WMG: Judge Dredd

We do know what Judge Dredd looks like.
We have never seen HIS face, but we have seen Fargo's! In an early story (prog 377), five judge clones are hijacked on their way to Texas City. We see the faces of the original judges, one of whom is Judge Fargo. The first judge, logically Fargo seeing as he gets mentioned first and the other four shortly afterwards with less flair, even has the right sort of chin.
  • Did he keep his hat on all through the Dead Man arc? I suppose he must have done, otherwise the bionic eyes should have been a dead (uh... sorry) giveaway.
    • We see Dredd's full, disfigured face multiple times throughout that story, including his eyes, but had it not been for one character pointing out how his eyes just don't look natural, I doubt the casual reader would have been able to pick up that they were bionic by just looking at the artwork.
    • You can't really tell whether they're bionic or not, necessarily, but the eyes do look strange. They have square pupils, for instance.
    • He is, however, far more disfigured from his encounter with the Sisters of Death at the beginning of this tale than he's ever been suggested to be in any other tale; even the parts of his face that we'd always see are horribly scarred.
  • Even earlier, during the Rico Dredd story, there's a flashback which shows a young Rico with his helmet off, and since Rico is a clone-brother of Joe... he's not bad-looking, given the chin.
  • The same story shows Joe sans helmet. He and Rico are seen on a firing range in profile. However, there is a fan theory which states that, due to the immense amount of pummelling, surgery etc. that Dredd has received over the years, he probably doesn't look much like that any more.
  • It's also hinted that Dredd's face is somehow disfigured, in an early strip he reveals his face to some thugs (covered to the audience by a big 'CENSORED' sticker) and they seem pretty horrified.
  • His hair fell out and he can't admit because of his bad people skills.
    • Funnily enough, that WMG was a plot point in one story where Dredd was faced with a group of bald extremists.
  • Fargo's face was shown in the comic in an early story (it's on Fargo's entry on The Other Wiki for those interested), but it's likely that this has been Ret Conned by Origins.

The movie is a propaganda film made by the authorities of the comic book universe.
  • Judging (NPI) by the film's quality, it's more likely that it was a smear campaign by his enemies.
  • Dredd, however, probably is more likely to be this.

The uniform is more important than the judge.
Slap the uniform on someone with a modicum of ass-kicking skills and send them out on the street. The judge uniform is SCARY. But as the comics show, any judge who is not Dredd is pretty much cannon fodder. Propaganda judges are perfect. If they succeed and capture some criminals, great. If they blast a few people, who cares? If they get blasted, so what? Ten judges walking down the street tends to be more a crime deterrent then anything else.
  • So are you saying Dredd's secretly a Legacy Character Dread Pirate Roberts style? Would explain why we never see his face.
    • An idea explored (Disastrously) in the comic at one point when Dredd quits. Also they tend to be quite good for named Judges showing up years later and so on, it is not just Dredd. That aside it is interesting to note that in Hondo Cit you can only see a judge's name if you are wearing a Judge helmet. To all other citizens they are nameless, faceless, avatars of Justice.
  • Also, the current Chief Judge, Dan Francisco, was a propaganda judge with his own tv show The Streets Of Dan Francisco, a sort of Cops parody where Dan had to perform his duties in a manner that entertained the audience. Also, there's Judge Pal and the Pals Club where juves would inform on perps in exchange for prizes.
  • Hondo City judges run with this. The names on their uniforms can only be read by someone wearing one of their judges' helmets, making them faceless, nameless and, therefore, less human and more authority.

Judge Dredd takes place in the Warhammer 40,000 universe.
Consider:
  • Hive cities/ Mega cities
  • Eagle motifs, ps(i/y)kers, manliness and Shoulders of Doom all around
  • Both purge mutants and criminals with equal zeal
  • An Arbitrator Foreboding is mentioned in Ciaphas Cain
  • Commissars and Judges are empowered to shoot criminals on sight if need be
  • Judge Death and pals / Daemons or Champions of Nurgle

