Video Game / Utawarerumono: Itsuwari no Kamen

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Utawarerumono: Itsuwari no Kamen is a visual novel by Aquaplus released in 2015 for the Vita, PS3, and PS4. It is a sequel and followup to the original series. The story begins when a young man wearing a hospital gown awakens in the middle of nowhere, finding himself walking in the snow. He is attacked by a giant insect, which is devoured by a red slime before escaping with a young girl with animal ears and a tail named Kuon. She declares herself his guardian because she saved his life and returns with him to her village, where she finds that while he's physically quite weak and very lazy, he's also smart enough to fix the water wheel in minutes despite never having seen one before.

From there begins a tale of a man out of time adjusting to this brave new world.

An anime adaptation by White Fox began airing at almost the same time as the game's release. A Western localization for the game by Atlus was announced on January 18, 2017. As such, most of the tropes here are based on the anime.


  • Adaptation-Induced Plot Hole: The first anime's ending omitted that Hakuoro had a child with Yuzuha which causes issues here given that she's one of the main characters now that she's an adult.
    • The above cause also gave way to a bit of a problem in the anime. Casual viewers who aren't aware of Kuon's parentage will find her suddenly having destructive powers in episode 23 as a Deus ex Machina. Apart from that, the foreshadowing and build-up of what Kuon can really do and who she's related to were removed from the anime besides showing her relation to the heroines of the previous game/anime.
    • Sakon, the balding candy vendor, interacted with the everyone more frequently in the game more than the anime. This made The Reveal that he's Mikazuchi, one of the Eight Pillar Generals, come out of utterly nowhere with little buildup.
    • Haku being suddenly able to go toe-to-toe with Oshutoru when he was never shown capable of fighting before made much more sense in the game where he frequently fought battles alongside his party and was thus capable of holding his ground against even someone like him.
    • Oshutoru being falsely accused of poisoning Anju made little sense in the anime since the explanation and the situation that implicated him in it in the first place were removed in the adaptation. See Demoted to Extra below.
  • Always a Bigger Fish: A boro-gigiri attacks Haku in the first episode, but after chasing him briefly is set upon by one of the cursed slimes and devoured. Haku utilizes this in second episode against another giant bug.
  • Badass Beard: Ukon, hands down.
  • Bad "Bad Acting": While pretending to be held captive by Nosuri, Anju repeatedly screams "Oh no!", but it's so blatantly unconvincing that everyone stops taking the ransom seriously, and some soldiers can be seen taking noodle bowls in the meanwhile. Oshutoru takes the entire thing seriously, however, to show how stupid what she just did was since if she had really been kidnapped he would be forced to resign and commit suicide even though he retrieved her immediately.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: The gigiri are normally about the size of a large dog, making them dangerous in large numbers. Then comes breeding season, in which you can say hello to boro-gigiri...
  • Big Eater: The more Kuon eats, the more aghast Haku looks. Eventually, between frames she manages to make food the size of her head disappear.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The rescue mission both succeeds and fails. Anju's death is prevented by Kuon's group, but Haku isn't so lucky. Oshutoru ultimately dies after winning a harsh battle against Vurai. Oshutoru instructs Haku to take up his duty, meaning that Haku has fake his death while he takes Oshutoru's identity. Haku's party is heartbroken, Kuon especially as she leaves Yamato to return home. Meanwhile, Yamato is still under civil unrest, and the mastermind behind the Emperor's death and Anju's attempted assassination is still out there.
  • Bleached Underpants: A fairly odd example, seeing as the game doesn't feature any real adult content, unlike the original prequel. In the proper introduction to Nosuri and Ougi, a scene where an unlucky Haku is sucked into a sewage pipe results in him unwittingly latching onto Nosuri, who's climbing a ladder. In the anime, he accidentally tears off her top. In the game, he tears off her undies... Somehow...
  • Body Horror: The Cursed Slimes are actually humans. Liquefied humans.
  • Breaking the Fellowship: At the end, after Haku dons Oshutoru's mask and identity and is presumed dead, most of his party stays at Ennakamui to mourn his "death", while he, a broken Nekone, and the Chains stay at Yamato to unify the people. A heartbroken Kuon leaves her companions for Tusukuru to return home with Oboro (and in the game, Aruru) at the end.
  • Brilliant, but Lazy: Haku for sure. He was the only one smart enough to figure out how to fix the water wheel mill, and he calculates large equations instantly. he also goes from illiterate to reasonably well read within a period of time that rather surprises Kuon. However, he's physically weak, can't walk or hike too far without his feet turning into hamburger and has a very lazy, laidback personality. Most of this comes from the fact he was a scientist in the past.
  • Bullying a Dragon: A couple of soldiers vs. a BSO Ding Kuon with more than a slew of Witsarunemitea's powers. Guess who wins?
  • Call Back: The way Haku reacts to seeing someone with a tail is exactly the same as Hakuoro. He instantly grabs it.
  • Cerberus Syndrome: The first half of the anime is very easygoing with very little conflict. Come round the second half, and it opens with a war between Yamato and an invading nation, among other things.
