YMMV / Civilization


  • Broken Base:
    • When it was announced that V will have Panzer General style combat, will only allow one combat unit per tile, will be released with Steam, that there will be DLC, and that you will have to pay extra to play the Babylonian civilization. Cue Flame War. It bears noting that there is actually a "rant thread" on the Civfanatics forums that was created by the moderation staff specifically to keep the massive firestorm of complaints from cluttering up the rest of the forums and to keep said complaints at least somewhat civil. On the flipside, there were players who welcomed the "one combat unit per tile" rule, citing the massive 'unit stacks of doom' as a Scrappy Mechanic that bogged down the combat of previous games and required next to no strategy.
    • Gods and Kings continues the tradition, generally making people who liked the game like it more and people who hated the game hate it more, "Religion and espionage were already in IV", "They're totally different here", "that's a bad thing, IV had it right", etc.
    • The announcement that Brave New World will have the XCOM Squad unit. Some feel it's an unnecessary crossover in a history-based game, others are fine with the idea and point to the Giant Death Robot that has existed since vanilla V.
    • The arguments of which opening policy is better: Tradition or Liberty. Arguments for Tradition includes providing food bonuses (with unlocking the food growth-based Hanging Gardens), expand borders & build wonders quicker and faith buy Great Engineers. Arguments for Liberty include faster settlers & workers, faster building speed, and obtain 1 free Great Person of your choice.
    • Various civilizations added in Brave New World have divided the fanbase.
      • There was a fair amount of complaining over Maria I being chosen as Portugal's leader. The only highlights of her rule were fleeing with the rest of the royal family to Brazil during the Napoleonic invasions (which ironically makes her a more revered figure in Brazil, since the family taking residence there led to the country's independence a few decades later) and descending into literal screaming insanity during her last 21 years of life (which led the aforementioned Brazilians to dub her "Maria The Mad").
      • The inclusion of Venice and its unique role has also broken the base in many places. Some dislike it for being another European civilization when the continent is already heavily represented, others are fine with more European civs but would rather have seen a unified Italy and/or feel that Venice has had too little impact on world history, and even some who like the idea of a Venetian civilization aren't fond of its unique ability that prevents it from founding cities, instead having to rely on a unique unit to puppet city states. Minor points of contention include its colors (shades of purple and white taken directly from a small part of a flag on The Other Wiki) and unique unit names that are seen as bland (Great Galleass and Merchant of Venice).
    • The fact that Adolf Hitler has never been a playable leader while both Josef Stalin and Mao Zedong, the other two leading competitors for leading the highest death tolls the 20th Century, rate series regulars is very controversial among the fanbase, many of whom would enjoy seeing Hitler included due to his impact on history despite his crimes. Possibly related is the fact that V is the first game in the series to feature neither Stalin nor Mao, with Russia and China instead being represented by Catherine the Great and Wu Zetian respectively, their greatest female leaders.
    • Upon the announcement of VI, many have complained about the new art direction, which has been criticized as too cartoonish for a game as serious as Civilization. Others have welcomed the new style, noting how much easier it is to distinguish objects on the map. And a third group doesn't care how it looks either way as long as the game isn't as horribly optimized as V was.
    • Many of the leader announcements for VI have greatly divided the fanbase for a variety of reasons, some of the most controversial ones so far include:
      • Catherine D'Medici. Aside from being ethnically Italian (rather than French), many people are upset by the selection as most of her ruling of France was done behind the scenes; Catherine never directly controlled the French throne. In addition, Catherine received the spot over many popular choices or previous leaders such as Napoleon or Louis XIV. Supporters of the decision are happy to see a fresh face ruling the Civ, particularly one with such an interesting involvement in history (she was essentially a real life Cersei Lannister, albeit a far more competent one). In addition, her role as The Spymaster and the presence of her Flying Squadron (in real life, ladies-in-waiting who had sex with nobles in exchange for secret information to send to Catherine to aid her in her machinations), are seen by many as a compelling and unique bonus that has yet to be seen in Civ VI.
