11 Hours Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

Video Game / Xenoblade Chronicles X
aka: Untitled Monolith Soft RPG

"Together, we resolved to forge a new way of life here on Mira, come what may. New LA was our beautiful lie to ourselves...Truth is, we were adrift, heading into the unknown. Our native home was gone, swallowed in a shroud of light, and our future was uncertain: we had no idea what fate lay in store for us...Only that we had to keep living in order to see it."
Lin Lee Koo

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/xenoblade_chronicles_x___boxart.jpg
We're all the same, even if from another world.

Xenoblade Chronicles X, previously code-named X, is the (thematic) sequel to the cult Wii hit Xenoblade, developed by Monolith Soft for Wii U and published by Nintendo, released in Japan on April 29th, 2015, and on America and Europe on December 4th, 2015.

In the year 2054, two alien races began a battle in near-Earth orbit. The collateral damage from the battle did a number on the planet; humanity was left with no recourse but to evacuate shortly before the planet was completely destroyed.

Two years later, one of the Colony Ships able to escape the chaos mostly unscathed - an American evacuee ship called the White Whale, holding the city of New Los Angeles - was attacked by one of the two alien factions, which had been tailing them the entire time. Thanks to the efforts of the military bravely fending off the attack, particularly those of a high-ranking officer riding a mech, the ship manages to crash-land on the closest hospitable planet, Mira; however the damage from the fight caused the pods containing the cryonically-suspended citizens to be scattered all over the planet's surface on the way down.

You play a player-created character, awakened from one such pod by one of the White Whale's staff, Elma; you must aid the struggles of those of New Los Angeles to survive, settle and thrive on Mira, a world filled with exotic locales and creatures.

The game features mech combat as one of its key gameplay aspects and massive open world environments filled with Scenery Porn. The character designs are by Kunihiko Tanaka (character designer for Xenogears and Xenosaga Episode I), the music is composed by Hiroyuki Sawano (of Mobile Suit Gundam Unicorn, Attack on Titan and Kill la Kill fame), and the game is being executive-directed by Tetsuya Takahashi (director of previous Xeno- games).

While the title implies a direct connection to Xenoblade, it was at first stated to have no relation to the previous game early on, but in 2014 at the Nintendo Treehouse Live @ E3 it was confirmed that it was more of an indirect successor; while there are notable similarities in the battle systems and UI design between games, Xenoblade Chronicles and Xenoblade Chronicles X share no relation in terms of story or setting other than some philosophical ideas, Mythology Gags and cameos. In addition, there are said to be more elements such as playable mecha and initially a red stylized 'X' logo used for the game that recalls that of Xenogears, harkening to previous Xeno- games in early previews and teases.

View the three trailers here (January 2013 Nintendo Direct), here (E3 2013) and here (E3 2014). Gameplay video can be found here (early 2014 Direct; gives a basic glimpse at combat, both in-mech and on-foot) here and here (Treehouse hands-on at E3 2014, Days 1 and 3 respectively; both broadly cover the opening half-hour of the game).


This game provides examples of:

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  • 100% Completion: This is a BIG game. In order to get 100% completion, you have to unlock every single one of the 749 achievements, and also completely survey all 5 continents and all sections of New Los Angeles. Just reaching all the locations isn't enough, each segment has a specific treasure to find, tyrant to hunt, or quest/event to see that must be completed before it counts. And regarding the tyrants, each of the five continents has one segment with a level 90+ tyrant.
  • Ability Required to Proceed: Many Affinity Missions can't be taken until after Chapter 10. This is because, if you've passed that mission, it's assumed you have both a Skell and a Flight Pack, as where it takes place can't be reached without flight.
  • Abnormal Ammo: Physical-type guns use bullets, but others fire ether, shoot flame or electricity, or create gravity fields.
  • Acceptable Breaks from Reality: Some recruitible NPCs, particularly Hope and Nagi, say that they can join you in the spare time from their rather busy schedules. Fortunately for you these rare moments always seem to come up whenever you approach them, and last as long as you need them to.
  • Adventure Guild: BLADE. It's divided into 8 'Divisions' that have divided between themselves the work needed to survive on an alien planet. Each provides a minor stat bonus to players who share an online (asynchronus) multiplayer squadron.
    • Pathfinders specialize in exploration and data probing. They recover HP at a higher rate.
    • Interceptors specialize in combating indigens. They do more damage with ranged weapons.
    • Harriers specialize in fighting tyrants. They also inflict more damage with melee weapons.
    • Reclaimers specialize in treasure box recovery and data probe installation. They have increased item drop rates.
    • Curators specialize in item collection and tyrant extermination. This Division bestows an increased critical hit rate.
    • Prospectors specialize in resource acquisition. They have bonuses to defense.
    • Outfitters specialize in investments towards Miranium and arms manufacturers. They provide bonuses to money earnings.
    • Mediators specialize in quest completion. They can earn TP when using Arts.
  • Adaptational Heroism: While the Telethia in both Xenoblade games aren't exactly considered good or evil, the Telethia in the first game are vicious creatures that kill anything they see out of simple savagery when unbound or per Zanza and his Disciples' orders, as well as devolved High Entia turned feral. In X, Telethia, the Endbringer not only spares Team Elma after it kills three Tainted Sphinxes threatening them, it is considered the guardian of Mira and is non-hostile toward the player and all non-Tainted life. You can attack it anyway if you want the fight of your life, however. Likewise, the Nemesis Telethia Plume is just considered a very threatening indigen that shows up every now and then.
  • An Adventurer Is You: Xenoblade Chronicles X has an interesting take on the class system. While there are six paths to level up the charactersnote , the actual Arts are tied to the weapons equipped. Once the final tier of a path has been maxed out, they can equip weapons specific to that class regardless of whether it is their active class or not. Skills, on the other hand, can be used by class immediately after learning. This leads to quite a large number of combinations of weapons and builds.
  • After the End: Earth is destroyed in the opening cinematic, two years ago for the characters.
  • All There in the Manual: The official website has a short story with more details on the game's intro. The second alien faction flying purple ships that is fighting the Ganglion is referred to as "Ghost." They have the ability to phase through solid matter and their Skells are powered by antimatter / matter reactors. The massive explosions on the Earth's surface are the result of the Ganglion fleet shooting down Ghost Skells, which causes their reactors to overload and detonate. The reason why the Earth is destroyed is because a particular large Ghost reactor detonated and took the Earth with it. The short story also reveals that the planet Mira was named by Maurice Chausson after a woman he admired who chose to stay behind on Earth and not get her mind digitized and uploaded to the Lifehold because she valued her human body that much.
  • Aliens Are Bastards: The humans didn't want any part of the alien war, but that didn't stop the combatants from shooting most of them down as the humans tried to escape Earth. At least the Ganglion have a reason to attack humans since they are descendants of a mysterious race known as the Samaarians whom created the Ganglion and humans contain the failsafe in their DNA to stop the Ganglion. The Ganglion's opposing faction that shot down the White Whale, the Ghost? No reason given.
  • Alien Invasion: Subverted, there wasn't any landing. Rather, the Earth was destroyed in the ongoing war between two alien races. One of them pursued the survivors intending to finish the survivors.
  • Alien Sky: Not so much during the day, but there are four very prominent moons visible in the night sky.
  • Aliens Speaking English: Played straight. All alien species encountered are able to speak English with considerable fluency. Interestingly, when asked, the aliens believe they are speaking in their own native tongue and not English. It's later hypothesized that it is the planet Mira itself to blame for this odd phenomena. Played even straighter with L'cirufe, who admits to learning English by studying the data contained inside a Lifehold archive of the Library of Congress.
  • Always a Bigger Fish:
    • The rather humiliating fact that the Ganglion are, according to the Ma-Non, little more than a run of the mill crime syndicate doing some dirty work for the Samaar Federation. Earth was basically destroyed not by the brunt of the Samaarian forces, but by thuggish stooges. Descendants of the mythical founders of the Samaar Federation or not Humans are very far from being on top of the food-chain, whether on Mira or beyond.
    • Chapter Six sees the party surrounded by three copies of the chapter boss, until a goddamn Telethia drops from the sky and rips all three apart.
  • Always Chaotic Evil: The Marnucks and the Milsaadi serve little more than as the Mooks and Elite Mooks of the Ganglion army. None are recruitable, none are named, and all of them are absolute murderers.
  • Always Identical Twins: Lara Mara and Lara Nara are twin brothers, though they won't tell you unless you talk to them while they're talking with each other, which requires you to do some side-missions involving them.
  • Amazing Technicolor Population: The player character creator allows for skin tones that are naturally impossible for humans, but the game says the player character is still human as it is justified as the player character's body is a "Mimeosome" or "Blue Blood" in the Japanese version.
  • Ambiguously Bi: Lots of characters express what may amount to more intense feelings than mere "friendship" for members of the same sex. However, as almost none of them make their intentions clear, it falls squarely within the sphere of ambiguity.
  • Anti-Frustration Feature:
    • Story and affinity missions cannot be aborted once they are started. However, if a certain required enemy proves too difficult during said mission (such as defeating a large creature with a prototype Skell rifle on foot), the game offers to lower that enemy's level a bit after you die against it a certain number of times.
    • If a mission requires a certain piece of gear to be equipped, anyone in your party can do so - no need to switch classes and handle in personally.
    • The game remembers the weapons, arts, and skills you had equipped for each class. If you switch paths to experiment and then decide to switch back, you don't have to spend time re-equipping everything.
    • Every single material dropped by any enemy in the game, even Bonus Bosses, can be bought directly by redeeming them with Reward Tickets gotten whenever someone in your online squad completes a randomized item collection or enemy type kill goal. You still need to hunt down the items found lying around the landscape the old way, but they're much easier to find in large amounts and to respawn than in the previous game.
    • Your AI-controlled party members tend to wreck their Skells. However, they always eject their Skells perfectly, preventing them from wasting Skell insurance if there's any left.
    • The AI in general isn't nearly as effective as a player can be; they don't acknowledge high ground, environmental hazards, and have a difficult time binding larger enemies in their Skells. Fortunately there are commands that can circumvent this, such as gathering around the player or avoid binding in order to let the player do it instead.
    • Aggressive enemies won't attack you if you're ten levels higher than them, unless they're an ambush type enemy who springs up when you approach it, like Mortifoles and Thalluses. Tyrants will also do this.
    • If enough time passes between play sessions, every Skell's fuel is fully restored, allowing you to use all of it up right before you plan to end your current play session.
    • You can't save after crossing the Point of No Return, to prevent you from being totally hosed if you went into the battle underprepared and unable to defeat the final boss.
    • There's a separate slot for equipping fashion gear. This allows you to equip a character with gear which only influences how they appear in cutscenes without effecting their stats. This opens the door for more customization options without having to worry about what your character's appearance will be.
    • Affinity missions required to progress through the main story (namely Lao's and Gwin's) only require one heart's worth of affinity to start at most, compared to the three or four hearts required for later, optional affinity missions.
  • Applied Phlebotinum: New Los Angeles is filled with a "shock-absorbing gel" found at the bottom of the city. Thanks to Captain Nagi's quick thinking when the city had to be jettisoned and fell into Mira's gravity well, they crystallized the gel, which allowed the city to survive the impact. Crystallized gel can be seen spiking out all over the exterior of the city.
  • A Mech by Any Other Name: Referred to as "Skells", which is short for "exoskeletons". The original Japanese calls them "Dolls".
  • An Interior Decorator Is You: Once you join BLADE, you can customize the barracks, and when you get a Skell later on, the Hangar.
  • Antagonist Abilities: Early on, Elma warns you that a Tyrant's level means nothing. Many Tyrants are not significantly strong in terms of offense or defense, but possess some sort of ability that makes fighting them difficult. For example, Celestin, the Spring Storm has the ability to stop your characters from moving at all for a short period of time. For another example, Yama, the Obliviator is immune to ether damage.
  • Apocalypse How: The game's opening cinematic shows the people of Earth being forced to flee a Planetary Physical Annihilation, due to Earth being caught in the crossfire between two warring alien races.
  • Arbitrary Headcount Limit: Your party consists of up to four members, and your avatar is always one of them. Inactive party members remain back in NLA, meaning quick traveling there is necessary whenever you want to adjust your formation.
  • Arch-Enemy: Several quest chains have these:
    • Alex and Eliza, the former of whom is a murderous xenophobic bigot calling other bigots to his cause so that they can eliminate all of the aliens in NLA. Eliza does everything she can to stop him, recruiting Rook to help.
    • Corwin and the Black Skell. After it almost kills a young member of his team, Corwin sends out teams to try and eliminate it—most of which don't come back. Depending on the choices Rook makes, the entire unit can get wiped out.
    • In a lesser sense, Rook him/herself can make a business archenemy in Tobias, if s/he does a good job installing probes. Tobias complains that Rook is installing probes for free, rather than doing it for profit like he did, and will repeatedly challenge Rook to see who can become wealthiest using the system.
    • The entire reason that Justin took up the mantle of the Blood Lobster was to become one for Rook, but not because they bear Rook any ill will or grudge, no; it's because the Blood Lobster is a justice-obsessed freak who admires Rook and believes that s/he is the only one able to become his idealized version of a "true hero". When the Blood Lobster is cornered, Rook has the option to execute them for their actions, which is exactly what the Blood Lobster wants, or refuse to play the Lobster's game and spare them, which results in the Blood Lobster essentially self-inflicting a Fate Worse Than Death.
  • Arc Words: "That is the Destiny of Growth."
  • Artifact Title: Averted in that while the Monado from the first game is absent in this one, the title still has meaning due to the military organization the Player Character joins being called "BLADE" and the various aliens are occasionally called "xenos". Some of the xenos have even joined BLADE, technically making them Xeno-BLADEs, however, all but a couple of them are very minor characters. Then again, Elma is a major character and she fits the term fine as she is a "xeno" and a BLADE member.
  • Artificial Stupidity: Teammate AI mistakes are much more noticeable in this game than in the previous. Here are some examples:
    • An AI teammate piloting a Skell seldom manages to be able to bind an enemy for more than a second. For reference, how long an enemy can be subject to the bind debuff is determined by the QTE system much like how Soul Voices work, so it isn't too hard to begin with.
    • Teammates cannot identify an enemy's reflect barrier, meaning that they'll often just keep damaging themselves with an attack element the enemy is reflecting.
    • Teammates can't recognize terrain properties, meaning that they will charge into deep water (where they can't fight back), stand on damaging surfaces, position themselves to be knocked off cliffs, and take no advantage of inclines or higher ground.
  • Artistic License – Economics: The prices of certain items can be a bit peculiar. In one affinity mission, you have to buy 10 Pizzas for the Ma-Non, which cost 10,000 credits, which would make you think that one credit is worth as much one Japanese yen (though it could be just that Pizzas are in high demand, thanks to the Ma-Non). Yet, in another mission you have to buy a car which is around 10,000 credits and in yet another mission, it takes 30,000 credits to sign a treaty with a nopon caravan (Though the dealer says that it's a good bargain). So we're suppose to believe that a pizza cost one tenth of a car, which cost one third of public treaty. Possibly justified in that NLA is an entirely new society, and the value of credits is determined by each person individually, so they can charge whatever they want.
  • Attack Drone: Psycho launchers used by the Blast Fencer/Galactic Knight. Also a weapon option for Skells.
  • Attract Mode: If you leave the game sit at the title screen, it'll start showing off Scenery Porn as the camera moves through the landscapes of Mira.
  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever: Some monsters are several stories tall, and tend to easily squish all but the most prepared of on-foot characters. Taking them on in Skells is generally preferable.
  • Autobots, Rock Out!: Going up against any of the Tyrants is a tall order. So they're highlighted by the accompaniment of "Uncontrollable", instead of the game's usual battle theme. It becomes a near literal example, once you're outfitted with a full party of Skells to take them on.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: The various Superweapons you can develop for your Skells are split between Infinity+1 Sword and this: the ones that fall into the former category generally have the highest overall damage values and other properties that allows their damage to be boosted high enough to One-Hit Kill even the strongest Tyrants, while the ones in latter category tend to be the ones that take up 4 weapon slots to equip, use up huge amounts of fuel, take an incredibly long time to cast, and have better alternatives. The Hexad Partican is probably the most obvious example of this, since it's the only Superweapon you can get without having to make it yourself, it takes up the aforementioned 4 slots to equip, costs 1200 fuel a shot, and a good number of weapons do the same thing it does except better and with just 2 slots. Dragoon Lance is another such example since it also takes up 4 slots to equip and you rarely if ever come across a group of normal enemies that can survive the entire attack, but it's also too weak to take out singular Tyrants on its own: you also can't move or use other attacks when it's in use and it takes 10 seconds until the attack is finished.
  • Awful Truth:
    • Rook turning out to be an android and not completely human. Is also a Call Back to the original Xenoblade as the Main protagonist, Shulk, turned out to be a re-animated corpse and not a normal Homs. However, this is subverted in that while it's a surprise to Rook, it isn't to every other human in NLA since they already know they're all android avatars controlled by their in-stasis bodies, and Rook seems to get over this pretty quickly.
    • The Earth's rich, powerful and connected used their influence to put themselves on the Arcs at the expense of the less fortunate. Learning that his wife and daughter died so their place on the Lifehold could go to some trust fund kids is what drove Lao over the edge.
    • When Team Elma finally reaches the Lifehold Core, the rest of the team sans Elma learn that there were never really any human bodies on board the White Whale and they all died with Earth. This is then downplayed when it's explained that their consciousnesses are stored inside a supercomputer (from where they control the mimeosomes) and they can make new human bodies from the protoplasmic fluid and the genetic data stored in the core, but it is hardly less unsettling to the team since it brings up the question of whether they're still really human if they can just make a new body they weren't born with.
  • Back Stab: Back Slash makes a return, though it's hardly the only art that gets a damage bonus when striking from behind.
  • Badass Crew: BLADE is a military unit trained to be NLA's line of defense against hostile Indigens and the Ganglion. But only the elite among them, such as the Interceptor and Harrier factions, possess the skill to go up against Tyrants. Or have what it takes to qualify as a Skell pilot.
  • Badass in a Nice Suit: If you want, male party members can be decked out in full-dress military garb and business suits.
  • Battle in the Rain: Chapter 8 is drenched with rain through the entire chapter, which is The War Sequence.
  • Beef Gate:
    • Many land bridges in northern and western Primordia have a mid-30s Grex waiting right in the center of them, to deter players from reaching certain probe sites. You'll also find high-level enemies blocking narrow passages in other parts of the world, but there are usually ways to get around them since many have a relatively small aggro radius.
    • Treino, The Cataclysm, is a level 60 Filivent tyrant in Cauldros who is standing on top of a teleport pad that leads to a treasure. You have to kill him for the pad to activate.
    • Lambert, The Divine Wind, is a level 15 Insidia tyrant that blocks the land bridge in Noctilum leading to Chapter 4's finale. There's no way to get around him and you'll have to fight him to get through.
  • Belief Makes You Stupid: Or in the case of Fraisie, belief makes you susceptible to a shapeshifting alien pretending to be an avatar of God.
  • BFG:
    • Characters in the Shield Gunner job class can be equipped with gatling guns and gain range and accuracy bonuses while using them. While Psycorruptors/Masterminds use ray guns that're so bulky that they're more like proton packs.
    • The "Retic" class of Sniper Rifles from Grenada Galactic Group are surprisingly large compared to the other weapons of it's class. While most rifles fit over the right shoulder, Retics cover the entire back and are nearly as big as the Rayguns and Gatling guns.
    • The Skells can be outfitted with far greater firepower, such as the "Super Weapons"; especially the Skell-sized Hexad Partican, Graviton Assault rifle, Hyper Railgun, and the Six Cannon most of all (seen @1:41-2:40).
  • BFS: Your party members can be armed with swords of the standard and beam weapon variety, some of which are as big as the characters themselves. Doubly so, for the ones that can be equipped to your Skells. Javelins are pretty damn big, too, and not just in length.
  • Biblical Motifs: As is tradition with the Xeno franchise, various biblical references are mentioned directly in the story, or certain story elements are inspired from them. Gwin comments about Noah and The Ark in the ending.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: All of the insectoid indigens are big. The smallest types, Blattas, are on average the size of a dog, and they just get bigger from there, up to the whale-sized Millepods.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The Ganglion are defeated, but the human race is extinct (only living on through their Mimeosomes, though it is possible that other arks survived the destruction of Earth), one of the protagonists unintentionally became the Final Boss, and one of the alien groups responsible for Earth's destruction is still around. It's implied that the Lifehold Core can build new biological bodies for all the remaining Humans living in NLA (as demonstrated with whatever pet you have living in your barracks), but everyone else is lost forever.
  • Black and White Morality: The humans of NLA are the one thing standing in the way of the Ganglion, a ruthless, tyrannical syndicate. Gets less so as time goes on as side missions reveal there are quite a few scumbags among the human NLA population, such as racist BLADEs ready to commit genocide against all alien races, criminals and murderers raising hell in the city, and that's not even getting into the late-game reveals that the selection process for the White Whale was corrupt to the bone. In addition, there are some notable defections from the Ganglion, such as the Tree Clan of the Prone and the entire Wrothian race.
  • Blade on a Stick: The Javelin weapon class.
  • Bonus Boss:
    • As in the original, there are certain enemies that're far stronger then the usual Indigens found scattered throughout the world. As such, they're referred to as "Tyrants"note  and, depending on which one you're fighting, the degree of difficulty can range from only slightly above normal - to being tough enough to make the Final Boss seem like a joke by comparison. For example, a level 92 Millesaur in Primordia who will attack you on sight. Normal Millesaurs are about level 50s or so, and can give a max-leveled player a hard time even if they are prepared. For the record, the final boss is Level 50. Compared to the first game, the amount of bonus bosses that are higher than the final boss's level is a lot more. Taken even further that your max level is capped at level 60 and Tyrants are higher than that level.
    • Once enough player activity has built up the meter when you load up the game, the Global Nemesis Yggdralith Zero and/or Telethia Plume will be available to fight. It's essentially a raid like in an MMORPG. This is the only way to get certain crafting materials needed to create many different weapons and armor. Even if you can't complete it, you'll get a reward based on your efforts.
    • The Neilnail Albus and Neilnail Furvus are a pair of strange Skells that are exclusive to the Time Attack mode, and cannot be fought in any other setting.
    • The Rexoskell and Blood Despair are quest-exclusive bosses that are stronger than the final boss.
    • Even among Tyrants, there are some that stand out. Besides the obvious pair of Ultrafauna, there's also Lugalbanda, the Wanderer King; Nardacyon, the Shadowless; Vortice, the Deific Blast; and Dadaan, the Strongest Prone. All of them get an alternative battle theme and range from level 88 to 96. There are also several other high-level Tyrants that have unusual battle traits and get special descriptive text in the Enemy Index, such as a sheperd Sylooth who tends Ovis, a pair of gargantuan Sabula, a Xern outfitted with defensive drones, and a Millesaur that's missing its neck. Some of these don't spawn until the game has been beaten.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing:
    • Tyrants look almost identical to their normal counterparts but have much higher stats and oftentimes have nasty abilities and attacks that their normal counterparts lack. Stay away until you have enough firepower, but remember that even if you're on even or superior ground, they can still put up a fight. For example, one particular Tyrant — Sirene, the Lost — is a level 13 Lepyx in Primordia that looks exactly like normal Lepyxes, save being much bigger, but the fact that it's killed over 200,000 players and earned a gold crown in kill count speaks volumes that this thing is not something you want to mess with early on.
    • Large enemies early on can become these, as they have colossal amounts of health and deal lots of damage, with some having access to nasty attacks. Don't think you can handle a large enemy like a Cinicula or Progen just because you're the same level as it; some of them can be a minutes-long struggle even for teams ten levels above them. This goes double for large Tyrants. And good luck if multiples of them show up.
    • One of the Bismuth Xe-doms in Sylvalum is level 92, on par with Luciel, the Eternal, whereas all the other Xe-doms patrolling the region are 42-55 at most. The only thing different about it, besides its stats, is that it's being escorted by a pair of Oc-serv.
    • Filiavents are giant anemone-like indigens whose levels are always 51 or higher, are huge, fly out of reach of your attacks, attack with extremely powerful electrical-element attacks, have very high stats, and are ambush-types and so will attack no matter what.
    • The Jacul and Auravis tyrant classes have powerful and difficult to dodge attacks all of which will hit you it you are next to it. Below the tyrant's level? You are definably dead. At the same level? Still very likely to die. Overleveled? Will still be able to kill you if you are careless. Bring a skell? You will have an easier time but these things hit like trucks going at 90mph and you can still end up saying goodbye to your insurance.
  • Bottomless Pit: The canyon in Oblivia. If you fall down it, you'll unlock the achievement "Dive to Freedom" right before you respawn with a death cry. There's also Mount M'Gando in Cauldros, but the results of jumping into the mouth of a volcano should be exactly what you'd expect.
  • Bowdlerise:
    • The North American and European versions of the game alter Lin's skimpy bikini costumes to be less revealing. Specifically, they changed her character model so she looks like she's wearing black underwear underneath the unaltered bikini costumes. They also remove the bust-size slider from the character creation menu, which is left intact in the Japanese version. (Ironically, this one is proving to be the more controversial of the two choices in some circles.)
    • The Italian subtitles replace several swear words with euphemisms.
  • Brain Uploading: Happens twice. First to survive the rigors of space travel, the humans uploaded their consciousness to the Lifehold Core computer, from which they remote controlled the mimeosomes; second, when the Lifehold Core crashed into Mira, and the central computer was destroyed, some unseen force, possibly Mira itself, uploaded the humans and kept them alive in their mimeosomes.
  • Bread, Eggs, Breaded Eggs: "Tatsu no taste like chicken! Tatsu taste like poop! And poison! Tatsu taste like poison poop!"
  • Bribing Your Way to Victory: For the Japanese, the extra character pack would be this, as all of its characters (minus Bozé) as well as the Ramjet Rifle can prove quite handy for That One Level. Averted in the Western release, as this pack is included with the main game free of charge.
  • Broken Aesop:
    • Early in the game Elma lectures the team about the differences between self-defense and being bloodthirsty when it comes to dealing with indigens. However, gameplay-wise, killing many or significant indigens doesn't impact the environment in the long run (they just spawn again upon returning to the zone) and during quests, trying to deal with indigens peacefully almost never ends well. Suffice to say, there's no moral ramifications for mass-murdering indigens.
    • An early Affinity Mission has Irina help a couple of possibly misogynistic and definitely Jerkass BLADEs, stating that humanity's future depends on everyone's efforts, even that of the dirtbags. This lesson come crashing down in flames when it comes to people like Gadd, Alex, and Gus.
  • Broken Bridge: Between the big deal made of how Skells help exploration, and the gaping blank spot on the map representing an ocean, most players would be inclined to think the two north continents were off-limits until the plot says so. Wrong. It's quite a hike, but you can actually hoof it along an archipelago and a couple of sandbars and get there from the word go. Said archipelago is a Prone fortress, though, so be prepared to go swimming, too.
  • Bubblegloop Swamp: Primordia has small sections of this, but the southern half of Sylvalum is nothing but sand and marshes covered in gigantic spore plants. Lake Ciel is more of a salt lake, but the spore plants basically make Sylvalum more of a Bubblegloop Swamp instead of a Shifting Sand Land.
  • Butt Monkey: Tatsu is always on the receiving end of some kind of joke about or attempt at eating him for dinner. Lin in particular, since she's stuck with him as his caretaker. They treat him well and listen to his advice otherwise.
  • But Thou Must:
    • ...join BLADE. Especially egregious when they insist several times before that it's your choice, and it appears that it is...unless you try to refuse, in which case Nagi asks you if you'd really "refuse the people who saved your life"...and if you say no to THAT, the nature of the question makes him interpret otherwise.
      Captain Nagi: You said no, you wouldn't refuse—that's a yes, right?
    • The same goes for using Elma and Lin, because you have no choice but to include them in your party for every story chapter and for most of the affinity missions. And in many cases, the fourth character slot is predetermined too. Meaning, the game dictates who you take with you the majority of the time.
  • Call a Rabbit a "Smeerp": Discussed. Random conversations compare several indigens on Mira to terrestrial animals, such as birds, wolves and dinosaurs. They realize, however, that those comparisons are probably arbitrary. Mia's affinity mission in the post game has the Nopon themselves calling local indigens "Birds" (even though said bird in question is a dragon-like Colubrim).
  • Call a Smeerp a "Rabbit": Lampshaded. A couple of times, Tatsu mentions Earth terms, and at least once Lin calls him out. ("How do you know what an X is?") He also refers to the Wrothians as "Kitty-cat people", when cats are not native to Mira whatsoever. However, there are cats in NLA (brought from Earth), and by the time the Wrothians are encountered, Tatsu might be familiar with them. (In fact, the team might have one as a pet.)
  • Call Back: A Tyrant you can have the misfortune of stumbling upon early in the game, Hayreddin the Territorial, is almost certainly referencing a very similar (and infamous) Unique Monster from the previous game, Territorial Rotbart. Both are "territorial" level 81 simian-monsters wandering around the open plains, who are liable to crush new players.
  • Calling Your Attacks: As in the original, your characters will shout the name of whatever art they're using (though a few will instead use a phrase), and some bosses get in on it, as well. While it generally doesn't apply while piloting a Skell, anyone who uses a superweapon or is in an Ares model will call out the names of its signature weapons.
  • The Cameo:
    • The Bionis and Mechonis from the previous game appear on a figurine, and one of the male Avatar voice options in both English and Japanese is Shulk, along with Fiora (English) and Shion, Melia and KOS-MOS (Japanese) for females.
    • The Japan-DLC characters all make an appearance when the team goes to fight at the Lifehold Core. Yelv is also shown providing backup for Elma in The Stinger.
  • Camp Gay: Lara Nara. He sounds stereotypical, has purple hair, uses feminine poses, and wears purple mascara. He even mentions that he found a real looker of a BLADE, and he's just his type. He's wondering if he can get Vandham to "coincidentally" assign them together for a mission. As the game progresses on, the citizens of NLA acknowledge his success in finding a boyfriend.
  • Cap: Your party and Skell levels max out at level 60 and your BLADE rank caps at 10. Enemies in the world, Tyrants especially, can go up to the high 90s. Preparation, teamwork and strategy are needed to close the gap.
  • Cartography Sidequest: One of BLADE's primary missions is to explore and map out planet Mira, in order to gather data on the indigenous wildlife, search for resources, and to recover wreckage from the White Whale; particularly, what's left of the Lifehold. In return, you'll be rewarded with EXP, credits (the in-game currency), and SP which can be used to increase your skill level in your chosen field.
  • The Casanova: A BLADE named Christopher believes that he's got every girl in New LA wrapped around his finger. At the very least, he's right about Dana, although he's rejected her several times according to her. If you give him the wrong gift, he even laments the fact that there's one girl whom he can't or won't pursue.
  • Casual Danger Dialogue: Subverted in that it doesn't take place during combat, but after you finish a battle, the characters often say something as if the fierce battle they just fought hadn't happened at all. There's a conversation for each and every character with almost everyone else. Even the voice of your own character determines the subject.
    Mature Female: These Miran winds aren't very compatible with my hair.
    Elma: I know a good treatment. Hit me up once we're back in the city.
    Irina: Hey Colonel, wanna go shopping when we're done?
    Elma: Sure. I hear Mall Cruz is having a sale.
    H.B.: Follow my example, Mia, and you'll go far.
    Mia: YES, SIR! (muttering to herself) ...Almost as far as that stick up your butt.
  • Central Theme: There is a line between self-preservation and genocide, and doing right means knowing which one is which. Is it better to kill out of fear of what's unknown and different or take a chance at peace and mercy, even knowing that it can end disastrously? These questions are brought up in the story proper regarding the Ganglion and their fear of humans, in sidequests regarding humans who kill aliens out of fear, and in gameplay regarding killing the hostile flora and fauna of Mira as threats to humanity's survival. Neither killing nor mercy are the right answer on every occasion, and the choice is always difficult.
  • Chain of Deals: A quest in the commercial district has you taking a Bronze Blatta Miralife card and slowly working your way up to the legendary Golden Nopopotamus. The person holding that card doesn't seem to find much value in it.
  • Chainmail Bikini: A lot of the armor sets inexplicably are a lot more revealing on female characters. It gets sillier when some of the light armor sets actually cover more then the heavier ones do (The Six Stars heavy armor is easily the biggest offender). Liviana in the commercial district even lampshades it:
    Liviana: I went there once myself out of curiosity— they were selling items from a wide variety of manufacturers. I was impressed at how risqué a lot of the ground gear for women was! Not that I could hope to pull it off...
  • Character Customization: The player character can be customized in looks and name, a first for the Xeno series.
  • Character Death: Subverted in regards to humanity. It's revealed that everyone in NLA is really a robotic humanoid called a Mimeosome that closely mimics humanity, but their real bodies are stored in the Lifehold Core, so if their Mimeosomes die, they can just be reborn later. But then, Double Subverted when it's revealed that the Lifehold Core's systems were destroyed months ago. So all those Mimeosomes that died? Yeah...those people are Killed Off for Real.
  • Cliffhanger: While humankind's immediate future on Mira is secure, it turns out that the Lifehold control system was destroyed during atmospheric entry Mira, meaning everyone should have died months ago. Additionally Lao's alive, and has seemingly recovered a flesh and blood body. What any of this means will need at least one sequel to explain.
  • Colony Ship: The White Whale, and every ship in Project Exodus. New Los Angeles was actually the Habitat unit of the ship, and was BUILT in space over a period of two years.
  • Collision Damage:
    • Small enemies take damage and are launched if a Skell steps on them.
    • This is subverted for the player; while you will be knocked back if you collide with a monster that's much larger than you, you won't take any damage.
  • Contrived Coincidence: It seems incredibly unlikely that EVERYONE in NLA would avoid mentioning being robots before it is revealed in the most dramatic fashion. Especially since afterwards it's mentioned quite regularly.
  • Convection Schmonvection: Giant lava pit? Won't hurt you unless you step in it, and even then you only lose 600 health per second while Skells are completely immune to it. Again, largely justified by the durability of mimeosomes.
  • Cool Down: The main combat mechanic, like in the previous game: it functions more or less identically here, with the addition of secondary cooldowns that fill up whenever you use the type of weapon associated with that Art without using it when it's available and which greatly increase its effects the next time you use it if it's filled up all the way.
  • Cool Helmet: Unlike last game, where the helmets' open-faced designs left the heavier sets looking ridiculous, this time there's a wide array of fully enclosed helmets.
  • Crippling Overspecialization:
    • The Psycorrupter and Mastermind are support classes geared towards crippling the enemy with debuffs and bolstering the party's resistance. The downside? You'll only be able to use knives and ray guns. Plus you won't receive the stat bonuses the other job classes do.
    • On the upside, rayguns are key to at least one Game Breaker build, and the Psycorruptor line has some skills that are useful to any class.
  • Crusading Widower:
    • Lao, a party member, became The Mole in revenge for losing his family after they were denied passage on the White Whale.
    • Powell becomes a xenophobic Serial Killer in revenge for his wife being Driven to Suicide.
  • Damage-Sponge Boss: Many high-level bosses and Tyrants have loads of HP and hit hard, but Gradivus, the Headless Emperor, is a post-game Millesaur Tyrant whose most notable feature, besides lacking a neck, is a planet-sized 100 million HP and a resistance to all types but Ether and Thermal to back it up. For comparison, Telethia, the Endbringer, has about a tenth of that.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory: The B button is the universal Cancel command in the game. In combat, you'll be presented with command prompts that require you to hit the B button for various purposes. Depending on what you do and how fast you do it, the prompt can appear and the ring will shrink either really slow or extremely fast and everywhere in between. This alone throws your timing off because you start to expect a pattern. When fighting bosses or if a fight drags out too long, the prompts are likely to be very fast, and if they happen in rapid succession (such as Binding a large enemy with a skell), then you may accidentally cancel out of the command. This becomes a problem because you can cancel out of combat altogether, and cancel out of Overdrive immediately after you activated it. Players will end up wasting their Overdrive at some point or another because they hit B on accident.
  • Darker and Edgier: The original had its moments, but X stops pulling punches after chapter 5. Uncautious or unlucky players can get an impressive number of named characters killed off during Side Quests.
  • Dark Is Evil: The Ganglion wear very dark clothing, their technology is either black or dark purple, and even the interiors are very dark and unlit. Also, Cauldros itself is basically a Red and Black and Evil All Over Mordor. Naturally, the Ganglion choose to make it their main base.
  • Dark Secret: Like most organizations, the Earth Colonization Project has several.
    • The people chosen to get on the White Whale were the rich and powerful elite, along with anyone those elites deemed "useful".
    • Related to the above, the people who got on the White Whale in fact, didn't get on at all. The inhabitants of the Whale are all the downloaded consciousnesses of the people who were picked to be saved. The original people those consciousnesses came from were lied to, and then died when the Earth blew up. The rest of NLA proper are also living with the delusion that their "real bodies" are in the Core.
    • Whatever the heck is going on between Eleonora and Yelv.
  • Dead All Along: Technically the entire human race. For an unknown reason, the Mimeosomes that were created to carry their consciousnesses are alive on their own and have fundamentally replaced the original human for good. Unknown on Lao's fate on the ending.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: Guns and related arts tend to do their damage across many small hits. This makes them ideal for Overdriving, as Overdrive increases art strength as the combo counter rises.
  • Death Mountain: Mt. M'gando in the center of Cauldros is an active volcano with a spring at the bottom. The volcanic crater in the center is also a scenic viewpoint.
  • Death World: Mira may be an ecological paradise, but it's an ecological paradise swarming with hungry house-sized megafauna, covered in dangerous terrain, and features dangerous weather like electromagnetic storms and brimstone rain. And then there are the alien invaders and enemy bases all over the place. No wonder so many people die out there.
  • Debate and Switch: The Affinity Mission "New in Town" involves Rock, an Actual Pacifist who does not want to fight, due to traumatic events which led to him killing everyone in his friend, Celica's, hometown. Despite this, Director General Chausson presses Rock to fight, because Rock is otherwise contributing nothing to help out the city, and according to Chausson, NLA can't afford idle citizens. To prevent Rock from being forced to leave, Celica goes on a suicidal mission to become a BLADE and almost gets herself killed as a result, only being saved by Elma and Rock, who wrestles with an indigen to save Celica and stays out of the way while Team Elma kills it. Despite her efforts, Chausson still isn't satisfied. Rock finally submits to the Director's insistence to fight, but it turns out that Chausson has decided Rock can just as well pay his debt to society by working in heavy industry. As a result, though the mission ostensibly ends with Rock remaining a pacifist, the fact that he only moments ago relented to fight out of guilt is brushed aside. As is the fact that he was doing it to save Celica, who is now an active BLADE soldier despite being less capable in combat than he is. The end result is that his pacifism is treated as a character quirk that can only be afforded because it's now convenient to do so.
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance:
    • Nopon see money and commerce as their highest value. While, granted, many of them will express concern over the safety of their loved ones or innocent strangers, profit to be gained from any endeavor is a very close second. To wit, when they learn that humans have a tendency to do what they want for free because they're cute, most Nopon are quick to exploit this fact.
    • Ma Non pride themselves on science and advancement over anything else. They don't know how to fight, nor can they do manual labor—and don't want to do them, either. As such, anything they can't understand or do physically they will figure out via science and technology, and if it can't be tackled that way, it becomes either extremely interesting or frustrating to them. Further, although they pride themselves on viewing any issue scientifically, when they do get caught up in their emotions, it's completely uncontrolled. A Ma Non overcome with strong or intense feelings is one of the most dangerous things you could ever imagine.
    • Prone are a Proud Warrior Race that sees every situation in regards to military strength and power. They measure both themselves and their allies up at every turn, and tend to show outrage if they don't like what they see. Also, Prone don't tend to forgive a slight of any kind. The Tree and Cavern clans have been at war for a long time, and neither is likely to stop feuding any time soon. Even when the Tree Clan are rescued from the Ganglion, many of them (aside from clan leaders) are still itching for payback. When some of the Cavern clan defect to NLA, the Tree and Cavern clans continue to feud, only avoiding outright violence for the most part due to both the laws of NLA and the decree of their leaders. Still, some of them will run off to fight Ganglion forces at the drop of a hat, simply because they can't stand not satisfying a grudge.
    • The Wrothians are a Proud Warrior Race and a Fantasy Counterpart Culture of Samurai Japan. As such, both fighting spirit and honor are everything to them and most of their values can be directly transferred from Feudal Japan. For example, the Wrothians have great praise for one of their warriors when she takes off alone to satisfy her need for vengeance against the Ganglion, with the full knowledge that she is almost certain to die from such an attack. In Japanese, this is known as "Makoto", whereas someone who is under obligation to redeem honor or act upon an intense emotion (or, as in this case, both) is supposed to act without thinking of logic or consequences. This is why attempting to appeal to the logic of said warrior, to stop her from killing herself, will fail. However, you can stop the warrior from getting herself killed by asking her to think of her friend's feelings, which falls into another Japanese virtue called "omoiyari".
  • Difficult but Awesome: The Enforcer's primary class line. Their weapons are the Raygun and piddly knife, which do terrible damage and build TP slowly. Push on to Psycorruptor and Mastermind and you'll get the ability to put an entire group of enemies to sleep for 30 seconds or more, or the ability to force an enemy to fight for you (or just stand and take damage) and make it KILL ITSELF TO BUFF YOU. The Enforcer weapons are also tied to the game's best healing spell (gained through Irina's first affinity mission which you have to do to progress the story), and the Mastermind's passive skills include Secondary Accelerator, which can make any class's arts much more effective.
  • Disc One Nuke:
    • The Affinity Mission where you recruit Alexa comes with the one of a kind Ramjet rifle. While weak, it gives the player 900 TP per round. This makes it really easy for players to keep up Overdrive and trivialize boss fights and other nasties, at least until they get the hang of Augments and stack skills that can do the job better.
    • The knife's arts gained after the Drifter class can this while also being Difficult but Awesome. Smooth Recovery makes health much less of an problem, the Brainjack + Servant Sacrifice combo makes gaining TP easy while also getting rid of non-tyrant/boss enemies, and Screamer makes fighting multiple enemies more manageable and there are even more useful arts from the Knife. Late-Game sees you make use of different, and more effective weapons, as the the knife's arts will deal with non-issues at that point.
  • Double Standard:
    • The armor for men and women are completely different, with women getting a variety of extremely skimpy wear. The imbalance is only somewhat alleviated by the fact that men can receive custom armor that amounts to nothing more than Sarashi, but women get a vast variety of swimsuits, Chainmail Bikinis, and Playboy Bunny outfits as well. The discrepancy is even noted in-universe.
    • A non-negative example, depending on how you feel about censorship of Jailbait. When her Affinity is high enough, Lin Lee Koo will say that she thinks of the Player Character as either a Cool Big Sis (if female) or Parental Substitute (if male). This may be due to the prevalence of the Little Sister Heroine trope in Japanese media, and thus referring to the player as a "big brother" could send the wrong messages—especially to a Western audience.
  • Downer Beginning: The game begins with an Earth-Shattering Kaboom.
  • Drama-Preserving Handicap: In Chapter 12, Luxaar decides to enter the fray himself using the super-Skell recovered in Chapter 6, the Vita. Before he does this, one of his minions reminds him that the Vita is badly damaged and he is incapable of using it to its fullest power, but he goes anyway. The Vita was present in the battle during the opening cutscene and was easily cutting a swathe through the Ghost fleet. If the Vita had been repaired, Luxaar would have won.
  • Driven to Suicide:
    • Ornella commits suicide at the end of the mission "A False Hope", guilty about her betrayal of Hope and their clients.
    • Subverted with Toluera, if the player decides to take a step further in uncovering the truth. It looks as if Toluera suffers a mental breakdown after discovering that the Golbogga are real. He then runs off the cliff he was perched on. Talking to Feloran reveals that Toluera is alive and well, just insane.
  • Dual Boss:
    • Ryyz and Dagahn are the collective boss of Chapter 8. Though Dagahn's enormous size and strength makes him appear to be the more dangerous of the duo, Ryyz's strange gravity powers make her nearly as powerful a combatant.
    • After you deplete about half of Bonus Boss Atreides, the Distinguished's health, his roar gets the attention of his mate, Gesserith, the Wileworm, who joins the fray.
  • Dual Wielding: The Commando and its 4 sub-classes can equip dual pistols and dual swords.
  • Dub Name Change: Some of the names were changed in the English localization.
    • BLADE's full name was changed from "Beyond the Logos Artificial D''estiny Emancipator" to "the Builders of the Legacy After the Destruction of Earth".
    • The "Dolls" were changed to "Skells".
    • Some of the characters were renamed, like Ru (Changed to L). Other character's names were simply respelled (Van Damme to Vandham and Guin to Gwin).
    • "Overeds" are referred to as "Tyrants".
    • "World Enemies" is changed to "Nemeses".
  • Early-Bird Cameo: When Vandham is going over the different sects of BLADE, you can see many of your future party members as their representatives in the presentation, including ones that were originally DLC.
  • Early Game Hell: Starting out is not an easy feat. The combat system can take some time to get used to, let alone learn the intricacies and hidden mechanics. Movement is fairly slow, which combined with the immense world means it takes a long time to get to places. The world is littered with enemies that you won't be able to have a fair fight against for hours, and you'll be sneaking around a lot of them. Getting killed while trying to explore uncharted territory before finding a node or landmark and losing all that progress is an all-too-real possibility. Weapon choices are relatively limited, and aside from a few Arts, you won't have other elemental types besides Physical. Decent healing skills are also very hard to come by. Levelling up, expanding your influence, and obtaining the Skell and its flight abilities makes life much easier on Mira.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: In the opening, the Earth becomes the focal point of a fight between two warring alien species. Unfortunately, the fight does a number on the planet, forcing humanity to launch several colony ships to escape, shortly before the planet is completely shattered.
  • Eldritch Location: The planet Mira itself translates the languages of the inhabitants and allows the mimeosomes to retain their personality. It didn't appear on any starcharts and seemingly came out of nowhere before the White Whale crashed. The Ganglion suddenly got trapped on the planet and have no idea how. Aliens/xenoforms describe a "white light" and then suddenly being transported to the planet. A NPC named Professor B claims to be a time traveler so it's possible some of these life forms could even come from different time periods. Professor B mentions the galaxies and stars have all been charted yet Mira has never appeared on them. The planet also prevents lifeforms from leaving it. It causes faster mutations and individual changes to the Orphe that normally take generations of division. And as the final scene for the ending shows, it's been keeping humanity alive as part of their Mimeosomes long after the Lifehold Core's database, that holds all of humanity's consciousness, was destroyed in a flood; shortly after their crash landing, and long before they could find it, much less reclaim it.
  • Elemental Tiers: By default, very few things have any resistance to the gravity element, larger enemies naturally take the most damage from it and the G-Buster series of weapons, which are the cornerstone of doing large amounts of damage early on with Skells, are gravity element. That being said, a number of strong weapons ignore enemy resistances, allowing them to do large amounts of damage by default, and on foot, ether is the preferable element to focus on if you want to see large damage numbers as there's a passive skill unique to it that increases all damage done by it by 150% at the cost of being unable to destroy appendages, and a large number of enemies weak to ether.
  • The Ending Changes Everything: The Lifehold's database being destroyed since making planetfall on Mira now means that there is a completely different reason for the mimeosomes being active.
  • Epic Tracking Shot: Much like the beginning of Xenoblade in Sword Valley and Colony 9, we get an incredible shot of New Los Angeles when entering the city for the first time.
  • Everyone Has A Special Move: While various characters can share weapon loadouts and classes, each of them has a pair of arts restricted to them, and them only, usable by Rook upon completing their respective Affinity Missions.
  • Everything's Better with Dinosaurs:
    • The Millesaurs, which resemble brontosaurus but have heads reminiscent of a praying mantis. They're among the largest monsters in the game, and a prominent part of Primordia's scenery. They're also safe to approach for a closer look...save for the one with the bright red markings.
    • Insidias are essentially armless raptors with mohawks. They are considerably less safe to approach.
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: Mira rivals Australia in terms of environmental hazards and aggressive wildlife, plus all the indigens that hide as objects just so they can attack things. While there is a fair number of species that don't attack on sight or proximity, any splash damage will make them just as mad.
  • Evil Counterpart: Inverted. Celica and Rock are the good counterpart to Ryyz and Dagahn respectively. Celica and Ryyz are young and powerful girls who are uncertain about humans and are more aggressive compared to Rock and Dagahn, who are much larger and less human-like. Team Elma even thought that Ryyz and Dagahn were in Noctilum, based on their signals, because Celcia and Rock were hiding in there.
  • Evil Laugh: Almost every time Ryyz is on screen and it's quite menacing and psychotic.
  • Exact Time to Failure: The percentage counter on BLADE Tower is an indication of how much energy remains in the Lifehold Core. If it reaches zero, the remnants of humanity in the Lifehold will die when their life support ceases, causing the Mimeosomes they control to shut down and spelling the end of the human race entirely.
  • Expy: The E3 2014 trailer shows a few characters who bear a resemblance to ones from prior Xeno- titles:
    • Lynlee is a dead ringer for MOMO.
    • Lao looks very similar to Dunban.
    • Doug also looks similar to Mumkar. Doug and Lao are also long-time comrades and ironically Lao is more in Mumkar's shoes being evil all along, while Doug is a Neutral Good character.
    • Elma shows similarities to several characters:
    • New Los Angeles bears some resemblance to Midgar.

