[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/puyo_cut_small_2537.png]]

->''"It's fast, it's furious, and it's puzzlingly addictive!"''
-->-- '''Puyo Pop Fever''', EU back cover

''Puyo Puyo'', [[MarketBasedTitle known as]] ''[[MarketBasedTitle Puyo Pop]]'' [[MarketBasedTitle outside of Japan]] [[note]]Although SEGA appears to be going back on this, as both ''[[VideoGame/HatsuneMikuProjectDIVA Puyo Puyo! 39]]'' and ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' keep the name[[/note]], is a series of competitive [[FallingBlocks Falling Block]] puzzle games originally created by Creator/{{Compile}} and currently owned by Creator/{{Sega}}. The object of the game is to flood your opponent's board with Nuisance Puyo by making chains with several multi-colored Puyo, which explode when four of the same color are connected. Despite its relative obscurity in the west, it is arguably one of the more influential puzzle series; its competition-based gameplay and colorful stable of characters were groundbreaking in the early '90s and [[FollowTheLeader inspired a wide variety of competitors]].

''Puyo Puyo'' was created to counter the legions of aesthetically-bland ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'' imitators of the late '80s and very early '90s. To that end, Compile incorporated characters from ''Madou Monogatari 1-2-3'', an earlier first-person [=RPG=] that sees ActionGirl Arle Nadja battle a variety of colorful monsters. Though the original MSX and Famicom Disk System ''Puyo Puyo'' games quietly came and went, the arcade version became a hit and its sequel became nothing short of a Japanese arcade phenomenon. How many other puzzle games can boast that they have held ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bbf-Z2IgnVY televised tournaments?]]''

Unfortunately, despite (or, perhaps, [[HoistByTheirOwnPetard due to]]) ''Puyo Puyo'''s success, Compile very quickly racked up a staggering amount of debt that they were unable to repay. As part of a restructure attempt in 1998, ownership of the series transferred to Sega. Compile continued to create ''Puyo Puyo'' titles for two more years before leaving the series forever. Sega, utilizing their Sonic Team banner, produces ''Puyo Puyo'' games to this day.

The following games are considered the major ''Puyo Puyo'' titles. This includes the seven mainline entries, as well as miscellaneous games that utilize ''Puyo Puyo'''s standard gameplay mechanics:
* ''Puyo Puyo'' (1991): Primitive, primarily single-player version for the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}}2 and [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]] (in disk and cart form) with simple Endless and Puzzle modes, the later serving as a predecessor to the ''Nazo Puyo'' series. It is largely [[SequelDisplacement displaced]] by its identically-titled successor.
* ''Puyo Puyo'' (1992): Whenever someone refers to the "first" game, they are almost always talking about this one. Compile (with the help of Sega) retooled ''Puyo Puyo'' into a multiplayer UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame. The UsefulNotes/GameGear port, despite [[NoExportForYou never leaving Japan]], [[CountrySwitch turns into the fully-translated]] ''[[CountrySwitch Puzlow Kids]]'' [[CountrySwitch in a "foreign" system]], and the arcade version received a Europe-released English translation that may or may not be official.
* ''Puyo Puyo Tsu'' (1994): The second, and arguably most popular, ''Puyo Puyo'' UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame adds Offsetting (the ability to erase Nuisance Puyo that waits above the field) and Margin Time (an invisible time limit that, upon being reached, results in the steady increase of generated Nuisance Puyo). The Neo Geo Pocket Color port was localized as ''Puyo Pop'', while the Mega Drive port was released untranslated on the NA/PAL [[UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} Wii Virtual Console]]. Confirmed to be ported again for the Nintendo3DS as part of the Sega 3D Classics lineup.
* ''Puyo Puyo Sun'' (1996): The third arcade ''Puyo'' game is based around "Sun Puyo", which send extra Nuisance Puyo to the opponent when cleared.
* ''Puyo Puyo~n'' (1999): This console-exclusive entry introduces character-exclusive Super Powers and moves at a much less frantic pace than its predecessors.
* ''Puyo Puyo Box'' (2000): Compile's swan song for the ''Puyo Puyo'' series is a [[CompilationRerelease compilation]]. It features ports of the first two arcade games, an RPG-like Quest Mode, and a gauntlet that features every single ''Puyo Puyo'' character as a potential opponent.
* ''Minna de Puyo Puyo'' (2001): ''Minna'' is the first installment developed by Sega's Creator/SonicTeam. The Game Boy Advance title was localized, [[RecycledTitle perhaps confusingly]], as ''Puyo Pop''.
* ''Puyo Puyo Fever'', aka ''Puyo Pop Fever'' (2003): The final arcade ''Puyo Puyo'' game [[{{Retool}} introduces an almost entirely new cast of characters]] and adds "Fever Mode", a LimitBreak that repeatedly drops preset chains into the player's field. It was localized for [[UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube GameCube]]/[[UsefulNotes/NintendoDS DS]] in North America, [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 and]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Xbox}} many]] [[UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance more]] [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable platforms]] in PAL regions.
* ''Puyo Puyo Fever 2'' (2005): ''Fever 2'' adds several single-player features, including a map system and items. It also introduces new characters.
* ''Puyo Puyo! 15th Anniversary'' (2006): ''15th Anniversary'' features a variety of gameplay rulesets, including the rules of the original ''Puyo Puyo'', ''Tsu'', and ''Fever''. It also reintroduces several Compile-era ''Puyo Puyo'' characters that went absent after ''Minna''. Unlike previous games, every character has its own set of single-player opponents.
* ''Puyo Puyo 7'' (2009): In addition to introducing new protagonists, ''7'' adds the "Transformation" rule. When triggered, the player's character will transform into either a child (which causes tiny Puyo to fall ''Fever''-style) or a fully grown adult (in which the player uses gigantic Puyo).
* ''Puyo Puyo!! 20th Anniversary'' (2011): ''20th Anniversary'' retains most of ''15th Anniversary's'' rulesets and adds even more, including a ruleset based on ''Puyo Puyo Sun''.
* ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' (2014): A crossover between ''Puyo Puyo'' and the [[TropeCodifier grandfather of nearly every]] [[FallingBlocks Falling Block]] game, ''{{VideoGame/Tetris}}''. Each player can individually select whether they want to play ''Puyo Puyo'' (based on ''Tsu'') or ''Tetris'', play modes where all players are switching between separate ''Tetris'' and ''Puyo Puyo'' boards on a timer, or even have the two gaes running on the same board. It was released for UsefulNotes/{{PS3}}, UsefulNotes/PSVita, UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS, and UsefulNotes/WiiU on February 6, ported to [=PS4=] and Xbox One on December 4, then ported yet again to the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch as a launch title. It also got an overseas release for the Switch and [=PS4=] on April 25th, 2017 (28th in Europe), the first proper ''Puyo'' game to be localized in ''13 years.''
* ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle'' (2016): A game to celebrate the franchise's 25th anniversary. Similar to past anniversary titles, it features a plethora of game modes for multiplayer, up to 17 modes including the return of Tsu and Fever rules. Unlike past anniversary titles though, there is a new mode that acts as an expansive RPG with a healthy amount of side quests. As Arle and Carbuncle, you are flung into a new world where you have to find your way back home, with the help of a new character named Ally. Released for the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS on December 8.

[[AdaptationDisplacement As you might already know]], ''Puyo Puyo'' came to the West in the form of {{Dolled Up Installment}}s. Said installments, as well as other non-Compile/Sega-developed ''Puyo'' games, include:
* ''VideoGame/DoctorRobotniksMeanBeanMachine'' (1993): ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog''-themed localization of the first arcade game.
* ''VideoGame/KirbysAvalanche'' (1995): ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}''-themed localization of the first arcade game.
* ''Qwirks'' (1995): Windows 3.1 and Mac game with original characters.
* ''Timon and Pumbaa's Jungle Games'' (1995): The PC version of this ''Disney/TheLionKing'' party game featured a cut down ''Lion King''-themed version of the standard game labelled "Bug Drop" (Compile are credited for its use).
* ''Kidou Gekidan Haro Ichiza: Haro no Puyo Puyo'' / ''Mobile Theatrical Company Haro: Haro's Puyo Puyo'' (2005): ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}''-themed GBA game.
* ''[[VideoGame/HatsuneMikuProjectDiva Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX]]'' (2015): Includes a cut down Music/{{Vocaloid}}-themed version of the standard game labelled "Puyo Puyo [[ArcNumber 39]]" as a side game. Yes, that's actually the first time in the West that ''Puyo Puyo'' has been called "Puyo Puyo".

In addition to the above games, ''Puyo Puyo'' (and ''Madou Monogatari'') has yielded more than a dozen spinoffs; some were released for traditional platforms, while others were released as part of Compile's "Disc Station" disk magazine. It has also heralded several Drama [=CDs=] and LightNovels for both ''Madou Monogatari'' (an entire series titled ''Shin Madou Monogatari'') and Puyo Puyo (''Amitie and the Mysterious Egg'', ''Everyone's Dreams, Coming True!?'', ''Sig's Secret'', and ''Satan's Space Amusement Park'').

Speaking of ''Madou Monogatari'', that series continued alongside its MorePopularSpinoff until shortly after Compile's restructure. Curiously, Sega did ''not'' receive ''Madou Monogatari'' despite owning essentially everything inside of the games, opening the door for D4 Enterprise to pick up the rights upon Compile's closure. Aside from re-releasing the ''Madou Monogatari'' games on several platforms (the "Ultimate Collection" trilogy for PC being the most notable releases), D4 collaborated with Creator/CompileHeart to release ''Sei Madou Monogatari'' for the UsefulNotes/PlayStationVita. This game contains an all-new cast (for obvious legal reasons) and was released outside of Japan as ''Sorcery Saga: Curse of the Great Curry God''.

Relevant ''Madou Monogatari'' tropes are currently covered on this page, due to the amount of overlap with the early ''Puyo Puyo'' games as well as the fact that the series is essentially unheard of, even compared to ''Puyo Puyo''.

We have a character page [[Characters/PuyoPuyo located here]], though not everyone is covered due to ''Puyo Puyo's'' [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters sheer number of minor characters]].

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!!Let's play Puyo!:

* AllJustADream: Arle's search for Carbuncle in ''Pocket Puyo Puyo~n'' turned out to be a daydream. He was returned to her completely fine at the ending.
* AllThereInTheManual: The SEGA games seem to assume that you've already played some of the ''Madou Monogatari'' games, in that facts like where Arle got Carbuncle from, what her favourite food is [[note]]Curry, which is why difficulty is done by spiciness[[/note]] and several other callbacks are meaningless unless you're aware of the past games.
* AmbidextrousSprite: Arle was the only one that played this straight, as her armor pads were the asymmetrical aspect of her design. This lasted up until ''20th'', where her current appearance is entirely symmetrical. Sig, Ecolo, Ringo, S, J and L, and Z avert this, each having a second set of sprites to reflect their asymmetrical aspects (Sig's left arm, Ecolo's "?", Ringo's hair clip, etc.)
