive and a bit smarter and more mature. Her newer character strength shown in delivering a sharp one-liner to her bitchy mother and quickly saving Lord Sinderby from scandal also helps.
  • Relationship Sue: Besides being Mary's One True Love, Matthew is a rather bland Straight Man compared to the quirky others.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: Mary's triangle with Gillingham and Blake. A common complaint is that the two suitors are such similar characters that it's impossible to care about which one Mary ends up with. And then she goes with neither of them, making it all feel like an even bigger waste of time.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Sarah Bunting. Yes, she's incredibly rude. However, she's also right a lot of the time (saying that she thought the Czar was misguided for instance). She's one of the most hated characters in the show.
  • The Scrappy:
    • O'Brien
    • Vera Bates.
    • Larry Grey.
    • Dr. Tapsell
    • Sarah Bunting. Unlike those listed above, she's not an "evil" character, and the venom directed at Bunts is mostly due to her representing a rather a clumsy attempt at portraying the hackneyed "feisty female", with very little depth or charm to back it up. In Series 5, she makes a nuisance of herself at Robert and Cora's Wedding Anniversary by being rude to every aristocrat in sight, because he's funding a WWI memorial for the village.
      • Even her name is annoying, especially when Branson says it; "Boon-teeng". When Mary and Robert refer to her, after the above incident, they both place special emphasis on the "Bunt" part of her surname....
      • Hugh Bonneville even said in an interview that “[Robert] would probably be delighted to have a healthy political debate with Sarah Bunting but the trouble is she is just an absolute cow.”
      • Mary quips “I’m not very keen on Miss Bunting”.
      • She gets worse when displaced Russian nobles come to Downton and all she can do is loudly proclaim her support for the Bolshevik cause. In front of said nobles. Said Russian nobles are - rightly so - immensely offended.
      • Eventually she makes one too many of these speeches and Robert tells her to Get Out and stay out. She does.
      • One hardly knows what about her character is more grating: the fact that she seems to have as much sensitivity as a block of wood or that she has absolutely no concept of how to behave in polite company. The actress portraying her accepted an opportunity to be on an American show, which seems to have turned her character into something of an Aborted Arc. One gets the strong impression that there was intended to be a romance between she and Tom that would've led to Tom's exit from the family at the end of the season. He leaves anyway, but one feels that her characterization could've been more graceful regardless.
  • Seasonal Rot: Everything post Series 1. Forced melodrama caused by various characters grabbing the Idiot Ball or Jerkass Ball, actors leaving causing outrage amongst the fandom and new characters being written who just can't quite fit.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: For some reason, fans of Bates/Anna and Thomas/Jimmy do NOT get along, despite the fact that there's no reason why both ships can't peacefully coexist. It's probably because Bates and Thomas are almost antitheses of each other and generally if a person likes one, they do not like the other (or their romantic interests). Then this article came out and fans of each ship attacked the related poll with warlike zeal.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: Evelyn Napier and Edith Crawley are shipped by a large portion of the fandom, despite them never really interacting with one another.
  • Squick: Bates' ill-advised use of a "limp corrector".
  • Strangled by the Red String: The Tom/Sybil romance in Season 2. What could have been a heartrending story of them slowly falling in love and struggling with their forbidden feelings, turns into a repetitive Yoyo Plot Point. Tom gives an out of the blue Love Confession in the first episode and with a 180 from his previously rebellious, but more vulnerable characterization, Tom continually nags Sybil to run away together, while the normally fiery Sybil makes non-committal noises and ums and uhs. This conversation is repeated Once per Episode, taking up valuable screen time for the characters. The whole relationship really needed some build up and Will They or Won't They? before the proposal was thrown in, and its only the classic Uptown Girl conflict and work of the actors that gives it spark.
    • Tony Gillingham falls head over heels for Mary in just two episodes, while she's been mourning and far from her most engaging.
  • Strawman Has a Point: Sir Richard Carlisle was a brute whom the whole family disliked, but his main actual complaints against Mary were her lingering feelings for Matthew and her slowness in planning their wedding, both of which she denied. Upon breaking their engagement, she became engaged to Matthew that same day and they were married within a few months.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Shows up consistently in general fan response to the second season. Some elements of the series are altered drastically with the advent of World War One, although a great deal remains the same, which, in turn, has spawned an outcry from other portions of the fandom, who protest that the narrative glosses over or speeds by too many major global events to be considered realistic. An unfortunate but unavoidable side-effect of setting a drama series during a time of extreme social and political upheaval.
