• Archive Panic: Good luck watching the whole franchise from start to end. Leaving out the two webseries, the series totals 384 half-hour episodes and four feature-length movies. That's roughly six days. The tie-in comics add another 271 comic book issues.
  • Cant Unhear It: The voice acting of the DCAU is so iconic that its fans generally read DC Comics in the DCAU's voices. Kevin Conroy as Batman and Mark Hamill as the Joker tend to be the biggest cases of this (as each had been around since the DCAU's very beginning with Batman: The Animated Series). Despite several other Batman animated series being made after the DCAU and a very well-regarded live action film series, Conroy and Hamill remain the definitive Batman and Joker voices to several generations of fans.
  • Complete Monster: In true DC style, the universe is replete with heinous villains: see here.
  • Hype Backlash: The DCAU is put on a high pedestal. Its descriptions of characters are called the definitive versions by fans. Every other superhero animated show (and even live-action versions) are compared to it. As a result, some people can be confused by the praise and find it So Okay, It's Average. It doesn't help many other superhero shows borrowed from it, causing Seinfeld Is Unfunny.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Lex Luthor, depending on the author. And there're also the Joker, Darkseid and Grodd.
  • Tough Act to Follow: The multi-series continuity, art style, great writing and voice work ensures that successive series, ranging in quality, have a very high standard to meet.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: Granny Goodness is a woman, but the fact she's both visually based on and voiced by Ed Asner makes it a little hard to tell.