Video Game / Metroid: Fusion

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Metroid Fusion is an action-adventure platformer video game published by Nintendo for the Game Boy Advance. It was released in North America, Europe, and Australia in November 2002, and in Japan in February 2003. The game is considered to be the fourth main installment in the Metroid series; the intro alternatively refers to the game as Metroid 4. Metroid Fusion was developed by the same development team that created the previous Super Metroid, to which Metroid Fusion bears heavy resemblance.

Chronologically, Metroid Fusion takes place last in the fictional Metroid universe. The story centers around bounty hunter Samus Aran, who is sent by the Galactic Federation to assist Biologic Space Laboratories in their expeditions on the planet SR-388, which Samus had purged of Metroids in Metroid II: Return of Samus. While defending the scientists from the local wildlife, she gets infected by a previously undocumented gelatinous lifeform and later passes out while piloting her gunship. The organism has spread throughout her body and her biomechanical Power Suit, and the scientists surgically remove portions of the infected suit to no avail. In a last ditch effort, the scientists infuse Samus with a serum containing preserved Metroid DNA, which destroys the parasite and cures Samus.

Now sporting much altered armor, Samus is sent to the B.S.L. space station to investigate an explosion. There, she learns that the station is swarming with organisms infected by more of the gelatinous lifeforms — now called X-parasites — virions that can replicate their hosts' physical appearances and memories, killing them afterward. The fact that the Metroid DNA saved her and allows her to absorb other X Parasites is now known to be because the Metroids, genetically engineered creations of the Chozo, were made to be predators of the X; the recent Metroid purge let them infect the creatures on SR-388 and spread once more. In order to check the spread of the infestation, Samus must work her way through the station under the guidance of her new gunship's Artificial Intelligence and eradicate the X Parasites and their host bodies, among them the SA-X, a clone produced from the remains of her Power Suit.

The game is notable for having a much more in-depth plot than the previous games in the series, full of political and corporate intrigue and character interaction. While the first Metroid Prime game, released the same year, opted to tell its story primarily through scan logs, Fusion tells its story through dialogue with an AI commander and through Samus' Internal Monologue. As a result of this heavier emphasis on story, the game is more linear than the previous games as well.

The game can be hooked up to Metroid Prime to unlock both Metroid and a Fusion Suit skin for Prime.

This game contains examples of:

  • Abandoned Laboratory: The game takes place in a space station made of these.
  • Action Girl: Samus, at her most prominant. Even after facing a deadly parasite and given a minimal chance of survival, she's still up for taking bounties, as well as her deadliest mission yet.
  • After Boss Recovery: Justified, as all the bosses and enemies are made of X Parasites that Samus absorbs to recover health, so it makes sense that the bigger bosses have more potent X for her to eat.
  • A.I. Is a Crapshoot: Ultimately subverted with Adam. At about the point one might expect him to start singing "Daisy Bell," he sides with Samus against the Federation and helps her destroy the X Parasites. Adding to the subversion is the fact that Adam's not a true AI either; he was human to begin with, and just had his mind uploaded before he died.
  • All There in the Manual: The games are easy to understand plotwise on their own, but there's quite a bit of canonical backstory for both Zero Mission and Fusion, as well as the entire franchise on the whole, to be found in the manuals and the two-volume manga.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Enemies and boss doors have a chance to drop a red X, which heals you greatly and refills a lot of ammo.
    • The underwater sections are quite tedious, but after killing Nightmare and receiving the Gravity Suit, they are much easier.
    • Recharge Rooms.
    • Wall-jumping is back, and can get you out of a few sticky situations.
  • Artificial Brilliance:
    • The X in general. The first few X will attempt to be absorbed, because the X are trying to infect Samus. After a while, when they realize she's just absorbing them, they'll try not to be absorbed. And then when the Cold-X start appearing, the cycle repeats.
    • The SA-X as well, utilizing a bit of a Call Back, will attempt to freeze Samus with the Ice Beam, and then blow her to bits with a Super Missile because that's the most efficient way of killing a Metroid...
