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Video Game: World of Tanks

Roll Out!

World of Tanks is an MMORPG based around... well, what do you think?! World Of Tanks will eventually feature hundreds of Soviet, German, American, French, British, Japanese, Chinese, and "Europe mix" tanks.note  Essentially, this game is Tank Goodness incarnate.

You start the game with very basic tank designs barely worthy of the name and proceed to work your way up the tech trees. The tech trees themselves consist of a mixture of vehicles that saw service in their respective armies and vehicles that only made it to the prototype stage or never made it off paper. note  All the vehicles featured have been extensively researched and their in-game characteristics are based on their real-world counterparts. Despite that, the controls are relatively simple, and it is most definitely not even anywhere close to being a hardcore sim. The range of tanks available stretches from the 1920s (with a single tank from 1917, and its many derivatives) to the early 1960s.

Vehicles are spread across three categories: tanks, tank destroyers and self-propelled guns. Tanks are the mainstay of each force, with tank destroyers serving sniping and ambush purposes while Self Propelled Guns (SPG) provide artillery support. Tanks are further split into three more categories: light tanks with amazing speed, medium tanks balancing speed, firepower and armour, and heavy tanks focusing on heavy armour and massive firepower.

A card-based MMORTS Spinoff, World of Tanks Generals, was announced by Wargaming.net. There also are the in-development spinoffs World of Warplanes and World of Warships which is the same idea, but with warplanes and warships instead. The ultimate goal of Wargaming.net is to eventually be able to combine all three games into one big wargame.

The Girls und Panzer anime by Studio Actas is often considered to be The Anime of the Game. In a move that surprised no one, the makers of the game and Studio Actas will cooperate in creating in-game exclusive content related to the anime in celebration of the creation of a Japanese server cluster for the game.

This game provides examples of:

  • Acceptable Breaks from Reality:
    • There are no actively participating infantry, aircraft, anti-tank guns or other vehicles (halftracks, armored cars, and so on) in the game.
    • Some tanks have rather outlandish equipment available for use; for example, the KV-1 can mount the fictional 57mm "project 413" gun, which is virtually identical to the historical ZiS-4 available to other Russian tanks, but shoots much faster.
    • Because the game's matchmaker does not consider the tanks' nationalities as it forms teams, you can see German tanks fighting alongside American tanks against British and Chinese tanks, along with other unlikely combinations.
    • A number of the early German SPGs are actually uncasemated assault guns intended to provide support for advancing tanks against infantry and fortifications. They were never meant to be used for indirect fire: along with a number of tank destroyers, they belong to a class of armoured vehicles known as assault guns, which were designed to provide mobile fire support for infantry.
    • In actual combat, a shot that manages to punch a hole into a tank will almost certainly guarantee a knock-out, if not outright destruction. Most armoured fighting vehicles are not very spacious: chances are that something, or someone will get hit. Even without an explosive filler, any projectile that manages to penetrate will generate spalling, causing fragments of the armour to break off and turn into shrapnel.
    • The maximum sighting range for a tank is 500m, which can be extended to 625m if a friendly spots a target for you. In World War 2, most tank combat took place at ranges from 500m (for tanks with small caliber weapons) to 1km (for late-war machines), and some guns could effectively engage at twice that distance.
    • Many of the guns had to be watered down to avoid one-sided battles. For example, the Tiger I with the 8.8cm L/56 can knock out an M4 Sherman at 2,000 yards/1,828.8 meters (and it indeed could accurately hit targets at that range) head on, whereas the M4 had to catch the Tiger I on the flank at around 700m. In-game, the accuracy of the Tiger I's 8.8cm L/56 and the Tiger II's 8.8cm L/71, and especially the Russian D-25T 122mm L/44 gun have been reduced tremendously over their real-life counterparts for gameplay's sake.
    • Though most tanks approximate their historical counterparts' specifications, other stats are sometimes fudged. For instance, many tanks can fire their guns much faster than they would have been able to in real life: a fully-trained crew in a T-62A, for example, can fire 10 rounds a minute when the realistic rate of fire would have been about 7 rounds per minute. Unrealistic fire rates are probably to compensate for reduced range and accuracy.
    • A few vehicles such as Crusader SP SPG and the Alecto TD actually have their guns facing the rear, but for gameplay they effectively drive backwards. This is very noticeable on the Crusader SP because it's 'reverse' speed is almost twice the forward speed.
    • In general, some tanks are very much inferior to their real life counterparts - the IS-7 is a notable example - for the sake of balancing the game.
  • Accidental Aiming Skills: Happens often, especially due to RNG. Among the most common reasons are -
    • Tanks sitting behind friendlies who get spotted and deliberately or inadvertently use their stealthed allies as invisible cover.
    • Sometimes tanks (with poor accuracy) will shoot on the move on the off chance a hit will land.
    • Inevitable with Artillery, of which most have very poor accuracy. It's not uncommon to aim at one tank, fire, miss, and hit his friend nearby (who might have not even been spotted).
    • There have been numerous videos of tanks missing their intended target, only to kill an unspotted tank on the other side of the map. The most absurd has to be this one.
    • There are two skills that generally try to avert this trope; Snap Shot (decreases the accuracy penalty from moving the gun/turret) and Smooth Ride (decreases the accuracy penalty while moving the tank).
  • Achilles' Heel: Many German tanks have frontal transmissions, meaning that crippling engine damage and module-destroying fires are possible from frontal hits. A few tanks, such as the British Centurion, German Indien-Panzer and Soviet IS-3, one-up this by having frontal ammo racks, meaning a big enough hit can One-Hit Kill these tanks. Training Preventive Maintenance or Safe Stowage is important for these tanks to reduce the chance of catastrophe.
  • Acrofatic:
    • The Soviet T-28 is very fast despite being bigger than some heavy tanks. However, it does not have the health to match its size.
    • The German VK 30.01 (P) is a Tiger prototype with a 60 km/h speed limit. Only qualifies when upgraded however, and acceleration remains somewhat poor, meaning that it won't always manage to reach its top speed. Don't get in the way of one going downhill, though.
    • The KV-1S and IS series heavy tanks are surprisingly fast and nimble for their size, almost edging into medium tank territory at times.
    • Higher tier French heavies can be faster and more maneuverable than some medium tanks in the game.
    • The T1 and M6 Heavies aren't much better protected than the M4 Sherman (apart from the excellent, well-angled frontal armour), but they're pretty fast and agile for their size and weight.
  • A.I. Is a Crapshoot:
    • The matchmaker occasionally produces teams with the results being obvious from the start, such as several nigh-impenetrable hard hitters a la Jagdtiger against a bunch of medium-light tanks on an urban map with low maneuver potential. While it's not impossible to beat, depending on the skills of the players involved, it still favors one team over the other.
    • The matchmaker will create 7-vs-7 games outside of the "Team Battles" game mode when it thinks that there aren't enough players in queue.
    • One of the most irritating scourges of the game are players who use a bot program to play hundreds of games in a day and thus avoid Level Grinding. Bot tanks usually follow the nearest tank and fire at anything that is spotted, which can lead to bots pushing you out of cover and pinging uselessly off the front of tanks they have no hope of penetrating. Some bots are even worse, simply sitting stationary in the cap circle all game and firing at the nearest enemy tank spotted.
  • The Alleged Tank:
    • The starter tanks are barely worthy of being called tanks. Small guns, very thin armor and speed issues on certain types of terrain... thankfully, you generally only face other starter tanks in these, so everyone else is just as weak as you.
    • Special mention to the Light VIc gift tank. No armor, armed only with a machine gun, and had a horribly underpowered 88hp engine, making its top speed a lie. Worse, the better T7 Combat Car was given out a few months prior. All the VIc had over it was penetration and gun handling, but the T7 was subsequently patched to have the same penetration and was even given a speed increase. It's not surprising that many people sold it immediately after getting to free up the garage slot it came with; its only worth now is as a collector's item.
  • Aluminum Christmas Trees:
    • Many of the unlikely pairings between Axis and Allied tanks on the same team are Truth in Television: The Germans in particular would use practically anything they got their hands on that was still in functional condition (some to the point where they would start manufacturing it themselves), whilst the Allies looted a number of abandoned Axis vehicles and used them to swell their own ranks, particularly in the earlier, more desperate years of the war.
    • Also applies to a surprising amount of the French tree. It's commonly assumed that most of the designs in it must have been 'paper tanks', too weird-looking and impractical to ever be produced in real life, particularly given the brevity of France's military role in the Second World War. Except that a lot of them were real.
  • April Fools' Day:
    • A long-running April Fools' joke is that Wargaming will add the Landkreuzer P.1000 Ratte to the game. They even made a video about it.
    • For their April Fools' Day joke 2014, Wargaming added in a new tank, the Tier 1 Karl SPG (a miniaturized version of the Karl-Gerät super-heavy siege mortar), which is put on its own map against other Karls only. The map itself is a Shout-Out to Battle City, with all the rules and obstacle behavior. It's as hilarious as it sounds.
  • Armor Is Useless: Averted, even shots from large guns can sometimes bounce off tanks with relatively thin armor. Also, thick armor can completely neutralize shells with low enough penetration.
    • Most low tier French tanks are regularly reported to survive taking up to 80 hits when facing tanks around their tier.
    • Taken to absurd heights with high tier American tank destroyers, especially the T95, which can take artillery shells to the face and not be hurt.
  • Artistic License - History: Most of the tanks in-game were operational vehicles (T-34, M4 Sherman), prototypes (T95, Maus, IS-7), blueprints (most of the E-series, KV-5), or at the very least conceived of (Jagdpanzer E-100). However, some are simply invented by Wargaming. Despite this, the small in-game histories of these vehicles give the impression that they existed - the Waffentrager auf E-100's reads: "A proposal to mount a large-caliber antiaircraft gun on the chassis of the E-100 tank." In fact, no proposal for an E-100 Waffentrager was ever made, because such a thing would be contrary to the design principles of both projects.
  • Artistic License - Physics:
  • Attack Its Weakpoint: Damage caused to the tanks' modules is calculated separately from damage to their health. Stopping the enemy by shooting their tracks is possible even if your weapon can't pierce their armor, the same goes for most other modules. Nothing is as satisfying as setting a enemy's engine on fire, aside from destroying their ammo rack. Some tanks also have weakpoints that are easy to score critical hits on. Knowing where to aim for the modules and crew members can help even the odds against larger tanks.
    • The German tanks in general had glaring weakspots in their gun mantlets (allowing lower-tier tanks to penetrate and score damage). Before patch 0.6.4, the Tier 9 VK4502 Ausf. B heavy tank had a frontal weakspot that could cause the tank to catch on fire from a starter tank's shot. The gun mantlets were fixed in patch 0.6.5.
    • Soviet tanks usually have a vulnerable driver's hatch note  and triplex periscopes note .
      • The otherwise hyper-armored on all sides KV-5 has a big weak housing for a radioman, routinely referred to as "R2-D2" by fans. Said radioman's sad life is also a recurring theme. On the upside, that radioman has bought so many farms, he now owns several small countries outright.
    • US heavy tanks have well-protected turrets, but their chassis armor can be penetrated relatively easily.
    • In the case of tracks, it's also subject to a rather brutal inversion: it's possible to get hits on an enemy which will damage their tracks but not their tank, even when you can damage their tank, in effect making the tracks some of the best armored parts of a vehicle.
      • Some tanks in real life had tracks that were designed to be an additional layer of armour.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Premium ammo in random battles, especially for guns that have high damage and low penetration with normal ammo, like the American and German 105mm and Soviet 122mm tank mounted howitzers that appear relatively early on. The extra penetration makes them absolutely devastating, but the price (in both Gold and Credits) skyrockets the higher up the tech tree you go. They can still bounce off armor as well.
    • Tier 9-10 vehicles tend to be unprofitable even with a 50% win ratio and a premium account. So it's either playing with a platoon to rely less on the mercy of the autobalancer - or grinding repair and ammo money with other tanks.
      • Special mention goes to the T95 American tank destroyer, which boasts almost impenetrably thick frontal armor and a monstrous gun, it can hold down entire choke points alone. But it is so slow, that the game is often either won or lost before the T95 can even shoot anything.
    • No matter how cool it may be to drive with a historically accurate module configuration, they tend to not be the best choice, with a few exceptions.
  • Badass Adorable:
    • Popular fan consensus is that the hulking, deadly T29 heavy tank's 'ears' (the pair of coincidence rangefinders on the sides of its turret) make it one of the cutest tanks in the game.
    • The AMX 40's shape has earned it the nickname of Duck. It helps that it has the same armor as a heavy tank a tier higher.
  • Better to Die than Be Killed: Some players deliberately drown their tank, hit themselves with HE splash damage or drive off tall cliffs when the battle has been lost to deny the enemy an easy kill, which means less XP and credits for the winning team.
  • Bigger Stick:
    • More often than not, players jump to conclusions about the battle results just from seeing the tank line-ups and players rallied by a top-tier tank will usually give their all to support it.
