YMMV: Dog Sees God

  • Anvilicious/Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: The play definitely doesn't back down on speaking out against homophobia, bullying and suicide. It might be hard to take seriously considering what series its based off on, but considering that those things are still big problems in today's society, perhaps its for the better.
    • Beethoven's rant at C.B after the latter tells him that he would've been bullied less if he didn't "act gay" couldn't be any bigger of a middle finger at society's often stereotypical view on homosexuals.
    Beethoven: And how does one "act gay"? By playing the piano?
  • Alternate Character Interpretation: The whole show is built around this.
  • Crowning Moment of Funny: Plenty in the scene with Van's sister.
    • This exchange at Marcy's party, after C.B reveals that he invited Beethoven.
    Marcy: C.B, my parents would kill me if they knew we let a homosexual in the house!
    C.B: Marcy, there are 7 people upstairs on ecstasy fucking in your parents bed.
  • Crowning Moment of Heartwarming: C.B's meeting with Van's sister is hilarious, but its also this as she actually listens and gives support to CB at a time he needs it the most, helps C.B to confirm that his feelings for Beethoven are real and not some impulse, and congratulates C.B. for going against the norm and not apologizing for it. Doubly so, since she and C.B were dating before she got incarcerated, which means that she's willing to lose their relationship solely for C.B to be truly happy.
    Van's sister: And next time, when you come, if you could just maybe stick a book of matches up your ass, I'd be your best friend forever.
    C.B: You already are.
  • Fridge Brilliance: Pen pal, C.S. (Charles Schulz), since the play is set in the Peanuts universe, is God, and the letter C.B. receives is an answer to his questions about what comes after death and an assurance that Beethoven, C.B.'s dog, and the bird are happy somewhere.
    • Alternatively, C.S. is Charles Schulz, who C.B. had been writing to all his life. Schulz used the letters C.B. sent him as the basis for his comic strip (Schulz at one point said that the Pen-Pal may be the person who felt the most sympathy for Charlie Brown in the original comics) and has played a sympathetic ear. Now that Schulz is dead in real-life, he writes C.B. one last letter from heaven, where he sees Beethoven.
  • Les Yay: Tricia and Marcy are accused of this at once point, and are horrified by it.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: Peanuts was never the most idealistic comic strip, but this slides it waaaaay over to the cynical end of the scale.
  • The Woobie: Isn't C.B. the original Woobie?
    • Poor, poor Beethoven...