Their Earth-like planet was colonised waaaaaaay back when the Emperor was still alive, but got cut off from the rest of the universe by a big warp storm. When it subsided, the planet was forgotten by all the Imperium and civilisation underwent an evolution parallel to Earth's history up to the late twentieth century, then split off into the Judge Dredd timeline. When people looked for a new emblem for the Judges, faint memories, generations old, reminded them of the Adeptus Arbites and the eagle symbol. They chose Fargo as a very distant version of the God Emperor, for he founded them.
  • Well this makes some sense, given that Games Workshop has often admitted that Judge Dredd was a major influence.
  • Considering the Adeptus Arbites actually have a special unit called Judge Dread (sic), a far more likely theory is that Judge Dredd takes place in the past of Warhammer 40,000, and the Adeptus Arbitres grew out of the Judge system, with Dredd (or a clone who also had the surname Dredd) as a founding member. Hey, the Emperor needs somebody to enforce the law.
  • Since a few writers of Judge Dredd strips have gone on to write Warhammer 40,000 books, there's probably a bit more influence there now.

"Day of Chaos" is going to be John Wagner's last story before retirement.
It's got PJ Maybe, Sovs, AND the Dark Judges. With all of Dredd's surviving perennial enemies, it sure looks like Wagner intends to go out with a bang, as there's really no way to top this.
  • Jossed. Tough Love was scripted by Wagner and printed in the April 2013 Megazine.

Judge Dredd takes place in the future of the Vertigo Comics series American Vampire.
  • Skinner Sweet reproduced either before or after he became the first American Vampire, and his line led to the Angel Gang.

Judge Dredd takes place in the same universe as Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.
  • Dredd's bloodline has its roots in Stabler's. C'mon, just compare the chins. I wouldn't be surprised if there was a Judge Munch either. Plus, it would explain how the SVU detectives go without sleep: They have a sleep machine in the office.

The "Slo-Mo" users in the 2012 film are actually Burst Linkers IN AMERICA.
  • Which is why they can experience reality at less than normal speed. They only don't say "Burst Link" when they access that ability, though.

Judge Dredd's future successor is Captain Falcon
  • Think about it. Look at them side by side. It's possibly logical that after some many years after Mega City One, New York became Mute City in 24th century. Which somehow Judges started to come away to form the Galtaic Federation. It was then Captain Falcon's DNA who was cloned by Internova Police Force....
    • The Falcon Punch was developed from archive footage of Dredd's encounter with Judge Fear.

Judge Dredd is set in the same universe as Escape from New York.
  • The USPF is the precursor to the Judge system. New York is built over and the prisoners devolve into Troggies, as seen in the Undercity.

Film!Rico would eventually have become Judge Death.
  • He says that it's only a matter of time before innocents become perpatrators, which is the sort of Insane Troll Logic which lead to the Dark Judges wiping out their home dimension.
    • Could well be, given that Death is the Final Boss of the Video Game adaptation, several levels after Dredd defeats Rico.

Dredd and PJ Maybe are morally-inversed, alternate-universe counterparts of Inspector Javert and Jean Valjean from Les MisÚrables.
  • Javert is an eminent, feared and highly skilled lawman who is defined by his complete and utter devotion to the law above all else, basically being Lawful Neutral personified. Dredd is also an eminent, feared and highly skilled lawman who is defined by his complete and utter devotion to the law above all else, basically being Lawful Neutral personified. Javert relentlessly pursues Jean Valjean, a fugitive whom Javert wrongly believes to be a dangerous criminal-mastermind. Dredd relentlessly pursues PJ Maybe, a fugitive who actually is a dangerous criminal-mastermind. Note that both Valjean and Maybe frequently use disguises and false identities to evade their respective pursuers, imitating wealthy men of political influence. Javert and Dredd are both frequently the only ones to see through these disguises. The same basic story is retold in each reality, with the roles of hero and villain being traded off between hunter and hunted.

Judge Fear is a Boggart.
  • A boggart takes the form of whatever their victim fears most. We've seen Fear's face three times, and it was different each time, so that must mean that his face changes depending on the person who looks at it, just like a boggart!
    • Which is why it doesn't work on Dredd. Judge Dredd fears nothing.

Judge Dredd is an alternate timeline to the Fallout series
  • Some similarities occur between both universes: A nuclear war in the 2070s, radscorpions as a species (and mutants in general), auto-docs, a Faceless Knight Templar who is Made of Iron, was nearly burnt to death and carries a Hand Cannon, Black Comedy. The difference? The transistor was invented in the Dreddverse.

Canonically, the events of the tie-in video game are how the events of Judge Dredd played out.
  • It's closer to the source material than the film is. It makes more sense because Dredd keeps his helmet on, Fergie is absent and Judge Death appears as the Final Boss.

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