    • Generally, the biggest weapon available for your tank is preferable, unless it's a HE-only howitzer or unique to a certain vehicle.
      • Averted with high-penetration, low-damage guns like the Soviet 57mm ZiS-2 and variants, which are often smaller calibre than the biggest gun on any given chassis.
      • Averted with the S-35 CA's stock 17pdr, which has better penetration and faster rate of fire than any other gun on the chassis, making selection of one of the other guns more of a playstyle choice than them necessarily being "better".
  • BFG: Even the smallest weapons available qualify, if you think about how big they are in Real Life. They get bigger with each tier up to the humongous 240mm artillery gun.
    • Taken to an almost comical degree with the French ARL V39 tank destroyer and the German Porsche Tiger heavy tank, as both have access to guns nearly as long as the vehicles themselves and are mounted at the very front of the vehicle. Logically speaking, they should be tipping over and burying their guns straight into the ground each time they go down a hill.
  • Boring, but Practical: Typically, even when there's a wide selection of guns to unlock, the gun with the most penetration (which is nearly always the "top"/last gun to unlock) is generally the best gun to pick in most situations.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Averted, since you need to spend the Credits you earn in battle on refilling your magazine. You can also spend some Gold or lots of Credits for better shells like High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) rounds for better armour penetration.
    • It also causes serious problems for players who equip high-caliber weapons on smaller tanks. The most extreme cases are the SPGs: e.g. the Russian SU-5 can only hold 14 rounds for its biggest cannon.
    • Amusingly played straight in a few cases, as it's physically impossible to fire off the KV-2's 152mm howitzer's full load of shells within the confines of a 15-minute match, since it reloads very slowly. Similarly, the M37 carries 126 rounds. Over the course of a 15-minute match, it can only fire, at most, 76 of them.
  • Bribing Your Way to Victory: Gold-based purchases are a mixed bag.
    • Premium ammunition (which can also be purchased for an account draining sum of Credits post-0.8.1) are either AP rounds with higher penetration (APCR/HEAT) or HE rounds with a bigger bang. They can still bounce off armor if the shooter is unlucky, and a miss with these is still a miss.
      • The E-100's 15cm gunnote  cannot reliably penetrate the front armor of a King Tiger with AP, while HE rounds essentially make the tank a direct-fire only Tier 5 artillery piece. With HEAT rounds, however, it becomes absolutely murderous.
      • In general, most Artillery will not be able to inflict the full amount of damage their gun is potentially capable of; this is especially true with American and Soviet pieces which have the highest shell damage. With HE having such low penetration value, targets which can actually be penetrated are usually one shotted without getting to see the full potential damage, most tanks which aren't penetrated (especially heavies) take only a fraction of the potential damage because armor will reduce the damage from non-penetrating splash shots. Load HEAT rounds however, and you can suddenly knock off half the health of even high tier heavy tanks... but you have to land a shot directly on them.
    • Premium tanks generally do not outclass their regular counterparts and are in most cases, less dangerous. They also do not lead anywhere on the tech tree. Instead, they earn an increased amount of Credits and are dirt cheap to run. Some of the best are:
      • The Lowe is a Tier 8 super-heavy premium tank. While no better than its Tier 8 brethren, it goes against the premium tank trendnote  by having a potent gun and relatively weak armour. It's competitive at any level, and absolutely murderous against lower tier vehicles. New players use it as a way to skip the work required to get a regular high tier vehicle and even experienced players use it, since it is the absolute best Credit maker in the game. It proved so effective (and popular), it's real world cost was increased.
      • The 0.7.2 patch saw the American Tier 9 T34 heavy converted into a Tier 8 premium tank. It has weak hull armor, but has very strong turret armor and a powerful 120mm main gun, and is already giving the Lowe some serious competition as the game's premier Credit farmer.
      • The 0.6.7 patch saw the introduction of the Type 59, a one-off Chinese knockoff of the T-54. It is Tier 8 (one tier lower than the original) and its acceleration and firepower are inferior even to the T-44, but it retains most of the original's armour and can still be quite a potent threat in the right hands. Being easy to play, it ended up appearing in such amounts that it skewed game balance, so now it is no longer being sold except for rare special events.
      • The French Tier 8 FCM 50 t heavy tank improves upon the best qualities of late-tier French tanks while mitigating several of their weaknesses. The end result is a heavy tank that has excellent firepower, superior maneuverability to most medium tanks, and the best armour layout of any French tank in the game. On top of all that, it also has preferential matchmaking. Played correctly, this tank is easily one of the best Credit Farmers in the game, which is evidenced by its high cost in real world money.
      • The Soviet Tier 7 SU-122-44 tank destroyer boasts extremely high DPM, has well-sloped armor that no gun under 175mm penetration will go through, excellent mobility and speed, and great ammo capacity. The only downside it has is a terrible view range for a Tier 7 tank destroyer. It is agreed upon among fans that the SU-122-44 outmatches almost every other tier 7 TD in the game despite its premium status for these reasons.
      • The British Tier 6 TOG II* heavy tank. It's the longest tank in the game, does a whopping 14kph, has poor armor for its tier, and will get shredded if by itself. It's often bought just for sheer comedy value. However, it has the HP pool of a Tier 8 and the gun of a Tier 7, and is so heavy it can't be moved if killed. A platoon of 3 becomes a Lethal Joke Platoon.
    • A tank crew can be instantly trained to 100% competence with Gold. A 100% crew greatly outstrips a 50% starter crew and has access to secondary skills.
    • Premium accounts allow players to earn 50% more XP and Credits per match, and are all but indispensable when rolling around in the high-tier tanks, as the cost of repairs and ammunition can easily put the player in the red.
    • Tier 6 is usually the highest point that non-paying players can reach with grinding until they begin to lose interest in the game as the XP costs for researching vehicles and modules simply become too high without buying gold to convert vehicle XP to universal XP.
  • Brits with Battleships: Four British-produced tanksnote  in Soviet colors and markings can be purchased for gold (or given as gifts or promotional items). They were also included as a separate line in 0.8.1 with the famed Crusader, Matilda, Churchill and Centurion tanks. The tank tree is divided into Lightning Bruisers akin to the high-tier Soviet medium tanks and Stone Walls like most of the early French tanks. They also have a line of tank destroyers, which start as tiny and lightly armored, with big guns, and turn into massively armored, lumbering behemoths with, at least to start with, popguns.
  • Camera Abuse: The camera will rock and shake as the tank receives hits. Getting hit with HE rounds will also create a smoke cloud in your field of vision. This can affect gameplay, as all the bouncing around can throw off the player's aim. The 0.6.4 patch added an option to turn this off in sniper mode.
  • Cannon Fodder: The lower tier tanks in the match often become this in the most brutal way; often their job is to go first and locate the enemy by being the first ones to get shot. However, if the players driving them are skilled...
  • Cast from Hit Points/Explosive Overclocking: The Russian/Chinese-exclusive Removed Speed Governor consumablenote  boosts engine power by 10%, but will slowly damage the engine. The Cyclone Filter equipment can mitigate this to an extent, as it increases the engine's durability.
  • Cherry Tapping/Death of a Thousand Cuts:
    • Light tanks (usually) have piddly guns, but if they can avoid getting shot and hit the right area several times (like the rear), they can take down much heavier tanks. It will take time, however.
    • Low tier tanks have access to autocannons, which can allow them to fire multiple rounds with one burst. Some can even fire more than one burst before needing to reload. However, their penetration and damage tends to be rather lacking compared to single-shot guns.
    • The American M2 Light is probably the best example of this trope when stock, since it packs an actual machine gun. While powerful for a machine gun, the M2 Browning is not made for tank warfare.
      • The French Renault FT-17 and D1 can also equip a slightly larger 13.2mm machine gun. It's not much better in power, but it shoots even faster.
      • The British get in on the action as well with the slightly stronger but slower-firing 15mm BESA machine gun, available for the Medium Mk.I and Cruiser Mk. III.
      • The most extreme example to date is the Pz.Kpfw. I Ausf. C with the Mauser 7.92mm Automatic. Needless to say, this is a machinegun, which will take around 50 to 100 hits to kill a same-tier opponent. Against a heavier tier, it takes hundreds of rounds... or it will just simply bounce every shot, giving the enemy an easy laugh before they blow you away. However, it is extremely effective against thinly-armored opponents, should the player properly use the Pz.Kpfw. I Ausf. C's speed and agility. A properly executed Pz.IC attack goes something like this: Zoom. Stop. BRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAP!! Boom. Scratch one enemy tank after just a few seconds.
    • The Germans also have 2cm flak cannons on the Pz.Kpfw. I and Pz.Kpfw. II, and a 3cm aircraft cannon (the MK103) on the Pz.Kpfw. II Ausf. G.
      • The Soviets have an autocannon as well. It's a 37mm that packs a decent punch but doesn't quite have the penetration to suit the tanks it's mounted on - the T-46, the T-50 and the A-20.
    • The Soviet 57 mm ZiS-4 and 413 guns deal rather low damage per shot, but can send shells out every 2 seconds, and can penetrate almost any tank from Tier 4 to Tier 7 from the sides and rear, if not frontally.
    • The StuG III's 7.5cm L/70, along with a highly-skilled crew, can fire once approximately every 3 seconds with full accuracy restored by the time the next shell loads. Its excellent penetration coupled with a high rate of fire means that its fairly meager AP damage rating quickly adds up even against higher-tier opponents. Your only problems will be running out of ammo mid-fight and the enemy returning fire.
      • The E 25 takes this Up to Eleven. The same gun, except now it reloads in two seconds.
    • The 7.5cm L/100 for the Panther and Panther II has great penetration, nearly unrivaled accuracy, and fires every 4 seconds. Of course, it deals small amounts of damage for its tier. It is possible for some tanks to withstand, on average, 20 hits or more.
    • The American 76mm guns in general also follow this — they have similar stats to the two German guns listed above (slightly weaker per shot than their counterparts at similar tiers, but More Dakka to make up for it).
    • The British 2-pdr and 6-pdr guns fall into this category, sending rounds out every 2 seconds, but with low damage. The 2-pdr Mark IX-B on the Matilda has the best penetration of all Tier 4 and Tier 5 guns, but with piddling damage.
    • HE shells deal damage based on the enemy's armor thickness and will deal a small amount of damage to armor your gun can't penetrate with AP rounds. This allows weaker vehicles to finish off badly injured higher tier vehicles or to cripple them through module damage, especially with fast-firing guns.
    • Ramming usually causes a small amount of damage. Oftentimes, a heavier tank will ram a lighter vehicle that is at low health, rather than wasting expensive ammunition.
    • Occasionally, matches where both sides are incapable of damaging each other with AP rounds happen. With the advent of French tanks, it is possible to get into standoffs at around Tiers 2 to 5 where even HE rounds won't be doing any damage.
    • Japanese guns in general tend to have superior rate of fire, quicker aim times and better recoil control then other nation's guns but tend to lack penetration and damage-per-shot.
  • Chinese with Chopper Support: Added in patch 8.3. Quite a few of their tanks are modifications of vehicles from other countries, while their original designs have heavy Soviet influence. In general, Chinese machines are Lightning Bruiser flanker/brawlers - small tanks with big guns, excellent handling, and thin but very well-angled armour.
  • Closed Cities: The Ensk map.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: There's an Epic Medal, "Kolobanov's Medal", for playing this straight by winning a match as the last tank on your team against five or more enemies.
  • Cosmetic Award: Several:
    • Step Achievement Medals: Kill X enemies, survive and win X matches, and so on. These are all named after famous tank commanders (Leclerc, Abrams, Carius, etc.).
    • Mastery Badges: Awarded for being among the top 50/20/5/1% (3rd Class, 2nd Class, 1st Class and Ace Tanker, respectively) players on a certain tank, determined by the average XP gain on that tank.
    • Marks of Distinction, Kill marks on the barrel of your gun for doing more average damage in that tank than most players.
    • Titles of Honor, which can be divided into:
      • Kill Streaks: One-Hit Kill 3 or more enemies in a row, hit enemies X times in a row, penetrate enemy armor X times in a row... These awards show the highest (or current) streak.
      • Special Achievements: Capture the enemy base without being seen by any of the enemy team, kill a higher tier enemy by ramming it, kill two enemies with one shot...
      • Tank Master Badges: Not to be confused with the Mastery Badges, they are awarded for either researching an entire tree or killing one of every tank in a tree. Originally just a single badge for all the trees, it's been expanded to have separate badges for each nation's tree as well.
  • Counting Bullets: Common tactic when facing autoloader tanks, which are nearly helpless while reloading. American tanks generally have smaller magazines and faster reloads than French ones.
  • Crew of One: Zig-Zagged. All tanks have a certain number of crew (minimum of 2, maximum of 7) that operate the tank. However, it is still possible for all the tank's systems to keep working even if only 1 crew member is still alive; however, the tank will be essentially crippled at that point, as all other roles will function at half efficiency.