    F-J 
  • Failed a Spot Check:
    • During Nagi's first Affinity Mission, Vandham comes to Elma's team with an assignment. He doesn't notice that Nagi is part of said team until after he speaks.
    • None of the BLADEs that have visited Cauldros noticed the massive citadel and ruins that serve as the main base of the Ganglion's forces until Ga Jiarg specifically tells them that's where the Ganglion are located. It could be argued that since Cauldros is a continent, they simply never explored any place nearby. Except during one mission, a member of Corwin's team specifically asks for directions by giving his position relative to where the Citadel is and the base camps also mention them. It could also be argued that they noticed the ruins, but not that it was the Ganglion headquarters, except that it also serves as the place from which all of their massive ships and mobile bases dock and launch from and base campers flat out tell you as much.
  • Falling Damage: Implicitly Hand Waved, along with Not the Fall That Kills You, by The Reveal.
  • Fanservice: This game does not shy down to having LOTS and LOTS of clothing, especially 'risqu&eacute' clothing. You can strip down all characters to their underwear that looks like shorts or even wear skimpy clothing on specific armor types that goes beyond the default armorless set. Thanks to fashion gear option, you can wear those types of clothing cosmetically while wearing your badass armor. Later in the game, you can change your character, including gender and skin color to match your desires. Of course, for skintight outfits, you can even match the skin color to those skintight outfits, making them more deceiving.
  • Fantastic Racism:
    • New LA becomes the home to numerous different alien species, such as the Ma-Non, and the Prone. While most humans find it quite appealing to interact with the different xenos and learn from them, there are still a few who are scared and resentful of them. One shopkeeper refuses to let Ma-Non shop at her store because she has a crippling fear of reptiles, and their skin creeps her out. More than a few of the Prone receive hatred for what their race has done in the story. All things considered, the aliens all take it rather well, as they respond more out of confusion rather than offense.
    • According to the art book, the battle that destroyed Earth seen at the beginning of the game was between two alien civilizations who are at war due to differences in their physiology, making it an interesting variation on this trope.
  • The Farmer and the Viper:
    • One early quest involves a BLADE named Carl being asked to kill some indigens because their proximity to New LA makes them a future danger to it. But he's too lazy to do it himself, so he dumps the mission on Rook. Upon discovering that said indigens are younglings, Rook is given the option to spare them or to kill them as ordered. Sparing them yields the consequence of them growing up and attacking people, including Carl, who is fatally wounded.
    • There's a mission where Quincy offers some typical jobs only for Gus to attempt to hijack them and steal the reward. Later he's seen being chased by an indigen. If you "rescue" him, he's an Ungrateful Bastard and screws you over anyway.
  • Final Death: A variation in that this can apply to Skells, but you have multiple ways of preventing it. The "Skell Insurance" feature allows you to get a Skell back for free three times, after which, you have to either pay a massive sum of credits to repair it (which is especially inconvenient for any of the level 60 Skells, since the fact that they require rare materials to make is factored into the price, pushing their repair cost to 5+ million credits, although thankfully they come with 10 Insurance instead of 3), use a Salvage Ticket, or buy a new one. For early-to-mid-game player (who cannot afford these risks/setbacks), this can actually make traveling/fighting in Skells more nail-biting and frustrating than fighting on foot, since you can be in the middle of something and get suddenly one-shotted and find your Skell destroyed. In order to avoid losing insurance points, the player has to hit a Perfect during a Quick Time Event that look exactly like normal Soul Challenges, so they might not pick up on the urgency until it's too late. And good luck if they were entering a command of some kind just when the QTE pops up.
  • Filler: Chapter 10 could have been taken out of the game or have been pushed to the last chapter, and nothing would have been lost. Ryyz takes a never-before mentioned weapon from the Ganglion Base to attack NLA and is stopped and killed long before she even reaches it. She's never mentioned again. The only thing taken from this chapter is a small character moment for Lin that could have been in an Affinity mission and getting Ryyz and Dagahn out of the story, which they could have done at any time.
  • Five-Man Band: The races that come together in NLA form this kind of dynamic.
  • Flanderization: The Nopon. In Xenoblade Chronicles, some of them were nomadic, and focused much of their efforts on business, but most of them were content with staying in Frontier Village and were pretty carefree. In this game, they're a lot more on the penny-pinching side, often scamming people on a regular basis, and they all have a caravan in every continent (save for Primordia, where they stay in NLA).
  • Floating Continent: Oblivia's Floating Reef comes closest, though there are small platforms near the Third Talon in Primordia.
  • Fluffy the Terrible: Some of the Tyrants have utterly ridiculous titles, like Casper, the Unhealthy Eater.
  • Flying Seafood Special: A large portion of the piscine indigens are capable of levitating or soaring through the air by various, usually ether-based means. It wouldn't be fun to have to fight them in the water, would it?
  • Foreshadowing:
    • The very first conversation hints at a plot thread that won't be resolved until the end of the game, though most players will see it coming around the time that the game reveals the other twist that same conversation foreshadowed.
    • One of the responses to L going to NLA is to reject him on account of him possibly being a Ganglion spy. There was indeed a Ganglion spy introduced in that same chapter, but it's not L.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: The Vita can be seen in the introduction cutscene during the space battle.
  • Free Sample Plot Coupon: The game has the Blood Lobster sidequest, where the main character has to find 99 lobster-shaped toys stuffed with explosives, scattered all around New Los Angeles. Why 99 and not 100? Because Rook manages to spot one and throw it away before it explodes in his hands (as the culprit planned to kill them before the start of the collection).
  • Frickin' Laser Beams: Not only are ray guns the Weapon of Choice for Psycorrupters, but "beam" is actually an elemental damage type.
  • Fun with Acronyms: B.L.A.D.E stands for "the Builders of the Legacy After the Destruction of Earth" in the North American localization. In the original Japanese, it's "Beyond the Logos Artificial Destiny Emancipator".
  • Furry Female Mane: Played with. Many of the humanoid alien species have some sort of head ornamentation that simulates feminine human hair.
  • Gainax Ending: The Stinger shows us that the database in the Lifehold that was supposed to be storing everyone's consciousnesses was destroyed all along, raising the question then of how any of the humans could possibly still be alive. In addition, Lao somehow survived the final battle and washes up on a beach somewhere back in either his mim or original human body, and is found by someone. There's also the implication that Lao may no longer be Lao, but some new entity that is the result of fusing Lao and Luxaar's minds together.
  • Galactic Superpower: The Samaar control a region of space spanning 6 million light years across numerous galaxies.
  • Game-Breaking Bug:
    • The game has a high chance of softlocking by making the cancel/confirm buttons unresponsive if you use the filter function when viewing affinity charts after recruiting H.B.
    • In the affinity mission Bff's, If you go to the Oblivia caravan before the Noctilum one, the trigger after the cutscene to find Tatsu's mom never plays. This is especially devastating when you realize that this is an affinity mission, meaning you can't cancel it. Hoped you didn't save the mission when you had it active!
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: With a game this large, it is very easy to overlook every detail
    • Y'know how the faces had to take a hit to facilitate for the game's cases of Visual Effects of Awesome? It can be justified in story because of the Ridiculously Human Robots ...for the humans at least.
    • While exploring, you can easily survive jumping or falling from any height, and indeed, shortly after starting the game, Elma makes the suggestion of jumping off a high cliff to get down faster. Turns out, there's a reason for that.
    • The fact that your player character is an android avatar, like all the "humans" in NLA justifies being able to re-edit your character after starting the game (even changing their gender!), though you have to unlock the ability through a side quest.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation
    • You can decide to explore the entire planet with the main three, yet some chapters still have Elma and Lin react as if they've been in an area for the first time (like when you enter Oblivia\Sandy Butt Canyon during Chapter 5's story missions).
    • Lin will mention Tatsu in some of her post-battle quotes, even before you meet him.
    • Some NPCs will ask the party certain things that Nagi shouldn't be around to hear such "sensitive information" or planning to assassinate him while he is in the party.
    • At one point during her affinity missions, Irina complains that there aren't many female BLADE members. But just by running around NLA and even looking at the playable characters list, there are lots of them.
    • The White Phosphor Lake in Cauldros is said to be radiated and it's possible to accidentally (unless the player's doing so on purpose) get a named NPC killed from phosphorus poisoning due to poor directional guidance, yet the player character won't be affected by the radiation, but only standing in the phosphorus.
    • When you add Elma to your party, she says that she's pleased to serve under your team until your next big assignment (namely, Story Missions, whereupon she becomes commanding officer again). Except, in any cutscene where she has a speaking role, Elma instantly becomes the leader. For example, there's L's, Celica's, and Gwin's first Affinity Missions, which amounts to the team just helping out those characters and not being on any type of assignment. It can become really noticeable, though, when Elma gets credit for a lot of things that you accomplished without her needing to be in the group whatsoever. For example, his Affinity Mission has Nagi state that he's been serving under Elma for some time. Except that, when you add him to the party, he says it was you he wanted to serve under. This is possibly an artifact from early production design, in which there was no Supporting Protagonist, and so the team leader and the Player Character were likely the same person.
    • In the Affinity Mission, "Boot Camp", Gwin says that he is too weak and wants to train. Elma then wants to fight him to see how "weak" he is. When you fight him, he is level 40, when it is highly unlikely you trained Gwin to level 40 by the time you do this Affinity Mission. Then Elma tasks Gwin to do some missions with her (or Rook's) team, and his levels drop back down to what they are when he is a regular party member. After you and Gwin do those missions, Gwin takes another battle with your party. In this fight, he is now level 46. Somehow a BLADE can all-the-sudden grow by 6 levels just by doing some missions from Elma.
    • Elma, Doug and Lao are all shown to be Skell pilots before joining your party, but until you get your Skell License, you can't even have them support you with their own Skells. Similarly, despite a big deal being made about Skells being a limited resource, you can buy as many as you have credits for, and can even hand them out to inexperienced BLADEs such as Phog or L.
    • The fact that L and Celica can use Overdrive. It's heavily implied that Overdrive is a function of the characters' robotic bodies, since you can't use it until after the reveal, and the icon depicts a set of gears. Despite being flesh and blood, both L and Celica are somehow capable of using it, too.
    • You can take Celica and L with you on the initially racist Boze's recruitment mission and he doesn't seem to care at all. Being nice to non-humans in conversation also raises his affinity as much as any other character.
    • A female Orphean may appear as the client for a Basic Mission before completing the Mission where they are brought into existence.
    • In Chapter 12's cutscene, it doesn't matter what your Skells look like, because they're not the ones you're piloting.
    • You can take any member on missions where you fight the Definians, yet most of the time in their affinity missions (i.e. Boze and Hope), they act as if the Definian they encounter there were the first they saw.
    • After Chapter 5 a mission requires Rook to give a Ma-non worker some means of compensation in exchange for their technology and knowledge. Pizza is the key, and the worker immediately gets hooked. Exploring NLA before doing this still shows the Ma-non mad for pizza, even though it's often stated that it's Rook who started the Pizza fad in the first place.
    • It's possible to find combat probes in mechanical treasure spots before undergoing Hugo's missions, which imply that said probes are his inventions and the first of their kind.
    • The main game's story ending heavily implies you have completed most of the affinity missions and unlocked every character in the game, even if you did not recruit the optional characters. An example is Celica's Affinity Mission: not completing New in New LA. Rock seems to be working in construction when he obtains the job after the affinity mission is completed.
  • Gender Bender: A subquest, once completed, will allow the player to change their character's design almost at will (it's at a single location that can only be done late at night. The nearest waiting area is a good distance away, but fortunately that distance is mostly straight up, and you can quick-travel to the location anyway), even voice and gender. This is explicitly mentioned as an option in-story, though when you do it, everybody acts as though you had always been that way.
  • Generic Cuteness: A common criticism of the game is how generic, artificial or "doll-like" the characters all look. Most of them have a generically cute aesthetic, especially women (there's somewhat more variance with men—particularly older characters like Vandham and Nagi). A common Fanon theory is that this is because humans are mimeosomes and are thus supposed to look slightly artificial. This doesn't apply to alien characters like Celica or Elma (in her real body), however.
  • Giant Enemy Crab: The Forfex indigens are basically this in all but name.
  • Giant Flyer: Every flying indigen save Vesper and Adsecula are ginormous.
  • Gotta Catch 'Em All:
    • The Holofigures, which can be used to decorate the barracks. Most of them are earned through quests, while the rest are earned by defeating specific Tyrants.
    • In-universe, the citizens of NLA are obsessed with collecting Miralife cards, which feature artwork of various indigens.
  • Graceful Loser: Roselle accepts defeat after her battle and either offers Rook a bribe or simply turns herself in for kidnapping, depending on the player's decision. Probably the only time something like this happens with a hostile BLADE.
  • Gratuitous English: Like in Xenoblade, occasionally prompts to hit the B button will appear; hitting the button in time offers various subtle rewards. There are two levels of success; hitting the inner circle (hitting the button a little late, but still in time to be successful) will tell you that you've "Succeeded". Hitting the outer circle (precisely when hitting the button would no longer be considered "too soon"), however, will tell you that you've "Huge Succeeded". (Un)fortunately, this turned out to have been beta text, as later videos have shown that it's been changed to "Good" and "Perfect," respectively.
  • Gratuitous German: Wir Fliegen, literally meaning "We Fly" in English, have lyrics that are completely in German, in a Japanese game that usually uses songs in Engrish. Possibly a quirk of the composer, who also had lots of Gratuitous German in his Attack on Titan work.
  • Green Hill Zone: Primordia. It's the first continent, and along with the vast green plains it has plenty of beaches and coastline plus a lot of tall mountains. The beaches and coastline make areas of Palmtree Panic work in.
  • Grey and Black Morality: Maurice Chausson isn't afraid to prepare for dirty tactics when it comes to combating the Ganglion.
  • Guide Dang It:
    • Despite the lengthy in-game manual, there's still a number of features that go completely unexplained and unmentioned: the largest one of these is the total lack of info on how much various buffs boost said stats, making it hard to decide which one of them is the best one to use, especially since the main character can ultimately learn all of them and because each buff's effect was thoroughly documented in the previous game's art list. The annoyingly small font doesn't help with any potential in-game help text either.
    • Not counting the Player Character, there are 18 additional party members. Seven of them are recruited over the course of the story. Ten of them require you to complete an Affinity Mission in order to unlock them. That one last party member, Mia, is a pain in the ass if you don't know what to do: you need to complete a certain chain of Normal Missions in order to finally unlock her, 3 of them first requiring you to find her in specific locations out in the wild, and even then the earliest point you can unlock her is right between Chapter 11 and Chapter 12, and that's only if you're ridiculously OCD about doing segment recon, as the requirement for the last quest to unlock her requires you to have 65% completion rating in Cauldros, which is the last continent.
    • You will get quests asking you to gather items from the overworld. However, the quests will only tell you the continent the items are on, despite most overworld items being located only in particular portions of the map (and even if you are looking in the right place, what you find is randomized). This lead many players to run around in circles for hours, hoping to find the one item they are missing to complete their quest. This can get quite infuriating when important quests require you to find such items, such as the mandatory one to get your Skell licence.
    • Completing the Collectopedia, a fetch quest on a much larger scale. In order to get a 100% completion, you must collect and register at least one of every item that spawns on map. It sounds simple enough, but items have different levels of rarity meaning the RNG plays a big factor into this. Items are also exclusive to specific regions within each continent and the game will not give you clues where to locate them. Also, more common in Sylvalum and Cauldros, some items can only be picked up at specific times of day with specific weather conditions. In other words, the only way to get 100% without using a guide for reference is through dumb luck.
    • Indigens, aliens, and mechanoids recorded in the Enemy Index only show what continent they're on, not a specific location they appear. If you want to find them again, you'll have to find a bounty mission that points out their area, or consult the Internet. The Index also records item drops from enemies, but doesn't tell you which appendage needs to be destroyed to have a chance at obtaining one. This really bites for missions that require you to obtain items from enemies. For example, the objective may tell you to get a Topaz Wine from a Clay Tectinsula in Oblivia, but it doesn't show you where they appear or which appendage you have to destroy to get a chance at obtaining one.
    • Heart-to-heart conversations and Affinity Shifts. They're not marked on FrontierNav unless you happen to pass by someone who knows the information, and even then the info isn't available until after completing certain missions. Some of them have specific requirements, such as finding the person at a certain time of day in an area they usually aren't found while they're not in your party, after completing a previous heart-to-heart with them, and sometimes having a certain type of pet in the barracks. Unless you manage to find the information or have a guide, finding the heart-to-hearts involves stumbling upon the people by pure luck or intense searching. Affinity Shifts take the above but replace "party member" with random civilians.
    • Getting the "best" outcome on some Normal Missions sometimes means knowing some technical bits about the world beforehand (whether it be getting random info from random unnamed NPCs with some cryptic context behind it or understanding the geography and names of different parts of the continents) or talking to NPCs that aren't listed in your objectives. While some actions you take to save lives are common sense (such as stepping in to defend an endangered person), being ill-prepared for some decisions (whether it be the player character not having gained info on how to do something or not having a specific item when someone's in danger) can result in negative outcomes such as the death of someone you were supposed to save. One such quest requires you to talk to another person nearby before speaking to the person the quest requires you to speak to, another quest can get another person killed if you don't do a specific part first and gain information regarding an item from them and yet another quest requires you to provide information about an enemy type's weaknesses and attacks on the fly without being given the option to check it in your enemy index beforehand so that the other party's attack won't result in casualties.
    • There are hexes on the continential maps that have the quest icon, indicating that either a quest mostly takes place in that area, or a quest is obtained in that area. Sometimes it's not obvious, and said missions can be easily missed (such as Conner's second quest).
    • The Dopang Caravan is harder to locate than the other Nopon caravans in Mira, since it doesn't have any affinity missions tied to it. It's also hidden in a secluded place in Sylvalum and the fast travel point name it uses is based on the spring nearby.
    • Deep in your journey you may find a mission on the BLADE terminal Off the Record, where navigation hints and indicators are unavailable, and there can be multiple versions of this mission as well. It turns out these missions are required for getting a field skill up to level 5, and only become available upon reaching level 4 in a skill.
  • Guns Akimbo: The ranged Weapon of Choice for Commando, Winged Viper, and Full Metal Jaguar classes.
  • Hate Sink: Tobias. Even before he challenges Rook on account of "stealing" his probe income he's an absolute Jerk Ass to Kirsty, and is only in it for the money. When he does challenge Rook he's a complete Smug Snake and frequently accuses Rook of underhanded tactics, which Tobias himself is implied to be doing behind the scenes. However, he's really a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, so he has a justified reason for his greed.
  • Have I Mentioned I am Gay?: Lara Nara and Lara Mara are very flamoyantly Camp Gay characters and will never stop talking about either men they find cute/attractive, or the fact that they supposedly have a boyfriend. It can also be interpreted that they're at least somewhat bi, because they also have some praise for women they finds cute/attractive also, although this isn't brought up nearly as often.
  • He Knows About Timed Hits: The game is rather forgiving about breaking immersion when talking about game mechanics, but a little of this still happens. You'll get advice from characters that pauses the game and mentions story missions and other game mechanics. One NPC in particular, Wolf, gives you advice on handling enemies, such as knowing how to take advantage of an Art's 2nd cooldown timer (the green ring that fills up.)
  • Hello, Insert Name Here: For the first time in the series, the player creates their own fully customizeable avatar; including their name. But your fellow party members and NPCs will only address you as such during onscreen text (i.e. scenes that aren't voice acted), not during cutscenes. Elma and other characters eventually start calling you "Rook", for "rookie".
  • Heroic Mime: Zigzagged. For the most part, your avatar is limited to calling their attack names and a few lines in battle, but doesn't speak during cutscenes. Instead, you'll occasionally be given a prompt, followed by 2 or more responses to choose from. Lampshaded by Commander Vandham, who says that "Chatty Cathy" isn't much for conversation.
  • Hidden in Plain Sight: Some indigens like to camouflage themselves in the scenery, not being detectable by the targeting system until they ambush you. Mortifoles and Sacrifoles disguise themselves among ordinary plants (though moving petals might tip you off); Germivores, Tectinsulas and Arenatects disguise themselves as land formations; in Sylvalum, some Cantors like to pose as perfectly stiff statues (aside from their heads turning in different directions with clock-ticking sound) next to stone walls.
  • Hollywood Old: Artistic Age example, probably, but one of the face options for a male Rook is called "Old Man". The actual face doesn't look over 55, and can pass for 35. The kicker here though is that the "Man B" option looks older than the "Old Man" option.
  • Hope Spot: All the citizens of NLA are waiting with baited breath for the day they'll finally be able to bring everyone out of stasis from the Lifehold Core and return to their biological bodies. Some citizens can't wait to see their loved ones again, especially their children, or fallen BLADE members. The Lifehold core mainframe was destroyed upon impact with Mira. All those people can never be brought back, even though the technology to recreate bodies is still functioning. While the game doesn't go into detail about it, it's pretty obvious that Chaussen, Nagi, Vandham, and the rest of the leaders in NLA will have to choose very carefully how and when they'll break the news, because some citizens are getting impatient.
  • Hostile Weather: Electromagnetic storms can break out in Oblivia. Like other environmental hazards, it deals damage to your party, but it has the benefit of reducing mechanoids' detection ranges. It covers a sizable chunk of the whole continent, and only getting to a relatively enclosed place will stop the damage.
  • Hub Level: New Los Angeles. Not only has it become the home of the entire human race, it is also your base of operations because it is the location of the BLADE Barracks.
  • Humans Are Bastards:
    • One might think that humanity's dire circumstances might've promoted greater unity among them, but deception, backstabbing, and other shady business is still commonplace, both among the civilians and BLADE members. Some of them also prove to be less then accepting of their alien visitors...sometimes to a deadly degree.
    • The quest to help Professor B, a friendly alien in the Industrial Sector, is a simple fetch quest to help further his research. Upon finding the item, you're ambushed by four BLADE members who don't want you to help him out, and they're ready to kill you to see it through. They attack you, and you have no choice but to kill them.
    • Fraisie at the Chapel tries to exploit the Ma-Non into following her religion. See the Snake Oil Salesman entry below.
    • One human noticed how the Ma-Non were having trouble adapting to New LA and wanted to hold a seminar teaching them some basics of humanity, but talking to him reveals it has nothing to do with concern for the Ma-Non and is fueled by his own frustration with them. In the end, the "seminar" is really a plot to round them up and Kill 'em All, which the player interrupts. Unfortunately, he's not alone in his opinion.
    • A good bit of Lao's entire shtick as a villain stems from his view that humans are bastards to each other. Not only is he furious that his family was denied a place on the Whale, but he's certain it was due to their socio-economic status and stops exactly short of outright accusing the NLA leadership of full-blown racism in its selection process. He even goes so far as to warn Lin that "people like us" are only treated as valuable so long as they're seen as useful, which is about as subtle as a brick to the head.
  • Humans Are White: Played with. Within NLA, almost every character is of fair skin, and characters like Lin and Nagi are Chinese and Japanese respectively. Other than that, due to the lack of clear skin tones and ethnic features, it's hard to tell if there any, say, Black or Alboriginal people. Many players, in fact, have complained that the character creation system does not do a good job of providing options for non-White and non-Asian characters. As such, pre-made NP Cs (such as Powell at Army Pizza) are a slightly darker shade than others, but could just be tanned for all we know. However, given the tenor of some of Lao's comments during chapter 11 in particular, the marked "whiteness" of the White Whale crew may not be unintentional on the part of the developers...
  • Humongous Mecha:
    • The Zu Pharg, while outwardly appearing to just be a spacecraft, turns out to be one of these.
    • While not nearly as huge as the previous example, the Vita still towers over Skells, being more then twice as as tall.
    • Xe-doms are some of the biggest mechanical enemies in the game.
    • Xerns are by far the biggest flying mechanical enemies in the game right after Zu Pharg and it's more than likely that you initially mistake one as a piece of scenery as they resemble parts of the abandoned mining towers found in Cauldros.
  • Hungry Jungle: Noctilum is full of overly-dense tropical plant life, acidic water, and enemies literally Hidden in Plain Sight who don't show up on your radar until it's too late and you've already entered battle.
  • Idiot Hair: Almost every hairstyle in the character creation screen gives you the option to give your character a forelock that sticks out apart from the rest.
  • I Have to Go Iron My Dog: Frye and Phog can't both be in the party at the same time until you complete a certain Affinity quest. If you have one in your party, the other will make up an excuse to decline your invitation.
  • Impossibly Cool Clothes: In stark contrast to most of the costume and armor sets of the previous game, the ones found in Xenoblade Chronicles X are not only awesome to look at it, they're fully customizable. During GameXplain' 3-hour livestream, Derrick shows you can even set the characters' headgear to be invisible (@1:06:13-1:10:09). Plus, there are costume sets that are referred to as "fashion armor". A vast improvement from before.
  • Infinity+1 Sword:
    • There's a number of weapons that far outclass normally available weapons' damage rating and have passive skills to match, but they're only either dropped by a single Bonus Boss each or need a large number of rare materials and a maxed out arms manufacturer level to create or buy.
    • The Skell version of these are Superweapons: with the exception of a single one you get as an affinity quest reward, you need a large number of materials to make them and the blueprints for level 60 versions of them are only gotten from finishing affinity quests, although some of them border on Awesome, but Impractical.
    • The Ares 90 is this for the Skell Frames. On it's own without any augments, the Ares 90 is strong enough the steamroll through majority of the high level Tyrants in the game. It can practically kill everything short of the Super Bosses with ease.
  • Infinity–1 Sword:
    • Bonus points for being actual swords, you can obtain the Unbreakable Blade and the Legendary Nopopopopon from post-endgame quests. Both are level 50 and offer considerable strength that surpass many of the level 60 swords, but they can't be upgraded with more skill slots.
    • Skell-wise, both Ares models are significantly easier to make than other level 60 Skells and have extremely high starting stats and a weapon that's compareable to other superweapons in damage output. However, you can't change their equipment, meaning that outside of their augments, their power can't be increased with stronger weapons and they only have 4 weapons, meaning they'll have to wait for their cooldown that much longer to use any of them again and they miss out on a significant number of augment slots. That being said, making a normal level 60 Skell that can consistently outdamage an Ares and has overall higher stats is a massive time and materials investment and isn't really that useful for anything besides the novelty of being able to take down strongest Bonus Bosses in a single hit.
  • In Spite of a Nail: Some decisions in missions don't affect the long-term outcome at all, or only affect the reward prize. Examples can include deciding which materials to gather for someone (and it turns out they need the other anyway), failing to kill a target and only that target, failing to kill a target within a specified time, or deciding to look the other way from an incident and accepting a bribe.
  • Interface Spoiler:
    • There's an area in NLA called the Mimeosome Maintenance Center.
    • The first time you have a Heart-to-Heart with each of your different party members, you'll receive an achievement for it. Well, except for Lao, that is... Heart-to-Hearts are also recorded on the map when they're found out and/or completed, unless they're for a character that is Downloadable Content in Japan; again, except for Lao.
    • During character creation, you can pick from a rather wild variety of skin, hair and eye colors, as well as some extremely non-human eyes. Moreover, nobody feels moved to comment about it if you do. This is because you're customizing your mimeosome, rather than a biological human body. Nobody comments because they all know you're a tricked-out robot, even if you don't at first.
      • For that matter, in character creation none of the eye designs look all that natural.
    • Chapter 3 introduces you to the Prone race with the implication that they were behind the destruction of Earth, and the base you encounter them in also has Puge and Pugilith support. Chapter 4 then formally introduces the Ganglion coalition as a whole, which the Prone are just one race in. However, the enemy index entries on the Prone, Puges and Pugiliths (accessible as soon as you engage any of them in combat) mention the Ganglion before you even hear of them in-story. On another note, the entry for the Prone lists them with "Cavern Clan" in parentheses, indicating that not only are the Prone divided into two races/clans, there are a few mission-exclusive fights with Tree Clan Prone, the aforementioned second Prone clan that becomes one of your allies. On a further note, there's an Achievement called Cavern Clan Immigration, implying the seemingly Always Chaotic Evil clan of Prone will become allies too.
    • The "[Race] Immigration" achievements usually don't spoil much seeing as the race names won't mean much until you meet them, with two exceptions: the one listed above is one, but you get " Definian Immigration" for completing a quest that involves the Heel–Face Turn of one of their race, and it isn't until the post game that only a couple more join in.
    • It might seem a little odd that the Enforcer healing skill is called "Repair". It removes debuffs as well as heals, so maybe it's just named a little thematically for the high-tech setting of Xenoblade X? Well, yes, but there's a bit more to it than that. This even ties in to Irina mentioning getting repaired during an early affinity mission and she herself having the art.
    • Ever wonder why the empty bottom left section of NLA has a survey percentage number like the rest of the districts?
    • Irina and Gwin of Team Irina can join you on missions, despite technically being part of another BLADE team, with Irina even leading it as Team Irina. They have another member, Marcus, who curiously never actually becomes playable. There's a fairly good reason for that, and it involves a lot of Ganglion missiles.
    • One of the categories in the Enemy Index is Chimeroids, and a category of Criticals Up and Slayer augments exist for this enemy type, all of which can be seen long before you encounter them.
    • After you defeat Luxaar for good and go through the cutscene, you earn a story achievement. But because the progress says 4/5, you know there's still more...
    • Subverted before proceeding to Chapter 11. Both of Gwin's Affinity Missions need to be completed to begin, but nothing happens to Gwin at all.
  • Jack-of-All-Trades: The player character plays the trope straight and subverts it at the same time by being the only one allowed to change job classes. Once any class is mastered, you're allowed to retain all Arts acquired from it and can still use the weapons associated with it even if you change to a different classnote . Meaning, it's entirely possible to master every job class and weapon that the game has to offer.
  • Jail Bait: Like in Xenoblade, it's possible to take off all the armor of characters, including Lynlee, who is officially 13. However, age of consent in Japan is 13. In the English localization, Lin's skin colors on her character model was changed so it looks like she's wearing a black underwear underneath the armor.
  • Japanese Ranguage: The songs in this game are all sung in English, but it's pretty easy to tell that the singers are Japanese. "Black Tar" gets better about this halfway into the song— After the first mention of "brack tar", you can clearly hear the L sound from there on. Both singers in "Uncontrollable" are especially hit hard by this, as it's hard for them to enunciate properly.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: During Kristy's questline, you discover that she's working on the framework for a new Frontier Nav system, believing she is the only survivor of the team after crashing on Mira. Along the way, Tobias challenges you and says you're cutting into the profits he's trying to make using the system himself. He comes off as a smug asshole who only cares about money. An "Avatar of Avarice", as she calls him. At the end of the questline, you discover that Kristy never realized that he was part of the team, and that he transfered all the money he'd been saving up into her account so they can both work on the project together. Kristy is left wondering what the hell just happened.
  • Job System: Each character is pre-designated to one of the game's 15 available job classes, but your player created avatar is the only one allowed to switch between them. The one you choose will determine which weapons you'll be able to equip and which Arts and Skills you can learn. Once your skill level in any job class reaches max rank, it will be marked "Mastered", allowing you to keep all Arts you've acquired from it and use the weapons associated with it in any class.
  • Joke Weapon:
    • In the affinity mission in which you get it, the Ramjet Rifle, a prototype weapon with Skells in mind, is treated as such in-story. For said mission, you are testing the weapon on foot against creatures in Sylvalum. Said rifle has even worse stats (aside from its amazing tension point gain for the earliest point you can access the mission) than your starter rifle. If you decide to test the rifle against the larger creature as suggested by Alexa (which is quite a challenge if you don't know how to take advantage of its hidden potential), the results of said test give everything the rifle's designer needs to know that weapon as it is would be abysmal against the things Skells are made to fight (not taking TP gain into account story-wise).
    • Murderess's second affinity mission makes you fight against a large indigen with a high kill-count (Skells recommended for support) with a crap-stats weapon as part of a bet between unruly BLADEs (although you have the option to chicken out and let them win the bet). The weapon in question: the Scrap Duo, which unlike the Ramjet Rifle, don't have any positive traits that could turn them into a Lethal Joke Weapon. Worse yet, the weapon is flagged as an essential quest item, so you can't get rid of it from your inventory even after you complete the quest.
  • Jump Scare: There are quite a few enemies who are Hidden in Plain Sight, and don't become targetable until they ambush you. Mainly plant creatures, but there are others that become more prevalent once you leave Primordia. An NPC in the Admin District mentions that one BLADE member is now traumatized by the sight of flowers because she barely escaped a plant that jumped her. There are also some enemies that are just plain hidden, such as a level 65 giant Sabula tyrant in Oblivia that makes the Spice Worm look like an earthworm in comparison. Woe be to any player who doesn't think there's anything unusual about the sand on the ground looking slightly different from the rest of the area
  • Jungle Japes: Noctilum serves this trope with its tropical vegetation and lakes, but it's mainly the Hungry Jungle listed above.

