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This is a "Wild Mass Guess" entry, where we pull out all the sanity stops on theorizing. The regular entry on this topic is elsewhere. Please see this programme note.
Night Watch

This section is for Literature/NightWatch.

Svetlana was the one that 'suggested' Las go to Kazakhstan.
We know Sveta is both strongly precognitive and excellent at reading probability lines. She also knows much of what happened at the Assol complex. It's entirely possible she foresaw Anton would need a lift and persuaded Las to get the right train, knowing he would get off at the same spot after the spell wore off.

As for why she went to the trouble of calling him, that allows her to cast a weaker (and thus less detectable) spell while also deflecting suspicion away from herself.

Olga has swapped bodies with men quite often already.
This is a Wild Mass Guess for the Day Watch movie, and it is quite a small one. But based on the way Olga was preparing herself to be strangled from behind and the fact that she is already comfortable with passing for Anton among his colleagues, it seems like Olga must have done this before. It makes sense, since she has been a Night Watch agent for a long time, working under Geser and being a pretty close friend of his, that she was his go-to person for mind-swapping a person as a decoy.

  • Not to mention knowing the way around the wrong voice. And she was remarkably comfortable with him feeling his/her breasts/ass/groin. Then she let him go off with his girlfriend, knowing he was almost certain to let her in on the secret.

Merlin's riddle wasn't a warning.

Colossal spoilers for The Twilight Watch follow.

    Show spoileriffic content 
Merlin's riddle says "Proceed if you are as strong as I. Or turn back, if you are as wise as I." Anton takes this to mean that a wise Other will turn back, as the seventh layer of the Twilight is incredibly dangerous.

However, by working with Nadya, he is able to break through the barrier at the bottom of the sixth layer, and gets to the first layer, because the layers are cyclic, with the surface world being both the zeroth and seventh layer. While it takes a lot of power to get there from the sixth layer, he could have gotten there easily simply by going back up through the layers of the Twilight.

And that's what Merlin's riddle actually meant. From the sixth level, one can reach the seventh in two ways. The strong other will use brute force to open a portal, while the wise one will take the easier path of going up to the zeroth level, which is also the seventh.

  • What is this doing at WMG page? This one was spelled almost leter-to-later in book itself.

This section is for the Discworld book of the same name.

Ned Coates didn't die (at least in the altered timeline).
He was still alive a moment before Vimes was sent back to the present. We don't see him die, so he might still be alive.
  • It's also possible that he died in the original timeline (hence the grave with his name on it), but not the altered one. To avoid a paradox, the History Monks sent him to Fourecks, which had a messed up timeline anyway.
    • Would that make him the "Tinhead Ned" who'd occupied the jail cell before Rincewind?
  • Vetinari mentions that the fighting continues for a time after Vimes/Keel and Carcer disappear into the present (during which time he, Vetinari, kills four men). It's possible that Ned was killed during that time, or that he was injured earlier and the wound proved fatal.