  • Critical Hit: Not quite a standard example, since it simply means that you've hit a subsystem or crew member, rather than increasing the amount of damage done. 0 HP hits on the tracks of a vehicle are probably the most common critical hits in the game. Other forms of non-damaging critical are also possible against guns and some sighting systems, while any amount of damage that makes it through armor has a chance to damage a subsystem or kill a crewmember in addition to HP damage. Also, hitting the ammo rack has the potential to One-Hit Kill any tank, while hitting the engine and/or fuel tanks can cause the tank to catch fire, dealing additional Damage Over Time.
  • Crippling Overspecialization:
    • Most tank destroyers sacrifice their turrets for the ability to mount powerful and accurate guns, and increased camouflage.
    • SPGs can fire shells beyond standard view range and over limited cover; at the cost of rate of fire, accuracy, and endurance. Ammunition for their cannons is also very expensive and they cannot carry many into battle.
      • HEAT rounds for Artillery are also this, as you can get enough penetration to do full damage with your shells against better armored targets, but lose splash damage, so near misses or ricochets do nothing.
    • Most light tanks are fast but lack the firepower and armor to take on anything but other light tanks and artillery with reliability.
    • Most heavy tanks have heavy armor and/or large and powerful guns. They are also slow moving, large and easy to hit, have turrets that turn slowly and long reload times. If caught in the open, they can be picked apart by constant bombardment.
  • Critical Existence Failure: Played with. Damage to subsystems and wounded tank crewmen will hinder your tank's performance. However, as long as you have at least one hit point and crew member remaining, your tank is still combat effective. However, in the (extremely) rare case of ALL of your crew members getting wounded, your tank is considered "knocked out", even if it still has health remaining.
    • "Combat effective" is a relative term; it's possible (though very unlikely) for your tank to be crippled by Critical Hits - immobilized, vision reduced, gun disabled - without taking even a single point of HP damage. While the crippling effects can be repaired with time, they still won't work as well as they normally do.
    • Averted in the cancelled hardcore mode, where there were no hit points and Subsystem Damage determined whether the tank was knocked out. This resulted in 15 minute camping spree, as any penetration could easily knock out any tank.
  • Color-Coded Armies: Type IV; enemies get red icons above them, friendlies get green icons.
    • Also, the vehicles of each faction have unique color schemes: German tanks are gray, Soviet tanks are light green/olive, American tanks are olive drab/dark tan, French tanks are navy blue/cyan, British tanks are khaki and Chinese tanks are deep dark green. Some variation of colors allow easier recognition of vehicles. For example, the Soviet T-34 is given a brownish color to distinguish it from the later T-34-85 and the American M6 Heavy is painted tan in contrast to the very similar looking light green T1 Heavy.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory: Using the Crusader SP is complicated by the fact that the vehicle goes faster driving backwards than it does driving forward. This is because in real life, the gun is facing towards the rear of the vehicle, but for gameplay reasons it is set up with the gun forward. The British Alecto is the same way (as can be seen by the driver's compartment), but the difference in speed is not as noticeable.
  • David Vs Goliath: Any low-tier tank going up against a higher tier one. The winner depends on the skill of the players involved and more than a little luck. An example.
  • Death from Above:
    • You will quickly learn to hate enemy SPGs. Also the reason why they are usually the primary targets during an attack.
    • One can fall from a cliff and land on a careless tank, causing a lot of damage or even killing it outright. Firing from that cliff instead is also pretty effective, as the top armor is the weakest point on a tank and returning fire would be quite difficult.
  • Death or Glory Attack:
    • If an SPG sees a light or medium tank charging towards it, the safest thing to do is to flee towards allies or find cover and hope your team kills it before it gets to you. However, if you stand your ground and try to zero in on it, you've got a chance to make a one shot kill gamble. Miss and it's pretty much assured they will kill you before you even reload.
    • Ramming with low health can be pretty risky too.
  • Development Gag: The old "Orc beat by tank" trailer released in the months leading up to the game's release? Turns out, it's almost entirely made of recycled assets intended for the game that would become World of Tanks, which would've been a bog standard fantasy MMORPG.
  • Difficult but Awesome:
    • Tank Destroyers and Heavy tanks in general require far more knowledge than medium or light tanks, both strategy and stats wise, as they rarely have the speed to go anywhere but the one or two places on each map where the serious fighting is, have to avoid artillery, angle their armor rather than rely on the more luck-based dodging for lighter vehicles, and tank destroyers need a complete understanding of camouflage, particularly good TD players can even fire repeatedly without being seen.
    • The US Tier 5 T49 tank destroyer. Low hp, no armor to speak of, and a high speed means that more often than not, in the hands of an average player it gets used as a proxy scout, which just results it getting destroyed early in a match. In the hands of a decent player however — who knows about its excellent camo value and view range, plus its fast-firing 76mm gun — it becomes a killing machine capable of carrying even up to tier 7 matches. It's these combination of traits that make it the Tier 5 vehicle of choice for so-called blue and purple "unicum" players.
  • Dressing as the Enemy: The German Panther/M10 is a Panther disguised as an American M10 Wolverine, to the point where it uses American inscriptions and insignia instead of German ones.
  • Diesel Punk: While many of the more famous tanks of the period are present, there's no denying that a large percentage of the vehicles in-game never made it either off the drawing board or past the prototype stage. On top of that, the vast majority of the vehicles are from the era which inspired the genre.
  • Dodge the Bullet:
    • If you are at sufficient range, have good reflexes, have a fast enough connection, and see the tank that fired the shot, you can easily back off enough that the shot misses its mark. It's extremely difficult to do, but survival in some tanks depend on your ability to do this.
    • It should also go without saying that smaller light tanks, such as the French ELC AMX, can pull this off just with their speed, maneuverability, and small size. It's not uncommon to see an ELC driver zipping around in the opposing teams base, annoying the heck out of everyone present as they zig zag around, taking out the artillery, and lighting up everyone to be sniped from the tanks on your team.
  • Do Not Run with a Gun: No, seriously, don't. Very few weapons are able to fire accurately on the move, which is period-appropriate, and even then, it's more of a "slow crawl" than anything else. Most players will stop to shoot and having a gun which has a dispersion that drops down quickly when you stop can be a major advantage.
    • Light tanks are an exception: stopping is death for them, so they usually close to knife-fighting range when fighting and circle-strafe.
    • The lowest cruise control setting offers your tank reasonable, but still reduced accuracy on the move. Even if you don't want to fire while moving at this speed, dispersion drops more quickly once you do stop, including reduced rocking forward and backwards after hitting the brakes.
    • The Vertical Stabilizer equipment increases accuracy on the move, but is expensive and is usually only available at high tiers. US tanks can get them as early as Tiers 5 to 7 (depending on which branch the player takes), but are still rather expensive.
    • The US tanks in general tend to be more accurate on the move, but it's still recommended to stop to shoot.
  • Down to the Last Play: Two versions:
    • The game has a set time limit that, when reached, will immediately end the game, even if you were a split second away from killing the last tank on the enemy team. This is especially important in Assault map mode, where only one team has a cap circle and the timer is significantly reduced; meaning the defending team need only wait out the clock to win.
    • When a base is captured, there is a small delay until the game ends. It is possible for the other team to cap as well for a draw. It is also possible to lose even if you've capped, if your team is still killed before the match is over.
  • Dying Alone: The most likely fate for SPGs if the team loses: they usually remain at base and survive until the very end, to be mocked by the dead players for being useless. However, it is possible, if unlikely, for them to turn around the situation, particularly if the enemy team is incredibly stupid and comes at the surviving SPGs at a rate just slow enough that the SPGs have time to reload between enemy attacks, as opposed to swarming in all at once.
  • Elite Tweak: For most tanks, the upgrades are pretty much straightforward: equip the parts with the highest level, and you've got yourself an awesome battle machine. Some tanks have powerful alternatives:
    • The Pz.Kpfw III can pack a short 7.5cm cannon with awful armor penetration and reload time, which seems rather undesirable, until you notice that its HE round has penetration that's almost as good as its APnote . This inverts the usual German "snipe and run" tactics, making the Pz.Kpfw III a powerful close combat vehicle.
    • The old KV (which could be the KV-1 or 2, depending on the turret used) took the cake, being a radically different tank with the turret upgrade. Also, all of its weapons (except the starting one) were useful to differing degrees. Even after the split, you'll still never know which KV you will encounter.
      • The Tier 5 KV-1 can equip the 57mm, which deals little damage per shot, but has a great rate of fire, penetration and accuracy, an all-rounder 85mm cannon or a powerful 122mm howitzer.
      • The Tier 6 KV-2 (which also gets even more HP and an increase to reload speeds) gets the famed 152mm howitzer that gives it its Lethal Joke Character status, and the relatively accurate, high penetration 107mm turns it into an exceptional tank destroyer. There's also the same 122mm howitzer as the KV-1, which still packs quite a punch and reloads much more quickly than the 152mm.
    • The Luchs has a Leopard-style turret that allows the use of more powerful guns instead of rapid fire autocannons. The downside is that it's heavy enough to hinder the tank's agility somewhat.
    • The M4 Sherman has a 105mm howitzer upgrade that, at first glance, seems to be a poor tradeoff against the 76mm cannon that's also available. However, the 105, while slow loading, allows the Sherman to one-shot most light and some medium tanks, and will still deal effective damage against heavies.
    • Before 0.8.0, installing the Schmalturm and the 7.5cm L/70 on the Pz.Kpfw IV pretty much turned it into a tank destroyer, though its mobility suffered.
    • The infamous Hetzer can mount either a 7.5cm L/48 cannon which has moderate penetration and damage values but reloads quickly or a 10.5cm howitzer with an extremely slow reload time and mediocre accuracy, which can one-shot most light tanks and cause quite a bit of damage to even heavy tanks.
    • Putting the BL-10 gun on the ISU-152, which is otherwise merely average for its tier, turns it into a monster that can penetrate nearly every tank from any direction and deals huge amounts of damage.
    • The German VK 36.01 (H) has what is probably the most varied and flexible selection of guns of any tank. It can mount the rapid-fire 7.5cm L/58 Konisch, the Jack of All Stats mid-range 8.8cm L/56, the sniping oriented 7.5cm L/70, or the close range heavy hitting 10.5cm L/28.
    • The Aufklärungspanzer Panther light tanknote  offers a reliable and accurate 75mm conical gun and a somewhat random, but powerful 105mm HE gun. Whether you choose the ability to provide long range support or the ability to one-shot light tanks and excellent DPM at close ranges note  is up to you.
    • Skills and Perks, when mastered, can turn an ordinary crew into an extraordinary threat for the enemy.
  • Experience Points: They're used to research modules and to unlock the next tank. Crew members also have a separate experience stat, which increases their percentage of competence. Both are obtained through fighting battles.
  • Extreme Melee Revenge: It's surprisingly common to see light tanks who are harassing SPGs and TDs getting rammed, all the more appropriate since light tanks tend to destroy at least one of these assets before another tank comes to the rescue.
  • Every Bullet is a Tracer: Expert Artillery players can deliver counter-battery fire without the need for scouting just by watching very closely for shell trails.
  • Everything Fades: Averted. Tank carcasses stay on the battlefield and often serve as impromptu cover for other tanks. With the 0.6.4. patch, these can even be moved, albeit slowly, so you got yourself some mobile cover.
  • Every Tank Is A Ronson: While the results of a small tank meeting a giant HE shell may look impressive but realistic to a degree, heavy tank parts flying several meters away from a low-caliber AP round that didn't hit anything critical, and only exhausted the tank's HP...
  • Evil Twin:
    • The premium German-captured French tanks (Pz.Kpfws 38H, S35 and B2), all slightly different (and EVILLY GERMAN) to their normally-researched French counterparts.
    • Subverted by some units not having their true nation equivalent or name — the FCM36 Pak40 is a French premium TD despite technically being a German Marder I, and the Soviet Tetrarch has no British tree equivalent, though it was a British tank. Essentially evil twins with no good counterpart. The Lend-Lease Matilda and Churchill were this for a while, if only because the British tree didn't exist yet.
  • Fake Balance: The perception of this leads to arguments.
    • One of the main ways Wargaming balances tanks is by the amount of HP they poses, which doesn't actually change how the tank performs, just how much it can get hit.
  • Fluffy the Terrible: The Maus.
  • Follow the Leader:
    • Some of the French postwar designs show quite a lot of German and some Soviet influence, and nearly all of them use German engines directly and German guns with serial numbers filed off.
    • Chinese tanks from Tier 5 onwards tend to be either direct copies of Soviet designs or modified copies of Soviet designs. On the other hand, their Tier 1 to 4 tanks are a hodgepodge collection of tanks from 4 different countries with modified equipment.
    • After the success of World of Tanks, several other tank-driving multiplayer action games had been announced announced, such as Armored Warfare.