    • Series 4 had to deal with the loss of three major cast members within the previous year, leading to some awkward writing at times.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Michael Gregson, the perfect match for Edith with a quite interesting story of his own. Then he disappears in the Beer Hall Putsch, with the question of whether he's still alive being stretched out for an absurdly long time given that it turns out he isn't, apparently just because Edith must be utterly miserable at all times.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: The Lord Hepworth/Lady Rosamund/Marigold Shore subplot in the Christmas special. It didn't really go anywhere, which is just sad considering the possibilities. Also falls into They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character for Hepworth and Shore; the two were played by gifted veteran actors Nigel Havers and Sharon Small, and when you've got actors that good, you really ought to do something with them. Small in particular deserved much more than spouting undeniably witty one-liners and the utterly predictable subplot of her affair with Hepworth.
    • In series 4, instead of the rape storyline, many fans said a better way to take it would have been for Thomas to save Anna, resulting in her and Bates being indebted to him.
  • Took the Bad Film Seriously: Pretty much the entire cast; the only thing that saves the latter series of Downton is the simply luminous performances coming from its main cast members. Maggie Smith is busy winning Emmys as Violet; Isobel Crawley is lifted to the skies by Penelope Wilton's sensitive and understated portrayal; Phyllis Logan and Jim Carter spin an utterly, heartbreakingly lovely relationship and eventual romance for their characters; hell, even Rob James Collier knocks his scenes as Thomas out of the park! Virtually every veteran cast member is acting their socks off, and only making the shoddy writing and slipshod character development look even worse by comparison.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic: Robert in Series 5. He's clearly suppose to come off as an unreasonable jerk like in Series 3-4. But it's perfectly reasonable for a grandparent from wanting to keep their grandchild from growing up in poverty. And let's face it, Branson's new love interest Sarah Bunting can be a really nasty piece of work when she wants to be as seen at Robert and Cora's Wedding Anniversary Dinner Party. Given that the Russian Revolution has just happened, Robert is understandably suspicous about Tom striking up an accord with someone who was in many ways just like his old self: hateful, and hot-headed.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Tom and Isobel support Sarah Bunting instead of their in-law, when she speaks her mind when she's voicing what she thinks about the village war memorial... as rudely as possible... at Robert and Cora's wedding anniversary party, at which she is a guest — hardly the time or place to discuss such things.
    • Sarah Bunting is suppose to come off as a progressive, liberal person like Sybil, but she is nowhere near as charming or polite as Sybil was. In fact she's down right nasty when talking to the aristocracy, just because they are the aristocracy.
    • Many viewers objected to being asked to sympathize with the Russian nobles in series 5, considering the conditions in Russia prior to the Revolution (not that they got any better after, mind you). Especially since one of them still speaks of the Romanovs in adoring terms (note that this was far from the case historically, as many nobles eagerly took to blaming the Romanovs for the Revolution). Particularly bad is when, just three episodes after we're meant to be offended on behalf of one of them when Bunting badmouths the Czar, the exact same guy is shown to be a despicable anti-Semite.
  • Values Dissonance: Besides the deliberate use of the period, the show also runs into this hard upon airing in America, where viewers tend to side far more with the working class than is quite intended and find the Crawleys, Robert especially, insufferable for their flaunted wealth.
  • Vocal Dissonance: Jack Ross is presented as a suave jazz band-leader, but his singing voice is decidedly nasal, tight, and tonally off. Not to mention totally unlike how any jazz singer of that era actually sounded.
  • Wangst: An in-universe example in Season 4, with Mary after Matthew's death. While she has the right to mourn, all the family, (well except Robert), agree she should be getting over it and reengaging with life, six months after the event.
    • And of course, to put it in perspective, Tom was in a much worse situation when he lost his wife, as he was stranded alone at his hostile in-laws house but made an effort for his daughter, whereas Mary had her whole family supporting her and basically ignored George.
    • And it gets worse in Series 5 when she refuses to acknowledge Edith has any right to be upset at all when Gregson's death is confirmed, and accuses her of ruining everything, a comment that Cora inexplicably defends.
  • Wheelchair Woobie:
    • Matthew, but he gets better.
    • Bates would definitely fall under this, too, with his cane.
  • The Woobie:
    • Bates especially.
    • And Anna. Her entire existence in the show is basically one long Trauma Conga Line.
    • Branson, oh god Branson. Come Season 3 he's exiled from Ireland (because he burned down an aristocratic Anglo-Irish family's castle), separated from his family, trapped in the house he tried to escape from, lost his wife, (the woman he spent six years waiting for) and left alone with a new-born baby.
      • Now he's also lost his brother-in-law/best friend who was the only one who understood him.
      • And taken advantage of by Edna.
    • Edith Edith Edith!