* AdaptationDisplacement: When the [=PS1=] sequel ''Blaster Master: Blasting Again'' was released in Japan, instead of following the original ''Metafight'' plot, it actually followed the plot of the American version.
* AntiClimaxBoss: ''Enemy Below'''s third boss. Considering he was fairly hard in the first game... Here, he's a complete joke and can be dispatched without him getting a single hit against you.
* SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic:
** The first game has lots of it.
*** For example, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwMU9zkflYc this frenetic, yet catchy tune]] from Area 7.
*** Or the classic theme from Area 1, or the Area 3 techno theme, or... hell, just call it an Awesome Soundtrack, really.
* BaseBreakingCharacter: Shovel Knight's addition in ''Zero'' was met with some pushback, with fans claiming that Shovel Knight has already appeared in dozens of other indie games and didn't really need to appear in more. On the other hand, there are also fans who are happy about Shovel Knight because he's a good character, and his gameplay looked very fleshed out and interesting when first revealed.
* CatharsisFactor: Hated the [[DemonicSpiders searchlight guards]] in ''Zero''[='=]s Area 7 dungeons? Play as Gunvolt in EX Characters Mode, get Voltaic Chains, then laugh in their faces as you proceed to OneHitKill entire swaths of them simultaneously.
* CultClassic: Although it's not as well known as some of the bigger hits on the system, the original NES title is one of the most beloved video games out there. The sequels... [[SoOkayItsAverage Well, not so much.]]
* DemonicSpiders: The searchlight enemies in Area 7 of ''Zero''. The overworld enemies are normally docile, but if you walk into their cone of sight or attack them, they'll suddenly become aggressive and start leaping at you while firing lots of bullets. Not only are they crazy fast, they also have ''much'' more health than most non-boss enemies, which means it can take a while to kill them if you decide to confront them head-on. The dungeon versions are similar to the previously encountered soldier enemies, but if one spots you, ''every single one in the room'' will converge on your position and start attacking with a bullet storm. These guys also have ridiculous amounts of HP, and they can only be stopped by leaving the room or killing them all, which is easier said than done considering they're aggressive damage sponges.
* FirstInstallmentWins:
** Good luck finding any fans of ''2'', ''Enemy Below'', ''Blasting Again'', or ''Overdrive''.
** ''Zero'' is well liked and led to this page getting plenty of WikiMagic. Still falls under this trope as a remake of the original.
* GameBreaker: ''Zero'' has a number of these:
** The Wave Gun, which fires a wide triple shot that goes through objects and enemies and can be rapid fired as fast as you can [[ButtonMashing mash the Shoot button.]] Most bosses can easily be defeated with it in only a matter of a few shots. Of course, if you take a hit (or get hit in rapid enough succession for the Energy Guard to not work), [[UnstableEquilibrium the situation can go out of control in a hurry...]] That said, made even more broken when you have the upgrade that gives your weapon gauge a regenerating shield that takes a hit before your weapon does. Of course, the devs planned around this and [[spoiler:made the second form of the final boss immune to this weapon (the inverse holds true in Destroyer Mode; good luck maintaining that upgrade though!)]].
** Remote Blast trivializes dungeon bosses once you get it. Landing a full 15-hit salvo on a boss can burn through up to '''4/5ths''' of the boss's health. Ekoro has a nerfed version of this ability that lets her repeatedly hammer her targets while they move in slo-mo, but the fact that they move means you can't just fire and forget.
** Gunvolt himself is largely overpowered. The Prevasion mechanic means that as long as he isn't inside the SOPHIA III, he can pretty much never die while he still has EP and isn't Flashfielding, and SP charges fast enough that you can freely dump Luxcaliburs and Dragonspheres on enemies without worrying too much about downtime. His ability to WallJump and glide with Flashfield also makes the SOPHIA III nearly obsolete except for the Hover and Dive abilities, and Gunvolt can easily recharge lost hit points by hopping into a dungeon and using Galvanic Patch. The only thing Gunvolt doesn't have going for him is the lack of flexibility in his offensive options, which has the side effect of upgrading some of the bosses into ThatOneBoss.
** The Brainy Dance is the only transformation Shantae has to go out of her way to unlock, and for good reason. Once obtained roughly halfway through the game, it completely obsoletes the Mutant Dance and Elephant Dance dungeon transformations. The Brainy Dance transforms Shantae into Mother Brain, which allows her to move as fast as her untransformed running speed, gives her a powerful exploding projectile that can be used indefinitely and can be redirected while in use, and, uniquely, gives Shantae flight properties, which allows her to fly over bodies of water and drastically cut down travel time in later dungeons, especially Area 5 and Area 7 dungeons.