  • For Massive Damage:
    • Destroying a tank's ammo rack will result in the vehicle exploding with impressive pyrotechnics, regardless of its remaining health. As a bonus, this will also send the turret flying.
    • Artillery shells that hit the roof of a tank will generally penetrate and detonate inside, causing massive amounts of damage.
    • Getting set on fire is pretty painful for any tank, as the damage caused is percentage based.
  • Fragile Speedster:
    • Most light tanks. Can be extremely annoying due to their high speed, but are incredibly fragile — it's quite easy for heavier tanks to take them out and if they throw a track, they're practically always doomed. Artillery can also readily kill the light tank in a single hit or blow off their tracks, making them more vulnerable to follow up shots from other artillery or tanks.
    • The M18 Hellcat tank destroyer goes Up to Eleven since it set records as one of the fastest large AFVs of all time, easily reaching speeds of around 60 mph on good terrain, but only has 25mm armor at most on the front of the turretnote  in stock configuration, though its upgraded turret has much better armor. In-game, it's as fast as the T-50-2 and is capable of mounting a 90mm main gun.
      • It can be subverted if the Hellcat has the upgraded turret and is in a good hull-down position, allowing it to trade shots with even similar-tier heavy tanks and come out the winner.
    • The American T49 Tier 5 TD also qualifies.
    • The post-war period Gauls with Grenades (from Tier 5 onwards) take this trope and make sweet, sweet love to it. Their AMX 50 series heavies can outmaneuver large portions of the medium tanks of other nations, their light and medium tanks from the ELC AMX onward are blazing fast and all of them have autoloaders for their gun, letting them get off a lot of rounds before the enemy can return fire. However, if the enemy does manage to shoot back, they aren't going to last long.
    • The Panzer III medium tank is faster and more agile than some light tanks, but its armor is mediocre (aside from the 70mm-thick frontal hull armor) and their guns aren't much use against most heavier tanks.
  • Friendly Fireproof: Averted - misaimed shells, poorly aimed/timed artillery, sheer stupidity (driving into an ally's firing line) and plain bad luck are all possible ways to get shot by a team-mate. Deliberate team killing is discouraged by penalties and having too many incidents of friendly fire will cause you to be flagged as a team killer - which means you're a target for anyone in the battle.
  • Game Mod: For an online game, World of Tanks is surprisingly mod-friendly. Some of the mods are purely aesthetic, like tank skins, but a good number also supplement or enhance gameplay, like changing the default aiming reticule, improving zoom-out, giving a better sniper mode, or pinpointing the last-known position of an enemy tank. A rather infamous mod, XVM, tracks individual player performance, which it uses to predict the win chances of a team.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: The various "Epic" medals awarded to players for accomplishing difficult feats of skill are all named after real famous tank crewmen. Each medal has a brief history detailing the feat which made famous the person the medal is named after. Some of the medal requirements, however, aren't related to this history.
  • Gauls with Grenades: Came in patch 0.7.1. Also, 3 of their tanksnote  are available as premium tanks for the Germans. Generally, they are divided between pre-war tanks (as much armor as possible, at the expense of almost everything else) and post-war tanks (as much speed as possible, since Armor Is Useless).
  • Gentleman Snarker: Whomever is the author of the loading screen tips.
    Game tip: Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake. It's not polite! (It's worth noting that this particular tip was submitted by a fan for a contest, and was originally said by Napoleon Bonaparte.)
  • Giving the Sword to a Noob: Vehicle stats in the game can vary so much that advancing in vehicle tiers can force the player to use totally different tactics.
    • Especially rough with the Soviet heavy tree (the transfer from the T-28 to the exactly opposite KV), leading to a joke of "Buying a heavy tank in exchange for brains". Not quite as bad post-0.7.3.
    • Premium tanks in general, and especially the Tier 8 ones. There are no qualifications necessary to use these premium tanks beyond a sufficient amount of paid-for Gold.
      • Enhanced by the fact that all premium vehicles have greatly increased chance to be top tier present in battle. Therefore, these tanks will often be the top vehicle in a match, which are often far more powerful than those on the bottom. Good playing from the top will often ensure victory, while poor playing usually guarantees a loss, so a high level battle can end up in the hands of a player short on experience, but long on disposable income.
  • Glass Cannon:
    • SPGs. God help you if you get hit by an artillery shell, but god help them if you manage to get close and behind them.
    • Most Soviet Tank Destroyers are this, with the most extreme example being the Tier 8 ISU-152, which has no armour to speak of for its tier, but packs an absolutely devastating 152mm BL-10 gun, whose penetration and damage levels are only exceeded by Tier 10 TDs and high-tier artillery.
    • Before the gun was taken out in 0.7.5, the T-28 with an 85mm gun packed a substantial punch, but only had tissue paper for protection and was also an easy to hit target. There's a joke that T-28 tankers put up as many pictures of their loved ones, relatives and friends as possible with drawing pins to use as additional armour.
    • The US light tanks and the following M7 Medium have some of the best weapons for their tiers, but very low health and armor.
    • With the release of the French tanks, their Tier 5 to 8 light tanks, Tier 9 and 10 medium tanks, and Tier 8 to 10 heavy tanks are this. Their Tier 6 and 7 light tanks were built around the Panther's 7.5cm L/70, while the Tier 8 one up-guns it to a 90mm gun. Some of their high tier heavies are capable of unleashing a whopping 1800 points of damage in about a dozen seconds, which could potentially kill anything but a Tier 10. On the other hand, their armor is ridiculously thin for high tier heavies.
    • The US Tank Destroyers play with this trope frequently. The Tier 3 T82 is Glass Cannon incarnate, with nothing in the way of armor and a 105mm howitzer, which is typically a Tier 5 gun. The Tier 5 M10 Wolverine and Tier 6 M36 Slugger pretend to be Glass Cannons unless they're hull-down, at which point the sharply sloped 120mm thick gun mantlet takes over and they start bouncing nearly any round you can throw at them.
    • The British Alecto TD follows the same lines as the T82, with possibly even less armour despite being a tier higher. Only the guns-on-treads (UE57, UC 2pdr) have less.
    • Open-topped vehicles in general rarely have armor equal to their tier. Special mention, however, must go to those with fighting compartments open at the rear, like the Marder II and the SU-76. A single HE round into the open back will usually destroy them or at least wound most of their crew.
    • The 2nd German Tank Destroyer line features Waffenträger type vehicles, essentially artillery re-purposed for destroying tanks. The line offers, at best, 50mm of armor.
    • Literally with the American T110 series. In real life, the armor developed for the T110 contained layers of silica, which is... glass. Surprisingly, it turns out that the glass layer is actually quite effective against HEAT ammunition.
    • The Chinese Tier 10 113 heavy tank has a gun with a fast reload time and high alpha damage and does great damage per minute. It also has good mobility and a high top speed. However, it has very weak armor for a Tier 10 heavy.
    • The premium SU-100Y may claim the TD prize for this, as its outstanding 130mm naval cannon is offset by the vehicle being approximately the size of a house, with armour that can be easily penetrated by just about anything it could face.
    • Many Japanese medium tanks are this. They have excellent rapid fire guns and excel as DPS-Snipers but have rather thin armor.
  • Goomba Stomp: It's possible to jump down from a great height and crush an enemy tank. It's just a matter of having the hitpoints to spare and being heavier than the target.
  • Gradual Grinder: With very few exceptions, the clash of giant steel machines lives on this trope. Special mention goes to machine guns and autocannons, and to setting enemies on fire. Certain guns specialize in it too; ones such as the 6-pounder Mk. IIIA, ZiS-4 57mm and M1A2 76mm, though pretty hard-hitting at some tiers, soon become this. At high tiers, the 75mm L/100 and 88mm L/100 are this.
  • Griefer: Unlike Passive Griefers who go AFK when a match starts, Active Griefers will deliberately obstruct and undermine the team by shoving players out of cover, over cliffs, or into water. They will even try to damage and kill as many of them as possible with friendly fire. Being made a victim of friendly fire themselves is a given bonus.
  • Guide Dang It: World of Tanks is notable in that it doesn't have any kind of in-game guide, which means many of the important mechanics — like penetration, spotting distance, and camouflage — are left unexplained, leaving new players clueless on how to play smartly (which tends to lead to bad playing habits as said players move up the tiers). A patch added a tutorial, though it's been derided as a mediocre effort, since it only covers the bare basics and gives some sub-optimal advice (like hiding inside a bush instead of behind it, as the latter camouflages the tank better).
  • Half Truth:
    • Several tanks, especially low to mid tier German ones, have listed top speeds they can't reach even using their best engines; they can only reach it by going downhill.
      • A prime example of this is the French AMX 40, which has a listed top speed of 50km/h, that can be reached by going downhill. However, it weighs around 30 tons and its best engine only produces 190 h.p., so you're lucky if it can go over 20km/h half the time.
    • The listed tank stats dependent on crew skill, like rate of fire, were for 133% crew skill, not 100% crew skill. This was changed in the 0.7.2 patch.
    • Light tanks suffer from this trope quite a bit, as it so often happens where better modules (especially a new turret) weigh more, leaving you to wonder why your pimped-out Luchs drives like a slug when you expect it to dash like a greyhound.
    • Average Damage only tells you how much damage the selected gun can inflict with an Average Damage Roll. It doesn't tell you what the minimum and maximum damage output is.
    • For many tanks, the given armour thickness for each side is very close to being an outright lie. The cupola (the little dimple sticking out on top of the turret) is almost always less heavily armoured than the turret; in some cases, a non-apparent section of the tank (such as the lower hull) will be more weakly armoured than it appears. Inversely, some areas are actually more heavily armoured than they appear: gun mantlets are generally better protected than the turret facing they are mounted on, while some tanks boast "spaced armour" that can actually deflect shots and pre-detonate HE rounds before they hit the tank proper.
  • Hit-and-Run Tactics:
    • Most light tanks and the faster medium tanks do this when they aren't scouting.
    • Autoloader tanks do this a lot by necessity: pop out, fire off all the shells in the revolver cylinder within seconds and then hide for about half a minute to reload.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: The White Tiger (Der Weiße Tiger) events on the Russian Server. The titular Tiger has 14,960 hitpoints, uses the 8.8 cm L/56 which actually fires 15cm shells from the E-100's gun at the L/56's (faster) rate of fire. Its turning rate is a ridiculously high 460. It is only used in special events and is only pitted against fifteen T-34-85s. Head-on attack never works, but it is possible to set up an ambush, damage its tracks and shoot it from a distance using cover.
    • This tank has been added as a promotion of the movie The White Tiger in May of 2012. To the creators' surprise, players started killing it before they had time to add a description for the medal for destroying it. In the summer of 2012, the White Tiger was removed from the game, even the model was deleted from .pkg file.
  • I Call It Vera: External titles can be painted on the outside of any tank, some of which are names.
  • Ineffectual Loner: The game is team based, so if you see a lone friendly wander off, it's usually one of the following: a burden to the team, a suicide scout, or worst of all, your heaviest tank running right into the jaws of the enemy and yelling at you for not joining him in death. It rarely ends well for the loner in question.
    • For a really bad time, couple this with Suicidal Overconfidence, where the vast majority of the team overloads one flank. In this case the Ineffectual Loner isn't ineffective by choice; he's the one who's noticed the manpower issue, pointed it out and been ignored. The horde is usually wiped out or bogged down despite numerical superiority, and the Ineffectual Loner prepares for a gruesome end (if it hasn't happened already).
  • Instant-Win Condition: Maps can be won either by base capture or wiping out the enemy team. Usually, some variation of the latter is required to do the former, but sometimes a brave group can bypass the entire map/battle and simply capture the enemy base while the enemy team has charged ahead without any thought of defence.
    • The Assault game mode makes the bypass method rarely possible as one team is spawned on top of it to defend while the other spawns across the map to assault it. The objectives of Assault are also laid out in a way that the defending team can win just by having 1 surviving "defending" tank and the attacking team hasn't completed a capture yet. Even with 99%, they lose.
  • Invisible Wall:
    • Before 0.8.0, tanks were glued to the ground and you couldn't fall off a cliff — your tank just stopped moving and occasionally got stuck. When the physics model came out of development, these disappeared from the maps, producing rude surprises for anyone who forgot and tried to rely on them. Given the attitude of some players, though, this may have just created a new unofficial award for the most creative suicide leap. Speaking of the latter, apparently, a lot people dreamed of falling from the previously blocked bridge on Westfield.
    • There's also a barrier around the map boundaries, marked by a red line.
  • International Tank Gunnery Courses:
    • Low-competence crews perform worse than crews with higher competence. This, along with the game-determined gun dispersion, can lead to gunners repeatedly missing shots at any range. Highly skilled crews, on the other hand, can demonstrate Improbable Aiming Skills.
    • The regular "arcade" targeting reticule is notoriously inaccurate at point-blank range, which can lead to missing shots when your gun is literally touching the enemy tank. It's even possible to shoot over the top of a tank that's taller than yours!