* AmericanKirbyIsHardcore:
** The obscure English release of the first arcade ''Puyo Puyo'' game has this in spades, changing the loose plot to Silvana protecting her home from the forces of the Black Kingdom and changing several of the characters to become [[CardCarryingVillain Card-Carrying Villains]].
** ''Puyo Pop'' on the GBA changed several pieces of dialogue when it was localized, mainly to emphasis Arle's DeadpanSnarker characteristics. This is especially noticeable when you compare it to the hidden English translation in the Japanese version, which has a more faithful translation.
** The [[DolledUpInstallment Dolled-Up]] games are also a case of this. ''Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine'' has more crude artwork with larger emphasis on shading and more sinister sounding music, with the characters themselves being goofy looking robots that tend to be depicted with rather sinister or smug faces when the player starts losing. In keeping in-line with the TropeNamer, ''Kirby's Avalanche'' meanwhile depicts Kirby as more of a [[TrashTalk Trash Talker]] then normally and advertisements compare him to a ''criminal''.
* TheAnimeOfTheGame: An anime mini-series based on ''Madou Monogatari'' and ''Puyo Puyo'' was released via Compile's Disc Station magazine.
* AnotherDimension: Originally invoked to HandWave Arle and Carbuncle [[TheArtifact appearing in Sega's retooled setting]], dimension-hopping has since become a frequent plot point.
* AnotherSideAnotherStory:
** ''SUN'''s different routes feature a different character that is intertwined with the main plot.
*** Draco stars in Easy, which is chronologically first in the story.
*** Arle stars in Normal, taking place right after Draco's story.
*** Schezo stars in Hard, which ties in with Arle's, sometime after hers began.
** ''Fever'' does something similar with ''SUN''; Amitie is the main character of the [=RunRun=] and [=WakuWaku=] course, and Raffina is the player character for the [=HaraHara=] course.
** ''Fever 2'' has the three courses again, except the player character is now chosen between Amitie, Raffina, and Sig, each with a different take on the plot.
*** This even acts as a callback to ''Madou Monogatari ARS'', which introduced Arle, Rulue and Schezo through three different stories using the same interface.
** ''15th Anniversary'' determines who wins the tournament, with each character having a different set of opponents. They also have the opportunity of meeting the "stars that fell from the sky", as Sig noticed, and unlocking them allows them to participate in the tournament and win.
** After beating the story the first time in ''7'', you're allowed to play as one of Ringo's companions at the time of their presence for certain chapters.
** ''20th Anniversary'' initially has Ringo only, but stories are gradually unlocked as you clear everyone else's. One final Extra story is unlocked after everyone's story is completed.
* AntagonistTitle: ''Madou Monogatari III: Kyuukyoku Joou-sama'', with ''Kyuukyoku Joou-sama'' translating to "Ultimate Queen." The "ultimate queen" in question is Rulue.
* AntiFrustrationFeatures:
** The arcade games reduce the Puyo's drop speed whenever the player uses a continue. It will only do so twice per enemy, though, so Puyo will still drop ridiculously fast against late-game opponents. This seemingly does ''not'' carry over to the home ports.
** ''Tsu'' introduces double rotation. To make a long story short, it enables the player to flip their currently-controlled pair of Puyo if they are locked into a tight space.
** ''Nazo Puyo: Arle no Roux'' lets the player take a (larger-than-normal) health penalty to give up on the current puzzle and receive a new one. ''Rulue no Roux'', on the other hand, cruelly subverts this by making the puzzles that you passed on earlier in the game reappear near the end.
** All the ''Puyo Puyo'' games in the SEGA era have a cheat code which unlocks everything EXCEPT the in-game shop's content [[note]]On the UsefulNotes/XBOXOne, PS4 and UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch versions of ''Puyo Tetris'', this includes all the former DLC[[/note]] removing the need to play through the entire game.
** ''Puyo Puyo'' games on mobile don't use the normal match-3 mechanics, with ''Puyo Quest'' using erasure of Puyo obstructing a line, and ''Puyo Touch'' using changing the one Puyo that ISN'T the right color by dragging the right color over it.
* ArcadePerfectPort:
** The Mega Drive versions of the first two arcade games ''almost'' qualify. The gameplay, graphics, music, and sound effects are perfect, but the arcade hardware for both games has an extra chip that makes the voice acting possible; as a result, the first game gets rid of all but three of the voice clips while ''Tsu'' plays them at a noticeably lower quality.
** The (second) Wii Virtual Console ports of both games are straight examples.
* ArcNumber: 24, the GoroawaseNumber for "Puyo". ''Puyo Pop Fever'' was even [[MeaningfulReleaseDate released on the 24th of a month]] for each platform, and recent games have a roster of 24 characters.
* Area51: Is visited in ''Puyo Puyo 7''.
* ArtEvolution:
** Arle's design in general improves immensely from one version to the next for ''Madou Monogatari'', and further improves over the course of ''Puyo Puyo'', as Arle matures.
** Happens to the characters over the course of Sega's run. ''Fever 2'' dials back the color saturation, and ''20th Anniversary'' adds shading, giving it a more refined appearance. Compare, for example, Amitie's appearance in ''[[http://i.imgur.com/uPS0G8n.png Fever 1]]'', then ''[[http://i.imgur.com/u6tptyK.png Fever 2]]'', and finally ''[[http://i.imgur.com/bzwWTFa.png 20th Anniversary]]''.
** Some characters in ''Puyo Puyo! Quest'' gain more detailed coloring in their 6-star form. Compare [[http://i.imgur.com/ssMzUuE.png 5-star Jarne]] to [[http://i.imgur.com/O9wO9s6.png 6-star Jarne]].
* ArtShift:
** ''Puyo Puyo~n'', for the most part, trades in the SuperDeformed style of its predecessors for more traditional anime-styled art, with a introductory anime that looks gorgeous on Dreamcast. The series then shifts to an even more cartoony style in ''Puyo Pop Fever''.
** The games that Compile published in their "Discstation" disc magazine all suffer from this to some extent.
** ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle'' shifts away from the 2D art style for 3D character models and environments.
* TheArtifact:
** Satan is the only character that retains their English arcade DubNameChange in later English releases. ([[InconsistentDub Though this is toyed with at least a couple of times]].)
** Sun Puyo were retained in ''Pocket Puyo Puyo~n'' despite the plot having nothing to do with the sun.
** Older games would sometimes recycle voice clips from past games. As a side effect, Rulue in the first arcade game did not have a voice clip since she didn't have one in ''Madou Monogatari III''. This would persist with the many ports until being fixed in ''Puyo Puyo CD''. Similarly, Minotaur did not have voice clips in ''Pocket Sun'', ''Pocket Yon'', or ''Minna'' since those games recycled voice clips from the console versions of ''SUN'' and ''Yon'', which Minotaur was not playable for.
** Western fans might wonder why ''Puyo Puyo Tetris's'' story mode goes above 100% Completion. This is because the final chapters were DownloadableContent in the initial versions of the game.
** Subverted with Arle and Carbuncle, who appeared to be headed this way until they were rejoined by other former ''Madou Monogatari'' characters starting with ''15th''.
* ArtificialBrilliance: The AI definitely has its moments in the Sega games:
** If the AI faces an impossible amount of Nuisance Puyo, but might still win by waiting out the opponent, it will exploit the game's rotation mechanics in order to keep its active Puyo in the air for as long as possible. This most commonly occurs in the ''Anniversary'' titles' Original and Excavation rules. On the other hand, if an AI is gaining Nuisance Puyo at the top of their field, they will drop their Puyo as fast as possible in an attempt to quickly build a counter-chain.
** Characters who normally build large chains will occasionally break from their usual behavior if the player is about to lose; instead, they will attempt to prevent a comeback by making a chain that is ''just'' large enough to win the game. Some will also abandon their usual patterns if they have the ability to obtain an "All-Clear" bonus.
** Taken UpToEleven when Core AI is initiated. This "cheat" allows the character's AI to go without any restraint; they will always drop their Puyo at full speed (and use Quick Drop if allowed) and will build strong chains.
* ArtificialStupidity: Whether actually [[InvokedTrope invoked]] or not, there are several instances of this in the series.
** The most common one is a character never rotating their puyo, not even under Core AI. Skeleton-T and Oshare Bones have this trait in all appearances, as well as Draco in ''20th'' and ''Tetris''. [[WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer They are still fairly good at chaining under Core AI, however]].
** The second most common one is never trying to manually drop their puyo, letting gravity do so instead. Lidelle and the aforementioned characters are examples of this. Draco in ''7'' is a vast exaggeration of this, as her AI does not change in the slightest under Core AI, unlike other examples. This situation can be enforced on certain versions of the first arcade game, as well as ''Mean Bean Machine'', through the use of a second controller.
** In ''7'', no character AI ever tries to take advantage of hard drop in Transformation mode, for some reason. They also hardly ever bother defending against incoming attacks, preferring to keep building their chain instead, and getting buried by nuisance puyo as a result. The latter is particularly interesting as it does not happen in Fever mode.
** If the AI gets a giant puyo and only the final row of the third or fourth columns is filled, they will rapidly shuffle colours while dropping very slowly, and losing the match. This happens even if they have other free columns, or even if they can turn the giant puyo in a colour that avoids defeat.
** If the AI reaches fever and is not in immediate danger, they will start building a chain that breaks the prebuilt one, wasting a long time in the process. Similarly, if they reach fever while another player was popping their chain and sending nuisance puyos to them, they will likely react as if they were in danger and break the fever chain in a wrong way, even if those nuisance puyos are going to the background tray.
* AscendedExtra: Any of the ''Madou Monogatari'' {{Mook}} characters that appear beyond the first two ''Puyo Puyo'' titles could count. The most notable examples are Skeleton-T, Draco Centauros, Suketoudara, and Witch. (The last of which goes from {{Mook}} to playable to TheCameo ''back'' to playable.) There's also Harpy, Incubus, Panotty, Seriri, Nasu Grave, and Zoh Daimaoh, who become playable characters in ''SUN'', ''Yo~n'' and/or ''15th Anniversary''. Not to mention [[spoiler:[[MookPromotion Doppelganger Arle]] ]] who [[TheBusCameBack appears in Puyo Puyo Quest.]]
** Lagnus, Harpy and Seriri returned as Skill Battle exclusive characters in ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle'' after a very long absence in the main series.
* AwesomeButImpractical: While it is completely possible to do '''19''' chains in a standard field (which has one hidden row above), anything above 10 builds incredibly close to the top, risking a quick defeat from a small chain, and anything above 15 would require the perfect setup to fit it. We're talking chains you build yourself. Fever mode's pre-built chains don't count.
** Notably, some people have done videos of LITERAL chains they built themselves, using the puzzle edit function of some of the games.
* BadassAdorable: Arle, Carbuncle, heck, almost everyone in Fever qualify just because of the art style.