      • Cleopatra, who is likely the most divisive ruler on this list. While she is arguably the most famous Egyptian ruler, this is more due to her romantic affairs with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony than actual competence on her part. Her reign of Egypt didn't go so well and ultimately ended with her being Driven to Suicide after she lost a war to Augustus Caesar. In addition, like Catherine, she's ethnically Greek rather than Egyptian. Many fans would have rather seen the far more Hatshepsut in power. However, Cleo does have a fair amount of support for her inclusion, primarily more based on gameplay than her historical achievements. She is a highly interesting and memorable figure, as well as one with a particularly compelling personality and story, meaning that she'll likely make for a far more interesting opponent. In addition, her Leader Agenda seems to be following history by making her suicidally aggressive (Cleopatra hates weak Civs and City States, and will slaughter each and every one of them to prove it. Often through surprise attacks. This directly conflicts with agendas of rulers such as Teddy Roosevelt, Frederick Barbarossa, or Hojo Tokimune. All of whom have very strong militaries)
      • Queen Victoria of England, mainly since she's replacing Queen Elizabeth who had been a part of the series for such a long time. She's far less controversial than the other mentions, however.
    • On a more general level, since the full list of launch civilizations in VI was revealed there have been accusations of Eurocentrism, with European and colonial civs typically not in the base game (eg. Brazil and Norway/the Norse) making the cut to the exclusion of representatives of South-East Asia and non-colonial America beyond the Aztecs (whose status as a timed preorder exclusive is controversial for different reasons). Cleopatra's ethnicity, as mentioned above, is also often brought up in relation to this.
  • Cliché Storm: William of Orange's diplomacy text in III was filled with cliches about the Netherlands (Tulips, clogs, windmills, etc).
  • Contested Sequel:
    • Every game in the series has its fans and detractors, but by far the most controversial is V. So many staple mechanics of the series as a whole were either significantly retooled or dropped entirely that some fans of the older games refuse to buy it on principle, and an extremely bug-ridden first release didn't help matters for the rest.
    • Within V, the second expansion, Brave New World, made the game feel a little more like its predecessors by offering trade routes, a UN-style World Congress, a culture victory based on influencing other civs instead of merely building up your own (the latter now a means of preventing other civs from influencing you), and trade caravans that enable trade between cities, even ones outside of your civ. While celebrated by much of the fanbase, all of these features add a great deal of micromanagement and, depending on who you ask, don't do enough to make the game more interesting, and may even water it down. Certain elements that were slowly balanced in patches over the vanilla game and the first expansion were thrown out of balance (e.g. the Tradition policy is indirectly much more powerful than before because of trade routes and AI behaviour), and patching activity was minor after the release of BNW, presumably because the dev team was busy with Civilization: Beyond Earth.
  • Crazy Awesome: Nebuchadnezzar's quotes (such as "Are you real or just a phantom of my tortured senses?") are sometimes a bit funny. This is the guy who went crazy for a bit, according to The Bible. When he learns of his defeat, he finds it "very interesting".
  • Creepy Awesome: Montezuma.
  • Critical Dissonance: V has been and still is lauded by the vast majority of critics, while fan opinion is much more mixed, at least with fans that played IV extensively, as V plays differently and generally has less features than IV with expansion packs and mods does. The dissonance was especially obvious when V had just launched; before patches, it had far more bugs and weird mechanics which have since been removed and changed, but most critics loved the game right out of the box.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: See here.
  • Demonic Spiders: Barbarian tribes can get this way pretty easily, especially in V. Because they come from all directions, you need a competent garrison around... and because V has discontinued unit-stacking, having one becomes that more complicated. You have to keep an eye out at all times for incoming barbs who have designs on your settlers and workers. And finally, because units of similar strength are weighted to typically not lose more than half their health in any given battle, it requires two units to take out a single encampment quickly—during the early-game phase, where sparing even one unit for scouting is an imposition. Taking the Honor social policy track gradually leans barbarians to the Piņata Enemy side of things, as it gives you more strength against them and gives a culture bonus for defeating them.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Even though Xerxes and Darius have taken turns as Persia's leader throughout the series, Cyrus the Great's appearance in IV has left quite the impression, to the point where Persia's intro in V talks mostly about Cyrus' accomplishments, even though Darius is Persia's leader in that game.
    • Philip II of Spain has proven to be the by-far best received Civ VI leader announced so far, with many players anticipating playing him or playing against him. Unlike the more divisive leaders, he's clearly had a large impact on Spain and is viewed as a very good representation of a leader for the country. While he's replacing Civ long-time-returnee Isabela, rumors that she will return in DLC have limited backlash to that. His leader ability and civ bonuses are geared towards the new religious victory and appear exceptionally powerfully. Finally, Philip's character design has proven to be among the best received of the game.