  • Artificial Stupidity: The SA-X also has absolutely horrid looping programming, to the point most can be exploited for humor. Power Bombs in particular seem to completely throw its programming into an infinite loop when Samus isn't in a room needing the Power Bomb to advance.
  • Asteroid Thicket: During the opening, Samus' ship crashes into one of those. The asteroids look like they're only a few hundred feet across, and tightly packed.
  • Bag of Spilling: Played with. Samus kept all of the weapon upgrades to her power armor. Unfortunately, her power armor was infected with a parasite which is now using all of those weapon upgrades to try to kill her.
  • Bait-and-Switch Boss: A strange case of a boss being bait and switch for itself. When you first get to the water themed Sector 4, Adam mentions it was used to host the powerful Serris and that the X freed it for unknown reasons, suggesting a fight with the beast. And then you find its skeleton, a few rooms before having to fight an X clone of it. Something similar happens much later in the game: the frozen body of Ridley crumbles to dust when you touch it, as the X already infected and copied it.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished: Parts of Samus' suit have to be surgically removed, but not all of it could be taken off. This is due to much of her suit "fusing" with her central nervous system. She is given Metroid DNA to counteract the X parasite. This, along with her Chozo DNA, does not seem to affect her appearance in her death animation, though. It is also unclear whether or not she can ever remove her suit by choice.
  • Big Bad: The SA-X. It was the one responsible for the disaster and for releasing all of the captured X into the station. It is also responsible for all of the tactical and deliberate damage done to the station that hindered Samus' progress and blocked off necessary areas.
  • Big Damn Villains: Samus has beaten SA-X, plotted the B.S.L. Station on a collision course with SR-388, and is on her way to her ship to escape. But when she gets to the docking bays, the place is a mess, her ship is missing, and there is a huge shed skin on the floor. Suddenly, an Omega Metroid comes in and screeches at Samus. With one claw swipe, Samus is knocked down to one health, immobilized and completely helpless against the monstrosity....until a SA-X jumps in and tries to take it down. The Metroid quickly kills the SA-X, but this allows Samus to absorb its Core-X, allowing her to kill the Metroid herself.
  • Big Eater: Samus's new Metroid DNA allows her to devour X-parasites in large numbers to heal herself, as opposed to the series norm of just picking up power cells for her suit.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Samus saves the galaxy again and even reunites with former allies (even one previously dead). But in the process, destroys a Galactic Federation space station, a planet, and were forced to act against them to do so. Samus got new friends, but has likely made an enemy in the rest of galactic civilization.
  • Body Horror:
    • The X provide excellent examples of this trope; it is in their very nature to absorb a lifeform from within and either impersonate them for a specific task, or modify the body of their host by using the genomes of previous hosts. This has interesting and disturbing effects, such as turning humans into zombies made of regenerating goo. They also turn Hornoads (an enemy from Metroid II) from a relatively docile creature into a slavering, aggressive monster with More Teeth than the Osmond Family.
    • For a prime example, see the last battle with the SA-X. In desperation, it transforms from an exact Samus replica into what looks like a mashup of multiple creatures, whilst still showing bits and pieces of the original Power Suit embedded in its flesh. Notably, it resembles most a Hornoad, which was the last host that particular X had before infecting Samus.
  • Bookends: The game provides three. The end to the original trilogy had the Baby Metroid heal and give you a weapon to defeat the final boss, saving your life. In this game, the Metroid's DNA cures Samus of the X-Parasite infection (saving her life), and makes her able to absorb the X to heal her and replenish her supplies (giving her the weapon to eradicate the X). Also the ending, in which the SA-X, saves your life, heals you, and gives you the weapon to eradicate the Omega Metroid. Also, both the very first boss (Arachnus) and very last boss (Omega Metroid) are from Metroid II.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: A hidden Easter Egg lets Samus sequence break to skip an area to another save station. Doing so will cause Adam and a mysterious figure to congratulate her, with Adam musing: "I wonder how many players will see this message?"
  • Chekhov's Gunman: The Etecoons and Dachoras from Super Metroid come back in this game, and this time THEY save you. After needing saving a second time, but still.
