* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Does Dante really regret the sins of his past or is he just merely seeking a way to escape being punished for them.
* DemonicSpiders: Heretical Priests, which have the nasty habit of rendering themselves and anyone around them cross-proof (but not magic-proof!) until the Priest dies. On their own, they can be handled relatively easily, but they get really annoying when they use their protection on angered spirits, shades that catch fire and can only be attacked by using the cross attack (or holy magic) to put out the flame.
* DesignatedVillain: The first three bosses. Death is... well, [[TheGrimReaper Death]], Charon is just there to move souls, and King Minos only sorts the souls into the proper circles. Not terribly glaring, though; no one likes Death when he visits, the other two "work" for Hell regardless, and all three [[TheDeterminator got in Dante's way]].
* DisappointingLastLevel: Many reviewers have praised the game's first several levels, but have stated that the later levels fall into this. That is, Malbolge is just a series of trials - probably because it's pretty hard to make fraud interesting - and Cocytus is nothing but the FinalBattle.
* FreudWasRight: Lust, in its entirety.
* GameBreaker: A fully upgraded cross becomes this.
** To elaborate on this, upgrading the cross unlocks new holy spells which you can purchase. One of these is [[StoneWall Divine Armor]], which not only renders Dante invulnerable, but upgrading this spell causes Dante to recover health persistently while Divine Armor's invulnerability is active. Upgrading it fully increases this regeneration rate. Combine with Ciacco's Bile, a relic that causes persistent mana regeneration, and Divine Armor will literally be the only spell you ever cast all game, and the only time you will ever die is if you fall off something or (somehow) run out of mana. Possibly averted by the fact that if you do this and neglect the scythe, the final boss will curbstomp you.
** At (almost) the top of the other side of the upgrade path, you get the passive ability to regain mana... By killing things. That's right, the game lets you go invincible, regain health while doing so, then regain mana by killing the enemies you can't be touched by.
** The fully charged blast of the cross comes to mind. It is very powerful, has a long range and area of effect, breaks all defenses and knocks the enemy over. The only downside is of course a charge-time, which isn't very long. Furthermore, with upgrades, you can make the cross attack even stronger, and regain health from every enemy that dies from a cross attack. Single enemies (even some bosses) can just be spammed to death by it and even groups can be reduced to dust pretty quickly if you let them hug together on a tight area.
* GeniusBonus: In addition to being an adaptation of the "The Inferno" the game also incorporates some details about Dante Alighieri that will be interesting for anyone who is knowledgeable about the Florentine poet. Two notable tidbits are those about Bella when [[spoiler: Dante finds her in the Wood of the Suicides]] saying that she died of the fever (which is how the real-life Bella Alighieri (née Abati) died) and that the character Francesco shares his name with Alighieri's real-life half brother.
** On that note, the game's version of Dante grew up believing that his mother died of the fever [[spoiler: when in actuality, [[DrivenToSuicide her husband's abuse pushed her to hang herself.]] Even through the mid 20th century, it wasn't unusual for relatives/loved ones of suicide victims to cover up the suicide so the dead could receive a burial in hallowed ground and thus have a chance at salvation.]]
* GoddamnedBats: The Pests and the Temptresses, with the latter verging on DemonicSpiders on "Zealot" and reaching that territory easily on "Hellish".
* HilariousInHindsight: In a meta way. This is a HackAndSlash game that is a ''Franchise/GodOfWar'' clone of which that Sony owned series was created [[DuelingGames to compete]] against and partly inspired by the Franchise/DevilMayCry series which was in turn inspired by Dante Alighieri's Literature/TheDivineComedy. So it now seems things have gone full circle.
* NauseaFuel: Gluttony. Nothing quite as disturbing as walking though a giant digestive system. Or, for that matter, the Gluttons themselves explosively crapping excrement on you.
* OneSceneWonder: Death, if this [[http://dantesinferno.wikia.com/wiki/Dante%27s_Inferno_Wiki poll on the Dante's Inferno Wikia]] is anything to go by, despite only appearing once in the story, and very early on at that, has managed to become quite popular.
* RonTheDeathEater: The Historical [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alighiero_di_Bellincione Alighero di Bellincione]] gets this treatment from some people who are too lazy to do any research on the real person and foolishly assume the fictional Alighero in the game is an accurate representation when [[{{Expy}} he isn't him]].
* SoOkayItsAverage: The main line the reviewers are taking is that it's a very competently-executed ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'' clone -- but still, ultimately, a ''God Of War'' clone.
* {{Squick}}: Even the most hardcore gamer is going to wince at some of the stuff they witness in some of the circles. Like most of the stuff in the "Lust" and "Gluttony" levels.
* ThatOneLevel: One or two of the bolgia (sub-sections of hell) of the Malebolge.
* TheyChangedItNowItSucks: In relation to the [[TheDivineComedy original Inferno]] by Dante Alighieri. Some literary scholars and feminists have taken issue with this game's portrayal of Beatrice. To quote TheOtherWiki "Columbia University Professor Teodolinda Barolini, a former president of the Dante Society of America, criticized the game for its depiction of Beatrice, declaring, 'Of all the things that are troubling, the sexualization and infantilization of Beatrice are the worst. Beatrice is the human girl who is dead and is now an agent of the divine. She is not to be saved by him, she is saving him. That’s the whole point! Here, she has become the prototypical damsel in distress. She’s this kind of bizarrely corrupted Barbie doll.'[54] Other reviews of the game include similar comments from professors regarding the characters: 'Beatrice saves Dante... not the other way around,'[55] says Professor Arielle Saiber, an Italian literature professor at Bowdoin College."
* VisualEffectsOfAwesome: There is some very impressive animation during the game's cinematics.
* {{Wangst}}: Lucifer begins to crack in the final battle and starts screaming to God asking him why he has abandoned him, in a sort of ''Paradise Lost'' style.
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