* BadPowersGoodPeople and [[BadPowersBadPeople Bad People]]: Despite being half-demon, Sig doesn't care about it and seems to care only about his friends and bugs. It should be noted that, besides Akuma, most demons and monsters before are protrayed as {{Jerkass}}es or being AffablyEvil, as well as Sig's remains being part of [[spoiler: the demon within's Klug's book's original body. There's an unknown, but possibly good, reason that the demon was sealed away in the first place, something nobody even did to any previous demon. When the demon posses Klug, he intends to wound or likely ''kill'' Sig to get his remains.]]
* BaitAndSwitch: The story quest "Ally's Impossible Adventure!?" of ''Quest'' has ''two'' in the final chapter's final boss[[spoiler:es - Ringo, Maguro and Risukuma]], in regards to Active Skills. [[spoiler:Ringo begins the battle by turning 10 puyos into Nuisance Puyo. Alert players would expect that Maguro (who attacks second) would have an Skill that deals colorless damage based on how many Nuisance Puyos are in the board - which tends to be the case when Nuisance Puyos appear. But no, Maguro turns those Nuisance Puyos into '''[[HelpfulMook prism balls]]''', which power up your chains. Again, alert players may be wary and think it's SuspiciousVideoGameGenerosity, and that Risukuma's Skill may set up a Counter status on all three enemies, so that the Prism Ball boosts get reflected at the player's cards (something the Egyptian Mythos Series characters did in an earlier Guild Rush event). But no, Risukuma turns them into Heart Boxes... which at least does not boost your damage. Rinse and repeat]].
* BatmanGambit: A failed attempt at this by Compile is the reason why Sega currently owns ''Puyo Puyo''. To alleviate some of the financial stress that Compile was going through in early 1998, they worked out a deal with Sega where they sold the rights to the series but retained nearly-unrestricted usage for roughly four years. Masamitsu Niitani planned to use the borrowed time to raise enough money (presumably through the multitude of SpinOff titles) to buy the series back, but the damage was already done to the company's reputation.
* BattleButler: Butler for The Prince of the Oceans. Except, he doesn't really fight.
* BeCarefulWhatYouSay, because it ties into the trope below.
* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: In ''Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary'', the story mode has your chosen character [[TournamentArc playing through a Puyo tournament]], and the prize is a medal that will grant one wish.
** Ms. Accord's wish [[{{Unreveal}} is a secret]].
** Akuma wished for no demons to be able to enter the town. While he is a demon himself, the wish only stopped demons from ''entering'', so he's just fine.
** Amitie wished to be a great spellcaster. She gets nothing, on the reasoning that she's already a great spellcaster, which she feels is a cop-out.
** Arle wished to be able to travel freely between the two worlds. She got it, [[SubvertedTrope no strings attached]].
** Baldanders was ordered by Feli to wish for her and Lemres to be happy together. Ms. Accord informs him that he could only wish for one of them to be happy. [[{{Unreveal}} We never find out who he chooses.]]
** Donguri Gaeru wished for a pond in the forest. He got it just fine.
** Feli wished for Lemres not to grow old without her. She got that, but then Ms. Accord revealed that everyone was using anti-aging spells anyway, and Feli would have been better served wishing a PlotRelevantAgeUp on herself. Feli was ''not'' happy.
** Klug wished for his success to get a 16-page spread in the local mages' magazine. Ms. Accord pointed out that this was dependent on him being successful in the first place, which he had completely failed to wish for.
** Lemres wished for the beach to turn into candy, the sea to turn into jelly, the sand into cocoa powder with powdered sugar and skimmed milk, the pebbles into chocolates, and the shells into candy. ''He gets it''.
** Lidelle was going to wish to get rid of her horns, but after meeting Satan, she grew to appreciate them. Since she didn't have a backup wish, she wished for world peace. Ms. Accord said it would be granted, but we don't ever actually see it. It would make ''Puyo Puyo 7''[='=]s [[spoiler:TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt plot]] impossible, but nothing in ''15th Anniversary'' is treated as canon anyway.
** Nasu Grave wished to be taller. No, wait, he wants to not wear spectacles. No, wait, he wants to not be an eggplant. The medal heard three wishes when it could only grant one, so it didn't grant any.
** Ocean Prince wished for all his subjects to be his servants with free food and naps. Ms. Accord informed him that he could only get one of those (servitude, food, or naps), and asked him to choose, but he ran off without realizing his wish hadn't been granted yet.
** Onion Pixie wished to be with Onionette forever.
** Oshare Bones wished to meet "that person" (his lover?) again "someday". Popoi points out that this is a poor choice of words, as it doesn't specify an actual date. Even so, they are now guaranteed to meet again...eventually...
** Raffina wished to be more beautiful. The medal did nothing, which Ms. Accord claimed was because it believed Raffina was already the most beautiful. Raffina accepted this explanation happily, but after she ran off, Popoi suggested that maybe the medal just couldn't do that.
** Rulue was going to wish to be Satan's wife, but that wouldn't stop him from going after Arle. She was then going to wish for Arle to be taken out of the picture, but then she realized that would be essentially admitting that Satan loves Arle more than he loves Rulue, and she could never do that. Unfortunately, she said all this out loud and in front of the medal, which decided to grant her "wish" of never admitting Satan's love for Arle. As Rulue immediately points out, ''this doesn't make any goddamn sense''.
** Satan was going to wish for a honeymoon under the stars with Arle, but first he felt he had to chew out Ms. Accord over her students' disrespectful behavior toward him. The medal heard him say he ought to teach them manners and granted ''that'' wish.
** Schezo wished for everyone to stop calling him a pervert. It was granted, but everyone called him a weirdo instead. Ms. Accord empathetically adds he can earn a good name for himself by improving his attitude.
** Sig wished for new insects in the forest. The medal flat-out refused, as it dislikes insects due to not having hands to brush them away.
** Suketoudara wished for anyone to be able to do a solo dance at a dance party.
** Yu and Rei both wished for the same thing; to swap places for a day. The medal granted both wishes, for a net result of not doing anything.
** Zoh Daimaoh wished to be a king who would bring peace in a rich country, in a future with hope. He got that... as far as anyone knows.
*** To sum up, 22 wishes were made in total, 8 turned out fine, 4 were corrupted by poor phrasing, 4 were flat-out not granted, 2 were ruined by thinking out loud, 2 were caught on [[MovingTheGoalposts a one-wish technicality]], Nasu Grave's was not granted due to thinking aloud ''and'' the one-wish technicality, and we never learn Ms. Accord's. If we throw out Ms. Accord's wish, that's a 62% failure rate.
* BigBad: Varies per game. After the original series, the villains got less effective.
** Most, if not all, of the games before Fever had Satan as the final boss. If he wasn't, it was likely due to someone overshadowing him. [[spoiler: Such as Doppelganger Arle in Yon.]]
** ''Fever'' technically had Popoi, a talking cat-puppet-shadow.
** ''Fever 2'' had the very popular Strange Klug. He didn't do much though as a villain.
** ''15th'' didn't have a villain to speak of. It was just one big tournament.
** ''7'' had an effective villain in [[spoiler: Ecolo.]]
** ''20th'' didn't have one either. [[spoiler: Unless you count Ecolo possessing Satan to do something crazy...]]
* BigBadDuumvirate: [[spoiler:Ecolo and a possessed Satan in the final story mode of ''20th Anniversary'']].
* BigFancyCastle: Ta-Doon-Da Castle; it's fancy, but it hangs over a cliff side and reeks of ill omens. The inside is in need of cleaning, is the location of the boss fight with Popoi and Carbuncle, [[spoiler:and it might be where the "demon" lived.]]
* BilingualBonus: The first area of ''Minna de Puyo'' is translated to "Hajimari Forest" in English. "Hajimari" is the Japanese word for "beginning".
* BlackScreenOfDeath: Happens during Schezo's ending in ''Sun''. [[spoiler:Before the final battle begins, Schezo rests the tip of his sword on Satan's sun-enlarging device and then uses it to burn the hair off of the top of Satan's head. After Schezo restores darkness to the world, a half-bald Satan sneaks up behind him. The screen goes black as Satan beats him to a pulp.]]
* BlindIdiotTranslation:
** Like many of Sega's bilingual arcade flyers, the English text on the first game's flyers vary from overly literal to nearly gibberish.
-->"In addition to the thrilling feeling when you erase the [=PUYO PUYOs=], the action of sending them to your adversary's side to obstruct him in this highly competitive videogame increases the excitement."
** ''Puzlow Kids'' runs into this in its Quest Mode. The mission objectives range from the technically correct but awkwardly-phrased "Eliminate 10 [[DubNameChange p-kids]] at a time" (clear ten Puyo at the same time) to the even more awkwardly-phrased "Eliminate 3 groups of p-kids" (perform a 3-chain), to the flat-out wrong "Let 20 paire [sic] drop in." (Drop 10 pairs; in other words, 20 Puyo.) The Scenario mode endings have correct English, but, as they're based on the English arcade game's endings, [[CutAndPasteTranslation suffer from different issues]].
** The NGPC ''Puyo Pop'' had maybe six or seven lines that needed to be translated into English. ''Every single one of them'' has grammar issues. Not to mention that the back of the European box advertises enemies named "Walleye" and "Happy." If you haven't guessed, Creator/{{SNK}} published this game outside of Japan.
** The Japanese version of ''Minna'' has an English option with a [[SurprisinglyGoodEnglish surprisingly error-free script]]...except for whenever a character is defeated. Instead of flashing "Oh no!" at the top of the opponent's field (as every other English translation does), this version uses "Baba Bing." (Obviously taken from the Japanese defeat phrase, ''batankyuu''.)
** Fever's translation is not grammatically busted like many of the aforementioned examples; instead, it is rife with [[SpellMyNameWithAnS highly-questionable name romanizations]], some of which would persist all the way until ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' more than ten years later. By far the most notable example is Lidelle, with the game using ''[[InconsistentDub three different names]]'' for her. Sega would settle on "Rider" for a bit, the problem being that this name makes sense on paper but [[NoPronunciationGuide is blatantly incorrect to anyone familiar with Japanese pronunciations]].
* BloodierAndGorier: Quite possibly the most jarring example of this trope ever. Compared to the lighthearted and cutesy ''Puyo Puyo'' games, whose cartoon violence is extremely tame on the rare occasions it's even present, the PC-98 versions of ''Madou Monogatari'' occasionally feature [[http://okiraku06.lolipop.jp/gazo/madou-2-10.bmp graphic]] [[http://puyonexus.com/mediawiki/images/2/26/Dullahammadou2.png decapitations]].
* BookEnds: [[spoiler:''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' starts with the player battling Ringo as Tee. It ends with the player battling Tee as Ringo.]]
* BootstrappedTheme: "Theme of Puyo Puyo" has gone from being something of a misnomer to serving as the series's answer to ''Tetris's'' Korobeiniki in ''Puyo Puyo Tetris''.