  • In the Back: Most tanks have their strongest armor on the front and the weakest on the rear and the top. Shooting a tank in the back is also more likely to set it on fire, since the engine and fuel tanks are usually placed there. The rare aversions are usually heavy tanks designed for assaults on fortified positions.
  • Invisibility: Hiding in the bushes will drastically reduce your visibility range. Well-hidden TDs can be a pain to spot and a well-geared one in a patch of bushes can only be revealed by almost bumping into it.
  • Jack of All Stats:
    • Medium tanks in a nutshell, being the most balanced — some, like the T-34, put an emphasis on speed but are still outpaced by light tanks, while the Panther line concentrates on heavy guns and armor, though not to the same degree as the heavies. Best used as escorts, giving additional firepower to other classes, or as "wolfpacks", groups of mediums that swarm any opposition.
      • Within the mediums, the American line seem to be the best examples, as they have useful guns and decent armor in addition to being passably fast and maneuverable, as opposed to the more specialized lines of other countries.
    • American tanks in general seem to be an entire nation of Jacks. Their guns are less accurate (unless shooting while moving) but deal more damage than the Germans, and are more accurate but deal less damage than the Russians. They are also faster and more fragile than either of them, but not to the extent of the later-tier French tanks.
  • Katanas of the Rising Sun: Released in patch 8.10, Japanese tanks are mid-range flankers/DPS snipers with good terrain handling, superb elevation and depression, decent mobility, and guns that prioritise handling and rate of fire at the expense of penetration and per-shot damage. They pay for all these advantages by sucking at everything else, and in particular having armour that makes paper look durable.
  • Kill It with Fire: No flamethrower tanks, but being set on fire ranks up there as one of the' worst ways to die, as it slowly erodes your tank's health, damages random modules and more often than not cooks off your ammo. It can be done by destroying the fuel tank or damaging the engine. Even worse, fire damage is percentage-based, meaning that burning a Leichtraktor and a Maus to death takes the same amount of time.
    • The 0.6.4 patch rectified this, as the amount of damage the fire does decreases over time until it is put out and the fire extinguisher consumables put out the fire immediately, instead of just increasing the chance the fire is put out.
  • Last Stand: Occurs every now and then because of the victory conditions. Sometimes, as soon as most of the enemies are down, most of the team rushes towards the enemy HQ one by one. Just one defending heavy tank or even SPG can take this to Conservation of Ninjutsu levels impossible in a normal firefight, sometimes making it to a stalemate or even a victory.
  • Leaked Experience: Even without spending Gold to transfer experience, 5% of any experience gained in battle is given as "Free Experience", which can be spent to upgrade any tank, as opposed to being limited to the tank that earned it.
  • Lethal Joke Tank:
    • The KV-2 exemplifies this trope: It can be armed with the same 122mm gun as the KV-1 or a new 107mm gun, which bites quite hard, but slows the tank down. The third option KV-2 players can take, however, is the infamous 152mm howitzer - a gun known among the fandom as the "derpgun" or the "trollcannon" for its abysmal accuracy, incredibly lengthy reload time - and truly ridiculous damage with HE shells, dealing noticeable damage to even Tier 10 tanks and described by the game's own wiki as strong enough to send "the tank on the receiving end of the shell ... off the map and hurled into the sun". Absolutely suicidal to venture out alone with and so must be played in a support role, or in a platoon of three (which is at least as terrifying as a KV-1S platoon). Still, if you want a good laugh and the chance to put the fear of the Random Number God into the enemy team, this is the tank to grab.
    • The KV-1S "Sport" doesn't gain any extra armor when upgrading from the KV-1, unlike the T-150 or KV-2. Its armor is actually thinner, it doesn't have the awesome 107 mm cannon, and the health boost is barely noticeable. However, it's lighter, faster and its turret turns about as fast as a medium tank's. It also has access to the 122mm D-2-5T, which has amazing alpha damage at the expense of rate-of-fire and accuracy, making the tank an excellent city brawler.
      • Cue the collective Oh Crap from players on the other team when they see three KV-1Ss with the 122mm in a platoon. On its own, a 1S isn't much of a threat if you know how to beat it. Facing three with the 122mm at once ends about as well as someone sentenced to death by firing squad, as three combined 122mm shots can even make Tier 8 tanks (the highest tank a KV-1S can face with current match making) cringe as they can only fire off one shot to that platoon's three, if they even survive the first salvo.
    • The T57 is the first US SPG. Typically, SPGs are slow, poorly-armored and ineffective at close range. However, the T57's speed, armor and weaponry are on par with Tier 3 TDs and better than any tank in its tier, being a nasty surprise for anyone who expected an easy kill.
    • The T18 is the first US TD. It has 51mm of frontal armor, equivalent to or better than many tanks two or three tiers higher, and access to a Tier 4 howitzer, making it the terror of recruit matches.
    • Then there's the T-28, which is about as big as the Motherland, meaning it's rubbish at hiding, though it's surprisingly fast for its size. Initially, it's armed with a pretty pathetic short barreled 76mm close support cannon. With wafer thin armor, it's not going to last too long against its more well-armored contemporaries, but, once it gets a proper engine and the long barreled 57mm ZiS-4, it quickly becomes a Glass Cannon quite capable of punching out higher tier tanks.
    • The M3 Lee, combining the downsides of medium tanks and TDs and the good sides of neither, is widely mocked, ridiculed and hated by American medium tank drivers because of its massive profile, lack of a rotating turret and tendency to get killed by almost anything. However, it has very strong front armor for its tier and upgrades to a very fast-firing high-penetration gun that is capable of shredding even Tier 6 tanks that aren't paying attention.
    • The AMX 40, also (un)affectionately known as "The Duck", a Tier 4 French light tank with acceleration slower than most heavy tanks, a rather piddly gun... and armor equivalent to the KV-1 with completely retarded amounts of sloped armor. Place it in a Tier 3-4 match and watch as every shot that goes towards your general direction bounce off.
    • The ELC AMX, which has virtually no armor, terrible aiming time, matchmaking that will always pit it against higher tier opponents, and a turret that can't turn more than a few degrees left and right. However, it is among the smallest tanks in the game, with a profile so low that some tanks are incapable of depressing their guns low enough to actually hit it at point blank range. It is also very fast, with a maximum speed limit is 65 km/h and an incredible power-to-weight ratio of 37 hp/t when fully upgraded. In contrast to preceding French tanks, it also has a great selection of guns: though slow to load, its top 90mm gun is easily one of the most powerful weapons available to any light tank. In the right hands, it can be a devilish nuisance if you stop trying to play it like a tank and start playing it more like a "Go-Kart with a Gun" (as it's been affectionately called).
    • The British TOG II* premium heavy tank. It tends to get mocked by everyone on both teams in a match and has been dubbed "Train", "Boat" or "Whale". It's painfully slow, comically large (longer than the Maus) and its armour is totally inadequate for it's tier. However, its 80 ton bulk makes trying to ram it suicidal, 1400 hitpoints—double the Churchill III's health—allows it to absorb ridiculous amounts of damage, and it mounts the deadly OQF 17 Pounder Mk.VII, with very good accuracy, excellent Ro F and very good damage. Late game, it can go on enormous rampages, considering most tanks it will encounter will be injured by the time it reaches them.
      • Given it's immense weight and length, a TOG turned sideways on a bridge or other chokepoint can completely seal off avenues of attack to the enemy by becoming an almost-immobile piece of scenery, a tactic dubbed "TOG-blocking".
      • A well-coordinated platoon of three TOG II*s is a Lethal Joke Team. Between them, the three could have more hit points than the rest of their team combined, allowing them to shrug off attacks while throwing out enough firepower to practically vapourize anything they meet as they move towards the enemy flag at a casual stroll.
    • The American "T40" Tank destroyer is a slower, slightly more durable T82 with a massive gaping hole on top that just screams "KILL ME!" It's also a Tank Destroyer with a gun 2 tiers above it's own, naturally faster firing due to being open topped, and happens to have an abnormally large view range and traverse. Combined with its standard TD Camo and competent players, this generally results in an invisible spotter killing your scouts before they can see anything.
    • The humble Cruiser II, a Tier III British light tank. Not too many people play it, as most prefer the Cruiser IV's tree. It's slow, its armor isn't very strong, its starting gun is average and it doesn't have a ton of HP. However, it can equip the 3.7 inch Howitzer, a cannon firing tooth-loosening HE rounds that can annihilate almost any other tank of its Tier in a single shot. Get one or two kills in a match this way and people will begin to approach you a bit more cautiously or avoid you altogether. Faster tanks might attempt to close the distance and attack, but this usually winds up lethal to all parties involved. To give an idea of how powerful this gun is at this level, you find it on the Cruiser II's Tier VI cousins, the Cromwell and the Churchill VII.
  • Level Grinding: Mostly limited to the higher tier tanks, where the XP and credit gain doesn't quite scale to their costs.
  • Level Scaling: For the most part, you only get matched with tanks around the tier of the tank you're using.
  • Lightning Bruiser:
    • The American T25 AT and German JagdPanther are this at the cost of lacking turrets.
    • The high-end medium tanks such as the T-54, the E-50 and the M46 Patton, are fast, relatively well-armoured and pack a massive punch.
    • The KV-13 medium tank combines the heavy armor of the KV series and the speed of the T-34 series.
    • The American M3 Stuart light tank is often a player's first introduction to a Lightning Bruiser; it's one of the fastest and most durable tanks in its tier, and is actually tougher to kill than its larger but same-tier cousin, the M2 Medium. It also packs a respectable punch, though not quite as much as a fully-upgraded M2 Medium.
    • The German E-75 heavy tank is surprisingly agile for its size, packs insane amounts of armor on the front and has a Tier 10 gun that hits quite hard and is rather accurate.
    • The French FCM 50t premium heavy tank has a top speed of 51 km/h, a 1000 h.p. engine that allows it to accelerate quickly and extremely good steering. It is armed with the potent 90mm DCA 45 and has a good armour layout, unlike most other late-tier French tanks.
  • The Load: People who queue for a match then go AFK simply to get XP and Credits for being in the match. Stock tanks, which are almost universally terrible, are usually this as well even with skilled players, especially at higher tiers. Chronically inaccurate artillery and scouts who don't can take it up to levels of The Millstone. Anyone deliberately trying to pull a One Tank Army usually isn't going to be much help either.
  • Made of Bouncinium: Tanks with sloped armor are more likely to deflect shots, and deflected AP shots do 0 damage, so some tanks seem tougher than their stats would have you believe.
    • There is a considerable Hate Dom for the T-54 as well as its Chinese knockoff, the Type 59, because of their ridiculously well-sloped frontal armor, which takes this trope Up to Eleven and makes their survivability more akin to that of a heavy tank a tier higher. Most tanks switch off to HE ammunition to chip away at their health rather than hope that their AP rounds will do anything but deflect off armor that is half as thick as their gun's penetration range, If only its turret is exposed, its 200mm thick sloped armor makes it almost completely invulnerable to anything but a direct artillery hit.
    • The E-75, a Tier 9 German heavy tank, is a nasty surprise for anyone going up against one frontally. Normally, the machine gun mount, the driver's viewport and the lower glacis plate are easily penetrated by most guns. The E-75 lacks all of those weakspots and sports a flat, featureless front. The various viewports and the commander's cupola are hard to hit, the armor is very thick and well-sloped, and even the lower glacis plate and the upgraded turret's frontal armor rivals the US heavy tanks at 252mm-thick armor. A properly-angled E-75 can reliably bounce shots even from Tier 10 guns.
    • The Indien-Panzer's front and sides are highly resistant to point-blank shots from the Tiger II's gun.
    • The Tier 4 French "light" tank, the AMX 40, has well-sloped 70-80mm thick armor, which is thicker than its equivalent tier heavy tank. Now factor in that most early guns in the game can only penetrate around 50-60mm thick armor. Some people have already started to refer to the AMX 40 as the Tier 4 Maus.
      • A little explanation to understand just how well-armored it is: this tank easily gets the "Steel Wall" award for absorbing thrice its total health in damage and surviving. It often happens without any actual damage to its hitpoints.
    • The infamous Tier 9 T95 American tank destroyer has 305mm of armor, more than even the Maus. However, this still does not explain it's unnatural tendency to make ARTILLERY SHELLS go "DING!"
    • The Tier 7 and up American heavy tanks are like this on their turret; more due to their thickness rather than their shape. Even AP rounds from Tier 10 guns do nearly nothing. While their hull armor is weak by comparison, putting one of these tanks hull down can and will let them No Sell much of the enemy team.
    • As well, there is a medal for bouncing 10 or more shots in a row (not non-penetrations, but outright ricochets) called Cool-Headed. This is ridiculously easy to achieve when you have, say, Pz.Kpfw. I Ausf. Cs who don't know better engaging any French medium or heavy it encounters, or a British Matilda. As can be imagined, the machinegun spam is virtually harmless even when it hits.