  • Chest Monster:
    • One of the Core-X impersonates a Chozo Statue holding a powerup. Touching it damages you and prompts it to revert to its true form for a boss fight. The fact that it is revealed to be holding the already-acquired Morph Ball gives it away.
    • There are also traditional chest monsters. There is one hostile Energy Tank and a Missile Tank mimic in the game with the real one sitting in the same room or the one behind it.
  • Clipped Wing Angel: When the SA-X takes critical damage, it turns into a towering bug eyed monster... With almost no health left and no projectile attacks.
    • The X core left after defeating a boss also allows some breathing space. All it can do is ram into you, or attempt to shoot you if it has a beam upgrade, It also spawns X that will heal you if it gets shot with the beam, and only takes a few missiles to destroy completely.
  • Climax Boss: Nightmare. Its defeat grants you enough defensive ability to reliably take on the rest of the game.
  • Colony Drop: B.S.L., at the end, ends up with its orbit altered to intercept SR388. It crashes down on the planet with its self-destruct activated, destroying both it AND the planet.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: The doors are color coded by security clearance. Samus needs to find the override controls for each security level to unlock them. This becomes a plot point, as unlocking the controls also allows the X-parasites to spread further through the station.
  • Continuity Snarl:
    • The way Samus' suit works in this game (particularly how it functions when Samus in unconscious) is very contradictory to other games, especially Other M. Metroid Prime 3: Corruption however, seems to follow this rule when Samus was in a coma herself, and her Varia suit had to be altered to use Hyper Mode.
    • Compared to Metroid II: Return of Samus, The Omega Metroid is portrayed in a completely different manner than in that game. The Metroid wiki elaborates more, but to put it simply, the Metroid II Omega could fly, shoot projectiles, and was invulnerable to the Ice Beam and had to be killed by missiles. The Omega in this game can only claw swipe, doesn't fly, and is killed by the Ice Beam.
  • Cool Starship: Samus' gunship. The loaner ship she gets from the Federation after totaling her own in the opening may count as well.
  • Darker and Edgier: Than the previous games. Super Metroid was darker than the previous series, but this game is almost a Survival Horror game in tone. Samus is on a run of her life should she encounter the SA-X, who possesses her upgrades and Ice Beam. Not to mention the Nightmare is one of the most horrifying bosses in a Game Boy Advance game. Even the formerly benevolently portrayed Federation is shown to have shady goals that force Samus to turn on them, which she realizes will make her viewed as an enemy.
  • David vs. Goliath: Many bosses, especially Nightmare, are much bigger and more dangerous than Samus.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • After getting the Varia suit back, the formerly harmful blue X become harmless like all the other types, but the X (who intentionally suicide bombed you to weaken you) don't know that yet, so rather than immediately starting to run away, the first few blue X you find will continue to suicide bomb you, only running once they see it's stopped working.
    • You can even keep on purposely avoiding the Blue X to prolong the time it takes for them to stop the kamikaze attacks.
    • Even with all defensive upgrades, you still take more damage per hit than most other games in the series, to reflect the complete downgrade in armor that Samus is stuck with. It's only because she can absorb the X that she even has a chance.
    • Through a sequence of shine sparking, it is possible to make it back to the Navigation Room at the beginning of Sector 4 after defeating Nightmare without going the long way and getting the Diffusion Missiles. Adam and the unknown Federation member do have something to say about this.
  • Differently Dressed Duplicates: The SA-X is a perfect copy of Samus's Varia Suit... Except the SA-X's eyes are blank and white. However, in this game, Samus herself isn't wearing her iconic Varia suit because the SA-X overtook it, so she's wearing the more organic and streamlined Fusion Suit.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: SR388, when you collide the B.S.L. station with the planet. The station's self-destruct had been activated and it's orbit had been altered to intercept the planet. The explosion is powerful enough to completely destroy the planet.
  • Eleventh Hour Superpower: The Screw Attack is obtained extremely late and is useful for connecting all the sectors up, but the main example is the usually early game item the Ice Beam, which is gained from the SA-X along with an unnamed suit when the Omega Metroid kills it at the end of the game. This allows Samus to handily win when it was hopeless before.