    K-R 

  • Katanas Are Just Better:
    • The longswords are basically this in all but name and are widely regarded as the strongest weapon type in the game, due to having an extremely powerful damage-boosting aura in Offensive Stance, a multitude of special and powerful weapons dropped exclusively by specific tyrants and an absurdly strong tension art in Blossom Dance, which on top of possessing one of the highest damage multipliers in the game ignores the enemy's damage resistances, meaning everything is going to be feeling equal amounts of pain from it, even the superbosses. However, while acting like Katanas, they rarely ever look like them, and typically resemble broadswords. So they are definitely Playing With This Trope.
    • Nagi's second Affinity Quest shows how much of a badass he really is with his signature katana in an awesome display of Cutscene Power to the Max.
    • Various post-endgame tyrants drops Signature Weapons— legendary longswords that almost always look like a katana. There are no signature weapons for any other weapon type in the game.
  • Kicking Ass in All Her Finery: The game's "fashion armor" sets allow you to dress up female party members without altering combat stats. You can wear full combat armor but appear wearing anything else. They'll be armed and ready for a night on the town, spent mowing down enemies with melee weapons and heavy artillery!
  • Lame Pun Reaction: Everyone has a suitably awesome response to the Joker Female's lame after-combat joke.
    Joker Female: Whew! I'm bushed. Did I do all the work or what?
    Elma: You did enough, but next time you can do more.
    Hope: If you're bushed, then I'm shrubbed. So, there."
    H.B: Show some humility! That was all me.
    Murderess: Oh, please... I stretched a little.
  • Laser Blade:
    • The photon sabers utilized by the Blast Fencer and Galactic Knight classes. They generally deal beam damage, but variants capable of inflicting heat, electric, or even physical damage exist.
    • Skells can have energy swords, katars, rings, and claws.
  • Last Lousy Point: It's inevitable in a game this massive: whether it's collectibles, items, indigens, or stuffed lobsters, there'll always be that one thing that just won't be found. The nasty part about the Enemy List is that it doesn't log how many total of each species there are, and there are several species that only show up in certain weather conditions (like Frenzied Coronids during a Red Aurora).
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: Can be Exploited by players accidently or not. In this game, you can set up Holograms that you gain multiple times through the game. Players who join other people's squad missions will visit the host's barracks, and they can go to the hologram room and view the host's holograms they put up. Some of the holograms feature WalkingSpoilers, and while you can't view the hologram's name, you can still get spoiled by certain things, like the Prone Tree Clan and chimeras, even if the player won't understand the contexts they are from.
  • The Last of These Is Not Like the Others: The Ares skells. Every other skell model has an industrial aesthetic, Tron Lines and blade fins at the feet and shoulders. The Ares are more human in form and movement, and get wings during flight.
  • Lemony Narrator: The narrator for the English-language "Survival Guide" videos, who becomes more dickish with each new video. "If Map View is too difficult for you, consider staying on Earth to witness its destruction."
  • Les Collaborateurs: How the Ganglion operate. They appear to a species with a mighty show-of-force and give them the option of Join or Die, and then sit back and watch as The Quislings and the ones too afraid to resist go to war with the ones who want to fight back. The resulting civil war weakens them further, and the Ganglion help their new subordinates win.
  • Lethal Joke Character: Drifter!Rook is a Jack-of-All-Stats at best, Master of None at worst, and only really has the extra passive slots to go for them. Master the class lines for whatever weapon combo you want and a variety of skills, however, and you can turn it into The Ace when it comes to Rook's classes.
  • Lethal Joke Weapon: The Ramjet Rifle only has an attack power of 1, but gives 300 TP per shot with a three-shot magazine, making it easy to use TP arts.
  • Lethal Lava Land: Cauldros puts strong emphasis on the lethal aspect, as the heat generated by its fire storms causes your party to rapidly lose HP. Plus, there are numerous lava pools that act as an additional environmental hazard; making it the Xenoblade equivalent of Norfair.
  • Limit Break:
    • Overdrive functions this way: you can activate it after you beat chapter 5 in the main story and have 3000 or more TP. It greatly lowers Art cooldowns and enables tetriary cooldowns, which allow Arts to have even greater effects if you wait long enough after it becomes available. You also gain a number of different bonus effects if you use Arts in a specific color order, such as extending Overdrive duration, doubling the hit count (which increases the effectiveness of every bonus effect) for the next Art you use and increasing experience and Tech Points gained. You can also fully max out Overdrive duration if you gain another 3000 TP during it, which can be done with the right skill setup and gear augments: you can do this as many times as you like during a single Overdrive, which makes it a key to a number of Game Breaker setups. You also get various bonuses if multiple characters have Overdrive active at the same time, but since your AI-controller partners won't save enough TP to have it available unless you specifically tell them to do so, don't expect to see it often.
    • Skells also have their own form of Overdrive that generally seems use much more often, since their TP equivalent, GP, isn't needed to use their Arts: its exact effects change depending on the base Skell model, but generally speaking it increases stats, decreases fuel consumption, speeds up Art cooldowns and increases the change of triggering Cockpit Time with Art use, which makes the Skell invincible for its duration and resets all its cooldowns. Like the human version, it can also be extended beyond its default 10 second duration: the first extension is guaranteed, but anything past that is randomized and depends on whether you manage to trigger Cockpit Time.
  • Loaded Words: Many of the choices offered during missions and cutscenes use this to imply which decision is "right" and which is "wrong". For example, sometimes a choice says something fairly neutral like "Do something" and "Do nothing", whereas either decision could be correct. However, the description of each choice may be something like: "Rush in to help the person" or "Stand back and watch the show as this person is ripped apart while you grin evilly and wink at them.". A particularly noteworthy case (which actually inverts the pattern above) is when you're asked by a Wrothian whether or not it's okay for someone to die for a personal cause. The descriptions say "Say that there are causes worth dying for" and "Say that your own life must be saved at all costs". The two choices for this, however say: "Choose Sacrifice" and "Choose Selfishness".
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: X has 18 party members, more than double the size of the first Xenoblade's party. And then there are the named NP Cs who populate the affinity chart.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading:
    • A concession to fitting such an expansive game onto a single blu-ray is that all the game assets are stored heavily compressed; combined with the Wii-U's modest hard drive space precluding any large, uninvited install procedures, load times of 20-30 seconds are the norm when playing from a disc, and crop up any time you trigger a cutscene or fast-travel. As a counter to this, uncompressed asset packs can be downloaded for free from the e-shop, dramatically reducing loading times for those with the space to store them.
    • However, aside from triggering cutscenes or fast travel, you will never have any loading whatsoever.
  • Loads and Loads of Sidequests: There are three kinds: basic missions that give out small rewards for killing enemies or finding objects, normal missions that deepen the setting, and affinity missions which are voiced and develop your party members or major NPCs.
  • Logical Weakness: Large enemies and machines are especially vulnerable to gravity-based attacks. The bigger they are, the harder they fall, after all. In addition, wearing bulky armor reduces your defenses against gravity attacks — it's heavy, after all.
  • Loners Are Freaks: Downplayed, but commonly-used. The people of NLA (including the aliens that join you later) are portrayed as a society of people who all need to do their part and pull their own weight in order to survive on Mira. "Everyone must do their part" is stated and restated over and over again throughout the story. It's noted by NPCs that even the civilian sector is technically funded and supported by the government, because few of them would be able to survive otherwise. Characters like Phog, Murderess and Yelv, who are loners by nature, are considered abrasive or weird by other people. Part of your task in their Affinity Missions, in fact, is to form "bonds" with them so that they become stronger and more stable members of society. Beyond that, there's also Tobias, a greedy Jerkass whose only goal is to become rich off of FrontierNav, Fosdyke, a random guy in the park who says he wants to contribute nothing except his poetry (and is later revealed to be a murderous criminal and deserter) and a random Ma Non NPC who is a Spoiled Brat that happily announces she does nothing and lives off of her family.
  • Long Song, Short Scene:
    • Black Tar is over three minutes long (and has two versions). You'll finish most battles before the lyrics start. "Uncontrollable" plays when you fight Tyrants, though you'll probably only hear the lyrics if you're going to lose.
    • Wir Fliegen, the song that plays when you activate Overdrive has a 2nd verse after the chorus before looping, and on the same track there's a version that uses more rock instruments for the second half. However, both of these are missing from the game, especially considering that Black Tar has the second half in place while fighting in Skells
  • Lost Forever:
    • Mostly averted, unlike its predecessor. None of the quests have a time limit on them, and certain Affinity Quests that would logically become Lost Forever later in the plot are mandatory toward progression anyway. The only thing the player can truly miss out on are Lao's Heart-to-Hearts, but because of their temporary nature the game does not count them toward completion; all they provide is some dialogue and extra affinity points.
    • A more minor aversion of this is BP, which only comes from examining various alien objects, finding new locations and completing missions, all of which are only available in limited amounts and might potentially make it so that you can run out of BP to max out the Arts and skills needed for your preferred type of build if you spend it on every new Art and skill you learn: this is averted with the addition of Support Missions that're unlocked when you finish the main story and allow you to gain up to 60 BP per mission as many times as you want.
  • Love Dodecahedron: It goes like this: Gwin has a crush on Irina, who doesn't like men but just might have a soft spot for Elma or Rook. Lyvia is Definian who is the romantic rival of Eri, who has a crush on Rook. Mia flirts with Doug in an after combat dialogue, who is in love with Hope (who has numerous NLA citizens in love with her), who is vaguely hinted to be in love with...you guessed it...Rook. Rook is a Love Vortex, and all of these examples are just if Rook is male...
  • Loyalty Mission: Every party member (save Rook of course) has Affinity Missions to advance their story, build their relationship to Rook (and other characters) and allow a Rook which uses their weapon to learn their unique Art. Some of these are even required to progress the story.
  • Lost in Translation:
    • Black Tar's lyrics include, "Standing as long as we can until we get all Dolls up", which would make more sense if you understand that Skells are called Dolls in the Japanese game. At least it's not in the Skell combat part.
    • In-Universe, Professor B's native language contains words that don't translate into English, so he does the best he can to describe it when asked. The words just appear as jumbled garbage text.
  • MacGuffin: The Lifehold Core. Finding it is the primary goal of BLADE, and it isn't located until the end of the game.
  • Mage Marksman: The Psycorruptor and Mastermind classes specialize in buffs, debuffs, and minor healing Arts, and have very powerful raygun weapons.
  • Magic Knight: By contrast, the Fullmetal Jaguar and Partisan Eagle specialize in close combat and have many melee attacks that have elemental properties, and attacks that also inflict debuffs.
  • Magikarp Power: A minor example: the starting class, Drifter, has barely any Arts of its own and can't use any notable weapons but it's the only class that has 5 passive skill slots. Since you can use a class' weapons in any other class once you master its most advanced form and what Arts you can use is determined by the type of weapon you're equipped with, you'll ultimately switch to Drifter permanently to make use of its 5 skill slots once you master every other class since at that point you have no limitations on what types of weapons you can use.
  • Magma Man: Gularths are walking titans made of lava and rock, and breathe fire and launch lava bombs as their attacks. Millesaurs could be seen as volcano-like as well, as their materials include obsidian, they have a large conical port on their back, and some of their attacks, like Dino Mortar, fire blobs of lava.
  • Male Gaze: The Ganglion women get noticeable camera attention on their bodies, especially the rear end.
  • Marathon Boss: The two Global Nemeses, Yggralith Zero and Telethia Plume, offer an interesting spin on the concept. Fought in online events in the style of an MMO raid, these bosses have utterly obscene amounts of HP spread across hundreds of thousands of individual "lives". Each instance against them is timed, and a sufficiently prepared party can be reasonably expected to only shave off a few hundred lives in one sitting. The idea is that the entire community is supposed to work together to take these bosses down over the span of a few days.
  • Mechanical Lifeforms: According to Luxaar, The Vita, the Gangleon's ultimate weapon, was once the physical body of their god "The Great One". The post-credits scene reveals humanity itself has become this, as despite the Lifehold's inner core being destroyed, the mimiosomes are all still functional.
  • Megaton Punch: An attack used by Simiuses and Cantors. It's a thermal-based attack with extremely high damage, and will send whoever it hits flying if it doesn't outright kill them.
  • Mercy Mode: If you die on a story or affinity mission boss for a certain number of times, you are given the option to lower the boss's level by 5.
  • Mile-Long Ship:
    • The settlers leave Earth on enormous motherships, which seems to double as a colony on their adopted home planet.
    • The Ma-Non ship shown casually hovering above New Los Angeles is not too shabby either, being nearly as large as the city itself.
  • Mini-Mecha: Skell combat is one of the game's key gameplay mechanics and story elements. They're just over twice the size of their pilots and can transform into various land vehicles for faster travel. And eventually, you'll unlock their flight upgrade.
  • Mohs Scale of Sci-Fi Hardness: Compared to past Xeno games, Xenoblade Chronicles X is on the harder side of the spectrum, with very little Gnostic (or mystical in general) elements present. When the game brings up something that even borders on mystic or religious, chances are that it will be disproved through some scientific discovery.
    • Averted with a vengence by the post-credit scene, which reveals that many of the scientific explanations were actually impossible in and of themselves, since by all accounts, humanity's consciousness was destroyed when the Lifehold crashed.
  • Mood Whiplash: Practically any scene that involves Tatsu. In fact, most conversations are completely serious and formal...then Tatsu makes a joke or does something silly (which may or may not be followed by a rebuttal)...after which the scene plays goes back to playing out as normal. Whenever you hear that oh-so-familiar bass guitar start playing, you know the scene has turned comedic.
  • Monster Compendium: The Enemy Index keeps track of all the indigens, Ganglion, and otherwise that you've encountered over the game. It also includes a bit of information on their biology and culture (for nonhumans).
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous:
    • Simiuses and Cantors have four arms.
    • The Telethia has six limbs; the upper two always serve as wings/arms while the lower two always serve as legs, but the middle two switch between functioning as arms or legs depending on its stance.
  • Musical Spoiler: Right before you first encounter the Prone, it's painfully obvious someone's sneaking up on you because the music is suspensefully building up to a climax.
  • The Musketeer: All classes use two weapon types, a melee weapon for close range combat, and a gun for long range combat.
  • Mythology Gag: As per use in Monolith Soft.
    • There are a few inside the character creator alone:
      • Several default female faces are reproductions of popular characters from previous games of the metaseries, specially Xenogears.
      • One of the face paint options is the red X from the Xenogears logo.
      • In the English dub, there's a "Classic" voice option for the main character in each gender. The voice actors are Adam Howden and Carina Reeves respectively, who voiced Shulk and Fiora, the male and female leads in Xenoblade.
    • Lin's Monado hairclips.
    • In the affinity mission "The Ties That Bind", when Tatsu returns home, his brothers and sisters mistake him for their father. Lin calls out Tatsu as a "middle-aged deadbeat", something that could describe Riki. Lin also wonders if the Nopon live in trees, a call back to Frontier Village from the original Xenoblade.
    • At one point, Lin and Elma call Commander Vandham "Colonel Square-tache", something Reyn called Vangarre in the original game. In the Japanese version, the two share the same name.
    • In Chapter 10, Tatsu claims the Zu Pharg is even bigger than the "legendary" Frontier Village.
    • Choosing the right dialogue in Chapter 12 may lead to Tatsu calling his friends "hom homs", what the Nopon called the Homs in the original game. Gwin asks him what those are, and Tatsu doesn't have a clue. He then looks at the camera and smiles.
    • In both Xenoblade games, there is a boss battle near the end of the game against a close ally who was Evil All Along who is the last major boss before the finale. However, unlike the guy in Xenoblade, Lao makes a Heel–Face Turn.
    • The Blast Fencer and Galactic Knight classes contain a few to the original Xenoblade, such as an attack that resembles the Monado Buster, as well as a skill that deals extra damage to mechanoid enemies.
    • Characters in the Full Metal Jaguar class gain access to Shulk's "Stream Edge".
    • Shield Gunners act as tanks and use taunts to aggro the enemy. They also learn Reyn's "Wild Down".
    • Melia's Starlight Kick also returns as a Galactic Knight skill.
    • Funnily enough, though, despite the Melia-and-Shulk reference attacks, the weapon choice for Blast Fencer/Galactic Knight? Attack drones and a beam saber - exactly the weapon loadout for Fiora.
    • By the same token, one of Nagi's unique arts is "Blossom Dance", which was Dunban's signature move in Xenoblade.
    • One of the arts for the Commando is Shulk's Back Slash.
    • The quantum computer running the Lifehold greatly resembles Zohar from Xenogears and Xenosaga both in shape and overall appearance, and the capsule where Elma's real body is stored in is also greatly remiscient of the one KOS-MOS is kept in when she's offline or undergoing maintenance, which is fitting considering she's essentially a biological alien Expy of her.
    • In the English dub, Celica has an British accent and pronounces Nopon the same way it was pronounced in the original Xenoblade Chronicles (everyone else, including the Nopon, pronounced it differently), both of which call back to how Xenoblade was dubbed.
    • One of the collectibles is a pair of statues depicting the Bionis and Mechonis.
    • One of the collectibles is the Gem crafting furnace from the first game. Its description makes a joke about how there aren't any ether crystals or cylinders in this game.
    • The Sword of Legendary-ness sought after by a pair of Nopon is (a Nopon-made replica of) the Monado.
    • Mia nicknaming Rook as "Chief" is similar to Allen who also always refer to Shion Uzuki as "Chief".
    • Irina and Gwin always referring to Elma as "Colonel" is similar to how Captain Jin Uzuki always calls Commander Margulis "Colonel".
  • My Rules Are Not Your Rules: Some of the Tyrants are dangerous for this reason. They have abilities or powers that bend or break the normal rules of combat and force the players to find ways to counteract them in order to win.
  • Naïve Animal Lover: An early quest has an Interceptor named Carl task you with clearing a cave of indigens, but balk at the prospect when it turns out the beasts in question are all young. You're given the option to spare them, in which case they come back later in the game, now grown up and very hungry, and kill several BLADEs in their rampage — including Carl himself.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Applies to the Tyrants as a whole. Experienced BLADE members know they aren't to be taken lightly and are usually best avoided, unless you're outfitted with a Skell... and can still prove dangerous even then.
  • The Needs of the Many: Every citizen of NLA is expected to contribute something to the city's greater good, whether BLADE, alien, citizen or government official. In fact, during Celica's first Affinity Mission, Director General Chausson specifically says that the city cannot spare any resources whatsoever for idle citizens (especially one who eats as much as Rock). Even after Celica risks her life to become a BLADE for the sole purpose of helping Rock, Chausson still gives Rock the choice of either working in heavy industry or leaving the city outright. Every single character present (Rock, Celica, Vandham, Elma, Lin and you) applaud Chausson for how generous this decision is.
  • Never Smile at a Crocodile: Diluses are Mira's answer to the crocodilians. Your first encounter with them will likely be the Merciful Diluses in southern Noctilum, which have levels in the late 30s when the other indigens in the area are early teens. And despite the name they're aggressive, too.
  • New Neo City: The Hub City is named New Los Angeles.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: By killing and looting a simple Nopopotamus hanging out at Lake Ciel, you end up causing quite a bit of strife for a Nopon at the local Caravan who was planning on buying a wedding dress and proposing to his fiance. He was waiting for his friend and that Nopopotamus to arrive at the caravan so he would finally have the money needed to buy the dress, and give her a nice ring as a proposal as well. Instead, he's forced to take a loan from a local Loan Shark and deal with the consequences of not paying up in time. Fortunately, you help him get around the issue.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: The Ares Skell series are named after a Greek god of war, skate around on their oversized wheels when moving normally, sprout energy wings when flying and have Hinduism-themed weapons.