  • Combat Hand Fan: Just like Hakuoro, Haku quick takes to using this as his weapon after Kuon tosses him one.
  • Comedic Spanking: As soon as Munechika catches Anju at the inn, she immediately starts spanking the latter as punishment for running away and causing a ruckus. Not helped by Anju's defiant attitude, which earns her even more spanks, much Haku and company's confusion and maybe even pity.
  • Compressed Adaptation: A lot of scenes were altered or completely removed in the anime, including a majority of the battles that took place in the game. For example, Haku and Kuon encountered wild animals as part of a tutorial battle, Rurutie's introduction involved Kokopo chasing Haku all over town against Rurutie's instructions, while also removing Uruuru and Saraana's Early-Bird Cameo in the beginning of the installment.
  • Crapsaccharine World: We get more insight into the human civilization than in the prequel anime. The surface was unlivable (revealed in the game proper), but humans had managed to build a working civilization underground. But once the Curse broke out, things went to shit real fast.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Anything that Vurai does to his enemies.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: A couple. The primary examples are:
    • Yamato (with the Eight Pillar Generals in tow) vs the invading barbarians from Uzuurusha. Yamato wins.
    • Tusukuru vs Yamato. While the war between these two nations is still ongoing, the tides of the battle are clearly in favor of Tusukuru.
    • On a smaller level, we have Kurou vs Atui and Yakuto Waruto. Even with both of their strengths combined, neither of the latter two can even hold a candle to Kurou. Even after Kuon and Haku join in the fray later, team Haku is still on the receiving end of the curb-stomp (though Kuon at least gets points for managing to hit him while his guard was down).
    • God-mode Kuon fighting against a couple of assassins sent out to capture her in the game is equal to a person squashing some annoying bugs.
  • The Dandy: Maroro, a court scholar, looks like he's dressed for a Noh play or something. He also doesn't do much besides providing knowledge and offensive magic before running away.
  • Demoted to Extra: Entua and Woshisu from the game had their importance completely removed from the anime. While neither character was recurring enough to be part of the main cast, their roles in the climax were essential in the whole Emperor's death and Anju's poisoning incidents, with the former being hired by Honoka to work for the Emperor as a wine servant and therefore being indirectly and unwittingly responsible for Anju's poisoning and the latter for being one of the people who helped frame Oshutoru for the incident. He was also responsible for riling Vurai up to go after Oshutoru and gang by making sure Vurai was in the right place at the right time when he declared his suspicions on Oshutoru.
  • Fanservice Pack: Compared to its predecessor, this series is much more upfront with its fanservice and dirty humor.
    • That saying, compared to the original game, Itsuwari no Kamen has absolutely zero sex scenes.
  • Fantastic Arousal: Kuon reacts to her tail being grabbed as though he grabbed her butt, though that might be cultural rather than physiological.
  • The Gadfly: Karura stills like trolling Touka, including leading her to believe that Kuon and Haku were married.
  • Gray and Grey Morality: The failed invasion against Yamato by a nomadic nation sets the mood on morality for this series. The nomads are driven by desperation and disgust for Yamato's life of excess, but use the soldiers they capture as fodder for them. Meanwhile, Yamato's own forces have their own rogue elements, namely Dekoponpo being genuinely corrupt, and Vurai being bloodthirsty and almost psychopathic. Only the heroes' party is shown as being the most heroic in character.
    • Taken further by episode 18. Yamato has launched an invasion against Tuskuru, Kuon's and Hakuoro's home nation, in order to access the pre-apocalypse laboratory hidden within. Haku understandably is having a hard time keeping faith.
  • Guest Fighter: Tamaki and Sasara, in their Dungeon Travelers get ups, are available as DLC, and can be used as early as the tutorial fight.
  • Has Two Mommies: Kuon refers to Karura, Touka and by implication the rest of the original Utawarerumono heroines as her mothers, though Karura gets mad if she's not called her big sister instead. They aren't lovers or anything except in that they were basically the harem of the original protagonist Hakuoro.
  • Infant Immortality: Nnnnope. The Emperor's flashback reveals that absolutely no one was safe from Hakuoro's rage, which included children. The flashback barely gives us the mercy to only show it in shadow.
  • I Warned You: When a bandit attempts to make Kuon hostage, she tells him that he should just stop, but he wouldn't listen. Thinking that she has no other choice, Kuon submitted herself, making the bandit taunt and spit on Haku. A moment later, Rurutie, who has been kept hostage by one of the bandit's subordinate, tells everyone to run just before Kokopo madly attacks the bandit. Seeing this, Kuon says, "I warned you," and smiles.
  • Killer Rabbit: Kokopo is basically a giant, flightless sparrow who looks like a cute ball of fluff, but can beat a gang of bandits to a submission when her mistress is threatened.
  • Limit Break: Just like the prequel game, each character in your party can gain a powerful Finishing Move. This one just stands out a bit more thanks to being fully rendered... and usually ending with your opponents blowing up.
  • Little Bit Beastly: The world is populated by people once known as Maruta that all possess ears and tails. There are multiple subspecies, which all have slightly different traits and cultures.