  • Evil Is Not a Toy: The Federation seems to think it is, due to the fact they first have been trying to weaponize Metroids, which never ends well, and then later on have thoughts on weaponizing the SA-X, which is even less desirable. Samus detonating the station and taking everything therein with it is her attempt at sending that message but the ending suggests all it will accomplish is making her a wanted fugitive in the eyes of the Federation and that the Federation probably doesn't care that they're messing with things way over their head.
  • Evil Versus Evil: The X parasites and Metroids REALLY don't like each other. Put them in the same room, and they'll both ignore Samus and go right for each others' throats (or the nearest anatomical equivalent). There's an actual canon reason for this: The Chozo designed the Metroids in the first place to prey on the X, right down to the cellular level (hence why the Metroid vaccine works).
  • Exact Time to Failure: Twice: stopping the boiler room from exploding and dropping the research lab onto SR 388.
  • Final-Exam Boss: In a way, the SA-X is one, for you have to use everything you have learned about your upgrades to defeat it, especially if you missed a lot of energy tanks.
  • Fish Person: Many of the X-infected Space Pirates transform into fishlike versions of themselves when in water.
  • Foreshadowing: There's lots, all over the game.
    • Remember how in Metroid II, Samus was sent to SR388 to dispatch all Metroids? Including some in deep nocturnal areas of the planet? Is it any coincidence that Sector 1 (SRX), a section designed to replicate the environment of SR388 completely, is located right next to Sector 6 (NOC), a place meant for housing nocturnal creatures? What could be between them? A restricted laboratory, involving the breeding of Metroids, perhaps?
    • And again, following what was inside the Restricted Lab. You make your way back through Sector 1 in order to find a navigation room. Along the way, you pass some strange skins... They almost look like Metroid skins for the Larval, Alpha, and Gamma stages... And then during the countdown, you find a Zeta skin inside the hanger you're supposed to find your ship in, just in time for the newly-morphed Omega Metroid to show up.
    • The X are presented as mindless creatures, who invade an area, consume all of its organic material, and then proceed to hang around in its place. At first, the X attempt to get themselves absorbed to damage Samus, until they find it only heals her, and the X will start actively fleeing her. It happens again in Sector 6 (NOC), where the X had invaded Sector 5 (ARC), deliberately modified its own genetic makeup by hanging around in the cold, and attempted to infect Samus again, until the Cold-X realized she could absorb them once she got the Varia. All of this leads up to the reveal that the X are, in fact, intelligent creatures. They still want to infect the entire galaxy, but they can think and come up with plans.
    • Sector 2 (TRO) has dimmer lighting than the other sectors when you first visit, and in the background, you can see roots growing on and clinging to the sector's systems. Later on, the power goes out completely and you have to find out what's causing it, only to find the reactor core choked by plant roots. Naturally, this means your job is to find the plant responsible and kill it.
    • A Chozo statue, previously only found on Chozo-inhabited worlds like Zebes, Tallon IV, and SR388, appears in Sector 1. The same Etecoons and Dachoras from Super appear in the Habitation Deck. Ridley appears frozen in cryogenic storage. The Federation have clearly been scouring Samus' previous exploits, searching for something. Stumbling onto the Restricted Laboratory reveals just what they were looking for, and found.
  • Fridge Logic: In-Universe, at the end of the game, Samus wonders how her ship flew into the hangar after she defeated the Omega Metroid, since it doesn't have an autopilot. She gets an answer shortly after: The creatures she rescued earlier in the game flew the ship.
  • From a Single Cell:
    • X-Parasites, if not absorbed, will simply reform into another body. Also, the Federation had preserved a Metroid cell culture from the Metroid Hatchling. A vaccine made from these Metroid cells was used to cure Samus when she was infected by an X in the game's intro.
    • This suit made it possible for Samus to eat the X to regain Health.
    • And they also used it to grow new Metroids in a restricted laboratory hidden on the B.S.L. Station. Apparently for peaceful applications only, after what happened in Other M.