    • When added in 8.4, the British TDs from tier 5 on up (excepting the Tier 10 FV215b (183), which is a whole other story) will be just about the best armored vehicles of their tier, bar none. The Tier 5 AT-2 alone has 203mm frontal armor, and good side and rear armor that's at least 100mm thick!
    • The premium gift-only BT SV is ridiculous for the fact that it is immune to any tank that can't use a high-power medium caliber gun.
    • The Pz.Kpfw. II Ausf. J has 80mm frontal armor which allows it to attack other light tanks head on without any worry of penetration. That's right, it's a Tier 3 Premium "light" tank with armor to put Tier 5 and 6 heavy tanks to shame. No wonder they've kept it so rare.
    • The Matilda II really lives up to its legendary reputation of being immune to any gun that is smaller than a short-barreled 75mm or a long-barreled 57mm.
  • Made of Explodium: The T-44, T-54 and Type 59 are infamous for this since their ammo racks are spread throughout the tank, making it much easier to get a One-Hit Kill should a shot penetrate their armor.
  • Magic Tool: Your repair kit can instantly repair any damaged module. Medkits work the same way.
  • Magikarp Power:
    • Amazingly, every vehicle except most Tier 10s and the premium tanks work like this. You need to earn and buy a lot of upgrades to make them killing machines. For many tanks, this means a gun upgrade. A vehicle can go from laughing stock to legitimate threat, or even borderline overpowered, just by moving up to the next gun. German tanks and tank destroyers often require engine upgrades as well, since the stock engines tend to be really underpowered.
    • Perks operate this way, usually providing some great benefit (like Sixth Sense revealing if you are spotted) but do so only when 100% complete; having no benefit at anything less than 100%.
  • Meta Game: World of Tanks is interesting in that the variety of servers (and lack of mobility between servers - you can't transfer accounts) means that drastically different gameplay styles have evolved on each.
    • The RU Russian servers are by far the most populated - Players prefer very aggressive tactics along with high caliber 'derp' howitzers.
    • The EU Western European servers are defined by mostly a lack of communication, due to the varying languages (with German and Polish being the most common) - Players prefer lots of heavy tanks and some tank destroyers, since they are generally the least team dependent.
    • The NA North American servers (basically America and Canada) are very lightly populated and thus features a more average player base - NA generally has more light tanks, mediums, and artillery per capita than the other servers, combat is generally very campy.
    • The SEA Oceania server doesn't really have its own meta - It is sparsely populated and primarily features locals who either don't understand much of the game or transferred back from other servers (a couple of one-time events after the server was established) for the reduced ping, and international players who make a separate account for relatively easy battles.
  • Mighty Glacier: Generally, any tank is either this or a Lightning Bruiser if it is the highest tier tank in the match.
    • Heavy Tanks in general. Yes, they are slow as hell and easy to hit, but those hits will hardly scratch the paint. Special mention go to the Tier 9 and 10 heavy tanks, especially the Maus and its cousin, the E-100.
      • The KV-5 should also be given a special mention: while its gun is relatively weak and it's slow at pretty much everything, it has truly ridiculous amounts of mass and armor for a Tier 8 tank. Skilled players have been known to drive this tank backwards as well, as its rear is in some ways more armored than its front.
      • The TOG II* is considered the king of this trope, given that it is ridiculously slow; 14km/h and it will NOT go faster. TOG drivers have to carefully select where to go with their tank, otherwise they risk being miles away from the action. That said, even though their armor is actually crap, it has an incredibly huge HP pool (rivaling heavies TWO tiers higher than it) and a powerful, rapidfire gun.
    • Possibly the best known Mighty Glacier is the Tier 2 French Hotchkiss H35/German premium Pz.Kpfw 38H 735 (f) light tank (they're pretty much the same tank). Armed with a decent gun and sporting insane amounts of armor for its tier, it is mostly immune to the other tanks around its tier, including other Hotchkisses.
    • The American Tier 9 tank destroyer, the T95, sports almost impenetrable frontal armor, a 155mm main gun that can destroy over half the tanks in the game with a single shot and has a top speed of only 13km/h, which is slower than a Maus going in reverse.
    Tankmen's Novels: Guys, you're not actually moving, the tracks are turning the planet beneath you!
    • Nearly all the French tanks below Tier 5 are this.
    • The Tier 8 British TD, the AT 15, has excellent frontal armor with minimal weakspots and good all-around armor. It also has a very accurate and quick-aiming gun, one of the most accurate in the game, with a fast rate of fire that does decent damage. However, its speed is comparable with the Maus.
  • Military Mashup Machine:
    • The Maus is one of the few Real Life examples of the Land Battleship version of this trope.
    • The T95 bounced between "Gun Motor Carriage" or a "Superheavy Tank". It fits neither description and actually doesn't fit anywhere in the US Army.
    • The IS-7 and SU-100Y, while not examples, receive honorable mentions because of their 130mm cannon, which was originally for naval use. The US T29 and T34 heavy tanks and T30 tank destroyer also receive honorable mentions, as they are able to mount naval rangefinders (that need a lot of space) on their already enormous turrets.
  • More Dakka: As a general rule of thumb, any weapon below 57mm isn't going to rely on damage dealt in a single hit, it's going to rely on damage dealt over time. All weapons below 37mm (and including one that is) are automatic cannons.
    • Tier 1 to 3 tanks often have an autocannon that fires barrages instead of a single shell as an option. The fastest firing ones are the machine guns available for some tanks, which shoot about twice as fast as their nearest competitors. Don't expect these popguns to do anything more than annoy Tier 3 or higher tanks, however.
    • The T-34 with a 57mm cannon, the Rammer equipment and an experienced loader is a goddamn buzzsaw.
    • American mid-tier tanks seem to have been designed around one simple question - "how fast can we make this 76mm gun fire?" The answer is "very."
    • The 6-pdr gun mounted on many British (or British-derived in the case of the Ram-II) and some American tanks, and its smaller 2-pdr cousin, are capable of spewing forth huge numbers of shells in a short time.
    • The German 7.5cm L/100 has a rate of fire around double that of other guns in its tier.
    • French tanks take this trope to the extreme throughout their entire tree.
      • Even their Tier 1 tank, the Renault FT-17, can equip itself with the 13.2 mm Hotchkiss mle. 1930, a machine gun that can shoot upwards of 680 rounds per minute. That's so fast, it spends almost as much, if not slightly more, time reloading as it does shooting.
    • Japanese guns tend to have very fast rates of fire compared to similar caliber and tiered guns of other nations. Some can out-DPS autoloaders.
  • Mook Horror Show: When the top of one team's list meets the bottom of the other team's list. Averted if the lower tier tank manages to cripple the high tier one, or escapes.
  • Multi-Track Drifting: At high speeds, it's possible to do a power slide.
  • Names to Run Away From Really Fast/Theme Naming: Inherited from the Real Life versions.
    • The animal names, generally big catsnote  of German tanks. Also, Panzerkampfwagen. Exception: The Maus.
    • The Russian Iosif Stalin and Kliment Voroshilov tanks.
    • The Lee, Stuart, Sherman, Pershing and Patton tanks.note 
    • Averted quite hard with the French BS self-propelled gun. Whether or not the tank is "BS" because it's good or bad varies heavily, though.
  • Nazis with Gnarly Weapons: You get to drive some of the gnarliest in history, including the famous Tiger, King Tiger and Panther tanks, as well as the Maus, the heaviest tank ever built.
  • Never Split the Party: Even the heaviest tanks will go down to concentrated fire. Aside from scouts, going lone-wolf will just get you killed very quickly (and even scouts often work in groups and with artillery support).
  • New Roman Legions: Averted. Wargaming felt that Italy didn't have enough content to justify being included in the game.
  • Nigh-Invulnerability:
    • The gimmick of the American T29 and T34 heavy tanks and T30 tank destroyer is that their turret armor is some of the heaviest armor in the game. Of course, the hull of the tank isn't quite so heavily armored...
    • High tier tank destroyers tend to have incredible amounts of armor, including the infamous T95, which is capable of dinging some artillery shells.
    • After the 0.6.4 patch, the armor of the Maus is able to absorb several penetrating, definitely damaging hits without any harm.
  • No One Should Survive That: Crew members never die, they only get injured and can be brought back into action either by using a medkit or by finishing the battle. The thing is, this means they can survive ammo rack detonations or catching a 152mm AP shell with their skull.
    • Which is weird, considering that in the English version, your crew shouts "The gunner is dead, somebody get on the gun!" or "The loader bought the farm." or "The commander is dead, we can´t see what´s going on." when a crew member is hit. Also, if all of your crew members die, the tank is considered to be "knocked out".
  • No Sell: Every shot is governed by a Penetration Roll which is affected by the gun, the ammo type, distance from target, thickness and angle of the armor face. Trying to snipe with a small gun is very much a futile gesture that will only give away your position.
    Crew Member: Bounced off!
  • No Swastikas: The rules on creating tank skins say that no swastikas are allowed, and anytime you see a piece of statuary that would logically have one, the space where it would be is left empty, or uses traditional German colours or logos such as the Balkenkreuz. Even then, the bowdlerized German army symbols often cause an inquiry from the moderators.
  • Off the Chart: Players on the RU server have taken to categorizing the effectiveness of certain tanks based on win rate averages, one of their findings was that a very rare gift tank called the Pz. II Ausf. J, which was commonly decried as OP, was actually far more OP than anyone realized (blue represents player w/r while green represents average tank specific w/r at any given player w/r) [1].
  • Ominous Crawl: You often have no hope of survival if you're cornered by a much heavier tank. Since you don't have anywhere to run, they'll move slowly to retain accuracy. High tier TDs also like doing this, though some don't really have a choice.
  • One Bullet Left:
    • You get an Epic Achievement Medal called "Fadin's Medal" for killing the last enemy with your last round.
    • When your gun takes half a minute to reload and costs as much as a low tier tank to shoot - you should assume that this will be your last shot and you should as much damage as possible.
  • One-Hit Kill:
    • Ammo rack detonations, which cause you to die instantly, regardless of how much health you had beforehand.
      • Several Russian tanks and the Type 59 are quite prone to this, as they normally store their ammo in easy to hit places. Purchasing the Wet Ammo Rack equipment is almost considered a necessity.
    • Howitzers can cause this when they fully penetrate armor - when they don't penetrate, they do only a percentage of their full damage, but when they do penetrate, God help you. For example, the infamous 152mm "derp" gun on the KV-2 does over 900 damage. Needless to say, you really don't want to get hit by it, even if you're higher tier.
  • One-Hit Polykill: Possible with HE rounds, though very unlikely, as it requires your targets to be right next to each other. Pulling this off earns you a Title of Honor, Bombardier.
    • Somewhat more possible with SPGs, as their HE rounds can splash a wide area. Some of the top-tier SPGs using premium ammo have a 13+ meter blast radius and can deal enough damage to kill Tier 8 and 9 vehicles, especially if they're already wounded.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted and subverted quite often.
    • The Russian T-34 (Tier 5 medium) and American T34 (Tier 8 heavy) are two vastly different tanks that happen to have almost the same name. Similarly, the American T28 (2 different Tier 8 TDs) and the Russian T-28 (Tier 4 medium), the American M4 Sherman (Tier 5 medium) and the French AMX M4 (Tier 7 heavy) or the American T54E1 and the Russian T-54 (both are Tier 9 mediums).
    • The T-34 and T-34-85; the second one being an upgrade of the vanilla T-34 and has a very similar appearance, while being far more dangerous. The Chinese tree adds the Type T-34, the T-34-1 and the T-34-2 to the mix, only the first of which is actually related to the Russian one.
    • The KV family: The KV-1, KV-2, KV-3, KV-4 and KV-5 are known as the slowest tanks in the game (the price for heavy armour) that even SPGs can outrun. Players with the much faster KV-1S and KV-13 abuse this usual misconception to their advantage.
    • Also the IS series: IS-1/2 (Russian version can be either, Chinese version is -2 only), IS-3, IS-4, IS-5 (an IS-1/2 with a 100mm gun), IS-6, IS-7 and IS-8.
    • The Americans have the Tier 2 M2 Light and T2 Light, a Tier 2 T2 Medium and a Tier 3 M2 Medium. There's also a T1 Cunningham and a T1 Heavy, though these are unlikely to be mistaken for each other. Also, the M7 Priest SPG and the M7 Medium, as well as the M3 Stuart light tank and the M3 Lee medium tank.
      • The Sherman family consists of the M4, M4A2E4, M4A3E2 and M4A3E8.
      • There are also 2 drastically different tanks with the designation T57: A Tier 2 SPG and a Tier 10 heavy tank with an autoloader.
      • They also have two tanks named after General Patton, the M46 and M48A1.
    • Of Germany's six available heavies, three are Tigers. They also have three VK 30.01 medium tanks, Pz.Kpfw 38 light tanks and JagdPanther TDs. Then two of their medium tanks and one of their light tanks are Panthers while two of their medium tanks and one of their light tanks are also Leopards. There is also the E-50 and the E-50 Ausf. M.