  • No Bisexuals: Played With. Heterosexuality is assumed to be the default in nearly all cases that the subject of love or sex comes up—especially in regards to alien species. For example, when a Definian tries to seduce Female Rook, she disguises herself as male. There are many cases of Ambiguously Bi all over the place, but they're just that—ambiguous. Lara Nara is the only character who openly states an attraction for the same sex/gender, and while he also flirts somewhat with women, it's hard to know if he's just teasing. A possible exception is the suitor Rook finds for Male!Lyvia, who is female, but professes to like Lyvia regardless of what form she takes.
  • No Cutscene Inventory Inertia: Annoyingly, the game is extremely bad at recognizing whether or not you are driving a Skell for cutscenes. A few late-game missions mandate Skell use and show everyone in their cockpits, but most missions just assume you're walking up on foot even if your entire team is in Skells. This means you walk up to the cutscene point in your Skell, somehow hop out of your Skell for the cutscene, draw your ground weapon for a fight, and then get inexplicably teleported back into your Skell the instant the cutscene is done with the game not missing a beat. A few standout examples:
    • This gets especially weird in chapter 8. You're defending New LA from Ganglion attack, okay, sure... and the cutscenes imply you're helping to hold the gate and later clear the city on foot. Not only is this a full chapter after you get the ability to unlock at least a starter Skell (and has a level limit that puts you exactly at level to get a "proper" Skell and get Elma and Lin into Skells too, if they match yours) but literally everyone else defending New LA is using a Skell. The only other non-Skell folks are Lao's team, and that's because they're defending the relic mech inside a hangar. And yet, if you bring the Skells you almost certainly have, and which the scale of the crisis rather suggests you bring, it doesn't get acknowledged at all and you're apparently ground-pounding for some reason while everyone else is in robots, including Team Irina, who otherwise need to bum your Skells when they're on your team.
    • Chapter 9 also gets fairly strange about this: once again you have Skells and are heading into hostile territory, which rather passively suggests you should bring the robots for this run. You have to dismount to talk to Lao, which is a fair enough do, but you're then shown walking into Sylvalum on foot regardless of your robot status. You then reach the ambush point, and this time you're once again just shown as being on foot, regardless of Skell status, and are detained. You then have the duel with Jiarg, the first part of which is absolutely mandated as a foot battle - and when the second part begins and he summons his Skell... he tells you to "arm yourselves as you wish", and doesn't aggro immediately when you gain control. And your Skells are once again available to board. It's a very odd way of acknowledging that you probably want to use Skells for this fight without actually showing the Skells in the cutscene, and has left a few people wondering just what's going on with Skells and cutscenes.
    • Chapter 10 damn near goes off the rails with it - it seriously seems to be implying that you took on the Zu Pharg, AKA the robotic siege weapon the size of a large building, on foot. And won. In reality, you not only probably had everyone in Skells for that, but you very likely had flight modules!
    • It should be noted that the game regularly averts this outside of Skell-related issues.
  • Non-Mammal Mammaries:
    • Many alien women are not based on any sort of primate (or even mammalian) species and yet have human-shape breasts. Milsaadi women in particular have breast-like structures despite being mechanical.
    • Averted with the Nopon, who are all spherical in appearance, and Ma-non, who all possess slim figures.
  • Non-Human Sidekick: Tatsu, a merchant of the native Nopon race accompanies you in the story. He serves as comedy relief for the most part.
  • No Name Given: The name of the alien faction that fought the Ganglion over Earth and shot down the White Whale is never revealed in the game as well as a mysterious Black Testament - like character who approached Lao in the epilogue.
  • Non-Combat EXP: As in the previous game, you mainly earn EXP by exploring the world map and discovering landmarks, hidden areas, and completing sidequests and story missions.
  • Non-Indicative Difficulty: The amount of stars for each basic mission on the board usually represents the BLADE Level required to unlock it, not the overall difficulty of the mission. For example, there's a two-star mission that requires hunting high level 30 Purgovents, which can take a beating even from a Skell. Meanwhile, there are missions above five stars that involve killing level 15 Tyrants or enemies, and so forth.
  • No OSHA Compliance: Subverted. New Los Angeles has a few unfinished bridges between some of the districts without roadblock signs to stop people from driving off. Even the bridges that do have roadblock signs don't stop some exceptionally clumsy or drunk residents from stumbling off of them. The subversion kicks in when it's explained that the liquid at the bottom of NLA is shock-absorbing gel, which keeps uncoordinated residents from killing themselves this way. However, it's still a long climb to get back up.
  • No Such Thing as Alien Pop Culture: Almost every alien species that joins NLA gains some sort of fascination for human pop culture. The Ma Non become obsessed with pizza and fashion, L is captivated by human sayings and idioms, and at least one Prone is interested in human military strategy. However, for the most part, nothing of the aliens' culture aside from technology and weapons seems to catch on with humanity. In fact, there's barely anysign of alien pop culture at all. There's one Prone woman who seems to be a dancer, but that's about it.
  • Not Always Evil: The Cavern Clan Prone and the Definians seem like the Ganglion's signature evil Mooks, but a few can make a Heel–Face Turn and live in NLA. Both of the defectors wish to exact revenge on the Ganglion for leaving them for dead or treating them like expendable slaves.
  • Not So Different: When the player saves a bunch of Ma-Non from a racist human who wanted to kill them, they say they hold no grudge against you because every race, Ma-Non included, have their fair share of bastards.
  • Not Worth Killing:
    • Some of the Indigens ignore you depending on whether you're in a Skell or not. The medium sized enemies think of humans as lunch, but a giant armored robot would be too difficult to fight to bother with; the large enemies barely notice humans at all, but see the Skells as a threat.
    • Murderess learns that the serial killer who killed her parents on Earth somehow managed to get onto the White Whale, and has killed some of her friends in NLA since then. Knowing full well that she'd be throwing away everything she's worked so hard to obtain up to this point if she took her revenge and killed the guy, she decides to just walk away and lets him get eaten by a Caro instead.
    • Can be invoked with The Blood Lobster, resulting in a Villanous Breakdown instead.
  • Offscreen Teleportation: Your party members are always right beside you outside of combat. If you're running across a field, they'll just be running behind. If you jump off a cliff, you sometimes see them land with you. If you climb up a steep cliff face in such a way that they can't path their way to you, they will instantly appear as soon as you get up top.
  • Off with His Head!: While most monsters only lose tails, horns, or maybe a limb on occasion in battle, Millesaurs aren't so fortunate and can have their heads removed if their necks take enough damage. Doing this simply causes them to reveal their real head that's normally concealed within their chest, though. Gradivus, the Headless Emperor, like the name suggests, doesn't have one to begin with.
  • Older Than They Look: A father-son duo of Prospectors, Keifer and Leland, has everyone appropriately confused over their age and appearances. Leland is well into his senior years and insisted on having a mimeosome that looks younger than his son. His speech mannerisms support his age, but you certainly wouldn't know by looking.
  • One-Man Army: Once you reach the endgame status with any combination of Game Breaker setups listed on the YMMV page, you'll essentially be this compared to the rest of the party, simply because the AI-controlled party members can't make proper use of infinite Overdrive to reach the same kind of damage values you can and they will mostly serve as a distraction to the enemy, assuming you can be bothered to bring them along to begin with. That being said, they still contribute a decent amount in endgame Skell combat, mostly because it focuses more on overpowered gear setups over abusing a single battle mechanic.
  • One Stat to Rule Them All: Among the available field skills, Mechanical is this, as it serves not only to open up White Whale and vehicle wreckage, but it's also required to establish Frontiernav probes. And said wreckage often contains probes, which are miles more valuable than the augments and cosmetics Archaeological and Biological treasure spots occasionally yield.
  • One Time Dungeon: The Lifehold Core is the only place in the game that can only be played once; afterwards you can only hang around the outside parts.
  • Optional Stealth: A limited but still useful version: the dual swords Art Shadowrunner makes the character untargettable by enemies, which not only means that they can't be targetted in battle, but also makes the character untargettable out of battle as well, preventing the enemy from attacking you even if they'd normally see or hear you. This allows you to target an enemy without engaging it, use the Art, cancel the targetting and run past any Beef Gate that might otherwise One-Hit Kill you on your way to your destination or quickly grab whatever treasure they might be guarding. While this is normally limited by the fact that Shadowrunner is a TP art, you can just use another dual swords Art Blood Sacrifice to gain an instant 1000 TP on command at the cost of half of your current HP, which you can just quickly recover back by the virtue of not being currently in battle.
  • Our Monsters Are Weird:
    • Saltats are supposed to be birds, but they look more like huge primates with hand-shaped wings, a masked face, a huge trumpet horn on the back of their head, and colorful eye markings on their wings. They also constantly make horn noises, make spinning dances when not in battle, make Bring It gestures, and generally clown around. Liceors are similar, but have a more ethereal and bright design.
    • Gerrids look like an upside-down nautilus, except the shell is bright red, and the tentacles are more insectoid, and they have long, spindly legs. They also generate electricity and have a habit of jumping around and happily flailing about on the ground.
  • Out of Focus: Any character who is not required for the current story/affinity mission is visible in cutscenes, but will not interject or have their presence acknowledged. A jarring example of this becomes rather humorous if you take Irina as your 4th party member when you complete chapter 11, since she'll be just be standing there beside you and Elma while Elma talks extremely personal details about her to Vandham.
  • The Overworld: The world map is said to be approximately 400 sq. miles - spread across five continents, floating land masses, and the islands out in the ocean. And the only way you'll be able to fully explore it is by unlocking your Skell's flight capability.
  • Pale Females, Dark Males: Female aliens tend to have lighter coloration than their male counterparts. Notably, Buidhe is much paler than her master Jiarg.
  • Pistol-Whipping: The Assault Hammer/Buster arts for the assault rifle both have you bludgeon your target with it, potentially knocking them down or stunning them, respectively.
  • Playable Epilogue: Beating the main story unlocks new quests, adds a few superbosses to the world, and makes new items available for crafting and purchase.
  • Playboy Bunny: Female players can craft up two different bunny suits. One is the traditional one shown on the trope page, and the second is a bikini variant.
  • Point of No Return: There's no turning back once you enter the site of the final battle, the Lifehold Core. You can't save while inside, to prevent you from being locked in the place while underprepared.
  • Power Glows: Overdrive has a visual tell. It shows up in the rare cutscene as well, meaning that it's probably not just a gameplay thing.
  • The Power of Friendship:
    • The core lesson behind almost every side mission. People are fragile, flawed, weak, or straight-up bastards on their own, but learning to rely upon and help each other makes everyone stronger and capable of doing anything. Elma flat out states this as her Kirk Summation several times.
    • Mon'Barac worries that he isn't strong enough to survive on Mira, so he tries his hand at beast taming like the Prone are capable of. After you save him from being swallowed whole by a Lophid, you suggest he go ask the Prone for advice on his methods. He overcomes his fears of talking to other races and quickly makes friends with a Prone, Ma-Non, and Nopon. After you save him again from being swallowed whole by a Lophid, his friends come up to him and tell him that he can survive by working together with his newfound friends, and you teach him what the bonds of friendship mean.
  • Preexisting Encounters: Carried over from its predecessor; enemies will litter the landscape, and the player can seamlessly transition into fighting them at will.
  • Randomly Generated Loot: Discussed in-game. An NPC in NLA comments that weapons found inside the stomachs of various indigens tend to take on special properties. He wants to research why a gun found inside a Grex's stomach may end up being more powerful than store-bought equipment.
  • Real Is Brown: Averted (see the Scenery Porn entry).
  • Reality Ensues: Xenoblade Chronicles X is part Life Sim:
    • If you wanna earn currency in this game, you've gotta get a job by joining one of 8 factions, then check the missions board to see which ones are available. While you're free to choose any mission, the ones that fall under your faction's job description are the ones that will earn you the most Miranium.
    • Skells aren't just given to anyone and you can't simply walk in off the street and apply for one either:
      • The upper management of BLADE chooses who qualifies to take the certification test become a Skell pilot, based on their job performance. Meaning, the higher you raise within the ranks, the better your chances of being selected.
      • They're also expensive. You'll need to purchase their equipment, armor, fuel, and you'll need Skell insurance to cover the costs of repairs, or pay a large number of credits or use a Salvage Ticket to recover it in case it gets destroyed. Your insurance will only cover you the first three times it happens. After that, the cost of recovery will have to come out of out-of-pocket. Or you'll have to go without one.
      • One of the qualification tests required to get a Skell license requires you to have a regular probe income of no less than 15,000 credits; the logic being that if you do not possess the stable income required to sustain your Skell, you shouldn't have one until you do.
      • One explicitly stated is that Skells are fairly rare. You're constantly looking for wrecked Skells to be recovered, several missions involve gathering rare materials to fix them (or characters bemoaning the loss of their own Skell), and to even get one, you have to be deemed worthy by every single branch of BLADE, because Skell operators may need to be called upon by any branch.
    • Your ability to investigate resources out in the field depends on which skills you've invested in (archaeology, mechanics, and biology) and your current level of expertise.
    • It also deals heavily with economics, as you'll need to invest in arms manufacturers and R&D. Players can either use Miranium, or cash in CPnote  to acquire new gear. Or, you can opt to have them create specialized gear from rare items and materials you've gathered (@7:08-7:25). You also can't throw credits at them, the manufacturers are working with a blank cheque already, it's their slice of the resource pie that CP affects.
    • Since Mira is an uncharted planet, one of BLADE's primary tasks is recon. Research probes study the indigenous wildlife to determine which ones are hostile and which areas are safe to explore. While data probes help them find resources that can be used to further support NLA.
    • You'll also need to account for weather, since your party (including their Skells) are effected by it. Heavy rain weakens beam weaponry, sandstorms and spore clouds impair visibility which decreases the accuracy of your attacks, and so on. Also, if you're caught in a electric storm, you'll continually take damage from it. But you can prevent it by taking shelter indoors, beneath arches, or in your Skells 'til it passes. Electromagnetic storms will damage your skell, but you're safe from volcanic rain inside one.
    • Monster levels don't really scale depending on where you are in the game. So players will see many enemies far out of their league as soon as they start. A lot of time in the beginning will be spent sneaking around to make sure you don't alert monsters that can mop the floor with you. You'll even see these kind of monsters directly in the path to your story objectives.
    • This untamed planet is not laid out in an adventurer-friendly way. A tall cliff face might require going greatly out of your way to find terrain gentle enough to climb, and stumbling off a ledge might as well have teleported you several sectors away.
    • Size matters. Like in real life, some creatures can be intimidated if you try to make yourself look larger. Many giant creatures like the whale-like Levitaths will leave you alone if you approach them on foot. You're too small to be perceived as a threat. That all changes in a Skell. Peaceful monsters will turn hostile because you're large enough to qualify as a threat now. Likewise, many smaller indigens like grexes will turn peaceful because they know not to mess with you (unless you step on them by accident). Of course, there are plenty of indigens who attack regardless anyway.
    • Building relationships with all the numerous party members takes time, just like in real life. In order to do many affinity quests, you need to have at least two full hearts (sometimes three). This will require grinding a lot of Soul Voice combos in combat and it's best to have two characters other than Elma and Lin in your party while you make dialogue choices for side quests. Thankfully, due to the massive number of party members and the need to build affinity between them and the player character to unlock the quests that allow the player character to learn their exclusive Arts, a group of Support Quests exists for that very purpose and you can bring any party member from 0 to max affinity by playing the mission around 28 times.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over:
    • One chraracter effectively refers to Cauldros as "hell". It looks the part, too, what with all the black rock and lava everywhere. The place also happens to be the main base of the Ganglion.
    • Luciel, the Eternal, is a Millesaur with a distinctive red and black color scheme. It's also aggressive, a Tyrant, and one of the highest-leveled indigens in the game.
    • Tainted indigens are black-colored, have red electricity coming out of their eyes, and are aggressive and have an insatiable hunger for flesh.
  • Red Baron: Tyrants have unique names that illustrate how dangerous they are, such as "Pharsis, the Everqueen" and "Telethia, the Endbringer".
  • Red Mage: When it comes to stats, Blast Fencers and Galactic Knights have a global boost to them, meaning that there won't be any one of them that will go to what the Drifter has or worse. If the Drifter can be made The Ace due to its fifth skill slot, the Galactic Knight can be considered a close second as all of it's stats are boosted evenly. Obviously, the class is the second option for fully ranked-up Enforcers, which is the game's mage class.
  • Redshirt Army: The Ganglion treat the Zaruboggons as nothing more than expendable scouts. As an entire race, they have no aptitude for combat. Their ability to adapt to any environment is the only reason they're useful at all, and the Ganglion expect them to put up a fight and die.
  • Regional Bonus: The Western releases have the DLC characters (Alexa, Bozé, H.B., and Yelv) released for free on the disc.
  • Relationship-Salvaging Disaster: The lyrics for "Uncontrollable" are about a man and woman who put aside their differences and failed relationship in order to board Project Exodus to escape Earth and start anew.
  • Relationship Values: Every party member has these, and raising them is necessary to take certain quests. They're also needed if you're interested in striking a conversation with them while they're on a break (not in your party.)
  • Rewarding Inactivity: Depending on how you set up your probes on Mira, you can get high amounts of money and Miranium after a certain amount of time has passed in game. As such, it's a valid tactic to leave the game playing in the background with the Game Pad plugged in to have resources build up while you're busy doing something else. However, the game apparently has algorithms to determine if a player is idle; after a while, resources WILL stop accumulating until you start playing again.
  • Rewatch Bonus: There's so many plot twists (especially at the Eleventh Hour of the game) that if replay the game (or watch a Let's Play of someone else playing it), you can catch tons of stuff that you missed now that you have knowledge of said twists.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: The Nopon from Xenoblade return, and they're even more adorable than before due to updated graphics.
  • Ridiculously Human Robots: As per Xeno tradition, you'd probably expect at least one to show up and be a major plot element, and you might even suspect that various major characters might be one. The twist is that the player character is one - along with all the other humans. The residents of NLA for the duration of the game are all near-perfect human androids, piloted by the consciousnesses of the sleeping humans in the Lifehold.
  • Robotic Reveal: In Chapter 5, it's revealed that Cross/Rook, and indeed everyone in NLA, is an android called a Mimeosome.
  • Rocket Tag Gameplay: Post-game bonus bosses can certainly feel like this. Even with Skells, the strategy for a few of them can boil down to "use high powered attacks and an Overdrive extension abuse set to flatten them as soon as possible" or "die horribly in the first five seconds".
  • Running Gag: Most story missions begin the same way: Lin asks the player for ideas on what to cook. The dish she ultimately prepares is based on the player's choice (which includes fried chicken, pot pie, and foie gras). During the preparation of the dish, Lin will try and trick Tatsu into becoming part of the dish, to the Nopon's unending chagrin. Once the meal is prepared, other BLADE members may drop by for a meal before laying out the mission.