  • Epileptic Trees: In V, from the starting narration it seems all of history's great leaders were put on an Earth-like planet to be given a second chance to rule.
  • Even Better Sequel:
    • While most sequels in the series are contested, II is the true Trope Codifier for the 4X genre, taking everything that had been a hit in the original and refining it into a classic that's still widely-played today.
    • Broken Base of V aside, everyone seems to agree that Gods & Kings massively improved the experience in general, making naval combat not suck, adding a much-needed layer of complexity with the religion system, tightening up city-states, and just making the whole thing better overall. The second expansion, Brave New World, has also gotten overwhelmingly positive reviews in general, with plenty of new features to increase players' enjoyment of the game.
  • Game Breaker: Enough to merit its very own page.
  • Genius Bonus: The quotation for the Priesthood tech in IV is the Priestly Blessing (Numbers 6:24-26):
    May the lord bless you and keep you
    May He make His face shed light upon you and be gracious unto you
    May He lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.
    • As it turns out, this blessing is delivered while making the sign of the letter Shin in a specific way... a way upon which the devoutly Jewish Leonard Nimoy (who did the voice work for the tech quotes in IV) based the Vulcan salute ("Live long and prosper!").
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: When you meet Catherine in Civilization IV, she says that she's willing to have "closer relations" with who she meets. Considering her reputation in real life...
    • There's also an achievement for being the first to research Horseback Riding while playing as Catherine. Considering a rather infamous Urban Legend about how she died...
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • Barbarians are usually this if they're not Demonic Spiders, forcing you to always send garrison with settlers and having to construct and send out military units to destroy their camps if they get too close to your borders and start killing your workers and destroying your terrain improvements. Even on the first rounds of the game, they are never going to be able to fight their way past any city defender unless they outnumber you some 10-to-1 (and even then depending on levels), but again, killing workers and destroying terrain improvements, they're still going to annoy you.
    • Barbarians are kicked up a level in the Brave New World expansion for V. There are more of them, and if they are anywhere in the path of a trade route and no civilized unit is watching them, they will plunder the trade route, take the unit that took ~8 turns to build, and convert it into another barbarian!
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • Technical Pacifist Gandhi (who starts the game at the lowest possible aggression level) + India becoming a democracy (which is supposed to lower said aggression level) + underflow error (creating a large negative number that gets erroneously interpreted as a large positive number) = Nuclear Gandhi. To put it another way, on a scale of 1 being least aggressive to 10 being most aggressive, Ghandi becomes 255 points of pure nuclear rage.
    • There have been reports of Achivements in V unlocking when other players trigger the needed conditions.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight
    • In Fight Club, Tyler and the Narrator talk about fighting Gandhi. Who knew they were fans of the series?
    • Shaka Zulu and Julius Caesar decided to conquer each other... in a rap battle.
    • And after that, Ivan the Terrible fought Alexander the Great, Frederick the Great, and Catherine the Great... in another rap battle. Alexander even alludes to his Expansion Pack.
  • Inferred Holocaust:
    • In an eerily literal example, one of the expansion packs to III includes a fascist government type; immediately after a civilization adopts fascism, it suffers a slight population loss for a few turns, presumably as 'undesirables' are, ahem, dealt with by the Secret Police.
    • Forced labor (present in several forms of government in the same game, and under the Slavery civic in IV) has pretty much the same connotation. More liberal forms of government replace this method with the standard option to rush-build things by throwing enough money at it.
    • Razing towns kills its entire population. Although capitals can never be razed, so it's not possible to kill off entire races... in V. Before that, the games allowed, even encouraged genocide. Of course, you could always just assume that the displaced citizens are merely cast out into the countryside as their homes are burnt to the ground, which is still not all that great either.
  • It's Easy, so It Sucks: V got some of this attitude because it streamlined a fair amount of gameplay nuances. A big part of why the expansion packs were well-received was the re-insertion of many mechanics.
  • Memetic Badass: Real Life Gandhi is the defining image of a pacifistic leader. Civilization Gandhi is a bloodthirsty warlord who will churn out nukes like no tomorrow and will not hesitate to nuke your civilization into the stone age if you ever so slightly covet his lands.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "Spearman beats Tank."Explanation 
    • Our words are backed with NUCLEAR WEAPONS!Explanation 
      • A sub-meme of which is when Gandhi threatens you with them.
      • Even funnier (or scarier) when you realize that India is one of the few countries that have an active nuclear weapons program.