  • "Get Back Here!" Boss:
    • Zigzagged. The Core-X initially inverts it, by being a Personal Space Invader, but then the Beam Core-X mimics the main Core-X... Except it's invulnerable until it opens its eye.
    • Serris, to some extent, is this. You're stuck on four platforms over water, while you have a giant armored snake charging at lightning speed in and out of the water, only exposing its vulnerable head at brief moments. Don't bother trying to chase it, though, as you move at a slug's pace in the water, and Serris can easily run you down to take a few bites out of your life bar. The only effective way to fight it is to stay on the platforms and wait for it to appear. Or stay crouched in the water, just to the left of the rightmost spot where Serris comes into / out of the floor. It never hits you there, and you have a shot at its head when it comes out / goes in.
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: If you weren't paying attention, or don't know the significance of the shed Metroid skins scattered about the place, then the Omega Metroid boss might be a bit of a surprise.
  • Graying Morality: This game paints the powers that be as becoming as Unfettered as the Space Pirates, just with a multi system government's backing. Over the course of the game it's revealed they have been weaponizing Metroids (for "peaceful applications," though Samus doesn't buy it since she knows how uncontrollable they can be) and that, based on the events on the BSL, the X Parasites (and SA-X specimen specifically) could also be potentially weaponized (which, again, sends Samus sideways that they would think that trying to cultivate such things wouldn't be a disaster waiting to happen). She destroys their research in order to prevent any of this from coming to pass but expects that she will be branded a traitor and the Federation will likely stay the course with their increasingly dangerous direction.
  • Hailfire Peaks: Every zone is "X meets Eternal Engine," since you have various elemental environments taking place aboard a space station. Occasionally, you'll see several machines in the background.
  • Hell Is That Noise:
    • The footsteps of the SA-X can become Paranoia Fuel really quickly.
    • The buzzing of the Ki-Hunters will become paranoia fuel as well, especially during the sequences immediately before and after battling Yakuza / Gedo, when save points are few and far between, you're low on health, and they take several hits to kill with your wide beam.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Samus almost attempts one by detonating the self-destruct charges on BS-L to destroy the X-Parasites aboard; herself included. The AI Adam, however, informs her that doing that would be stupid, as it would not destroy the X on Planet SR388, and only serve to destroy the X's greatest obstacle: Samus. A different plan is then created, which destroys all the X in both locations and allows Samus time enough to escape the station.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: The game ends with Samus speculating she will become this, having destroyed a Galactic Federation space station, and the galaxy unaware as to why this seemingly terrorist act was necessary to stop the very dangerous threat of the X-Parasites.
  • High Voltage Death: Electrified water is a hazard in Sector 4, AQA, that damages you over time. The player can accidentally kill themselves falling into it if they have low health. You encounter this again during the second battle against the B.O.X.; as long as its in contact with the water flooding the area, it is electrified and you will take damage as long as you're in it.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: Every SA-X encounter before the proper boss battle in the finale. You have to either evade or escape it.
  • Hitbox Dissonance: There is one point in the game where the hitbox does not exist. If you willingly Troll the SA-X, there is one point where if you stand on a particular wood, Samus will not take damage from the Ice Beam.
  • Hub Level: The Main Deck of the station, as it contains elevators to each of the 6 sectors of B.S.L.
  • Implacable Man: The SA-X, especially in the beginning. Suited up with the Varia mode Chozo Power Armor, armed with Super Missiles, Power Bombs, the Screw Attack and the Ice Beam. The best you can do at first is just run. You can fare a little bit better once you get the Ice Missiles, which slow it down, but you still can't actually hurt it until the final boss fight.
  • Insectoid Aliens: The "Ki-Hunters" are insectile in appearance, having wings and a carapace. They also start off as caterpillar-like creatures that turn into pupae before turning into them.
  • It Can Think: The X both play it straight and are a subversion at the same time. They're definitely intelligent; one of the X parasites mimics a scientist and attempts to melt down the boiler room in an attempt to destroy Samus and all the X on board, but preserve the rest of the species on SR388. The X also have shown that they possess enough intelligence to deliberately modify their genetic makeup in an attempt to try to freeze Samus. However, they are still ultimately driven by a mindless desire to consume everything.