    • The French have the AMX50/100, AMX50/120 and the AMX50B. Then they have the AMX13/75 and the AMX13/90.
    • The British have four Cruisers, three Vickers Mediums, three Churchills and two Centurions.
  • Parabolic Power Curve: The Credit gain per fight reaches its peak at Tiers 6-8, and later tanks are usually not profitable unless played extremely well.
  • Pintsized Powerhouse:
    • High tier light tanks in general. They may look petty and harmless at first glance, but all of them can ruin someone's day if driven well, even if they're in a high tier heavy.
    • The French Tier 8 light tank, the AMX 13/90, weighs only about 13 tons (hence the name), is almost as fast and maneuverable as the T-50-2 and, thanks to its revolver auto-loader, is capable of unleashing 1400 points of damage in less than 12 seconds, which is enough to kill a Tier 7 heavy.
    • The Chinese Tier 7 and 8 light tanks, the WZ-131 and the WZ-132, have pretty powerful guns (stronger then several equivalent tier medium tanks' guns), strong armor and a decent HP pool for light tanks.
  • Play Every Day: The first winning match of the day in each tank gives doubled XP. Some special events increase this, tripling or even quintupling the XP gained.
  • PVP Balanced:
    • Maps based on real-life locations are modified to make both sides equal.
    • The terrifying Game Breaker of the Recruit battles (Tiers 1 and 2), the AT-1, is a tank killer often delivering One Hit Kills to most enemies, and is also very well-armored and agile for its tier; its only major downside being the reload time for its gun. In real life, its 76mm cannon variant was semi-automatic.
    • The T-34-85 had its 100mm gun removed due to this, despite the real one successfully passing tests.
    • There are lots of people who believe that Russian tanks perform better than their American and German counterparts, the T-54 only being part of it, to the point of the game's balance being reduced to a joke at the expense of the development team.
  • Politically Correct History:
    • American tank crews can be of mixed race. While African-Americans did serve in tanks, particularly in the 761st Tank Battalion, there were no mixed-race units and the American military was still segregated during WWII. Fridge Logic suggests, however, since many of the high-tier tanks are post-war designs, the game itself is not meant to strictly restrict itself to the World War II era and therefore doesn't need to worry about segregation.
    • In an inversion, Wargaming has not added Russian female tank crew - they may have been rare compared to the men, but significant numbers of them still saw combat, and some, like Alexandra Samusenko and Maria Oktyabrskaya, showed the men a thing or two about bravery. It may be due to the fact that they would require a completely separate list of names.
  • Popular History: While some maps are based off real battlegrounds and all the vehicles are real, match setups make little to no sense in terms of time periods.
    • However, averted by some enthusiasts playing historical setups in custom matches.
    • There is also an official Historical Battle mode, with its own balancing and restrictions on tanks and modules.
  • Random Number God: Every shot is governed by a Penetration Number Roll and a Damage Number Roll. The shot bounces if the Penetration Roll is too low and unlucky players tend to get Low Damage Rolls most of the time. There is also a Critical Damage Roll depending on where the vehicle gets shot.
    • The best indication of a player being mocked by the RNG is when they point-blank a shell into an enemy tank and it only causes Critical Damage. (Example: A 90mm AP shell from a BDR G1 B only injures the commander of an AMX 40 with the Stock Turret which only has 70mm Front Armor.)
    • The BL-10 "Trollcannon" seems to be the personal favorite of the RNG. When a gun with 286mm of penetration bounces off the front of a vehicle with less than a third of that armor, or misses at very close range despite having been perfectly aimed at the target, you know that the RNG is screwing with you big time.
    • The KV-1S is also adversely affected by the RNG as shown by QuickyBaby: The 122mm gun tends to deviate, bounce, and get low Damage Rolls from time to time. Even with Gold Ammo.
  • Rare Vehicles: Some tanks only existed in blueprints, other had a few prototypes made. More than two Maus or a single Panther IInote  or E-100note ? That's more than ever actually existed.
    • A real life as well as in-game example is the Pz.Kpfw. II Ausf. J, which is available only via a special code that can only be purchased from the Russian server. It's a Tier 3 light tank with 80 millimeters of armor, rivaling even Tier 5 and 6 heavy tanks.
  • Reds with Rockets: Featuring the T-34, the KV-2, the T-54 and the IS-4.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: Some French tanks have revolver cylinder based reloading systems, allowing for a higher rate of fire, at the cost of a painfully slow (20-30 seconds is fast) reload when empty . The 8.2 patch added an American line of revolver-loader tanks, which tend to have a lower magazine capacity, drastically faster reload times and more armor than their French counterparts.
  • RPG Elements: Players are awarded Credits and XP at the end of each battle, with the amounts determined by the player's performance. Additionally, the crew members of a tank gain skill according to experience earned, and on hitting 100% competence can unlock further specializations, including increased repair speed or view range, among other things.
  • Schmuck Bait:
    • No matter how tempting it is to shoot the giant turret of the KV-5 or any US heavy tank, the most harm your shot will do is throw off his aim. Even shots from high-tier guns will have a decent chance of simply bouncing off.
    • Putting all your efforts into shooting a Maus (or another top-tier tank) when other, more vulnerable enemy vehicles are around is also not the brightest idea.
    • Enemy scouts often turn into this when nobody is specifically defending the artillery, since the entire team will waste time chasing them around, getting forced out of position for the enemy's main attack while being lit up for enemy artillery the entire time. Higher-tier scouts occasionally survive as well, adding insult to injury.
  • Scratch Damage: HE rounds are this if the foe has thick armor. Ricochets with these rounds are a rare occurrence, but the damage will be barely noticeable.
  • Shaggy Search Technique: Combat is often initiated by frontline (and usually suicide) scouts stumbling upon the enemy, and if the enemy is low-profile and/or a tank destroyer, they're usually discovered at ramming distance.
  • Shoddy Knockoff Product:
    • The Type 59 (a Chinese copy of the T-54) is not just a tier weaker than the original, it's widely considered less threatening than the equivalent tier T-44: it's heavier, has a weaker engine, carries less ammo and even the radio is obsolete for its tier.
    • There's also the Type 62, an even lighter Tier 7 light tank also based on the T-54.
  • Shoot The Fuel Tank: A legitimate tactic, especially against heavier opponents. Destroying the fuel tanks will immediately set the tank on fire.
  • Shooting Superman: Played straight with less experienced players, who often blast away uselessly at the frontal armor of higher tier tanks. Averted with experienced players, who will shoot weak spots and tracks or retreat.
  • Short-Range Long-Range Weapon: All tanks can only engage slightly beyond the maximum sight range of 500 meters, while their real life counterparts can do so from much, much further away. For example, the Tiger I with the 8.8cm L/56 can knock out an M4 Sherman at 2,000 yards/1,828.8 meters head on, which is about double the length/width (1,000 meters) of the largest maps in-game. The same goes for artillery, the lower tier versions of which are incapable of covering a map that spans 1,000 meters by 1,000 meters at the most, while even the lightest real-life self-propelled artillery could rain shells at ranges well beyond 10 kilometers.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Signature Cannon: Some of the cannons are exclusive to a tank - or just mostly used on on it. These weapons are often given nicknames or are just called after that tank.
    • The most renowned is the 152mm howitzer of the KV-2 (see Lethal Joke Tank above), better known as the "derpgun".
    • Another renowned 152mm weapon is the BL-10 gun (aka the "Trollcannon") used by the ISU-152 and Object 704. Tends to be associated with the former, though, and it's the reason why an ISU-152 is a thing to fear even in a Tier 10 game.
    • The 17cm weapon on the Jagdpanzer E100 turns it into the mighty "Kaiju Jaegeru". It used to be called the Death Star before the FV215b (183) came along and introduced the nightmarish 183mm gun with its ultra-high penetration HE shells.
    • The 8.8 cm KwK36 L/56 and KwK43 L/71, while used by many other German tanks, are commonly known as the "Tiger cannon".
    • The Americans have the 105mm SPH M4L23, which is a signature weapon of their entire medium line after the Lee - Every American medium tank from the M4 Sherman onwards (aside from the T69, T54E1 and M48A1 Patton) can mount it.
    • The VK 36.01 (H)(and with patch 8.5, the Aufklarerpanzer Panther) have the unique 7.5cm KwK41 L/58 Konisch gun.
    • French Tier 6-9 heavies are capable of mounting the 90mm DCA 45 (essentially a French version of the German 8.8cm L/71). Average damage, very good penetration, cheap shells, fast rate of fire and completely devastating when coupled with a auto-loader. It is also the gun used on the Tier 8 FCM 50t premium heavy tank.
    • The Alecto, the Tier 4 British TD, gets a unique 25-pounder gun-howitzer that isn't used on any other tank in the British tree.
    • The infamous 122mm D-2-5T and D-25T guns are often associated with the KV-1S and IS series heavy tanks.
    • The 100mm D10T gun used to be the signature weapon of Soviet medium tanks from Tier 6 onwards.
    • Nearly all tier X medium tanks mount some variant of the famous British L7 105mm cannon. The only real exceptions are the Russian mediums (which mount faster firing but lower damage 100mm weapons) and the Chinese 121 (which has a powerful 122mm cannon normally found on heavy tanks).
  • Sinister Geometry: The giant, grey, harshly regular metal ingots that comprise most of the late-tier German tech tree look exactly as unfriendly as you'd expect tanks driven by Those Wacky Nazis to, and present quite a contrast to the friendlier curves and hodgepodge of irregularities found in most other nations' designs.
  • Splash Damage: Present with HE rounds. While not being very harmful to the hull, it often breaks the tank's tracks. Also, direct hits with HE will deal damage to several modules more frequently than AP rounds.
    • SPGs in general and American ones in particular rely heavily on splash damage, as their shells tend to be inaccurate but have a rather large splash radius and high amounts of damage, meaning they can cause heavy damage even if their opponent is in cover.
  • Skill Gate Character: SPGs have a far lower skill ceiling than tanks, but at the same time, are very forgiving, do not have as many risks, and are usually a bad player's only chance of beating a "Unicum".
  • Skill Point Reset: Occasionally, when serious changes are introduced to game balance. Ranges from compensating XP and Credits (or providing a replacement) when a tank or module is removed, seriously changed or replaced to actual skill point resets when new crew perks are introduced.
    • Can be done manually on Crew Skills/Perks which refunds a percent of the skill points earned on a crewman so they can be reassigned (80% for free, 90% for some silver credits, and 100% for gold/real money).
  • Skill Scores and Perks: A big part of the game, tank crews can get both, which are measured from 1-100%. Crew skills can have a major impact on gameplay depending on their configuration, so a tank with all crew of 3 skills/perks is obviously more effective than a tank with none. The amount of skills/perks a crewman acquires is technically not limited, but every consecutive skill requires twice the amount of experience as the previous, making it practically impossible to acquire them all.
  • Starter Equipment: The Tier 1 tanks of every nation.
  • Steel Wall:
  • Stupid Sacrifice:
    • Suicide scouting usually ends with the scout being destroyed before the SPGs are ready to fire. Some players do it deliberately to earn experience by spotting as many enemies as they can and then going over to another tank once they're dead.
    • Ramming a heavier enemy with better armor will hurt you much more than your opponent even if he is lower tier. Quite a lot of Kamikaze awardsnote  were actually failed Taking You with Me attempts.
  • Sub System Damage: Played straight, and is one of the game's core mechanics. Generally caused by Critical Hits.
  • Suicide Attack:
    • Low tier tanks unable to stand up to enemy fire used to hurry to chokepoints to stand there and die, blocking it with an impassable wreck. The most notorious for this is the T-28, the biggest Tier 4 tank (and one of the biggest overall). This is no longer commonly used, as the wreckage is now movable.
    • "Suicide scouting" is probably the most common form of scouting - light tanks, usually due to getting thrown into matches where they can't realistically hope to cause any damage, charge headlong into the enemy spawn area as soon as the match starts.
    • SPGs in a bad spot will often go into 'tank destroyer' or 'shotgun' mode and attempt to execute one of these before they die. Attacking a shotgunning artillery from the front can be equally suicidal.
  • Tactical Rock-Paper-Scissors:
  • Take That: The teasers poke fun at fantasy MMOs such as another "World Of" game, hyper-realistic games, EVE Online, and racing games.
  • Tank Fu: Ramming does damage based on the speed and weight of the tanks involved, and is rather effective against turretless vehicles if they're rammed from the sides, as they can't turn their gun to target the rammer. If the rammer rams a vehicle too heavy, though, the lighter vehicle will be worse off from the collision. There is a Title of Honor for destroying a tank that's higher tier than yours by ramming it. Appropriately, it's called "Kamikaze".
    • The E-50 weighs in at around 60 tons but can still reach a top speed of 60kph, making it an amazing rammer. Players have reported knocking 20-35% health off the T-54 just by ramming it once at top speed.
      • Similarly, the KV-5 weighs in at 100 tons and can reach 40kph. Don't get in the way of one headed downhill.