      • As of the Gods & Kings expansion for V, hostile leaders with nukes will occasionally exclaim this in diplomacy.
    • "BUILD CITY WALLS!"Explanation 
    • "Never trust an Aztec with nukes!" As discussed here, this one probably dates back all the way to the BBS days. Explanation 
      • V: "Montezuma's peace theme doesn't actually play in-game."Explanation 
      • TV Tropes is a hypercube wiki. Explanation 
    • "WOULD YOU BE INTERESTED IN A TRADE AGREEMENT WITH ENGLAND?" As trade quotes are often reused whenever a player asks what the AI is offering, Queen Elizabeth's quote has become one of the more recognizable and memetic quotes from Civ V. Doesn't help that she's one of the few leaders to speak English.
  • Memetic Psychopath: "Nuclear Gandhi". His threat that "Our words are backed by NUCLEAR WEAPONS!" provides the main page's image (and no, that isn't Photoshopped). Any aggressive civ leader, especially Montezuma, Atilla, and Shaka, get this treatment as well.
  • Narm: In V, whenever you wipe a civilization out of the game, you get their defeated animation, either congratulating you or just being a Sore Loser. Fair enough, but they also reacted the same way when you managed to kill one of their spies. Much laughter can be heard especially for leaders like Montezuma or Harald Bluetooth.
  • Nightmare Fuel: IV had a mod for Beyond the Sword called Next War. It's pretty much Nineteen Eighty-Four in video game form, with superpowers at constant war with each other and mind control centers (Ministry of Love and Room 101, anyone?), for instance.
  • Older Than They Think: Some players were surprised to hear one of the game's more memorable background music themes in, say, a documentary film. That theme actually far predates the game: it's "Our Town" by Aaron Copland, composed for the 1940 movie of the same name.
  • Player-Preferred Pattern: In V, the Rationalism Social Policy track, since it improves Science output that is so vital, is taken by almost everyone regardless of intended victory type.
  • Poles Love Civilization: To the point that Word of God says that they were the chief reason why Poland was added to V with the Brave New World expansion. When the game was in development, there was a fan petition to add Poland as one of the Civs. It managed to collect 7351 signatures; while it failed to reach the goal of ten thousand, the developers did notice it.
  • Power Creep: A risk that every expansion runs. As new mechanics are added, older civilizations may not be able to perform the same playstyle as effectively.
    • From V, there's America's unique ability, "Manifest Destiny", which cuts the cost of buying tiles in half (and gives all land units +1 sight, a comparatively minor buff). Come the Brave New World expansion, you have the Shoshone's unique ability, "Great Expanse", which gives every newly-founded city eight free tiles and gives military units a combat bonus when fighting on friendly territory (i.e. on the home front). This thoroughly outclassed America's unique ability, which many fans felt should have been beefed up in Brave New World to make up for it. America's unique unit, the Minuteman, did get a minor buff (it now generates Golden Age points from victories), but not enough to compensate.
    • Also from V, the Aztecs did not get a rework in Brave New World. Before that, their unique ability, "Sacrificial Captives", giving them Culture for kills meant that they could be used to pursue a Cultural Victory, counterintuitive though it might seem. Under the Tourism system introduced by BNW, that is no longer possible.
    • The big one in V, though, is India. Their unique ability, "Population Growth", is the only one that carries a penalty: namely, it doubles unhappiness from number of cities, with the fact that it halves unhappiness from total population (a very powerful buff) making up for it. It was crafted with the intention of building a very "tall" nation with a small handful of very densely-populated and built-up cities, which was optimal for a Cultural Victory in the vanilla game (more cities increases the culture cost of social policies). BNW, however, changed Cultural Victories such that now, a large empire is preferable, precisely the sort of thing that India's unique ability pulls against. The result is that one of the best empires for a Culture Victory in the vanilla game and G&K becomes a Tier-Induced Scrappy in BNW.
  • Reality Subtext: The more turns that pass, the fewer "years" pass between turns. This is meant to represent how social and technological changes accelerated throughout history, but it also hilariously mimics the fact that as the game grinds on, it takes longer and longer for just one turn to pass as the map gets overgrown with empires and armies.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The removal of unit stacking in V has had a mixed reception, but one headache resulting is that it kills unit pathfinding. If you tell Unit A and Unit B to both make for the same hex tile, and Unit A gets there first, Unit B will ask for new orders. Imagine if you did that to your entire 15-unit army. The micromanaging is a nightmare, especially when combined with an interface bug that makes Fortified units unselectable once auto-move orders have been executed.