  • Kaizo Trap: In the game's finale, it is possible to defeat the Omega Metroid, then have the timer run out while Samus's Gunship is docking.
  • Kill and Replace: The X mainly infect lifeforms to absorb their DNA and memories while killing their host, which they can then perfectly replicate. This notably happened to the crew of the BSL station and many other creatures, as a lot, if not most, of the enemies Samus faces in-game are mimics created by the X as opposed to being mutated outright.
  • LEGO Genetics:
    • Samus is a human being genetically enhanced by Chozo blood and, by this game's intro, she's also part-Metroid.
    • Technically the X count as well, due to their trait of retaining useful genetic information from past hosts and "improving" their current ones. It happens often in gameplay, where X from one defeated host will infest another and change its abilities. Horrifyingly, it also counts for the SA-X, as when it mutates after being defeated the first time, it takes on traits from multiple species to try and kill Samus.
  • Let X Be the Unknown: The gelatinous X Parasites.
  • Man-Eating Plant: Nettori's attackers. Land in one of them, and you will take damage until you can get out.
  • Me's a Crowd: The SA-X. Since the X parasites multiply asexually, by the time you finally see SA-X die, there are still ten Samus copies running around the space station! Fortunately, you only meet one at a time.
  • Monochromatic Eyes: The SA-X has blank white eyes, made more clear in the game's commercial.
  • Monster Delay: Nightmare is introduced as it streaks across the now wrecked sector of the ship. Mission Control tells Samus to ignore it for now, so she continues on. Later, the AI realizes how much damage it has caused and tells Samus to destroy it.
  • Mythology Gag: The artwork for the boss creature Arachnus (shown on the far right of the picture at the top of the page) portrays it with green fur on parts of its back which have scutes on the actual in-game sprite. This subtly references how recurring Metroid villain Kraid was originally portrayed with a furry green back in artwork for Metroid.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Nightmare. It's name alone can inspire terror, and its appearance and power allows it to live up to its name.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero:
    • Samus' Metroid extermination campaign caused an explosion in the population of the X Parasites, which the Metroids had been designed to kill. Oops.
    • Overriding the security doors allows the X to spread through sectors that they had previously been kept out of.
  • Nintendo Hard: When the A.I. warned Samus she was significantly weakened from the X-Parasite and the Fusion suit is far less protective than her normal suit, it's not kidding. Even fully upgraded, Samus takes the highest amounts of damage in this game than any other Metroid game by far. This means you have to be far more careful and strategic even with basic enemies, and going in Rambo style like in other Metroid games is highly likely to get you killed. And that's not even going into the games bosses, which there are more of than any 2D Metroid game to date.
  • Nostalgia Level:
    • Sector 1 has very many similarities to the early levels in Metroid II. Justified because the sector was designed to be a perfect replica of the environment of the planet SR388, where Metroid II takes place.
    • Some hidden parts of the Main Sector have a stunning resemblance to Ridley's Lair and Tourian, and they should, because you fight Ridley-X there.
    • The Secret Laboratory's escape sequence is very much like the ones in Metroid and Super Metroid
  • One-Letter Name: The X Parasites are typically just called "X" just to shorten it. Even the Chozo called it that.
  • Our Zombies Are Different: Everything the X infects dies, and the X are now able to clone what they absorb, creating zombie-like clones of dangerous enemies.
  • Patchwork Map: Justified, as the game takes place on a biological research vessel, and in order to support the needs of the wide variety of fauna and flora on board, each of the six sectors has its own artificially created environment, namely:
  • Plug 'n' Play Technology: The Fusion Suit is able to form new abilities just by absorbing "data" acquired from rooms and the DNA of the X parasites.
  • Point of No Return: Once you go up to the main deck to alter the station's trajectory, every possible route back to the various sectors is sealed off. Your only option left is to finish the game. Except in New Game+, which does not seal off the sectors until the final evacuation countdown.