** Shovel Knight in general can be called one for the most part as far as dungeons are concerned as he has no defense penalties, his attacks do hefty damage and he can reflect projectiles into equally damaging and piercing shots. He has an invincibility sub weapon, and can fish up more life/magic at low cost. And he can get an upgrade to give him a projectile (at max life), faster attack rate, and a wide arc charged attack. Navigation wise, his shovel can break through Area 4's special blocks and cracked walls (despite how the attacks may reach you have to hit the cracked wall from the proper side). People wonder if his damage output would get nerfed or not. What keeps him from being utterly broken is the hefty MP costs of his relics, but a cautious and/or skilled player can work around that. His Phase Locket is arguably even more broken that it is in his own game, since it lasts much longer and allows him to walk through bosses and go to town on them (very useful on Hard Shell, but [[ThatOneBoss Gurnahide]] is immune to it because you cant walk through it to get to its weak spot).
* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff:
** ''Metafight'' is not particularly well-remembered in Japan, probably due to the somewhat non-linear action-based gameplay. For the same reason, ''Blaster Master'' is '''beloved''' by gamers who cut their teeth in the NES era, as the game practically [[{{Metroidvania}} out-Metroided]] the original Metroid. The [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic awesome tunes]] helped this.
** This is so fantastically prominent that while ''Metafight'' practically fell by the wayside, America got a UK-developed ''exclusive'' sequel, a novelization, inspired several GameBoy ports, and by the time the ''Blasting Again'' rolled around, the American plotline ''superceded'' the Japanese one, even in Japan. And the game got a re-release on the Virtual Console due to, you guessed it, American pressure.
** Interestingly, the remake of the original by Inti Creates, ''[[http://inticreates.com/blaster-master-zero-3ds/ Blaster Master Zero]]'', quite clearly uses the ''Blaster Master'' name and aspects of the ''Blaster Master'' NES story, but in an entirely new continuity closer in tone to ''Metafight'' - for instance, Jason is a robotics engineer who has the design of Kane Gardner from ''Metafight'', Fred is an alien creature rather than a normal frog, humanity has been driven underground for a time by an ice age before they came back to the surface and restored it, and Eve is present with the design of Dr. Jennifer Cornet from the original ''Metafight''.
* GoodBadBugs:
** The "[[PauseAbuse grenade-pause]]" trick in the first game.
** The UK version of the original is horribly glitched; pausing can negate FallDamage, [[GameBreaker getting trapped in a wall now shoots you upwards]], and combining these two with the door glitch allows you to complete the game without fighting the first seven bosses and leaving [[CoolCar SOPHIA]] at the start of the game.
* ItsEasySoItSucks: A common criticism of ''Zero'' is the lack of challenge, especially owing to the [[GameBreaker game breaking]] Wave Gun, which can be acquired very early on in the game, and easily defeat most bosses. Difficulty issues aside, it's revered as a well-done retro remake overall. The difficulty issue has been remedied with the addition of a "Destroyer Mode", a NintendoHard variant of the game unlocked after beating the game, as of the version 1.2 update.
* PlayerPunch: The seventh boss battle, if one reads the aforementioned Scholastic Publishing tie-in, becomes one, as it turns out that the boss is Jason's escaped pet frog, Fred. But when you beat the game, you see Jason and Fred sitting on SOPHIA's roof watching the enemy's stronghold crumble, so either Fred turned back to normal after being defeated and the game never bothered to show it or neither of the frog bosses was Fred and Jason found him somewhere between beating the final boss and escaping the enemy stronghold. The ''Worlds of Power'' novelization explains that the frog boss' appearance was merely a disguise, meant to torment Jason psychologically. The real Fred was alive and well.
* {{Sequelitis}}: ''Blaster Master 2'' is ''notoriously'' bad, to the point where it just feels like a cash-in on the original game's success. The games that followed weren't nearly as terrible, but fell into SoOkayItsAverage territory until ''Zero''.
* SignatureScene: Even people who've never played it remember [[https://youtu.be/Vb8b02474FM?t=43s SOPHIA III's initial start up]]. ''Zero'' replicates that as well as doing one for [[spoiler:SOPHIA ZERO before the TrueFinalBoss]]
* SoBadItsGood: The voice acting in ''Blasting Again'' is so atrocious, it's actually somewhat hilarious to listen to.
* SoOkayItsAverage: Part of the reason the sequels aren't particularly well remembered is that they weren't really outstanding in any degree like the NES game was. Sure, they're far from terrible games, but they aren't great either.
* SurpriseDifficulty: The major complaint about ''Zero'' revolves around [[ItsEasySoItSucks its low difficulty curve.]] If you then decide to jump into Destroyer Mode while thinking it's just the same game with beefier enemies, ''[[NintendoHard you're in for a huge shock.]]''
* ThatOneBoss:
** In the first game, the sixth and seventh bosses. Not to mention the fifth boss if you didn't enter his room with your gun fully powered-up.