    • Unit stacking is problematic for military units, but it completely kills management of your civilians, most importantly workers. From I to IV, it was possible to stack your workers so they could finish tile improvements faster, meaning that laying rails or expanding in later stages of game could be done very fast, if not instantly with sufficient numbers of workers. By V, you can only use one worker per tile, meaning that no matter how advanced you are and how big your empire is, tile improvements take (sometimes literally) ages. It's even more glaring when you consider that some backward Iron Age civ is building its improvements almost at the same rate as the Next Sunday A.D. empire spanning two continents.
      • This can be alleviated considerably by building the Pyramids wonder (Workers build improvements +25% faster, and spawns 2 new Workers for free) and unlocking the Citizenship policy in the Liberty tree (Also +25% faster improvement speed, and 1 free Worker at your capital).
    • Trade routes being plundered in Brave New World. The unit for a trade route moves by itself. If a barbarian or enemy unit reaches the trade unit with any moves remaining, they can plunder it. If a trade unit runs into a barbarian or enemy unit, it can be plundered automatically. Upon being plundered, you lose the trade unit, which takes 10 turns or more to build in the early game. On paper, this makes sense; can't have a caravan or cargo ship moving around undefended. The scrappy part is that it's not enough to have a unit nearby that can see your trade unit; it must be right on the same space to keep it protected. Just escorting a normal civilian unit with a military unit is more work than it needs to be (both units have to be manually moved turn-by-turn to make sure they don't split up), but with an automated trade unit, the problem becomes worse. Oh, and if barbarians take your trade route, it turns into a barbarian military unit!
  • Stop Helping Me!:
    • The other civilizations love to butt in while you're deep in thought, planning, or an all-out war. There is no isolationist option for the game to play uninterrupted. In IV you could set up a game with no AI to play against, but this was again dropped in V.
    • If you accept an offer of friendship from Civilization A just to make them go away, you often find yourself immediately contacted by civs B, C, and D one after the other, each saying "I see you've become friends with A, I have done the same. Perhaps great things can come from this alliance in the future!", or conversely "I hate A, don't get too friendly with them or we'll have problems getting along" (not helped by the fact that you can't check diplomatic status when asked to declare friendship, and rejecting prevents you from proposing friendship with them for quite a few turns).
    • The logic routines used by UI in V to decide which units you should give orders to first is... Well, suffice it to say that you should get used to giving the wrong orders to wrong units, and to watching your screen go whizzing halfway around the globe. Sometimes twice, if you managed to give a command to the unit you actually care about while the game tries to foist some Worker Unit on you instead. It's actually very annoying how often the game will announce you have a new unit ready and then activate a different unit instead of the one it just told you about, making you send warriors to resources and workers into warzones. An option to disable this has since been added.
  • That One Achievement:
    • "Conquest of the World" in V, which requires you to win via a Domination Victory as Greece by 350 BC. Even if you play on a Duel size map (which is highly recommended for this achievement), there is still a lot of luck involved in what resources your city spawns near, what enemy you get and their playstyle, and how fast you can build up your military so you can both destroy your enemy and meet the deadline, all while ensuring your own civilization's economy doesn't collapse.
      • Unless, of course, you play one of the five tutorial maps, which technically count as a Domination Victory upon completion. You still have to keep restarting until you're randomly assigned Greece, though.
      • While fairly luck-based, a Domination Victory is NOT actually required for the achievement: the criteria to complete it reads "As Alexander, defeat every known player by 350BC". 'Every known player' refers only to the players whom you have met at any point in the game. So if you were playing on a Continents map and found yourself sharing it with a single other civ, then provided you're lucky enough to not meet anyone else before you can conquer them, it counts.
    • "Kamikaze Attack", also from V, requires you to defeat an enemy unit with your attacking unit having only 1 HP left. It's somewhat doable if already a Luck-Based Mission in vanilla, where health maxes at 10, but Random Number God give you the good luck you'll need to get it in G&K or BNW where health maxes at 100.
    • In BNW, "Pyramid Scheme," which requires you to have 1) the Louvre 2) in Paris 3) with a Full Set Bonus, which involves 4) two Artifacts and two works of Art, all from different ages and civilizations. The Art is easy to swap, but the only way to get an artifact that isn't from the Ancient age is to engage in a war of conquest or run into barbarians that haven't been killed off yet, fight a bunch of battles, and then cross your fingers. (At least your ruler is renowned for his warfighting abilities.)