  • Posthumous Character: Adam Malkovich is technically this, although Fusion puts an odd spin on it.
  • Power Copying: Samus gains abilities from the enemies she beats, though she does get some abilities from data rooms as well.
    • Morph Ball from Arachnus.
    • Charge Beam from the Beam Core-X.
    • High Jump and Jump Ball from Zazabi.
    • Speed Boost from Serris.
    • Varia Suit from Big Core-X, which had actually stolen it from a data room.
    • Wide Beam from another Beam Core-X.
    • Space Jump from Yakuza.
    • Plasma Beam from Nettori.
    • Gravity Suit from Nightmare.
    • Wave Beam from the Security Robot B.O.X. (Fight 2).
    • Screw Attack from Ridley-X, although this boss doesn't really use the attack unlike the others.
    • Ice Beam from SA-X.
  • Power Pincers: The X-mimicked Space Pirates have these, but they only use them to shoot lasers.
  • Raising the Steaks: The X not only infects people, but also alien wildlife on the BSL.
  • Recurring Boss: The Security Robot B.O.X. You fight it twice (more than any other boss in the game), and it changes its weaponry and tactics for the second fight.
  • Revenge: After being chased by the SA-X the entire game, it's only fair that you get your revenge before destroying the BSL.
  • Run or Die: This is the only advice Adam gives Samus regarding SA-X at the beginning, because it's equipped with all of Samus's weapons and abilities, including the Ice Beam which Samus is now weak against due to the Metroid Vaccine.
  • Scenery Gorn: Sector 5 (ARC), after Nightmare runs loose, looks like a complete and total mess. Broken windows, smashed passages, new crudely made tunnels where there were none before, and rubble scattered all over the place.
  • Sequel Hook: Fusion sure seemed to leave one hell of a sequel hook, what with Samus having illegally blown up a Federation outpost and become something way other than human. Sure, Samus had her reasons, but all the implications in-game are that the Fed will be antagonistic with her now.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: The Wide Beam and Plasma Beam have much larger spread, more damage, and the game would be near impossible without the Plasma Beam and actually impossible without the Wave Beam.
  • Shout-Out: A couple to the Stanley Kubrick film 2001: A Space Odyssey, as Adam bears a striking resemblance to HAL 9000. Also, the scene where Adam locks Samus inside the Sector 1 Navigation Room, is very similar to the famous scene from 2001 where HAL locks David Bowman out of the USS Discovery, even down to the dialogue.
  • Something Only They Would Say: How Samus discovers that her AI CO, which she nicknamed Adam, after her old CO Adam Malkovich, actually is Adam Malkovich.
  • Suicidal Overconfidence: The first few free floating X Parasites encountered will attempt to infect Samus again, not knowing she's now part Metroid and can eat them on contact. They learn to avoid her quickly, but it takes another lesson for the cold X Parasites after Samus regains the Varia suit.
  • Victor Gains Loser's Powers: Samus had all her abilities copied by the X. After killing X-infected bosses (which tend to be able to produce similar attacks), she can absorb the X-parasite to regain that power.
  • Warm-Up Boss: Archanus, from Metroid 2 makes a return as the first boss, but is significantly easier than its counterpart. He is also the only boss that takes damage from the normal, non-charged beam.
  • Weaponized Offspring: The game has enemies in the water zone that launch rotating eggs (maybe they're eggs...?) from their abdomens. As with other enemies appearing in the game, they do act different from their original template, the Evirs from Maridia in Super Metroid.
  • Whole Plot Reference: After investigating a remote outpost, a research team discovers a lifeform which assimilates, infects, and transforms and/or replaces its victims. Armed with this knowledge, one of the last survivors destroys the facility rather than allow the creatures to live and spread beyond it.
  • Zombie Apocalypse: The B.S.L. station succumbs to one courtesy of the X Parasites. It's a small taste of what could have happened to the entire galaxy had they got off the station. They kill whatever they infect and either pilot the bodies while applying Body Horror or simply mimic them.

Alternative Title(s): Metroid Fusion

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Videogame/MetroidFusion