    S-Z 
  • Sand Worm: Sabulas.
  • Sarashi: The Six Stars ceremonial uniform you can develop fits around a male's stomach or female's breasts.
  • Savage Setpiece:
    • Tons of them. Indigens like Progens, Millesaurs, and Coronids are never going to attack unless you do so first, with rare exceptions, but given how strong and highly leveled they are, you really don't want to unless you can handle them.
    • Telethia, the Endbringer itself is one of these. At level 99 it's the most powerful enemy in the entire game, but it's also totally non-hostile.
  • Scenery Porn:
    • As with the original, its spiritual sequel offers a wide variety of terrain and breathtaking vistas. The amount of detail in New Los Angeles alone is a vast improvement over either of the Colonies. Made moreso, once you get your first Skell and gain the ability to fly — you may even get to see an electromagnetic storm!
    • A prime example of this is right after the first boss fight, when you reach the Western Gate. Walk up the stairs and take a good look at the scenery from the extended balcony. If you waited until nightfall, auroras fill the sky, accompanied by a full moon. For that matter, cutscenes are rendered according to time. Whether you first enter, and then tour, NLA at morning, daytime, dusk, or at night is entirely up to you.
  • Secondary Sexual Characteristics: Most alien females possess human-like sexual characteristics, such a human-like bust. See also Non-Mammal Mammaries and Tertiary Sexual Characteristics.
  • Screw Destiny: The implication of the acronym B.L.A.D.E. in Japan - Beyond the Logos Artificial Destiny Emancipator.
  • Secret A.I. Moves: Subverted. You'll quickly notice most of your allies are listed as being "[class]+" with impossible weapon combinations, and even those that aren't have arts which you can't learn. However, mastering a class path allows you to use its weapons to mix and match, and unique arts can be learned from your allies through Affinity Missions.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge:
  • Sensible Heroes, Skimpy Villains: While players can dress their characters and teammates in anything from bulky armor to bikinis, the female characters start out wearing reasonable clothing and armor. For the two main female antagonists, Goetia wears a thong leotard with a Cleavage Window, and Ryyz goes for Absolute Cleavage. The female Cavern Clan prone tend to wear more revealing outfits than the female Tree Clan prone, and the Definians aren't too different either.
  • Sequel Escalation: Well, more of a Spiritual Successor Escalation, but still...
    • The last game's world was already about the size of Japan, but since the Skells are five times bigger than the characters, this game's world is five times bigger than the previous game's.
    • Just how expansive is this game? At one point, Monolith was worried one disc wouldn't be enough. While they did fit the final release on one disc, the thing is so jam-packed that optional data packs were released on the eShop to help decrease loading times.
    • To put that in perspective, a YouTuber named Griffon Li Britannia posted a video showing the elapsed time it took to sprint from the outermost edge of Oblivia, to Noctilum's outermost edge was 31 minutes. And that was travelling in a straight line, while ignoring both the northern continents and the islands, out in the ocean!
  • Sequel Hook: "This story never truly ends" indeed, once you beat the main game's story, that is. There are MANY mysteries and unanswered questions that it has its own page.
  • Serial Killer: There's a couple in NLA, who you have to investigate and take down during missions.
  • Shaggy Dog Story:
    • Naza Tenpanzi, a Prone who carried a seed from her home planet is trying to grow it in New LA, and gets help from an Orphean botanist, who sends the player on a Fetch Quest for something to help the tree grow. When the seed sprouts, the Orphean mistakes it for lunch and eats it, not realizing Naza's desire to grow the tree to preserve it, so she beats him up. The Orphean sends you on another fetch quest so that he can clone the sapling to appease Naza, only to have another Orphean walk by and eat the plant. Can actually be averted, in a Guide Dang It. Talk to Yun'tonam, who is nearby the two xenos and tell him what happened last time the tree got eaten at night.
    • A less comical version is the Celeste Three plot. After being betrayed by Fodsyke and Moorehouse when confronting Briggs, the safe remains closed until much later, where Adolphus and Ga Bewehe asks the player to find the remaining key needed to open it. Turns out the whole request was a wild goose chase, Adolphus had the key all along, and Ga Bewehe attacks the player. After all that, it's revealed that Ga Bewehe was playing both the player and Adolphus and took everything from the vault for her own purposes. The quest even ends with describing the whole story as "a waste of time".
  • Shifting Sand Land: While Oblivia is mostly desert terrain, it has oasis regions and waterfalls as well.
  • Shmuck Bait:
    • Every continent has enemies who just so happen to look like rocks or the local foliage, who just "happen" to be hiding out near tempting resource nodes or shortcuts.
    • A cove in Noctilum has a mysterious wrecked robot half-submerged in the water. Go ahead. Investigate it. See what happens.
    • In Sylvalum's North Silent Sandsea, you can find a large ring of tooth-like protrusions sticking out of the sand. Get closer and you can see that the innermost ring is opening and closing slightly. Go ahead, walk on the mysteriously mouth-like structure.
    • The first Filavent the player is likely to encounter at first looks like a very large, ornate flower, but the top parts are swaying around and the game plays ominous music if you get close. It's not quite as dangerous as the previous two examples, but it's still likely to be a Total Party Kill until you get a more powerful Skell.
  • Shout-Out: X makes nods to previous Xeno- games, going all the way back to Xenogears. Other science fiction tropes and works get the nod as well. Briefly:
.** The Telethias return from Xenoblade, though play a completely different role in this game.
  • Silicon-Based Life: There are numerous indigens and races who aren't carbon-based all throughout Mira. The game's bestiary states that the Milsaadi are metallic lifeforms similar to robots. The giant Gularths found in Cauldros are basically rock creatures. They absorb lava into their bodies in order to bolster their own defenses. Numerous petrimands, lophids, scintimurs, terrasquels, and other indigens live in the lava. One of the collectibles you can find in Cauldros is a fox who eats lava, and will die if exposed to the rain.
  • Skillgate Character:
    • The class selection menu describes the Striker as being "beginner friendly," since it grants you a balanced mix of attack/defense/and HP bonuses as you increase your skill level. However, it doesn't gain as many specialized Arts and skills as the Commando and Enforcer classes do.
    • Skells become this late game. Most players, after gaining the best Arts, Skills, weapons and equipment, choose to battle everything on foot. The reason being that the cooldown for Skell-based moves becomes a liability while ground-based ones recover much quicker and thus deal more damage-per-second. As such, Skells become only useful for taking out weak enemies easily (for farming or grinding levels) or fighting enemies that fly or are far too deep in the water.
    • Rook, Elma, and Lin, being required for all the story missions in addition to many affinity missions, become this as well. Without paying attention, the levels of these characters (especially Rook) will tower over that of anyone else. Elma having the Secret Art Ghost Factory (which grants Decoy to the entire party) makes this more apparent.
  • Silence Is Golden: The opening cutscene doesn't have dialogue until over two minutes in.
  • Sinister Scythe: A skell weapon, they hit twice and do extra damage from behind, making them a good way to kill enemies that should be too strong for you until you get the best weapons.
  • Sliding Scale of Gender Inequality: The game rests at the "Near-perfect equality" range, albeit a number of problematic issues. For example, the people of NLA and the BLADEs are pretty evenly male and female, and humanity is in such dire straits that Old-School Chivalry and Stay in the Kitchen mentalities are pointless. As such, in terms of being actors and agents of the story, men and women have an equal time of it.