    • Low-profile TDs can sometimes ram a high-tier tank, particularly a late-tier German or a KV-5, and be too small for the tank to get their main gun low enough to shoot them.
    • Players with high tier French heavies have a tendency to ram enemy tanks (since Tier 8 and above French heavies are faster then a lot of mediums and even some light tanks, but still weigh quite a bit) then unload their revolver auto-loaders at point-blank range. Rarely does a tank survive this kind of attack.
    • The Controlled Impact skill for drivers was made with this trope in mind: when you ram somebody while using this skill, you do more damage, and take less in return. It's very popular with drivers of the aforementioned E-50.
    • The Aufklärungspanzer Panther is as almost fast as the best light tanks, but is still as heavy and well-armored as a regular Panther. Usually one ram and a shot from its 105mm cannon is enough to finish of any light tank in the game, save for another Aufklärungspanzer Panther or a Chinese WZ-132.
  • Tank Rush: In random matches, teams will have a few coordinated platoons of three tanks each at best. Most of the time, teams will have poor coordination, resulting in an unpredictable swarm of armor in the chokepoints. This is surprisingly common even at high tiers and even the best tanks will be much less effective without coordination.
  • Tanks, But No Tanks: Amazingly averted. The developers didn't make very manynote  up, almost all the tanks in-game or planned to be included had at least one example built or had blueprints, and all upgrades were either used in reality, or were planned and tested. However, if you want to be nit picky, tank destroyers and self propelled guns are not, technically, tanks. To add another layer of nitpickiness, many of the "tank destroyers" are technically assault guns, meant for destroying fortified positions and supporting infantry, not designed for (though often used for) fighting other armored vehicles.
  • Tank Goodness: The Game
  • Tech Tree: How one advances through the game. Want to drive around in the IS-4 or King Tiger? You gotta play the tanks before them to unlock them. The tech tree can be bypassed by liberal use of converting regular XP to Free XP using real money, though you have to earn the regular XP the old-fashioned way, and Premium tanks which are also bought with real money do not have to be unlocked but also do not unlock anything on the tech tree.
  • The Dev Team Thinks of Everything:
    • While the controls and movement physics are simple, the damage model is highly advanced.
      • Every hatch, window, periscope, gun mantlet, armor plate, radio antenna or suspension roller will have its own armor thickness in addition to projectile impact angle. Any mechanism or crew member near the impact point may be damaged.
      • Every tank has hitboxes for radios, engines, gas tanks, ammo racks, crew members, etc. The locations are different for each tank, and are all based on their real life locations.
      • If you look closely at the T-34, you can even see the firing ports for the tank crew's sidearms. Look for a small circle below the side viewing slits.
      • Ricocheting projectiles are given one more chance to hit anything, causing shot trapsnote  to work, and even occasionally deflect into tanks that weren't the target.
    • Not using the crew members' actions like turning the turret, moving the tank, or firing the gun will result in faster repairs and fire extinguishing.
    • Guns with a muzzle brake will reveal your location at a greater distance than those without.
    • Diesel engines have a lower chance of catching fire than gasoline engines.
    • Tank drive systems are faithfully reproduced; some can only turn by running their tracks at different speeds forward, some can run their tracks in opposite directions and turn in place, some have to stop one track. This can have major effects in how they handle at speed.
    • Spaced armor, present on some recently-added tanks, nullifies HE or HEAT rounds completely. As this happens to include a lot of the premium ammo rounds, it can be an immensely unpleasant surprise to someone who expected to get out of trouble with some high-damage ammunition.
  • The Grim Reaper: The Title of Honor for One Hit Killing at least 3 tanks in a row is called "Reaper". In the Russian version, it's called "Death's Scythe".
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill:
    • HE rounds will deal tons of extra damage if they penetrate the armor, critically hitting multiple modules and wounding the crew. This often leaves smaller vehicles in the "Tank destroyed" state with maxed repair costs. Leads to Lethal Joke Tank above, when a weapon's damage output exceeds the health of most enemies.
    • There is such a thing as overkill in the case of artillery, especially if they're blasting tanks with only a couple of hitpoints left instead of the completely healthy ones mauling the rest of the team. While this reduces the number of guns shooting at the team, they could easily be left to friendly tanks instead of wasting an artillery shell that takes a very long time to reload.
  • Took A Levelin Badass: French tanks until Tier 4 are cumbersome behemoths with poor fire power, and as such many players see them as little more then (slightly) mobile cover and SPG bait. That said, at Tier 5, they go 180 degrees and become fast, lightly armored and armed with deadly cannons, a much more favorable combination, especially with guns in that tier being what they are.
    • Unfortunately, the sudden gameplay shift between slow and heavy and fast with overwhelming firepower can frequently result in the direct opposite for the unprepared player, or for players who actually like being slow and ridiculously well armored.
  • Too Dumb to Live:
    • A worrying amount of players seem to have no idea how the ramming mechanic works (in essence, armor + weight will always beat momentum) or assume that a higher tier/health tank can always ram-kill a lower one and so one sees such stupidity as KV-1S (weight: ~43 tons) drivers thinking that their tank will survive ramming a TOG II* (weight: nearly 85 tons).
    • Another large amount of the population similarly fails to understand vision mechanics, of which are most are rather apparent when they start screaming in chat about 'invisitanks'.
  • Tutorial Failure: Wo T is notorious for having one of the worst tutorials in today's gaming world. About the only thing it tells you is explaining very basic game controls such as how to move your tank or using sniper view, and some basic tactics. It ranks about as high as Minecraft Beta for not telling its new players how to play the game.
  • Underground Monkey: A lot of tanks in-game are similar to each other, often justified by their real-life counterparts. Some modifications of certain tanks are also considered different tanks in-game for balance purposes or to make up for the low diversity of the nation's tanks.
    • The Soviet medium tank branch from the A-20 through to the T-43 are basically the same chassis with different armor and turrets; the KV-1, KV-2, KV-1S and T-150 heavy tanks are the same.
    • The German PzKpfw III Ausf. A and PzKpfw III (Ausf. E or M, depending on the chosen equipment) are the same tank with different equipment. Similarly, there's the PzKpfw IV divided into Ausf. A, D and H models, plus the PzKpfw IV Hydraulic gift tank and the PzKpfw IV Schmalturm premium tank, as well as the Panther, Panther II, PzKpfw V-IV, Aufklärungspanzer Panther and Panther-M10. Also, the main difference between the E-50 and E-50 Ausf.M is that the M has more hitpoints and a rear-mounted transmission.
    • The American T1 Heavy and M6 Heavy are the same tank model with different turrets and camouflage.
    • All American medium tanks from Tier 7 onwards, the T29, T32 and T34 heavy tanks, the T30 tank destroyer and the T21 light tank are basically prototypes or modifications of the M26 Pershing.
    • 4 modificationsnote  of the M4 Sherman are also split into separate tanks.
    • There's also the T28 and the T95 tank destroyers, both being based of the real life T28/95 GMT, with the only difference being the 2nd line of tracks being removed.
    • The SU-152 and ISU-152 are the inverse of the above examples, having near-identical upper hulls placed on different lower hulls (the KV-1S and IS-1/2, respectively).
    • The French AMX 50/100, AMX 50/120 and AMX 50B are pretty much the same tank, just with different equipment (the 100 and 120 in the designations refer to the caliber of guns they are designed to mount). The same goes with the AMX 13/75 and the AMX 13/90.
    • The German Pz.Kpfw 38H 735 (f) is essentially a French Hotchkiss H35 with a German gun and radio.
    • Chinese tanks are, for the most part, slightly modified copies of other nations' tanks. Examples include M5A1 Stuart (American), Renault NC-31 (French), Vickers Mk. E Type B (British) and of course Soviet copies like the IS-2. Also, the WZ-132 is the WZ-131 with enhanced firepower and armor protection.
    • The British Centurion Mk. 7/1 is an upgraded version of the Centurion Mk. 1 while the Churchill VII is the Churchill I with better armor and some minor equipment improvements.
    • The Matilda Black Prince is a Cromwell turret mated to a Matilda chassis.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: A few vehicles don't play like everything else in their line.
    • The M3 Lee medium tank does not have a rotating turret note , making it play more like a tank destroyer than the medium tank it's classified as. This is a major factor in it being considered That One Tank by a lot of players going down the American medium and heavy lines.
    • Conversely, there's a whole TD line for the Americans whose whole gimmick is that they're tank destroyers with a turret.
    • The American M4A3E2 Sherman "Jumbo" is one if you're playing it to get through the American medium tank line, being a relatively slow Stone Wall compared to the other American mediums, which are all generally well rounded, though not especially armored.
    • The Russian SU-26 SPG and French BatChat 155 are the only artillery pieces with a fully-rotating turret, allowing them to fire in any direction without having to stop and reorient. The latter also has a revolver auto-loader, granting it a much higher rate of fire than most other SPGs.
    • Tier 1-4 French tanks tend to focus heavily on armor at the expense of speed and firepower. Once you start to get around Tier 5 or 6, French designs start putting much more emphasis on speed and firepower and tend to have very weak armor.
    • The British TD line repeatedly plays to this trope until Tier 5; the UC 2pdr is fast but somewhat unmaneuverable and lightly armoured, while the Valentine TD is slow and unmaneuverable, but slightly better armoured. Then you hit the speedy and maneuverable Alecto — and then you get to the AT2.
  • Unfortunate Names: A few:
    • "Assmann" is an available surname choice for German Crewmen.
    • Heh, Dicker Max.
    • Having a ST-I in your nether regions is pretty much exactly as unpleasant as it sounds.
    • "Dickerson" is an available surname choice for American Crewmen.
  • Unskilled, but Strong:
    • Soviet tanks usually deal more raw damage and have more effective armour than the others, but they lack accuracy, reload speed and radio range.
    • HE-only cannons can qualify. They can deal outrageous amounts of raw damage, but have low penetration, which is a problem... unless the player has learned the enemies' weakspots.
  • Variable Mix: The background music will change depending on the action unfolding. Often borderline on Musical Spoiler when the enemy is unseen for some reason, but the combat music starts playing.
  • Visible Invisibility: Spotted enemies will always have a red mark over their vehicle and show a red outline if you've got a direct shot at them, even through opaque obstacles.
  • Weak, but Skilled:
    • Many light tanks and low tier mediums (such as the Leopard or the M7) aren't considered a big deal, often dying in the first few seconds of combat. But even one experienced scout past the frontline can raise hell long enough to prevent the enemy from assembling defenses in time.
    • In general, German cannons deal less damage per capita than their American and Russian counterparts, but penetrate better and are accurate from much, much farther out. They also tend to have superior radios earlier, allowing them to know what's going on across the whole battlefield.
  • We Are Not the Wehrmacht: Some post-war German designs have made it into the game, most notably the Leopard 1 MBT. In the spirit of this trope, they have their own unique faction emblems to show that they really aren't the Wehrmacht.
  • We Win Because You Didn't: Possible in the Assault game mode, should at least 1 defender still be alive and the attacking team hasn't completed the capture yet once time runs out. In other modes, running out of time counts as a draw instead.
  • What a Piece of Junk:
    • Soviet heavy tanks are covered in welding seams, peeling paint, dirt and rust. Do not be fooled.
    • The Chinese tree takes it further - their tanks are absurd-looking, bodged-together mashups of second-hand parts from every other country, but that's small comfort when you're staring down the barrels of their viciously powerful guns.
  • Why Did It Have To Be Gun Depression/Elevation?: Expect to confront the limits of your vehicle's ability to raise or lower its gun a lot, particularly on the more hilly maps like El Halluf, or pretty much any time you want to come up over a ridge and can't fire at anyone before they get free shot at your vulnerable lower front glacis. This is especially bad with the high tier French heavies, whose oscillating turrets give them a truly pathetic gun elevation of a paltry 8 degrees.
    • The French tank destroyer line added in 0.7.4 features an even more frustrating example - the tier III TD has literally no gun depression at all.
    • German and Russian tanks in general have poor gun depression, usually having about 6 degrees, give or take 1, in either direction.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Cosmetic?: A couple types of Cosmetic Awards do provide a small bonus, namely players that achieve one in a battle they lose will receive the same amount of XP and Credits for the battle as if they won, for "courageous resistance".
  • World War II: Many of the vehicles in-game participated or were designed during it.
    • A "Historical Battles" game mode (which limits teams to using certain tanks and modules) was released in Update 9.0. Prior to this, fans on the forums had organized historical duels using training mode.
  • Yanks with Tanks: Featuring the iconic M4 Sherman, the M4A3E8 "Easy Eight", the M3 Lee and the M26 Pershing.
  • You All Look Familiar: When recruiting a new crew member, it's possible for him to get an avatar that is already being used by another existing crew member.
  • Youtube War Expert: A game focusing on weapons of war as much as this one is bound to attract some as a rather vocal bit of the user base.


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alternative title(s): World Of Tanks
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