* BossCorridor: Satan's chamber in ''Madou Monogatari II'' is a Carbuncle-shaped one at that!
* BossGame: The first game, ''Tsu'' (especially Hard mode), and ''Box's'' Scrambled Mode are all arguable cases.
* BrainwashedAndCrazy: Depending on the routes you take in ''Rulue's Spring Break'', either Arle or Schezo are subjected to mind control by the game's BigBad, Count. They snap out of it once Rulue beats them in a fight.
** [[spoiler:Anyone possessed by Ecolo.]]
** In ''Puyo Tetris'', [[spoiler: Raffina, Feli, and Rulue become subjected to this. Feli's case is amusingly PlayedWith, as she acts almost EXACTLY the same as before. Ringo lampshades this, and Lemres' presence is needed to determine if Feli is back to normal.]]
* BreadEggsBreadedEggs: ''Puyo Puyo Tetris''[='=]s "Puyo-Tet Mix"[=/=]"Fusion" game mode, which is a ''really'' janky mashup between ''Puyo Puyo'' and ''Tetris'', complete with its own entirely alternate ruleset.
* BreakoutMookCharacter: Subverted; the game may be named after the Puyo, but they are still treated as fodder.
* BrickJoke: Chapter 10 starts the same way as Chapter 1 after Ringo is teleported into the Spaceship Tetra, down to the exact same lines, [[spoiler:except with Ex instead of Tee, and them not getting shocked when challenging to a Tetris vs. Puyo match]]. It's only after the battle that they really pay attention to the similarity.
* BrieferThanTheyThink: The period between the arcade ''Puyo Puyo'' becoming a hit and Compile losing the series to Sega is just over five years. Even if you take away the two years that Sega essentially let Compile borrow the series, Sega has been running the show for more than twice as long.
* CallAHitPointASmeerp: ''Madou Monogatari: Big Kindergarten Kids'' switches out the common gold currency for ''cookies''.
* CallBack:
** ''Puyo Puyo Fever 2'' has an interesting callback in the fact it has three storylines in each mode... starring '''A'''mitie, '''R'''affina, and '''S'''ig, identically to ''Madou Monogatari ARS'', which stood for '''A'''rle, '''R'''ulue and '''S'''chezo. [[note]]In Madou's case, it was the origin stories for the three main Madou era characters.[[/note]]
** ''Sorcery Saga'' has a cross-continuity example. Its tutorial sees the heroine climbing a tower in order to retrieve an orb that will guarantee her graduation from magic school. This is almost identical to the plot of ''Madou Monogatari I'', where Arle climbs a tower in order to retrieve three magic orbs that will guarantee her graduation from kindergarten, down to how they both qualify for the tower climb: they left it to a pencil roll to decide their answers. The difference is that [[spoiler: Arle passes, while Pupuru fails]].
** During ''Fever'' matches, characters only call out one "named" attack when making a chain. But if the player uses Tsu or Sun rule in later games, the character will call out all of their named spells in sequence, referencing the vocal patterns in those games. And in Original rule, two voice clips are dropped from the Tsu/Sun pattern, referencing the lower spell count in the first game.
** A cheat in ''20th Anniversary'' changes the Compile-era characters' attacks to their lines from ''Puyo Puyo CD Tsu'' or ''Puyo Puyo Sun'', though [[LazyArtist at the cost of attack animations]]. Even without it, Arle has a unique vocal set that gives her six named attacks instead of the usual five, matching the number of attacks that characters called called out from ''Puyo Puyo Tsu'' through ''Puyo Puyo~n''.
** ''Nazo Puyo: Arle no Roux'' and its sequels use the "experience orb" and "facial expression as health indicator" mechanics from ''Madou Monogatari 1-2-3''.
* CallingYourAttacks: Actually useful in competitive play, since it gives you an idea of how big your opponent's chain is (and yours too) and how close it is to finishing. Admittedly, when you hear them begin to repeat their strongest attack, just put the controller down.
* CanonImmigrant:
** Part of the reason why ''Puyo Puyo'' and ''Madou Monogatari'' share a page is because the prevalence of this trope makes it very difficult to cleanly split the two series. About the only things that the two series ''don't'' have in common are ''Puyo Puyo~n'''s Chico, a number of ''Madou Monogatari'' {{Mooks}}, the antagonists of ''Madou Monogatari'' Saturn, and of course, the full cast of Sega-era characters.
** One of the game modes introduced in ''Tetris'' ''did'' return for ''Chronicle'': Big Bang, a battle mode where you attempt to deplete your opponent's HP by clearing as many Fever boards within the time limit.
* CanonWelding: Inverted. ''Madou Monogatari'' and Compile's ''Puyo Puyo'' play off of each other as much as two largely NegativeContinuity series can. (One ''Madou Monogatari'' game even explores the magic that drives ''Puyo Puyo'' matches in-universe.) After the franchises split, one underwent a [[{{Retool}} soft reboot]] while the other [[InNameOnly threw out everything except its name]].
* CaramelldansenVid: You will need to look through Nico Nico Douga, though.
* CheatCode: Most SEGA era ''Puyo'' games have them. The most prominent of these is the infamous "Core AI" cheat, which [[UpToEleven takes Very Spicy AI and removes the kiddie gloves.]]
* CherryTapping: As only one specific column needs to be filled for elimination, a lowly two-chain can be enough to defeat a short-sighted opponent. ''Box'' contains straighter examples; namely, two ''Yon''-rule powers that drop a single Puyo into both players' fields.
* CircusOfFear: Minus the fear. Except the BigBad from ''~n'' wants to replace Arle from reality.
* CockFight: Satan and Schezo get on each other's nerves whenever Arle is involved.
%% ColourCodedForYourConvenience: The Puyo, natch.
* CombinationAttack: Possible in Pair Puyo mode in ''20th''. It begins to build when both teammates start a chain at around the same time and activates when a certain amount of time passes without a chain from either player.
* ComebackMechanic: Most of the Super Attacks in ''Puyo Puyo~n'', made obvious when the CPU ''repeatedly'' uses its Super Attack as it nears defeat. Fever mode is also an arguable example, given that the Fever gauge is filled through defensive action.
* CommutingOnABus: Arle Nadja, who was not the main character for almost the entire time SEGA has owned the franchise, but also is in every single game. ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle'' returns to Arle being the main player character for the first time in over a decade.
* CompressedAbstinence: Lemres tried to train without his candy for a few days. '''It doesn't go well.'''
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard:
** Satan is one of the main offenders. Your pieces will be falling extremely fast. His ''aren't''. If you can keep up with the pieces, [[HoistByHisOwnPetard this can be used against him]].
** Challenge Mode matches in ''20th Anniversary'' reverse the situation; see SNKBoss below.
* ContinuityNod:
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKd5hrVu1cY&t=9m57s This]] little exchange between Witch and Schezo in ''20th Anniversary''. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HcVLNV2SAI&t=26s It's Puyo Puyo Sun all over again!]]
** A more subtle reference is found [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kga4uPoJvmw&t=14m13s here]]. Compare with [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HcVLNV2SAI&t=3m58s this]] encounter.
** When Raffina meets Yu, she tells her "Good luck dancing without any legs!" Come ''15th Anniversary'', Suketoudara says the exact same line in Yu and Rei's story, with a lampshade from Yu.
--> '''Yu:''' Hmm... What's this strange feeling of déjà vu?
** ''Tsu'' has more than a few nods to the first game, such as a [[PersonalitySwap Personality Swapped]] version of the first game's Arle vs. Draco scene.
** ''Chronicle'' has one involving Schezo: You find him in a treasure chest in an aqueduct, and he proclaims he was hiding in there to let himself dry after falling into the stream. This isn't the first time it's happened; he once fell into a river, and took shelter in a chest in ''BOX'' while his clothes drip dried in the background. Even Schezo himself is aware of this deja vu.
* ContrivedCoincidence: Pretty much the entirety of ''Puyo Tetris''[='=] Adventure mode.
** In the prologue alone, Ringo finds the current peaceful atmosphere a little boring, so she wonders if "friends will fall from the sky." Cue Amitie and Arle doing just that, and passing it off as a Puyo match gone wrong. Ringo then wonders what else can fall from the sky and how else a Puyo match can go wrong, and jokes that they could be transported to some place like space. Cue Tetromino falling from the sky and the three of them being accidentally transported aboard the SS Tetra.
** When the SS Tetra crashes at the end of Act 1, the ship just happens to land on Ringo's school. Immediately lampshaded by Tee and Ringo. The methods to repair the ship, and the ship itself become useful in later chapters.
** When [[spoiler:Ecolo reveals the method to reach the end of space-time involves building up everyone's Puyo and Tetris power, Accord makes her first appearance in the story and comes with a neat solution: a training space that allows the users to fight against the people in their memories.]] Lampshaded immediately by Ringo, who finds the idea of [[spoiler:Accord having just finished construction on a training arena at the exact moment they need it]] extremely convenient even by the story's standards.
** In Chapter 10, [[spoiler:when Ex starts to wonder why nothing goes his way even though it's his dream, Accord shows up and drops enough hints that it is actually not his dream]].
* CouchGag: ''Tetris'' has a random character perform the SEGA Choir, as well as saying "Tetris", every time the game is started up.
* CosmeticAward:
** ''20th Anniversary'', ''Tetris'' and ''Chronicle'' have a Shop option allows you to buy alternate Puyo appearances, alternate voice clips, and in the case of ''20th Anniversary'', alternate character designs. [[NotActuallyCosmeticAward The latter two often come with unique AI patterns.]]
** Most of ''Haro no Puyo Puyo'''s unlockables are alternate voice clips that can be equipped to each character. [[spoiler: The game's final boss, [[EvilPrince Gihren Zabi]] is an exception.]]
* CosmeticallyDifferentSides:
** This trope is PlayedStraight in ''Tsu''-based modes - all characters have the same chaining power and dropset. It is {{averted|Trope}} in ''Fever''-based modes, where characters have variable dropsets and (in most cases) chaining power.
** Either way, it is also {{averted|Trope}} when the AI is playing, as each character has a different playstyle, even in Core Mode.
* CreatorCameo: Masamitsu "Moo" Niitani, president of Compile, voiced Carbuncle in the Saturn version of ''Tsu'' and Satan in all versions of ''Sun''. [[spoiler:He's also the BonusBoss in ''Super Nazo Puyo Tsu''!]]
* CurtainCall: Present in the first game and retained in ''Mean Bean Machine'' and ''Kirby's Avalanche''. In the former's case, it is the only thing that saves the ending from AWinnerIsYou.
* DarkerAndEdgier:
** ''YON'', compared to the first three games, stepped back from the comical humor and went with a slightly more serious story similar to the ''Madou Monogatari'' games.
** On the subject of ''Madou Monogatari'', it was originally presented as more serious than its spinoff, but the NEC PC-98 versions take it a step farther by making the characters look much more realistic and adding gory elements such as [[spoiler:a decapitated Schezo]].