    However, most of the top brass of BLADE and NLA are male. The three superiors your team reports to are all male, and another character states that women are rare within BLADE proper.note  Furthermore, a number of design choices are still very gender-unequal. Case-in-point, female characters tend to be given very Stripperiffic outfits and the Male Gaze is everywhere. There's actually only one outfit in the entire game that is exclusive to the male gender, and it looks like L's outfit, six-pack abs and all. Even well-armored women wear conspicuous amounts of Breast Plate and Sensual Spandex armor. Alien women wear Thigh-High Boots, Combat Stilettos, Thong of Shielding, and low necklines.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World: Subverted. At first glance, Sylvalum looks like it's covered in a thick layer of snow and ice, and has music evocative of an ice world, but the material is actually pollen and white sand. However, during Moimoi's quest to find the Sword of Legendary-ness, he mentions that Sylvalum is pretty cold.
  • Snake Oil Salesman: Fraisie at the cathedral tries to exploit the Ma-Non into following her religion by selling "Miracle Water" that will cure them of their ailments. The water really is a miracle cure, as it contains the antidote to the poison she's been slipping into the local drinking supply that are making the Ma-Non sick in the first place.
  • Sniper Rifle: Used by the Partisan Eagle and Astral Crusader classes. While it hits about as hard as one might expect, its range isn't much better then the other ranged weapons, and needs to be boosted with arts, augments, or skills before it can hit enemies at somewhat appropriate distances.
  • Socialization Bonus:
    • When you start or reload your game, you're asked to choose a type of Squad to join, one focused on story progression, another focused on multiplayer and one focused on people you are friends with: these consist of up to 32 random players that you can hire to use as party members over the normal NPCs, offer up enemy drops you don't need yourself and do specific types of missions with together. The most visible component of this system are randomized Squad Tasks that require you to collect specific types of items or kill specific types of enemies: doing so awards some Reward Tickets every time someone contributes towards a task to that person and a larger amount of them to every Squad member when one of them is completed. Completing said Tasks also contributes towards unlocking more online Squad missions. Finally, Bonus Bosses might appear at specific times for a limited amount of time: you have a preset amount of time to deplete as many of their lifebars as possible and if you reach specific milestones, you can get a number of rare items when either all of their lifebars are depleted or they escape at the end of their availability perioid. However, the real purpose of fighting them is destroying their appendages: each one drops 1-2 items when destroyed and you can get 7-14 of them per fight, which you can redeem for large amounts of Reward Tickets and is by far the quickest way to get a large number of them assuming you're strong enough to fight them long enough to dismember them without getting killed yourself, which isn't particularily hard to accomplish.
    • Like stated above, you can hire other peoples' avatars to use as party members for a limited amount of time: killing enough enemies with them in your party increases their scout rank, which gives you some free items and if it's maxed out, a BLADE Medal when you release them: this is one of the few ways to get them and you need them to fight the Bonus Bosses mentioned above.
  • Soft Water: Explicitly so. But the "water" at the bottom of New LA is actually impact gel, not water. That said, you can already survive a fall of nearly any height, even onto solid ground.
  • Space Opera: Though the gameplay is confined to land and sky, the plot begins with an interstellar war between multiple alien species.
  • Spoiler Title: One of the soundtrack's name is Lao Chimera Telethia. Strangely, the actual track has nothing to do with those details, even though it all happens later.
  • Spy Catsuit: The Skell gear and Orphean Technologies light gear are the closest things to this.
  • Stab the Salad: There's a Normal Mission where Rook has to search for a Wrothian. Said Wrothian has a woman cornered in an alley and asks for a sword. Turns out he wants to be a chef and his sword will be his cooking knife. Played with in that this Wrothian was introduced in an Affinity Mission earlier and is clearly trustworthy.
  • Stalking Is Love: One Normal Mission has you working for a Ma Non who wants to analyze human emotions and satisfy them. His third and final subject is Dana, a female BLADE officer who has an unrequited crush on another BLADE named Christopher. At this point, she says that she's asked Christopher to go out with her several times and he's rejected her each time. His rejection, however, is framed as a misunderstanding or misevaluation on his part, thus she continues to follow him around and enlists your help to try and win him over. To this end, she asks you to help her assemble one of two gifts. One of the gifts will finally win over Christopher's heart and the other will have him reject her for a final time. There is no option, however, to tell her to back off of the guy. For his part, though, Christopher invites these assumptions.
  • Starter Equipment:
    • Any time the Player Character switches classes, they're given a free set of the most basic weapons that class can equipnote .
    • An odd example of this trope kicking in well into the game: your first Skell. It's given to you for free, and it's the only level 20 frame in the game. Meaning you're not getting a party full of them, its stats are nothing gamechanging, and it can only equip a fairly basic suite of weapons. It's still thrilling to explore with while you level everyone and save up for better gear, though.
  • Stripperiffic: Risque indeed in many occasions, especially the alien. Then again, aliens do not follow human decency standards, so it doesn't matter. And for the playable characters (mainly females), the equipment shop follows under this once you unlock them late in the game. Yes, you can battle with a playboy bunny suit, the bunny bikini, or even ones that don't show much on the lower regions. How everyone manages to take a ton of damage without losing clothes remains a mystery.
  • Subsystem Damage:
    • Enemy limbs and external features can be specifically targeted. These parts have their own Hit Points, indicated by a circle over the targeted part. Destroying parts can effect enemy status, remove their ability to use certain attacks, and earn you extra loot.
    • The same is true of Skells, lose an arm and you lose the arts attached to it. They regenerate after battle though.
  • Subverted Suspicion Aesop:
    • A recurring question in the story is where the line between survival, justice, and genocide begins and ends. While this lesson is best shown in the main story, there are a number of subplots that tackle it as well. For example, there's a side mission where you can choose whether or not to kill baby suids in their nest. The orders were to slaughter them all, but Rook hesitates to do so. If you let them live, the Quest Giver, Carl, tells you he respects your choice and says he'll handle the report. Everything seems fine until later where you find out those suids you spared are now slaughtering many of your fellow Blades.
    • Another more short-term example is during The Celestial Three quest. When you finally confront Briggs, you either have the option of sparing him and listen to his side of the story or finishing him off anyway when he's defeated. Sparing him means that you have to fight Moorhouse, Fodsyke, and Briggs rather than fighting just Moorhouse and Fodsyke.
    • The vast majority of the time, sparing anyone that attacks you in cold blood during missions is a bad idea. The one exception is Roselle, who offers a bribe and never causes trouble again.
  • Suddenly Voiced: Rook doesn't have any voiced dialogue until they get into battle, where they talk all the time.
  • Super Mode: Overdrive is both this for the characters and the Skells. By sacking 3,000 TP, the characters temporarially gain a boost in attack power and the ability to spam their arts with little cooldown. When you first get it, its a tad bit Awesome, but Impractical since the TP cost is rather steep, but once you reach end game, through proper use of TP Gain augments and certain art sets, it's very possible to permanently stay in Overdrive mode for the rest of the fight after you activate it.
  • Take Your Time:
    • The degredation of the Lifehold's core only increases when you decide to continue with the main story.
    • Nagi has a busy schedule as a Secretary, but you would forget about that if you have him in the party for 24+ in-game hours straight. This also applies to the other BLAD Es who have do other missions on their own time, yet you can have them in party for a very long time.
    • Even though the Ganglion are mercilessly attacking the shields of the Lifehold Core, they'll never break through until you go in.
  • Technology Uplift: Very downplayed at first. A quick, glossed-over line in the opening cutscene mentions that humanity, despite being technologically outclassed by the aliens that attacked their planet, had "known the war was coming" and had prepared themselves for it. Despite Earth being their only home, humans were well-prepared for FTL velocity, space travel, as well as alien world colonization. The Skells they use are also fairly new to them, as they're the only species that hasn't figured out how to make theirs fly (at first). The Fridge Logic involved with this, as well as how humans caught up in technology so fast, is brought up by Big Bad Luxaar in the final mission. It turns out that this was all thanks to Elma, the alien who warned humanity of the war, and helped them jumpstart their technology to survive it.
  • Tech Points: Two varieties, CP and BP: the former are gotten from enemies along with EXP and are used to level up your classes in order to learn more Arts and passive skills, while the latter are gotten from doing missions, finding new locations and performing Field Actions on the various alien artifacts and flora you can find and are used to level up said Arts and passive skills.
  • Teleporting Keycard Squad: Very often, seemingly unguarded Miranium deposits have enemies set to ambush you just as you're setting the probe.
  • Tertiary Sexual Characteristics: The alien races that are not very humanoid (such as the Nopon and the Ma-Non) possess characteristics that make it easy to tell them apart. For example, they may be lighter in color, have Tareme eyes drawn to look like they have eyeliner, or have slightly wider hips. Some of them (such a female Nopon) are even pink.
  • The End... Or Is It?: The epilogue reveals a revived Lao who is approached by a mysterious character who is only identified as "Black Knight" showing that there is more unidentified forces to deal with on Mira.
  • Theme Naming:
    • The two main Wrothians are Ga Jiarg and Ga Buidhe, which are similar to the names of two mythical spears owned by Diarmuid Ua Duibhne: Gáe Dearg and Gáe Buidhe, literally "red spear" and "yellow spear". To carry the connection further, Ga Jiarg note  has red/orange fur, and Ga Buidhe wields a polearm.
    • Given that the Colony Ship that brought everyone to Mira is named the White Whale, it's natural that there are plenty of Moby-Dick and Herman Melville references in several collectibles and areas of New Los Angeles.
  • There Are No Therapists:
    • Someone suffering PTSD like Lao or Irina (who lost family on Earth) and Reggie (who survived a monster attack by abandoning his unit as they were eaten) has no known outlet to cope and get a grip on their emotions. The closest NLA has are Hope and Joy, who are not certified therapists in any sense—just very good at listening and giving advice, and recommending how playing sports (tennis in particular) is good for lowering stress, respectively. From a Watsonian (in-universe) perspective, this can be Hand Waved by saying no therapists were on the White Whale or survived the crash. From a Doylist perspective, it could be because the game was made in Japan, where therapy is a very taboo and shameful thing to be made known.
    • Another major issue with this point is that Elma flat out tells Vandham that PTSD cases like Lao and Irina are expected, considering what everyone went through on Earth, then in space, then on Mira. And there are the bombs dropped during The Reveal at the very end of the game. Considering all of this, mental health should have been a major priority on the White Whale and in New LA. Again, this can partially be Hand Waved by assuming that most of the designated therapists died (or were lost) during the crash on Mira, but that still seems odd considering that most other essential crew at least survived well enough to function.
  • There Is Another:
    • Concept art of Mira reveals another city on Mira exists, possibly New Tokyo confirming that the White Whale is not the only survivor of the invasion on Earth as well as unexplored continents a few NPCs mentioned in-game.
    • There is a quest from Lara Nara to locate a piece of the Lifehold in Sylvalum, only to discover—aside from some Milsaadi setting up an ambush—that it's from another ship.
  • This Is a Drill: The massive Drillpile skell super weapon is a cross between a drill and a pile bunker, as per the name. It also does more damage when hitting things from behind leading to the obvious joke.
  • Three-Point Landing: You do this upon landing from a very long fall, and everyone does it in cutscenes.
  • To Be Continued: The epilogue of the main story ends with an equivalent: "this story never truly ends" or "this story is never ending" in the Japanese version rather than displaying The End on-screen.
  • Tough Love: A common theme over and over again throughout the story is that people who lose their nerve or are unfit for combat/duty/responsibility need some tough love to keep them in line. In particular are Boze and Corwin, who both resort to physical violence against one of their soldiers suffering from PTSD in two separate missions. No other alternatives are suggested, and as stated below, There Are No Therapists in this game. The theme exists in civilian facets too, such as the newlywed husband of a Prone woman whose father-in-law says he will use tough love to toughen his son-in-law until he's fit to protect his daughter.
  • Transforming Mecha: All of the Skells have a vehicle mode they can switch into whenever they please. Depending on the model, you might end up with a three-wheeler, four-wheeler, or even a tank.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: The Ma-non love pizza. LOVE it. They consider frozen pizza a good trade for the technological secrets the Ganglion were trying to kill them for.
  • Traveling at the Speed of Plot: The game has a "traveling companions" mechanic that shows characters who are supposed to be "traveling with you" to and from certain locations. However, only one of these characters (Tatsu) is visibly shown to be travelling with you (and only if Lin is in the party). Other than that, the character will usually already be waiting for you when you arrive at the destination (some will even chide you for being "late"). For that matter, characters who are NOT Blades or combatants in any way can somehow make it all the way to places like Oblivia (with heat waves, level 30+ monsters and electromagnetic storms) or even Cauldros without any assistance or protection while full-fledged BLADE members can barely travel five feet without needing backup.
  • Treacherous Quest Giver: There are a lot of examples of quest-givers that wind up turning on Rook, but the main story example is Lao, who starts two Story Missions (Chapter 6 and Chapter 9, specifically) and is revealed to be The Mole. On the sub-quest side, there are Fosdyke and Moorhouse, who feign being the victims of a cover-up, but turn out to have been in on the plan the entire time. That same quest is later followed up with Ga Bewhe, who feigns helping the player in giving out vital information, but then betrays them and the suit and takes all the cash reward for herself. Her intentions were pure though, as a follow up on the quest reveals that she spent all the money on medicine for her people and quickly became known as the "Wrothian Robin Hood". Then there's the hindsighted example of Alex, who is a xenophobic and genocidal terrorist.
  • Trial by Combat: The Wrothians love to implement these. Any uncertainties or disagreements are typically settled with a fight of some sort (sometimes on foot, sometimes in Skells). Most Wrothians will gladly step down and let the winner dictate things after the trial by combat is over, but a few require either additional convincing or will demand that their life be ended because they can't bring themselves to agree with the outcome. Even the latter, however, will be more amenable to some sort of compromise.
  • Turns Red: A vast majority of enemies get the "Enraged" status when their health gets low, increasing their offensive power. Many of the special Tyrants with descriptive text also change the flow of battle after taking certain amounts of damage or certain requirements being met. For example, Pyotr the Shepherd in Noctilum will turn enraged if you kill the two Ovis that he's watching over.
  • 20 Bear Asses: Many quests require you to obtain materials from slain enemies to complete them.
  • Twenty Minutes into the Future: The game takes place in 2056 A.D. Earth was destroyed in 2054.
  • Underground Monkey: There are lots and lots and lots of variants of certain enemy types, which are only differentiated by their level, location, size, and/or color scheme.
  • Uniqueness Decay:
    • At the beginning of the story, you're told that people who gain the privilege of driving a Skell are rare. The license to pilot one is only given to BLADE members, and then only the elite who prove that they're one of their most productive members. And then, only if they pass a difficult test. And then only if they have the money to buy it themselves. However, by the time you are able to buy/pilot one yourself, suddenly everybody has one. Characters whom you have to buy one for in gameplay (such as Irina) have their own, and evil BLAD Es (such as Alex, Gadd, and Fosdyke have one. Hell, even Powell from Army Pizza has one, and he isn't even a BLADE! The last one gets lampshaded by the Ma-Non BLADE, Ackwar after the related sidequest (provided you did everything to ensure he survived it), pointing out that Powell shouldn't have access to a Skell even if he's ex-military, leading him to suspect that he had outside help in claiming it.
    • Inverted with the Telethia in terms of the game universes. In the original Xenoblade Chronicles, Telethia were an entire family of monsters that are the devolved and mutated form of the High Entia race and Zanza's antibodies. In X, there are only two Telethia in the game, both considered the planetary guardians of Mira.
  • Unobtainium: Miranium. It's a mineral vital to creating various things on Mira, and it's always in short supply. One Ma-non states that it's extremely malleable and can be both extremely hard or very soft depending on how it's manufactured, and can be used as a fission-based power source.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight:
    • No one comments on your appearance (save gender), no matter how crazy your Player Character gets. After all, it's not your REAL body.
    • At the same time, no one bats an eye when you park your skell on main street while you chat up the locals. This one is sadly an engine limitation, vehicles and shrubbery lack collision detection to prevent Grand Theft Auto style antics. On the other hand, this also means that everything that DOES have collision detection is unbreakable, meaning that you can leave your Skell kneeling down on some random park bench or chain-link fence without damaging it in the slightest.
    • After you've found half of the lobsters for the Blood Lobster quest, the villain himself detonates a lobster in the commercial district after tricking some random citizens to gather at the spot. Nobody even mentions the explosion or the loss of life.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: You introduce the Ma Non to pizza. Which, to some of them, becomes very...very addictive. So much so that Army Pizza sees an explosion in sales. Which overworks Camilla, the wife and co-owner of the establishment, until she commits suicide from the stress of dealing with it and pizza-crazed Ma Non. Her death prompts her husband, Powell, to become a Serial Killer that targets Ma Non, which leads to a lot of innocent Ma Non and Powell himself being killed in the end.
  • Video Game Caring Potential: Once it becomes apparent that some NPCs can die during side quests as a result of your decisions (usually by accident), you may start being more evaluative about the decisions you make to reduce the number of preventable deaths that can occur (or prepared to Save Scum or do some research).
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential:
  • Violation of Common Sense:
    • During L's Conundrum, it's better off that Rook not recommend the kind of products that the two customers are looking for during their request. Thomas won't be satisfied with the honey smoke bomb and Nelly won't be too happy with the cooking pot, but they won't mind getting the other two items.
    • For Child of Mira, sending Orleron to see humans instead of his own kind, the Zaruboggan, for help, makes the mission slightly easier in the end (sending him to the humans only requires escorting him somewhere while sending him to the Zaruboggan requires a material from a species of Demonic Spiders).
  • Virtual Paper Doll: The gear you equip can be seen on your character. If you happen to find your stat-giving gear unfashionable or ridiculous, each character also has "fashion armor" slots, which provide the visuals without compromising stats.
  • The Virus: Some indigens in Noctilum are affected by a virus that turns them into black-colored flesh-hungry creatures with bolts of electricity coming out of their eyes, known as "the tainted." Fortunately, this virus can't survive outside of Noctilum, and the tainted indigens won't eat anything inorganic or other tainted. That includes Mimeosomes and Skells, but definitely not Tatsu and L.
  • Wake-Up Call Boss:
    • Many a new player who chooses to plow through the story missions right away has stumbled on the encounter with Goetia in Chapter 4, since it's the first fight in the story where brutal elemental attacks, the necessity of singling out certain enemy targets, and the value of soul voices really come into play. Getting through it requires fully wrapping one's head around how the combat system functions, as well as equipment upgrades and the various defense stats that need to be kept track of. This is made worse by the fact that not all of the game's complicated mechanics can be spoonfed to players, so you either need to look over the manual thoroughly or just really be paying attention.
    • Chapter 5's battle against 3 Qmoeva Skells, nearly equal leveled and difficulty, can easily wreck your if you come in this battle not properly equipped with higher gear and not plan a good strategy. Hopefully, you did not just run away from most of the battles throughout this very long road before approaching this, right?
    • Chapter 6 pits the player against tainted enemies, and culminates with a fight against a giant one. This stresses the absolute influence of Overdrive, and there's plenty of tainted enemies on the way to the objective (that won't attack the player despite the icons above them) to build up TP to prepare for this fight. Funny that this Chapter is required to finally get your skell.
    • Chapter 9's battle against the Wrothians will let you know that you can't just cheese your way through every human-sized opponent with Skells since the game won't let you use them in the first half and remind you to continue keeping your ground builds up to date. The fact that you're dealing with six powerful enemies at once means that you have to be able to handle their weaknesses, use Overdrive effectively, ensure that your teammates are of a sufficient level and not just yourself, and equip your team with the best items and weapons you can just to survive. The second half, which throws a huge amount of Skells at you, may tell you that the dinky level 20 Skell you started with won't cut it when you have to go through six powered-up Skells, as its low defenses and HP simply can't handle the punishment your enemies throw at it.
    • Chapter 10 against Zu Pharg can easily destroy all 4 of your level 30 skells if you come to this fight very unprepared, making this fight much more difficult than already is. Unlike other chapters, coming to this fight with just 1 or 2 Skells is not recommended. This isn't simply run-and-gun as there are parts of the giant ship you don't want to attack.
    • Chapter 11 against the Force Seidr is very difficult. Getting to the boss isn't easy, especially when difficult enemies are nearly nonstop due to the alarm and enemies before that are difficult to face. At this time, you have no access to your Skell, making this fight rely on your ground combat abilities. The boss hits very hard enough to knock out allies in 1 hit, even with level 45 gear. Lao piloting the Prog Ares is certainly difficult with its ability to resist weapon types and inventory of powerful arts, but you have your Skells this time for more relief to make this fight much easier.
    • Chapter 12 is a gauntlet full of boss fights without any breaks in between. Once a Skell is destroyed in any of these fights, you cannot retain them back until the Chapter is finished. You also cannot save once you start the fight. On the good side, all health is recovered before the next phase starts, but that doesn't help as much.
  • Walking Techbane: Jo, a barrista for a coffeeshop in the commercial district, just has absolute horrible luck with machines. Everything she touches breaks. This includes numerous coffee makers, an espresso machine, a freezer, and even her own comm device. She sends you on a quest to gather some repair parts while she has a freak out over how useless she is. Fortunately, her boss easily forgives her and wants her to keep working. She's used to it by now.
  • The War Has Just Begun: The endings invokes this, as the Ganglion are defeated, the Lifehold Core is secure, and survey of Mira to make it safe for human habitation is underway. However, there are many questions left unanswered, many dangers still looming, and the Ganglion were ultimately only a tiny part of the larger Samaar Federation, whose interests and role is still unknown. That's not even to mention the Ghosts. In short, the entire game was basically you playing Paul Revere, and the real war hasn't even started yet.
  • Warm-Up Boss: Lambert, The Divine Wind, is a level 15 Insidia Tyrant on the natural bridge leading to Chapter 4's end. There's no way to avoid it. Fortunately, it's not too difficult to defeat compared to most Tyrants of its size, but it's almost certainly there to test the player's capabilities for Goetia mentioned above.
  • The War Sequence: Chapter 8 subverts this trope. The Ganglion send an army to attack NLA, but Team Elma is tasked with protecting the East Gate and only that, even though you can prompt that you feel like taking on the whole army by yourself. Even though you fight off a fair share of enemies, Team Irina is shown fighting off far more enemies in the cutscenes.
  • Warp Whistle: Using the Wii U's Game Pad, players can warp to areas they have already visited.
  • Wave Motion Gun: The Hexad Partican and Agashura Cannon fire combined laser beams that can obliterate all but the must durable of enemies in a single hit.
  • We All Live in America: Despite the White Whale and its crew being primarily American, many of the themes and cultural values of the developers' native Japan shine through. For example, during an Affinity Mission for Lao, Lin accidentally says something that upsets Lao and when Rook tries to cheer her up and fails, Rook falls to the ground in a Dogeza pose. Also, characters are very quick to assume the best intentions of someone who works hard and personal problems are brushed off as too personal to bring up. For example, despite numerous issues that jeopardize the lives of his teammates, everyone gives Lao a lot of slack. Of course, since this story takes place forty years in the future of its release (plus the exceptional circumstances they're in), who knows how cultural values have changed.
  • Weapon of Choice: Each class has their own weapon loadout, although certain ally characters have variant classes with alternate loadouts.
  • Weird Weather: Planet Mira has weather patterns similar to Earth's, including rain and sandstorms. But its harsher environments have unusual weather phenomena that are unique to their respective continents. Such as: Oblivia's electromagnetic storms, Sylvalum's spore clouds, and Calduros' brimstone rain.
  • Welcome to Corneria: NPCs come in two varieties: generics you overhear and named ones you speak to. The dialogue changes as you explore and complete missions.
  • We Used to Be Friends: In the "End of an Idealist" quest chain, Alex says that the woman who's been foiling his plans, Eliza, used to be a friend and someone whom he saw eye-to-eye with (if Rook did make further attempts to negotiate with Alex during Shotgun Diplomacy).
  • What Could Possibly Go Wrong?: The game itself asks you this when, for an affinity mission, you make the somewhat dubious choice of teaming up with a person named Murderess.
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?: A reoccurring theme throughout the game. As more Xeno lifeforms migrate to NLA, many sidequests will become available specifically dealing with human's anxieties to sharing their homes with these new races. This get pushed even further in the last chapter when it's revealed that the true human bodies were left on Earth, with the plan to have new cloned bodies serve as the substitutes. This causes a minor identity crisis with Doug, who questions if they can even be considered humans anymore if they will no longer be returning to their old bodies.
  • What Is This Thing You Call Love?: Half of the xenos who come to New LA don't understand the concept of love. So it's especially hilarious when they start dealing with romantic feelings for the first time in their sidequests.
  • White and Grey Morality: Elma attempts to persuade the Wrothians, in service of the Ganglion, to make a more noble decision. The Wrothians only battled the humans at NLA as part of their objective given. They later abandon the Ganglion altogether and can be allied with NLA. In addition, Lin begs Elma to spare Lao even given his treason due to his family being wronged by the higher-ups. This even convinces Lao to give up.
  • Wide Open Sandbox:
    • In contrast to its predecessor Xenoblade, which was more of a stage 5 on the Sliding Scale of Linearity vs. Openness. Players are not restricted to exploring the map as defined by the story, either. If you want to run to Sylvalum or Noctilum at a low level, you're free to do so, provided you can get around the numerous hazards in your way if you don't just want to swim there. There are even low level monsters scattered around the other continents, just as there are high level monsters interspersed in Primordia.
    • According to Nintendo Force editor Lucas Thomas, the game world is bigger than the worlds of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, and Fallout 4 combined. It is so big that Thomas spent four hours simply running around the world map, seeing how far he could get, and cleared little more than three percent of the map.note 
  • Winged Unicorn: Progens and Monocerouses are giant alien unicorns with wing-shaped projections, though they cannot fly.
  • With Catlike Tread: No matter how much you run, stomp, jump, or fly around, as long as you don't step into an enemy's aggro range, they'll never notice you, so sneaking around them can turn into this at times. Augments exist to crank this trope Up to Eleven as well, reducing aggro range of enemies.
  • The World Is Just Awesome: After getting introduced to NLA Rook and Elma walk out into Primordia, and the camera cuts back and forth to different parts and Indigens to show off how amazing and beautiful and exciting Mira is.
  • World's Strongest Man: Dadaan, the Strongest Prone is this for the Prone (obviously). It's not a lie, either.
  • You Bastard: Surprisingly, the game goes out of its way as much as it can to make you feel horrible for pursuing the ultimate Bonus Boss of the game. The Telethia shows up during the main story to save the party from a hopeless situation, though they do theorize it may have been taunting them over its power, and when you have to face it in an affinity quest to get an item from it, its stats are lower as if holding back, and it cuts the battle after dealing one-fourth of its health, giving the item you were after while possibly deeming you worthy to live on the planet. Its enemy description even describes it as 'guardian of life'. And when you do encounter it outside of the affinity mission, it's non-aggressive. It'll only attack in self-defense once you attack it first, and it's death animation is rather disturbing to watch. Despite all this, you can still gun it down for the thrill of the challenge, and to complete a Tyrant tile to achieve 100% Completion.

Alternative Title(s): Untitled Monolith Soft RPG

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX?from=VideoGame.UntitledMonolithSoftRPG