** Ancient Freeze can be trivialized by Jason with the Flamethrower and Wave Gun, Gunvolt's Flashfield lets him focus more on mobility once the nodes are tagged, and Ekoro's charge shots stop for nobody, allowing her to pop the bladed discs without wasting shots on the boss. Shantae and Shovel Knight, on the other hand, have their work cut out for them. The room is perpetually covered in ice, which Ancient Freeze can renew with ice spikes at any time, and since their fiery options consume magic, that means you will have to endure the ice at some point. Also, their main form of damage is melee based, and you have to bust this boss to get the Ultimate Shovel Blade, meaning you have to play footsies with the nodes' lasers and the bladed discs at the same time while trying to avoid CollisionDamage. Shantae's Storm Puff lets her passively damage the boss while Shovel Knight's Phase Locket lets him mitigate damage, but since these use magic as well, unless you're willing to drag out the fight and risk getting shredded by something, they won't last forever. The fight gets easier as the nodes get destroyed, but see about lasting that long first.
** Area 5 has Gurnahide and Hard Shell. It's not that it's a problem for Jason, who has the [[GameBreaker Wave Gun]], but rather, it's a problem for the EX Characters, to varying degrees.
*** Gurnahide is kind of a joke if you're playing as Jason or Shantae[[note]]if you have the Brainy Dance[[/note]] and bearable as Ekoro; as Gunvolt, however, you're in for a ride. The boss advances upon Gunvolt's position all the time, and can only be pushed back by any significant degree with Cerberus auto-fire, which due to a lack of strafing option demands standing in the boss's face and holding the Shoot button while praying Prevasion saves you. It's also surprisingly resilient to Flashfield, which forces you to rely on Luxcalibur as your main damage dealer, the inherent problem here being that Luxcalibur eats two of your 3 SP, which means you're going to be running circles around Gurnahide's BulletHell salvos while waiting for your SP to recharge. If you're unlucky enough to get pinned at the far edge of the ring despite your best efforts, you're screwed.
*** Shovel Knight has no problem against Hard Shell as he can dig through the bubble walls and its bubbles can be reflected; with his damage output, the fight won't last long. However, Gurnahide without the Ult. Shovel Blade upgrade is pretty hard if tackled recklessly as he can't keep it back at his normal attack rate and its head takes less damage. It boils down to keeping one wing alive as long as possible to whittle it down, strafing to keep the shots aimed as straight as possible, and when both wings go down, using the Phase Locket to dig away at Gurnahide's face hoping it dies before you do. Given that it has an inert item for him, you'd be better off coming back with the Shovel upgrade to tackle him.
*** Hard Shell can be trivialized with the Wave Gun, Ekoro's charge shot and Kick can pierce the frontal carapace, and so can Shovel Knight's reflected projectiles, but because Gunvolt has none of these options, he actually has to ''properly'' fight the boss. Hard Shell happens to be a BullfightBoss that can only be significantly injured after a charging attack, and constantly sprays out bubbles that Gunvolt has problems punching through because his Tagging mechanic means he can only hit a few targets at a time without Skills. Luxcalibur is thankfully long enough to hit his back when he's facing you, and Gunvolt can continue dealing damage to Hard Shell once he lands a Tag, but he has to restore Tags once they wear off, and Hard Shell can give you a hard time while you're trying to do that.
*** Shantae doesn't have it much easier against Hard Shell. The pain is mitigated by the fact that Shantae's Storm Puff ignores enemies when deployed and can be moved by hair whips, allowing it to shock the boss' sensitive rear; the downside is that Storm Puff consumes a lot of Magic, meaning that if Shantae can't keep stocked, she has to whip the boss in melee range, and it inflicts a whopping two units of CollisionDamage when you only have 13 health at the most the first time around, and 16 at the most period. Brainy Dance doesn't help, as the 'projectiles' are large and can hit the boss' invulnerable legs instead. Have fun.
** The Boss Blaster mode is awfully generous with its health and energy pickups, allowing Jason to keep his weapon level raised as much as possible on foot and keeping the others topped off on the energy they need. None of that matters against Invem Sophia, which makes very competent use of all of the Sophia III's weapons systems in ways that make the player want to scream. The player is capped at 8 life maximum, which wouldn't be so bad if you weren't stuck with the Sophia III yourself, meaning the boss is better at what you can do, and it starts the fight with the [[OneHitKill Acceleration Blast]], putting you in a bind with having to manage your energy levels while avoiding getting yourself nuked into oblivion by its other weapons once it's done firing. Expect to die a lot to it no matter what you try.
* ToughActToFollow: The soundtrack for the original game is pretty hard to beat. Despite Ippo Yamada's best efforts, renowned Inti Creates music director as he is, some fans are disappointed about the soundtrack of ''Zero'' in comparison to the NES classic.
* WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs: [[spoiler:Area 9, "Alternate Dimension"]], in ''Zero'' is '''weird.'''
* {{Woolseyism}}: The Famicom version, ''Chō Wakusei Senki (Super Planetary War Chronicle) Metafight'' had a pretty standard space opera plot and setting. The game was set in the distant future on an alien planet and instead of a young boy looking for his missing frog, the main character was a space soldier sent to destroy an alien overlord. However, most of the plot is detailed only in the manual and only the opening and ending are actually different.
** The name of Metafight's planet, "Sophia III", being given to the Metal Attacker tank in the American release, making the CoolTank even cooler.