  • Mask Power: Continuing the tradition, each of the Generals wear masks that enchance their powers. Because these masks are based on Hakuoro's.
  • Mood Whiplash: Episodes 13-15 and the first half of 16 are played fairly seriously, as they focus on a brief war between Yamato and an invading tribe. Then comes the second half of 16, where the guys get bent in the inn, strip naked, and get involved in all sorts of stupidity.
  • Naked Freak-Out: During a bath scene, Kuon senses someone is peeping. She tries to chase after the intruder, but fails to do so. Hearing her annoyed shriek, Haku, who was told not to peek comes out and asks what happened. Kuon, seems to forget that she still has no clothes on, asks if Haku saw something to which he replies that he wouldn't say he saw something before flatly adding, "I see it now," a moment later, causing her to freak out in embarrassment.
    • A handful of episodes after that, Kuon gets treated to a sight of Haku's...manhood right up in front of her. She promptly punches it before leaving and freaking out.
  • Oba-san: Karura does not like Kuon referring to her as her mother, preferring instead to be her big sister.
  • Older and Wiser: Karura and Touka show up eventually and while Touka is still a bit flaky, both of them are more mature than they were and serve as mother figures for Kuon.
  • Older Than They Look: Touka and Karura should be at least forty, but don't really look any different than they did decades ago.
  • Party Scattering: In episode 23, after Haku's party is attacked by the forces of Yamato.
  • Prehensile Tail: Kuon wraps her tail around Haku's head, and quite tightly going by his pained reaction.
  • The Peeping Tom: An uncommon female-on-male version. Haku barely leaves the room for his bath before Kuon gets an evil grin on her face, runs to the exterior of the bath and finds a hole to watch through. On the other hand, her reaction may suggest that this is her first time peeping.
  • The Reveal: Alongside the prequel's reveal that this world isn't some alternate past, but a very distant future, and that humanity was annihilated; it's revealed that Hakuoro's rage was only the beginning, and that humanity slowly killed itself off until there was nothing left.
  • She Is Not My Girlfriend: Kuon and Haku's relationship is frequently misunderstood, but they don't even bother getting embarrassed about it.
  • Ship Tease: Despite mutually denying it, Kuon and Haku get loads in both mediums. While it was only heavily implied in the anime, Kuon eventually falls in love with Haku in the game, but doesn't get to realize it until after she had believed he'd died. Haku's feelings towards Kuon remain ambiguous however.
  • Spit Take: Nekone does an epic one with green tea when Anju innocently declares she might have fallen in love with Oshutoru.
  • Tempting Fate: In Episode 19, Nosuri boldly and loudly declares that she'll complete the mission, even if it costs her life. The next shot is her throwing up over the edge of the ship.
  • Underestimating Badassery: Yamato's invasion of Tuskuru sees no initial success at all. The situation is just barely a stalemate, and even then Yamato's forces are struggling to keep up against Tuskuru's military brilliance.
  • Vague Age: Just like the prequel, no one's ages are revealed, and the Time Skip between the original game and this one is just as ambiguous, so even Kuon's age is a mystery. it gets a little frustrating when the previous cast starts appearing, and they look like they haven't aged at all in decades.
  • Verbal Tic: Kuon ends a lot of her sentences with the questioning 'ka na?' (maybe/or not?) ending while Nekone says "desu" with greater frequency and emphasis.
  • Vomit Indiscretion Shot: When Nosuri gets seasick and throws up over the edge (the first time) in Episode 19.
  • War Is Hell: The second half of the anime starts off with Yamato fighting off an invasion, and barely any of even Yamato's forces' actions were being presented as anything really heroic.
    • Vurai's mass manslaughter while sacking a captured town is especially shown as horrific, as it haunts Haku in the episode after.
  • We ARE Struggling Together: Any time Dekoponpo is involved, Eight Pillar Generals will be having a hard time working together, as Dekoponpo is constantly throwing a wrench in whatever they're planning or thinking about with his mere presence.
  • Wham Episode: Episode 17, in which everything concerning Haku and the Emperor's past is revealed, and the story behind the series is expanded further.
    • Episode 21, Yamato's invasion of Tuskuru is aborted in failure, Munechika leaving herself behind to allow an escape. Oshutoru stands accused of attempted assassination of Anju by poison, and the capital of Yamato is in complete unrest.
  • Wham Line: Delivered in the very beginning of episode 18
    Anju: "My beloved people, I shall share with you the Emperor's words. Our nation of Yamato has decided to invade Tuskuru!"
    • And another was delivered in The Stinger of episode 20.
    Nekone: "We've received an urgent message from Yamato. The emperor is dead.
  • Yaoi Fangirl: Rurutie loves her yaoi doujins, which somehow exist in a world that barely knows the fundamentals of agriculture. Anju steals one of her doujins and greatly enjoys it, though she doesn't seem to actually understand what's going on.
    • Truth in Television: There was a market for printed (and often erotic) art in Feudal Japan. The show even gets right the fact that only the originals were properly coloured, as each had to be painted individually, and the price matched the labour. The cheaper prints were either roughly coloured, or plain black and white.

Alternative Title(s): Utawarerumono Itsuwari No Kamen

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