    • Also in BNW, "Raiders of the Lost Ark", which requires you to play as America and have one of your Archaeologists extract an artifact in Egyptian lands while a German Archaeologist is within two tiles. While it is a nice homage to Indiana Jones, its ridiculously specific requirements usually means that you'll probably never achieve this through normal gameplay without the help of other people online through multiplayer playing along with you to help you gain the achievement.
    • In BNW again is the achievement "Here's Looking At You Kid", referencing Casablanca. It requires you to play as Morocco with an enemy Portugal. You have to capture Portugal's starting city/capital Lisbon. You then need an Airport there to airlift a worker from there to Casablanca (Morocco's starting city/capital). You can already see the annoyance in getting this.
    • Thankfully, plenty of the achievements that could be seen as this can be alleviated with Hot Seat mode (a multiplayer mode where different players share the same computer). With that said it can still feel a bit grind-y.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • Once civilizations started having unique qualities and traits (which started in III), this became inevitable. As of vanilla V, the losers are Napoleon, whose trait, while very useful in the early-mid game, has an expiration date (though Napoleon is unique among playable leaders for his career ending in defeat...), and Suleiman of the Ottomans, whose ability to convert Barbarian boats to your control looks lame in comparison to the German ability to do that to land units (though a patch balanced things out by giving the Ottomans greatly reduced naval maintenance costs as well).
    • Theodora and Byzantium's unique ability in V is one bonus belief when founding a religion. It can be fun to see what combinations of beliefs become possible with this on lower difficulties or noncompetitive games, but on higher difficulties or competitive multiplayer, it's outweighed by how much work it takes to found the religion in the first place and to keep it thriving. It does not help that both of its unique units can go obsolete quickly and the promotions lack firepower. The uniques also have very poor synergy with each other. If you want to enjoy the religion bonus, you're busy building shrines and temples and have less time to build the units before they go obsolete. Bad synergy doesn't automatically make them bad overall, but doesn't help their case when they're already underwhelming.
    • It tends to boil down more to which playstyle people should pursue as them. Many civs have unique traits and units that help a lot early on and then taper off into nothingness, which encourages aggressive expansion or conquest in those early stages and building off of that advantage in the later stages.
    • In Brave New World, Napoleon and France were reworked. They lose one of their unique units (the Foreign Legion, which becomes a unit only available for civs following the Freedom ideology) and get a unique improvement that boosts culture and doubles as a fort. Their new trait plays off the offensive cultural system, instead of giving passive bonuses until an arbitrary cutoff date.
    • In Brave New World, India was not reworked to take advantage of the new offensive cultural system. The old Culture Victory system rewarded civs with a small number of well-developed cities, a strategy India was specifically geared towards: it has its "Large City" penalties halved and its "Many Cities" penalty doubled. The new Tourism system is dependent on generating large numbers of Great Mediamakers, which is easier with... many cities. Its unique building does generates Tourism, but in the end it still doesn't have a viable strategy.
      • While this is still true in trying to earn the "Bollywood" achievementnote , nowadays, it's considered a misconception that India cannot play wide empires or "Many Cities", just merely slowed down. To wit: once the city reaches beyond 6 in population, the decrease of unhappiness can be seen, so a wide Gandhi is still viable.
    • Among multiplayers in V, Venice is obviously the weakest with their inability to control any city other than the capital, and trade routes (their specialty) can easily be plundered or embargoed. To a lesser extent, Sweden, sometimes for the multiplayers, getting a 10% bonus in Great People production with a Friendship Agreement isn't worth it when you're giving Sweden an additional 10% of Great People production.
    • The Iroquois is often regarded as the worst civilization as its only unique building is one of of the few buildings that loses 10% production bonus in exchange for a highly situational production bonus for each forest tile, its buggy unique ability which is also very situational, and its lackluster unique unit which is also situational. About the only time people will play the Iroquois is if they're playing an Arboreal map, which is a map covered in trees.
    • The Rationalism policy in Civilization V, especially in higher difficulties, due to the fact that its theme, science, is one of the foundations that makes you win the game.
  • Woolseyism: The SNES version of Civilization I changes the traditional opening to a goddess charging the player to make his civilization greater than all others. If the player wins by wiping out all other nations the goddess reappears and congratulates the player.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/Civilization