Western Animation: Zorro Generation Z

Another Rick Ungar creation. This time the story of Zorro is updated to 2015 and the latest descendant of the De La Vega line also called Diego is a 17 year old teenager who takes up the mantle of Zorro with help from his mute friend Bernardo. To replace the famous Tornado we now have a Cool Bike called Tornado Z that helps transport Diego to fight against the corrupt mayor of the town.


  • Beneath the Earth: One episode has "The Subway People," a civilization that inexplicably lives below Pueblo Grande.
  • Broke Episode: There was an episode where Diego's dad decides to make him learn the value of a dollar and cuts him off from his trust fund, right when he needs a lot of money to rebuild his totaled bike.
  • Daddy's Little Villain: Mostly subverted with Maria. She fights the criminals working for her dad but when the opportunity arises to expose him as a criminal, she can't go through with it.
  • Family-Friendly Firearms: The future looks a lot like the present if you don't count weaponry. Guns strongly resemble the Star Trek: The Next Generation early "dustbuster" incarnation of phasers.
  • Four Is Death: Thoe show's most formidable villains are the appropriately-named Fearsome Four. Luckily for Zorro they only show up twice.
  • Laser Blade: Everyone has laser swords, and a lot of people have laser whips.
  • Left Hanging: The show ends with Mayor Martinez losing his reelection campaign... to an even bigger crook. The intro to a second season was released, but the season itself never followed. Strangely the season 2 intro makes it look like Mayor Martinez still would've been the main villain.
  • Legacy Character: There have been many Zorro's over the years. Diego is just the most recent.
    • Making it kind of weird is that (in the English version at least) they always gave the role of previous Zorros to the same guy who voiced the mayor, that is the Big Bad.
  • Mutual Masquerade: Diego and Maria have no idea of each others' secret identities, until the last episode.
  • Mythology Gag: Originally Maria's costumed identity was going to be the Black Whip, probably based on the movie Zorro's Black Whip, actually about a masked heroine. Presumably this was changed to make her more distinct from the black-clad Zorro. It's also a reference to Lady Rawhide, a popular "Bad Girl" spin-off of the '90s Zorro comics who wore red and used a whip.
  • Never Say "Die": Averted in the theme song. The show still uses euphemisms for the most part.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: Scarlet Whip's method of distinguishing herself from her civilian identity... she puts on red shades and wears a red trenchcoat. That's it.
    • They never mention this but if you look close her hair is pinker in costume, implying she also wears a wig.
  • Recycled IN SPACE: Zorro IN THE FUTURE!
  • Shout-Out / Expy: Scarlet Whip to Lady Rawhide
  • The Voiceless: Some actually assumed Bernardo Morn-esquely never quite got the opportunity to get a word in while on screen, before it was made clear he couldn't speak.
  • Whip It Good: The Scarlet Whip wields twin laser whips.
  • Whip Sword: the Scarlet Whip wields twin laser whips; Laser Blades with the reach and flexibility of a whip.
  • Zorro Mark: Naturally. Into the seat of an enemy's pants, usually.