* DeathOfAThousandCuts: By mechanic, chaining in Fever mode is slightly weaker but much faster than in normal mode.
* DefeatMeansFriendship: Somewhat...in ''Puyo Puyo~n'', ''Puyo Puyo 7'', and ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle''. In Yo~n, a select cast of characters (Draco, Seriri, Witch, and Chico) will tag along after you beat them (and even then, they have their own agenda for joining Arle), allowing you to use their special attacks. [[spoiler:This gets taken away from you when you face Satan, who walls off your allies away from the battle scene.]] In 7, a defeated person might tag along with your group for the story in ''Puyo Puyo 7'', take a few heroes and, for a short bit, Satan. As for Chronicle, just like with Yo~n, a defeated person will tag along with your party for the entirety of the story. This includes random enemies, as well as the main playable cast.
* DemotedToExtra:
** Minotauros, Mamono, and Owl Bear, all of which were final bosses in the ''Madou Monogatari'' series: Minotauros eventually becomes a background character, Mamono is a generic opponent in ''Tsu'', and Owl Bear serves as an "extra" battle in the same game. The latter two might be justified, given that Arle defeated them while in ''kindergarten''. Mamono's demotion is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in versions of ''Tsu'' that feature pre-battle conversations; the poor creature starts crying when Arle figures out that he isn't the final boss.
** Lidelle, Yu/Rei, Donguri Gaeru, Onion Pixie, Ocean Prince, Accord, and Popoi are this in Puyo Tetris, losing their playable status but having minor roles in the story mode.
** In a meta example, ''Puyo Puyo~n & Columns'' is named ''Sega Columns Deluxe'' outside of Japan.
** Fever mode slowly got hit with this since ''15th'' - being just one of the default modes in that game (Alongside ''Puyo Puyo'', ''Tsu'' and Task) instead of being the only important one, having very few appearances in ''7'''s story mode, with more focus being given to Transformation, and getting the same treatment in ''20th'' as in ''15th''. In ''Tetris'', Fever itself does not appear '''''at all''''', and only as an Endless option, partially in Big Bang Mode, and Fever dropsets in [=PuyoTet Mix=].
* DevelopersForesight: The Nazo Puyo spin-offs utilizes all the mechanics involving the player's Puyo as much as possible and creating many different goals to take advantage of them all, even utilizing mechanics that are rarely or never used in a normal Puyo Puyo game. Examples including using the "ghost" 13th row, climbing up stacks by rotating, wedging in Puyo by exploiting the Puyo's "pivot", and toying with the properties of gravity with both Iron Puyo and Blocks.
* DifficultButAwesome: T-spin Triples. Widely known as one of the most complex maneuvers to perform in ''Tetris'', a T-spin Triple requires a whole lot of planning ahead to perform, but is the single most powerful line clear type in the game, worth ''six'' garbage lines. If you can manage a Back-To-Back T-spin Triple coming off another T-spin Triple, it has roughly the same effect as scoring a [[NoKillLikeOverkill 7+ Puyo chain.]]
* DifficultyByAcceleration: Is utilized in almost every game's Scenario and Endless modes. As the games' hardware improved, they began to rely less on this and more on smarter AI; nonetheless, you can still expect fast drop speeds against later opponents.
* DifficultySpike: If you're playing an earlier game, and the field background and/or music changes, you can expect one of these to follow.
** There's even one in the Beginner's course of the first game. The drop speed against Mummy is much, much faster than the leisurely pace of the previous opponents.
** [=HaraHara=] courses aren't called "hard" for nothing.
** Story battles to Free Battle in the newer games. The story AI is barely better than the AI in the old games, while the higher level Free Battle AI opponents (Satan, Ecolo, Strange Klug, Accord, etc) will make short work of anyone without an intermediate level of Puyo knowledge.
* DivergentCharacterEvolution:
** There were no notable differences between characters in ''Sun''. ''Yon'' introduces character-unique Super Attacks, ''Fever'' and ''7'' use Dropsets and character-specific score tables, and Ice Block mode from the ''Anniversary'' titles have character-specific color sets.
** Four of the characters that were introduced in ''7'' ([[CommutingOnABus reintroduced]] in Draco's case) used the same dropsets and scoring tables as characters from ''Fever''/''Fever 2''. When said ''Fever'' characters returned in ''20th Anniversary'', the ''7'' characters received new dropsets. (They still share scoring tables with their predecessors, though.)
* DolledUpInstallment:
** ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'s Avalanche'', ''VideoGame/DrRobotniksMeanBeanMachine'' and...''[[Disney/TheLionKing Timon and Pumbaa's]] Bug Drop''?
** Given the series's history with this trope, ''Haro no Puyo Puyo'' almost feels like a subversion.
** Happened again (in '''''2015!''''') with ''Puyo Puyo!! Quest'' becoming ''Cranky Food Friends.''
* DownerEnding: All three stories in ''Sun'' have this PlayedForLaughs:
** [[spoiler: Draco gets her tan...[[EmbarrassinglyPainfulSunburn a bit too much of it in fact]].]]
** [[spoiler: Arle stops Satan's plan to grow the sun...only for Carbuncle to grow it back again.]]
** [[spoiler: Schezo also stops Satan, only to be attacked by the latter for his baldness-inducing cheap shot earlier.]]
* DownloadableContent: ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' moves a vast majority of the most common unlockables to DLC (extra alternate voices and Puyo/Tetris skins, for example). Naturally, the rereleases on the current-gen consoles have all the DLC added in.
** ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle'' continues this little trend, adding things such as extra dungeons and boss fights alongside extra music.
* DubNameChange:
** All over the place in the English translation of the first game. Arle is called Silvana, Nasu Grave is called Blue Ghost (despite being neither), Panotty becomes...[[MakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext Johnny]], and [[{{Bowdlerise}} Satan is called Dark Prince]]. Out of these, "Dark Prince" is the only name change that sticks, as it is also used in ''Puzlow Kids'', the Neo Geo Pocket Color port of ''Tsu'', the Game Boy Advance ''Puyo Pop'', and ''Puyo Puyo Tetris''.
** ''Puzlow Kids'' changes Puyo to "P-Kids."
** The ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' characters have single-letter names directly referencing the various Tetrimino shapes; the English version makes this less obvious by giving them longer but phonetically identical names. (For example, T becomes Tee, J becomes Jay and L becomes Elle.)
** The English version ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' also changes the game mode "Puyo-Tet Mix" to the simpler, yet aptly named "Fusion".
* DuelsDecideEverything: Just about any problem that happens can be settled with a Puyo match. An elephant blocking your way? Settle it with Puyo. Going to stop the BigBad's plan of the day? Settle it with Puyo. Two people trying to stop the Big Bad but only one of them can? Settle it with Puyo! If you're part of the crew of the SS Tetra, it's settled it with {{VideoGame/Tetris}}, and it works much the same way.
* DummiedOut:
** Almost all of the SNES and Mega Drive ''Puyo Puyo'' games (''Mean Bean Machine'' and ''Kirby's Avalanche'' included) have menus that are normally inaccessible to players.
** The first arcade game has a "stuttering" Diacute, akin to what happens when you use Diacute twice in ''Madou Monogatari''.
** The Mega Drive version of the first game has an "Insert Coin" prompt from the arcade version hidden within it. The Dreamcast version of ''Fever'' also has graphical assets that are used in the arcade version's main menu, alongside completely-unused English equivalents.
** ''Super Puyo Puyo's'' debug menu features a "Sousai" (Offset) option; however, it is only partially implemented. The same debug menu has a "Hard Puyo" option, which forces Nuisance Puyo to be "cleared" twice before they disappear.
** The Mega Drive version of ''Tsu'' has several unused voice clips, including alternate spells for Arle and catchphrases/lose quotes for a few enemies. Some would be used in later ports.
** The GBA ''Puyo Pop'' almost exclusively recycles voice clips from ''Sun'', so it shouldn't be much of surprise that ''Sun's'' TitleScream is buried within the game's audio data.
** Schezo has one unused expression for ''20th Anniversary'' shown [[http://i.imgur.com/ERjHtc9.png here.]]
* DynamicDifficulty: Big Bang employs this by varying your Fever boards based on the number of boards you've cleared without getting a Miss. More clears give bigger, more complex Fevers that give bigger chains if done correctly, while getting a Miss gradually reduces the size of the Fever and makes it easier to clear, while reducing the maximum possible chain. Lucky Attack boards in ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' also start tossing out T-spin boards if you clear enough within the time limit.
* DysfunctionJunction: Nearly everyone except Arle has some serious problems, though they're usually played for laughs.
* EarlyBirdCameo: In ''Tetris'', everyone goes to a virtual training space where they fight people in their memories to build up Puyo and Tetris power. O happens to summon [[spoiler:Ex, who reveals that he's the cause behind the game's events]], but he doesn't appear in person until the next chapter.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: It may not be much, but these little differences in the first game have more impact than you'd think.
** The MSX/FDS ''Puyo Puyo's'' competitive mode is an afterthought, only Arle and Carbuncle are present, and the game uses six colors.
** The first arcade game only utilizes one button (though pretty much all of its ports add counter-clockwise rotation) and reduces the color count to five. The games default to four colors starting with ''Tsu'', though they often come with the option to use 5 colors via handicap settings.
** Even putting aside that the first arcade game has only one rotation button, the game and its ports are slightly tougher to control than later games thanks to less developed rotation quirks. The most notable omission is the lack of the "double rotation" mechanic that allows you to flip the controlled Puyo pair 180 degrees if you're locked into a tight space. It doesn't seem like much on paper, but ''will'' lose you at least a couple of matches that you wouldn't lose in other games.
** Multiple playable characters didn't exist until ''Sun''; Arle narrated both sides of the field in the first two arcade games.
* EasyModeMockery:
** Once you clear the Beginner course in the first game, Satan dismisses the accomplishment before flying off.
** Cleared Puyo Puyo SUN on the Easy Route? Have fun trying to read the credits!
* EmbeddedPrecursor: ''Super Nazo Puyo: Rulue no Roux'' has two main scenarios, one of which is a remake of ''Nazo Puyo: Arle no Roux''.
* EverythingsBetterWithSpinning: The chain animations. Taken to its fullest in ''20th'', thanks to the fully animated sprites.
* EvilTowerOfOminousness: Primp Town has one on the edge of town. It hosts, get this, the Endless Modes in ''Fever 2''.
* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: Many, ''many'' examples, given that most of the early characters began as generic RPG enemy classes. The aforementioned [[CuteWitch Witch]] is a start.
** ADogNamedDog: Applies to pretty much every non-human character from the Compile games.
** Notably, the game ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' is exactly that. A VideoGame/{{Tetris}} game where you can also play Puyo Puyo, or even a combined form of BOTH games, that uses almost exclusively the art style and characters from the Puyo Puyo games.
* ExcitedShowTitle: ''15th'' and ''20th Anniversary'' both fall under here.
