YMMV: Chappelle's Show

  • Crazy Awesome: Rick James as played by Dave Chappelle.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: Dave's own son abandoning him, and adopting Nick Cannon as his "new daddy."
    • Even though the "Time Haters" sketch didn't air, most of the buildup before hand was pretty damn hysterical: First, the Time Haters deliver a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown to Adolf Hitler, and even the parts on the slave ranch before Silky shoots the slave master (up to calling the master a 'cracker' and 'honky', and then holding him at gunpoint) were pretty funny too.
    Silky Johnson: (After delivering a "The Reason You Suck" Speech to the slave master) -But the point is, is that in the future, all black people are gonna be free!!
    Slave: When's we gonna be free?
    Silky Johnson: That is a good question, my man! (Thinks for a Beat) How about now-ish? (BANG!!)
  • Discredited Meme: Dave actually chewed out fans at a concert for endlessly repeating the Rick James line.
    Chappelle: "You know why my show is good? Because the network officials say you're not smart enough to get what I'm doing, and every day I fight for you. I tell them how smart you are. Turns out, I was wrong. You people are stupid."
  • Ear Worm: Haters wanna hate/Lovers wanna love/I don't even want/None of the above/I want to piss on you!
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Tron Carter, Silky Johnson.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: During the "Niggar Family" skit, Chappelle's character follows up a collection of n-word puns by saying in a humorous tone, "This racism is killing me inside." After his existential-angst-fueled trip to Africa brought on by the racism of his show, it's hard to laugh at that line, because that racism was killing him inside.
    • In the aftermath of Chappelle's fallout with the show, a lot of humorous but still envelope-pushing moments take on this tone.
    • The Wayne Brady episode gives us an intro of Dave quitting over negotiations for the third season, this line especially stands out following the "Lost Episodes" run:
    Network Official: Suit yourself Dave, you've already shot all your sketches. At this point in the season you're replaceable.
  • Growing the Beard: The first season was largely ignored until around episode eight, when two sketches aired that basically caught the public's attention: The first was an R. Kelly parody, which had Dave as R. Kelly singing a song making fun of the singer's sexual fetish of urinating on women. The second was a Real World parody, where Dave made fun of the white people to black people ratio of the show by imagining what would happen if MTV would cast an edition of the show where there was one white guy (comic Christian Finnegan) and the rest of the cast were crazy black people, who mercilessly torment the sole white guy.
    • One could argue that the beard never needed to be grown in the first place. The Black White Supremacist sketch was in the very first episode. The elements that made it so popular were there from the start. What it lacked was popularity, which isn't this trope.
  • Guilty Pleasures: Of a sort. The show is intelligently written and well-acted, but it can be very uncomfortable for white fans to realize what they're laughing at.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: During the "Racial Draft" sketch, Tiger Woods becomes fully black. After clamoring about how he'll be going from eating fried rice to eating fried chicken and getting the chance to say "Fo'shizzle", the commentators receive word that he's lost all of his endorsements. After his later stint as a man who's cheated on his wife with an astronomical number of women and his falling out with the media and some of the people who admired him, Tiger Woods has lost most of his endorsements, to the point that his appearance at the Masters had him with his own logo. Your sympathies towards the man are subjective, of course.
    Dave: "Tough break, nigga. There's always FUBU!"
    • The DJs behind this prank call must not have watched the "Zapped" sketch's second segment. Otherwise, this little mishap might have been avoided.
    • The "Love Contract" sketch involves Dave getting a sexual partner to sign a consent form to show that they're a willing participant. Some time later, California and New York introduced the controversial "yes means yes" policies for universities, where people having sex are instructed to confirm that they have a partner's "enthusiastic consent"note . Many, critics snarked that the only real way to prove this was to have both people sign a consent form.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: The point of the Lost Episodes' "New 2Pac Song" sketch, which pokes fun at "2Pac Lives!" conspiracy theorists.
  • Memetic Mutation: Rick James, Sam Jackson beer, Wayne Brady's bitch-choking, etc., etc.
  • Misaimed Fandom: One of the factors in Dave Chappelle's Creator Backlash was the realization that a significant chunk of his audience was racist white people taking the racial stereotyping at face value and/or just being way too excited by hearing the n-word a lot.