Carcer is still alive.
Think about it. He was sentenced to hanging. Now let's see, which other characters were sentenced to hanging? There was 1) Rincewind, in The Last Continent. Escaped and saved the country. 2) Moist von Lipwig, in Going Postal. The hanging is faked by Vetinari, because he is useful, and he ends up as head of multiple large business organizations. 3) (I'm not completely sure about this one) Owlswick Jenkins, in Making Money. Is rescued and then secreted away by Vetinari, presumably to make something artistic that is very necessary, somehow. Now, who else has gotten the angel treatment? Moist von Lipwig, the incredible thief. Reacher Gilt, expert swindler and crooked business man. Owlswick Jenkins, stamp forger. So Vetinari only does it for normal thieves, not murderers, right? But doesn't it say, in the book, the whole "Would you let a murderer go for a thousand dollars?" passage? It's the same thing. What are Carcer's skills? Firstly, he's charismatic. He is said to almost be able to convince you that he is innocent. Secondly, he's super-sane. That's more or less the whole point. Why the hell wouldn't Vetinari take him? Remember, Vetinari is compared to a little old lady who collects pieces of string, because they might be useful. Every time throughout the book he comes up, he counsels towards the perfect arrest. In the second scene, he asks that shouldn't Carcer be taken in by the book, and says "and ask questions later." He knows Vimes perfectly. He knows that Vimes just wants to kill Carcer. He is subliminally convincing hhim not to kill him. In the graveyard scene, there are three hints. One, on the same note, he congratulates him on a perfect arrest. Two, there is the "What could I prove? And to what end would I prove it?" He is telling Vimes not to pursue this line of inquiry anymore. Vimes's life as Keel is over, and Carcer's life as Carcer is over. Thirdly, "The Job they had to do." Vetinari needs Carcer for something, and he will make him do it. I don't yet know what it is, but I feel like he will come up again. We never see him die. All we see is that he is sent to the gallows... and disappears.
  • Except that sparing a cop-killer who'd threatened his family is probably the one thing Vetinari could do that would make Sam Vimes turn against him. He's not going to waste an invaluable asset like Vimes just to acquire the services of an unsteerable psychopath.
    • Agreed, Moist, Jenkins, Leonard, et all are kept alive because Vetinari knows the buttons to push to keep them under control. Carcer doesn't have those buttons, like The Joker he just wants to watch the world burn. He's the sort of person that when sent on a mission to kill Colonel Condiment, would take time out to stomp on kids tea-party, slice the throat of of someone who looked at him funny, and then burn down a water-balloon factory all on the way. And not understand what he did wrong, or even there was a difference between any of those acts. Vetinari would have no use for such a man.
    • Also, Moist et al. are essentially good people. Carcer is not.
    • On top of the practical reasons outlined above, there's also the fact that Vetinari wears the lilac. We've seen how seriously those who were there take the rememberance of the Glorious 25th of May. Even Vetinari wouldn't be coldhearted enough to allow the man responsible for 6 of those 7 graves to walk free, and on May 25 at that.

Carcer isn't really a psychopath.
He's just Wrong Genre Savvy. He believes that he is the hero and everyone trying to stop him is just a Mook.
  • Which makes Vimes/Keel Carcer's Big Bad, naturally.

Reg Shoe died instantly from the first arrow shot.
He became a zombie immediately, but was so carried away by the intensity of the battle that he didn't even realize this had happened. He only lay down when the number of Annoying Arrows made movement difficult even for one of the undead, at which point he succumbed to a Heroic BSOD. Hours later, after someone from the Embalmer's Guild had pulled all the arrows out and buried him, Reg realized that just lying around wasn't accomplishing anything and dug himself up.
  • The idea of a zombie (a discworld zombie, anyway) being weighed down by arrows doesn't seem likely. It's been established (in Reaper Man) that they can easily smash their way out of a wooden coffin and dig their way out of the ground.
  • It didn't have to completely immobilize him, just hinder him enough to make him notice he'd been arrow-riddled and keel over from the shock of it.
    • Vimes does note this pretty much as a fact...except for the movement part. He only 'laid down' after he consciously realized that he SHOULD be dead, having so many arrows in him.
    • This might even help explain Reg's later habit of going to graveyards and trying to convince the completely dead to quit lying around: he never actually experienced an interruption in consciousness when he died himself, so assumes they're just as continuously-conscious and are simply being apathetic.

There are two Discworld timelines that merged at the end.
The Keel-timeline and the Vimes-as-Keel-timeline exist parallel. When Vimes and Carcer show up the timeline is splitted into one, where they do show up and one, where they don't. When the point is reached where the two timelines are very similar, they merge into one again, with some people remembering one timeline and one the other, since both really happend. This would explain why Vimes and Vetinari remember different timelines.


Thief of TimeWMG/DiscworldMonstrous Regiment
NeverwhereWMG/LiteratureOctober Daye

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