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YMMV: de Blob
  • Adaptation Displacement: Now that the Wii version has come out, try to find someone who has heard of the original PC tech demo, let alone played it.
  • Awesome Music: Admit it, the soundtrack KICKS ASS. Especially since every track starts out slow and simple when you enter a level, and gradually gets more complex and up-tempo as color returns to the world. Some tracks even change from a minor to a major key. Top honors go to Chilled and Empowered.
    • The whole damn soundtrack from both console games, really. Some examples from the first game include the classic Righteous, the outrageously happy Euphoric and melancholic Brazen.
  • Creepy Cute: The Blancs are some of the most adorable brainwashed cultists ever. Some may consider the Inkies also to be cute, especially since the common small ones have higher-pitched voices in the sequel. Alas, this may actually be a case of Killer Rabbits, given the reprehensible things the Inkies commit throughout all the games.
  • Ear Worm: Consider yourself dared to not dance, bob your head, whistle, beatbox, hum or snap your fingers to the music in this game. Go on. It's impossible. It's also impossible to get out of your head.
    • Justified in that the soundtrack consists of constantly looping jazz standards which grow and adapt to the amount of colour in the environment, with instrumental solos coming in for every building painted. Aaaaaand, cue Tetris Effect.
  • Genius Bonus: In the intro to the Soda Cannery level in the sequel, one of the characters drinks the Blanc Cola and says, "Yuck! What do they put in this? Waxed Tadpoles?"
    • "...Needs more tadpole."
  • Moral Event Horizon: Comrade Black crosses this in the last level of the second game, when he uses the Bus Full of Innocents ploy three separate times while you're racing the clock to catch him.
  • Nominal Hero: Seems to be the case in the original PC game, where de Blob's ship crashes into Utrecht and he immediately begins to absorb its brightly-colored residents. Arguably, de Blob is confused and in his rush to avoid INKT forces inadvertently rolls into innocents, although there's an equal case to be made that Blob is actively malicious and in the larger scheme of things the INKT forces are the true heroes in this game.
    • If you don't have enough of a certain color to paint a landmark, the game will bring up text saying "You need to absorb at least [number] people!"
    • Hell, in the series proper Blob and allies could count. Chroma City appears to have had no banks, public facilities, or other such vital infrastructure elements, just art-related businesses. INKT might be humorless bastards, but at least they made the trains run on time.
      • ...Except, of course, for that one mission in De Blob 2, where the subways won't operate until you restore color energy to them.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: The sequel is seen as more equally balanced, more logically done, you can go inside the buildings, the boss is more logical and it's more emotionally draining at the final boss.
    • Not to mention the gravity effects seen throughout the 2D segments and the final level.
    • One of the things the sequel really doesn't get credit for is how much more abundant paint supplies are compared to the first game. You've got color pools that can instantly restore your Paint Points to max, you've got more Big Paintbots running about, said Big Paintbots restore 50 instead of 30 Paint Points as before, and all Paintbots refill themselves after a much shorter interval. This is fortunate as the game's enemies take a lot more Paint Points to defeat and there is one particular maneuver (Blob's new rolling attack) that is paint-thirsty until later on in the game.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: The Raydians, fitting with the brightly-coloured side of the game's aesthetic.
  • Waggle: Particularly Egregious; the game maps its jump function to shaking the Wiimote, and requires a degree of precision when walljumping that is nearly impossible to achieve with this control scheme. The sequel fixes this by moving the jump function to a button, though this also takes out the satisfaction of using it to slam enemies.

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