* ExcusePlot: Pretty much every game. For example:
** The plot of the first arcade game is essentially "Arle has learned a new spell and she's going to go beat Satan with it!" ...and even that much comes from the [[AllThereInTheManual instruction booklet of the home ports]]. The Cut-and-Paste plot from the English arcade game (and presumably ''Puzlow Kids'') has "Silvana" defending her home against the Dark Prince's Black Kingdom.
** In ''Sun'', Satan enlarges the sun as part of a devious plot to...get the ultimate tan.
** In ''Yon'', A magic trick at a travelling carnival has Carbuncle disappear, only revealing at the very end that it was [[spoiler: Doppleganger Arle]] who stole him in order to lure Arle to them after Satan accidentally released them from a prison they presumably want to trap Arle in. Notably, with the portable version, it completely drops the implied KillAndReplace and plays it as AllJustADream.
** Most of the plots are excuses for the Fever series, as they're all done to play the named game; Fever 1 has finding Accord's cane (which no explanation why and how she lost a ''flying'' wand), ''Fever 2'' involves trying to find a special guest and some {{MacGuffin}}s, ''15th Anniversary'' is a tournament...
** 7 has something along the lines of, "The 7 wonders of the world, to play Puyo with 7 players." [[spoiler: Turns out it isn't much of an excuse, though, as all of those battles rip open a dimensional rift...]]
** The MSX game and the first two Nazo Puyo titles [[NoPlotNoProblem don't even bother]].
* FailureIsTheOnlyOption:
** Nuisance Puyo are dropped at a rate of 30 Puyo (five rows) at a time, with the player being allowed to place a pair between waves. Many times, the round is already decided once the first set of Nuisance is dropped and the turns between Nuisance waves are worthless. Players and CPU alike often just manual drop their Puyo straight down to get the round over with.
** The first two ''Nazo Puyo'' games do not explicitly tell the player that they've failed a mission; after the player has used all of their alotted Puyo, the games will endlessly provide pairs that are completely irrelevant to the current puzzle. This changes in ''Arle no Roux'', where the player is given a hard limit on the number of pairs that they will receive for a given puzzle.
* FakeBalance:
** Console ''Yon'' uses an inverted variation of "unbalanced skillset." Characters with situational Super Attacks are given quick charge times... but the quick charge times don't make the attacks any less situational.
** The separate charge times in general are a case of "skill underestimated," as even the slowest characters (aside from maybe [[JokeCharacter Skeleton-T]]) will either hit full SP or come close to it off of a decently-sized chain. The only time it even remotely comes into play is when three or four Super Attacks have already been used and SP gain thus slows to a crawl.
** The Puyo vs Tetris match-up in ''Puyo Puyo Tetris''. In theory, the Puyo player is meant to play the role of MightyGlacier, while the Tetris player is the FragileSpeedster. In practice, Puyo rule is similar to the SkillGateCharacter trope, dominating lower-level Tetris players but getting completely stuffed by high-level Tetris players. Ultimately, not even the power advantage holds up; certain Perfect Clear/T-Spin Tetris combos can single-handedly fill a Puyo field. This is after there was a balance patch that ''nerfed Tetris'' in the very first versions of the game, by the way.
* FakeDifficulty: Having a single rotation button in the first arcade button comes off as this; not only is its Mega-Drive-in-a-cabinet hardware more than capable of handling extra buttons, two-way rotation is included in literally every Puyo game before or after. Including the nearly 1:1 Mega Drive port that was released no more than two months later.
** The early ''Nazo Puyo'' games have a much less ambiguous case. The player's only gets to preview a single pair of Puyo, while the puzzles often require multiple Puyo placed in a specific sequence. This basically means restarting the puzzle over and over until the player memorizes the order in which the Puyo pairs fall. Oh, and we did mention that the games will drop useless pairs endlessly instead of telling the player that they've failed, right?
* FallingBlocks: The blocks are called Puyo.
* FiveManBand: The students from Primp Magic School.
** TheLeader: Amitie
** TheLancer: Raffina
** TheSmartGuy: Klug
** TheBigGuy: Tarutaru
** TheChick: Lidelle
** SixthRanger: Sig
* {{Flanderization}}: As this series loves RunningGags, it happens to essentially anyone that lasts more than two entries. Schezo and Satan are notable examples, with Schezo's AccidentalInnuendo and Satan's VillainousCrush consuming their respective characterizations.
** Also, Arle steadily got more cruel and heartless with her put-downs, with only her encounter with [[spoiler: Doppleganger Arle]] making her seemingly realize how much of a monster she's turning into.
** ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' is somewhat worse in that regard, seeing as some characters are flanderized to the point of coming off as one dimensional.
* FourElementEnsemble: In ''Puyo Puyo~n'', Draco, Seriri, Witch, and Chico joins your party.
* FourIsDeath:
** When four puyo of the same color connect they explode. Also means death for your opponent, since he/she is about to get hit with nuisance puyo!
** [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt Puyo Puyo 7 was the fourth game in the Fever Reboot.]] You don't need to get any farther than that.
** ''Puyo Puyo~n'' was the fourth and last main-series game from Compile.
* FreakyFashionMildMind: Akuma seems mean, but he helps Sig(sorta) in ''Fever 2''. Sig himself is half-demon, but doesn't harm anyone.
* GameBreakingBug: First-run copies of ''15th Anniversary'' could only perform [[UsefulNotes/PowersOfTwoMinusOne 255]] game saves.
* GameplayAndStoryIntegration: In ''Puyo Puyo~n'', where Carbuncle is stolen, he doesn't appear at all on the playfield, when all other games have an area set aside for Carbuncle to play around in. Slightly subverted on Dreamcast, where Carbuncle DOES appear... on the VMU's screen!
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar:
** On the cover of ''Pocket Puyo Puyo'', it shows a picture of [[http://i.imgur.com/ETPBXv7.png Arle vaulting over a red Puyo.]] Seems innocent enough...until you notice Satan in the background completely red in the face from [[PantyShot what he saw.]]
** Schezo's habit of fumbling on his sentences leads to some questionable conversations. For starters, Amitie and Ringo mistook Schezo's botched up speech in ''7'' as a suggestion of ''having a threesome''. Astonishingly, the ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' localization, instead of downplaying it, '''accentuates''' it, with references that go up to ''sexual assault.'' ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' has an age rating of ''[=E10+=]/PEGI 3''.
** In ''15th'', Rulue flirts with Sig because of his abnormally large left arm. On top of the already shady implications with her flirting with someone that's [[VagueAge (implied)]] to be in his early teens, her dialogue is laced with comments about "taming" Sig and "saying more than just 'yes'".
** In ''20th'', Rulue like other characters has an alternative voice set you can purchase. The voice set was supposed to make her sound drowsy, but due to the inflection used it can also easily sound like ''orgasms''.
** Mild example, but Raffina in the English version of ''Fever'' says "Damn" in an otherwise E rated game.
* GratuitousEnglish:
** A good amount of the [[CallingYourAttacks called attacks]] use this. Most even manage to get out close-to-correct pronunciations.
** Incubus lives for this and is known for his infamous [[PrecisionFStrike "Oh, Shit!"]] in SUN.
** Suketoudara also frequently shouts "Fiiiiiish!" and "Let's dancing!" in his cutscenes and introductions...in that Japanese games, at least.
* HaveANiceDeath: In addition to having [[ThisCannotBe defeat portraits]], opponents in ''Tsu'' and ''Box'' celebrate ''your'' defeat as well.
* HenshinHero: Puyo Puyo 7's Henshin mechanic transforms characters into their younger or older selves. It did not return in the following games.
* HoistByTheirOwnPetard:
** It's easy to accidentally clog your field if you aren't paying attention. Starting with ''Fever'', the spaces that will end you are marked with X's in order to lessen the chances of this happening.
** Thanks to the lack of Offsetting in Original rule, it is possible to make a chain that is actually ''too large''. A 5-6 chain is enough to bury the opponent; going any higher gives the opponent a chance to finish their chain first, which usually means death.
** In ''Minna de Puyo'', there's a Nuisance Puyo type called Point Puyo. It functions like any ordinary Nuisance Puyo, but clearing it adds extra Nuisance Puyo ([[CaptainObvious and points]]) to your attack or offset. You might get a rude awakening when your opponent digs out the pile you just sent to them.
** Also prevalent in Ice Block mode. Instead of sending Nuisance Puyo, players send frozen-over regular Puyo that thaw after three turns. [[LuckBasedMission Attack at the wrong time]], and watch your opponent get a massive chain.
** The final boss in Yon, [[spoiler: Doppelganger Arle]]. They did have to put the blocks to summon a million garbage blocks on BOTH sides!
** Unlike Nuisance Puyo, Nuisance Tetrominos are actually able to be used, as they take the form of a line of "garbage" Tetrominos that have a one-block gap somewhere. If you're really savvy with Tetris, it's possible to fire back with a chain of your own by clearing lines of Nuisance Tetrominos as long as you can actually reach the bottom of your stack.
* HolidayMode: If you check out the ''Puyo SUN'' Music room during the month of December (if a clock function exists for the system), the characters will be dressed up in Santa suits!
* {{Iconic Sequel Character}}s: Amitie and Ringo, who debuted 12 and 18 years, respectively, after the MSX / Famicom Disk System ''Puyo Puyo''.
** Sig and Feli debuted in ''Puyo Puyo Fever 2'', one game later than Amitie (and the soft reboot).
* IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels:
** Goes as follows in Fever 1 and 2.
*** [=RunRun=]
*** [=WakuWaku=]
*** [=HaraHara=]
** Additionally, setting the difficulty for VS play utilizes spiciness levels, going from "Very Sweet" to "Very Spicy".
*** AllThereInTheManual: ...which references Arle's little known fondness for curry.
* IKnowYoureInThereSomewhereFight: In Puyo Tetris, [[spoiler:Amitie to Raffina, Ringo to Feli, and Arle to Rulue. The first two are eventually cured after being defeated in a Puyo/Tetris Swap match, but Rulue has an interesting case where she comes to her senses simply from having Arle and Schezo chant Satan's name. Of course, Rulue still gets mad at Arle and challenges her to a fight anyway.]]
* ImageSong: Sega released ''Puyo Puyo Vocal Tracks'', a CD featuring vocalized versions of the cast's theme songs. Volume 1[[note]]Arle, Amitie, Ringo, Rulue, Sig and Witch[[/note]] was released on March 27, 2013, Volume 2[[note]]Schezo, Klug, Lemres, Yu and Rei, Maguro, and Satan[[/note]] was released November 14, 2013, and Volume 3[[note]]Carbuncle, Suketoudara, Ocean Prince, Popoi, Donguri Gaeru and Onion Pixie[[/note]] was released on November 26, 2015.
* InNameOnly:
** ''Puyo Puyo Gaiden: Puyo Wars'', whose only connection to the main games is the fact that Puyo are used as ammo.
** ''Sorcery Saga: Curse of the Great Curry God'' is a legally-necessitated example.[[note]]Notably, None of the original ''Madou Monogatari'' have used the Sorcery Saga title.[[/note]]
* IncreasinglyLethalEnemy: Margin time is a mutual PlayerVersusPlayer example, almost certainly designed to hurry players that can't chain properly off of arcade machines.
* InnocentInnuendo:
** When Schezo says "Be my desire!" ...he wanted something entirely different from what the other person was thinking. Notably, this only applies to the Japanese version of the games.
** Maguro's "you-know-whats", mentioned by Ringo in ''20th Anniversary''. [[spoiler: She means his face.]]
* InstantExpert: Pretty much EVERYONE in Puyo Tetris quickly learns the rules of the other game they're not used to playing. Taken UpToEleven with Lemres, who learns Tetris so quickly that he claims he can probably even beat the person who just taught it to him five seconds ago... and since you play as him in the next stage, he does.
* InstantRunes: Some attacks, but then again, these kids use magic.
* InterfaceScrew: The very nature of ''15th Anniversary'''s Spotlight rule. Unless light is shining on that spot, you can't see worth a damn.
* InventoryManagementPuzzle:
** In ''Fever 2'', you can carry up to [[ArcWords 24 items]]. Selecting chat or beating a [=HaraHara=] Course[[note]]Or talking to Oshare at one point, or beating Raffina's [=WakuWaku=] Course.[[/note]] rewards you with an item, along side using the shop. [[ButThouMust You]] ''[[ButThouMust also]]'' [[ButThouMust must take the item if you talk to them]], and Oshare won't give you items to replace it. So, in turn, you have to waste items in the courses... ''[[ButThouMust which you can't leave]]'' '''either''' [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption unless you lose, quit,]] or beat the course.
** Game Gear ''Madou Monogatari'' games only limited you to nine item slots per bag. You would have to discard an item if you found another and want to keep it.
* ItsAllUpstairsFromHere:
** ''Tsu's'' default mode sees Arle scaling a tower occupied by rival Puyo Puyo players.
** [[spoiler:Inverted in ''Yo~n's'' final stage. The player has to dig their way through high-health Hard Puyo in order to reach one of two 500k Point Puyo, which generates enough nuisance to bury the opponent dozens of times over.]]
* ItMakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext: Oh, boy... SUN, most of the plots, the reasons to fight, and Klug's... [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything "magic magazine".]]
-->'''Amitie:''' I never knew that you read this kind of book. ''(blushes)'' Gee...\\
'''Klug:''' What, no! That's the ''wrong page''!
* LargeHam: The higher the chain goes, the louder the character can get. Akuma, on some cases, [[VocalDissonance starts screaming]].
* LighterAndSofter:
** ''Puyo Puyo'' compared to ''Madou Monogatari''. Considering that ''Madou Monogatari'' had a [[spoiler: headless Schezo...]] ''Madou Monogatari'' was loaded with NightmareFuel in general!
** ''Madou Monogatari: Big Kindergarten Kids'' is this to the original ''Madou Monogatari''. It's filled to the brim with cuteness!
** ''Puyo Puyo'' became even softer starting with ''Fever''. The original series, while still largely made for younger audiences, did indulge in some {{Fanservice}} and things that might be considered gross or strange like zombies and foot monsters. When Sega took the helm, they swept most of that away and introduced their own cuddly stable of humans and creatures. Sega does [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar flirt with the Radar]] at times, but odds are that we'll never see pinup shots of Draco or a kid zombie losing his eyeball ever again.
*** ''Quest'', being a giant TheBusCameBack moment, provides some insight as to where Sega stands on Compile's work. Most of the characters are kept, but the aforementioned zombies and foot monster (along with a few more characters) are completely absent, Succubus goes from a {{Dominatrix}} to something far less provocative, and the summer-themed Draco card dons a fairly-conservative beach top and shorts instead of going for the obvious ''Sun'' CallBack. The one character who isn't toned down from their Compile-era appearance... [[spoiler: Doppelganger Arle, who smirks cruelly and, in contrast to Arle, looks even more like an EvilTwin than when she debuted!]]
* LightningBruiser: Tetris in ''Puyo Tetris''. Played competently and fast enough, a good Tetris player can hammer out T-spins and Tetrises faster than a Puyo player can build chains. As a result, they can constantly rain down garbage Puyo in layers, giving them little way for chain building, or in extreme combo rushing cases, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption "nearly unsalvageable"]] for the opponent.
* LimitBreak:
** ''Puyo Puyo Fever'' introduced Fever Mode, which a player would enter when his or her power bar was full. During Fever Mode, sets of already-built chains drop into the playing field, just waiting for you to pop them and unleash a HUGE attack on your opponent.
** ''Puyo Puyo 7'' added henshin mode, which actually causes your character to transform, along with all their Puyo. Chibi mode is like Fever, only the Puyo are tiny, whereas in Deka mode you play with ''huge'' Puyo that pop in groups of 3 and every match counts as a chain.
* LimitedAnimation:
** All over the place in ''7''. There were only about three sprites per character during their normal form, and two (some even only have one sprite with moving limbs) for each of their transformation forms. Carbuncle lacks any transformation forms (probably because he's an animal).
** Also exists in ''Puyo Tetris''. There are only three or four animations for the character's attack animations, plus one or two animations for tanking a large amount of Puyo, and are reduced down to cut-ins on the bottom screen. Not having full-body animations is understandable, considering how obstructive they can be when trying to perform Tetris combos.[[note]]They do have full-body animations when they win or lose, but they only have ONE for each.[[/note]]
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: Just... [[http://www.puyonexus.com/wiki/List_of_characters LOOK AT THIS]]! That's not even ''all'' of the existing characters. Yeah, sure, most of it's composed of characters unimportant to the plot, but just counting those that actually matter, there are over 45+. Let's not get started with Puyo Quest adding even ''more'' minor characters to the roster.
* LongSongShortScene: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyHM6C_z14Y Memories of Puyo Puyo]], which plays during the first game's Stage 1-8 pre-battle conversations. The song, which was previously used as the ''Madou Monogatari I'' dungeon theme, is fully remixed; however, almost none of the game's conversations last longer than 15 seconds. Amusingly enough, ''Mean Bean Machine'' features a cover of the song in a place where it can be fully appreciated...only to remove the last bit of the melody.
* LoveDodecahedron: Minotaurus wants Rulue, who wants Satan, who wants Arle, and Arle isn't interested. Most fans add another line by making Arle interested in Schezo, who has shown no ([[InnocentInnuendo real, intentional]]) affection ever. On top of that, Incubus wants Arle, though it's not clear whether it's for real reasons or just because he's a HornyDevil.
** PsychoticLoveTriangle: In the Game Gear ''Madou Monogatari II'', Schezo comes to Arle's aid when she confronts Satan and they ask her to pick between the two. [[spoiler:If she picks either of them, Satan will beat Schezo. If she picks neither, Schezo will take her power and Satan will take her soul, resulting in a game over]].
* LuckBasedMission: Many, many examples throughout the series. Heck, the very nature of the game means that there will be times where the color that you need just won't show up.
** "Nohoho AI" back in ''Tsu''. Nohoho (and his Fever counterpart Donguri Gaeru) would stack Puyo to the brim on the three rightmost columns on the field, clear one group, and pray the pile would magically create a chain or two. It may sound impractical (competitively speaking), but it won't be a laughing matter if you get hit with a five or six chain. (Suketoudara, Harpy, and Yu & Rei use similar "gimmick" stacking patterns, but none of theirs are quite as effective.)
** The placement of ''Sun's'' eponymous Sun Puyo is completely random. Players, particularly those that rely on long chains, are basically at the mercy of the game anytime that they Offset Nuisance Puyo.
** Fever mode is this. If you have bad luck, you'll end up getting the wrong type of Puyo. Crafty players can build onto the chain, otherwise the Fever is pretty much wasted.
** ''15th Anniversary'' adds many new battle modes. One of them is Non-Stop Fever, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. While it's appropriately awesome to be in LimitBreak mode all the time, you're basically clearing the warning Puyo you start with and then hoping your opponent gets a Puyo they can't match before you do.
** In ''15th'', there's a chance that all eight levels on any story mode will be different; a roulette is done to decide the games, which has (but not limited to) ''Tsu'' rules, Rotation, Underwater, and even classic Puyo rules (no offsetting).
** ''20th Anniversary'' adds Slots mode, which throws random effects after a certain amount of Puyo is cleared (30 is the default) ranging from erasing all nuisance puyo, freezing your opponent's puyo, to even ''swapping your field with your opponent(s)''. It's not uncommon to have a long chain turned on its head or even switched off to someone else, but it can also save you [[NormallyIWouldBeDeadNow when you'd normally be knocked out]] or even knock you out itself.
* {{Macguffin}}:
** Satan's evil plot of the day.
** The Lantern of the Stars and the Rock of the Moon in ''Fever 2''.
** The wishgranting medal of ''15th''.
** [[LivingMacguffin Arle]] for ''7''.
** [[spoiler: Ecolo]] in ''20th''.
* {{Mascot}}: In-series; Primp Town has "Puyo" ''everywhere''.
* MascotMook: Puyo were the resident [[Franchise/DragonQuest Slime]] equivalents in the ''Madou Monogatari'' series.
* MatchThreeGame: The "Match Four" varient.
* MiniGame: Not in the series proper, but it is one in ''VideoGame/SegaSuperstars'' and ''Sega Superstars Tennis''. And that's saying nothing of the other mini-games at Puyo Puyo Fever's websites.
* MillionToOneChance: Klug discovers how to unlock the power of his book [[spoiler: to release the demon inside, which posseses him]]. Conviently, ''during that same day'', Lemres, Klug's hero, is delivering ''the exact items needed to unlock the book'' to Ms Accord '''''[[TooDumbToLive with no protection]]''''' on these magical items, and you can see where this goes afterwards.
** ConvenientQuesting: All three playable characters were hunting for the items for their own uses that Lemres were delivering, which were, of course, in '''[[BigBad Strange Klug's]] hands'''; taking them away depowered him.
* MirrorMatch: One of the potential opponents in ''Box's'' Scrambled Mode is the ''Puyo Puyo~n'' version of Arle. It's also perfectly possible in most of the games' Free Battle mode.
* MissionPackSequel: ''Nazo Puyo'' and ''Nazo Puyo 2'' for the UsefulNotes/GameGear are basically the first Game Gear ''Puyo Puyo'' minus Scenario and Endless Modes. The only major distinction between the two ''Nazo Puyo'' games are their title screens, music, and Continue options. (The first uses passwords while the second has battery-backed storage.) The third GG Nazo Puyo game, ''Arle no Roux'', averts this by adding light RPG mechanics.
** ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle'' also focused on RPG mechanics in an attempt to avert the trope, this time for the ''Anniversary'' line of games.
* MultiplayerDifficultySpike: Most definitely. The ability to perform a 5 chain is enough to carry you through the first three games' single-player modes, but you'll need a lot more than that to defeat an expert player. The spike is slightly lessened in the Sega games, as opponents in Free Battle can perform anywhere from 3 to 6 chains at will.
* MythologyGag:
** The "stuttering" audio effect used on the characters' voices at the end of large Fever chains references the damage-doubling Diacute spell from ''Madou Monogatari'', which had a similar side effect.
** In ''15th Anniversary'', when playing in the hardest difficulty, matches against Satan in Story Mode emulate a bug in ''Tsu'' in which puyos drop slower when pressing down.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In ''20th Anniversary'', Ringo basically tells an amnesiac [[spoiler: Ecolo]] that people don't enjoy pranks, but really enjoy Puyo matches instead. [[spoiler: Bad idea. Ecolo soon gets bored with making people happy through Puyo matches one person at a time and tries to find a way to make [[WellIntentionedExtremist everyone happy on a large scale,]] eventually going as far as to try to possess Satan himself.]]
* NiceMeanAndInbetween: Arle, Schezo and Draco respectively in ''SUN''. Arle gives [[DefeatEqualsFriendship friendly banter]] post victory, Schezo flat out mocks his opponents, and Draco dishes out playful boasting.
* NintendoHard: Several examples.
** The game rules themselves. Newcomers might call it a "casual" game because you can periodically get away with some lucky chains, but actually pulling off huge chains with regularity and consistency requires intricate preplanning and working with the pieces you have. A single wrongly-placed piece can disrupt your chain, and so can accidentally firing off a chain too early or doing one in the wrong place. Most players can set up 2-3 chains, but anything higher than that requires serious practice.
** Long before Puyo Puyo came to be, the ''Madou Monogatari'' games '''did not have an HP or MP bar.''' You were only given descriptions of Arle's HP, MP, and how much damage she takes in battle. No exact numbers, except for your gold count, were given to you.
** The first Puyo game in particular didn't have the Offset rule, not to mention that the arcade version is played using ''one button''.
** ''Nazo Puyo: Arle no Roux'' has missions that require the player to fully understand and exploit how Puyo rotation is programmed. '''[[http://i.imgur.com/TuMBmct.png In the first area.]]''' And even when you do figure out the trick (hint: [[spoiler:always keep your pivot Puyo at the bottom]]), you're still probably going to lose several puzzles due to execution errors.
* NoFairCheating: Like many FallingBlocks games, ''Puyo Puyo'' hides every piece on the screen whenever the game is paused.
* NonStandardGameOver: ''Tsu'' ends if Arle runs out of opponents to battle on a given floor. However, it is nearly impossible to lose the game this way. (Unsuccessful rounds count toward your EXP total, each floor has an extra, hidden opponent, etc.)
* NoticeThis: Nomi, a '''three pixel wide''' minor character, requires this in order to be noticed, being a flea and all.
* NotMeThisTime: Both Satan and Ecolo are blamed for the events of Puyo Tetris. [[spoiler:It's not them.]]
* ObviousRulePatch: Arguably the entire point of ''Tsu''. Offset places emphasis on building the best chain, whereas matches in the first game were won by becoming the first player to generate ''just'' enough Nuisance to bury the opponent. Margin Time keeps players who can't chain very well from hogging the arcade machine forever.
* OffModel: Several of the Disc Station games, likely due to the fact that they were regular releases in a disk magazine and thus presumably had little time or budget dedicated to them. Notorious examples include ''[[http://i.imgur.com/U6CjAYb.png Madou Monogatari: The Final Test]]'' for Windows and the two ''[[http://i.imgur.com/tYS0jbI.png Daimadou Senryaku Monogatari]]'' games for PC-98.
* OhCrap:
** In the first two games, ''Mean Bean Machine'', and ''Kirby's Avalanche'', a mugshot of the opponent is shown on the screen. As their side of the screen fills, they will gain a scared/frustrated look on their face, then start sweating, and finally start flashing. The games also try to invoke this in the player, as the enemy gains a happy/smug look when the player's field is more than half-full and [[SongsInTheKeyOfPanic panic music]] starts playing when there are only a few free rows left.
** The newer games change the character portrait in the background to a frame of their "damaged" animation whenever the field is halfway full.
* OneGameForThePriceOfTwo: Zigzagged with ''Madou Monogatari 1-2-3'', which is three games in one...that were later sold separately on the Game Gear. It appeared that ''Madou Monogatari ARS'', which is also a 3-in-1 package, was going to receive similar treatment; however, only the A(rle) portion actually saw a separate release.
* OnlySixFaces: The series' artstyle as of ''20th'' uses one head shape for ''every single humanoid, non-anthromorphic character'', regardless of age or gender. Most of those characters have the same eye shape as well, resulting in faces that vary only in eye color and whether or not the character has BlushStickers or "whiskers" like Arle, Amitie, and Ringo. Hairstyles and other accessories go a long way toward hiding this, but even then a few characters still stick out. (''Quest's'' Rebecca essentially being an off-colored Witch, for example.)
%% * OurMonstersAreDifferent
* OurMermaidsAreDifferent: Seriri, although she seems to believe in the eat-the-mermaid myth.
* OurMonstersAreWeird:
** Satan and Ecolo aren't the only weird ones; you also have a gay skeleton, skeletons who drink tea, off-tune harpies, lovelorn minotaurs, acorn-frog hybrids...
** Even the Dolled-Up/licensed entries get in on the action. ''Haro no Puyo Puyo'''s TrueFinalBoss is [[spoiler:a sentient ''vase'']].
* OutOfCharacterAlert: To Arle in ''Tetris'', Rulue not mentioning Satan at all during a conversation is enough to tip her that something is off.
* PaletteSwap:
** The N-Gage ''Puyo Pop'' features most of the characters from the first Puyo Puyo...except that they all have vastly different color palettes than the original sprites. A straighter example is Harpy; her sprite is used twice, with each opponent having different hair color.
** Years prior, Harpy got this treatment in the English arcade game as part of her {{Bowdlerization}}.
** ''Box'' gets a lot of mileage out of this trope. All of the Doppelgangers except Doppelganger Arle are palette swaps, while most of the ''Yon'' characters use blatant edits of their ''Tsu'' mugshots. [[RuleOfThree And yes, there is more than one version of Harpy.]]
* PunBasedTitle: The "Tsu" in ''Puyo Puyo Tsu'' means "master" and is also the number "two" spoken with a Japanese accent. Likewise, the "SUN" in ''Puyo Puyo Sun'' means "three" and also references the new Sun Puyo. Finally, "yon" means "four", hence, ''Puyo Puyo~n''.
* PunctuatedForEmphasis: When [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hfyAtH335c#t=5m46s Arle and Ringo suspect Satan and Ecolo may be involved in the falling Tetris blocks]]:
--> '''Arle''': You...
--> '''Ringo''': Don't...
--> '''Arle''': Think...
--> '''Ringo''': That...
--> '''Arle''': It's...
--> '''Ringo''': Them...
--> '''Both''': [[OhCrap Again...!!!]]
* PutOnABus: Everyone except Arle and Carbuncle after the ChangingOfTheGuard in ''Fever''.
** CommutingOnABus: Panotty before ''Minna'' put him on the bus long-term. There's also the Sega characters mentioned under DemotedToExtra.
** TheBusCameBack: ''Puyo Puyo!! Quest'' has almost every single character from both eras; additionally, Nasu Grave, Zoh Daimaoh, and Skeleton-T appear in exactly one "regular" Sega entry before disappearing again.
** LongBusTrip: The characters that have yet to show up in ''Quest'', including Zombie, Mini-Zombie, Sukiyapodes, Nomi, and Choppun, are either on a long trip or flat-out ExiledFromContinuity.
* QuirkyTown: Primp Town seems to fit the bill. Residents include a ditzy student mage, a spacey half-demon boy, a CampGay fashionista skeleton, and that's just the tip of the iceberg.
* RareCandy: Golden Apples in the ''Madou'' games give you an instant level up. Some are in chests, others...are in weirder places. [[spoiler:In ''Final Test'', you have to run straight into a wall to find one!]]
* RecurringRiff: Several, the most notable being "Theme of Puyo Puyo" from the first arcade game and "Area A" from ''Tsu''.
* RecycledTitle:
** There's the MSX/FDS ''Puyo Puyo'', and the Arcade/Mega Drive/Snes/etc ''Puyo Puyo''. [[MarketBasedTitle Outside of Japan]], there's the NGPC ''Puyo Pop'' (localization of ''Tsu''), GBA ''Puyo Pop'' (localization of ''Minna''), and UsefulNotes/NGage ''Puyo Pop'' (semi-port of the first arcade game).
** Subverted with ''Madou Monogatari'' for the Sega Saturn. There were many ''Madou Monogatari'' games up to that point, but there was never a game named "Madou Monogatari" without any kind of suffix. Regardless, the fandom referred to the game as Mado'''h''' Monogatari for years in an attempt to differentiate the specific game from the series as a whole.
* {{Retool}}:
** Sega tried imitating Compile with ''Minna'' before resorting to this trope. ''Fever'' wiped the slate clean from a narrative standpoint; it introduced a new setting, new art style, and mostly new characters. Many of the new characters (especially the ones that survive the ''15th Anniversary'' and ''7'' cuts) are human schoolchildren, creating an environment far different than the originals' strange take on fantasy RPG tropes.
** The gameplay is also a mild example, with mechanics like 3- and 4-Puyo "pairs", continuous offset (Nuisance Puyo don't fall until the player misses a chain), and Fever mode making survival much easier, thus creating longer matches that emphasize VictoryByEndurance. For a bit of reference, the [[IncreasinglyLethalEnemy Margin Time mechanic]] triggers at 96 seconds in ''Tsu'' rules, began at 128 seconds in ''Fever'' and ''Fever 2'', and ended up increasing to '''192 seconds''' for ''7'' and later implementations of ''Fever'' rules.
** Predating the ''Fever'' retool is the first arcade game. The MSX and Famicom ''Puyo Puyo'' is a fairly straight take on ''Tetris'' (through its Endless Mode) and to a lesser extent ''VideoGame/DrMario'' (via Mission mode). Around the same time, a [[VideoGame/StreetFighterII humble arcade game]] thrust competitive play into the spotlight. Compile [[FollowTheLeader wanted in on that action]], so they retooled ''Puyo Puyo'' into a competition-focused puzzle game at the expense of including ''any'' "Endless" single-player gameplay. [[CrazyEnoughToWork It caught on]].
* {{Retraux}}:
** ''Puyo Puyo Box'' is visually based on the first two arcade games; the game even goes so far as to draw new, retro-styled portraits for the characters introduced in ''Sun'' and ''Yo~n''. Additionally, the Original, ''Tsu'', and ''Sun'' rulesets retain the choppy, grid-like vertical movement from their home games while Puyo drop smoothly in ''Yo~n'' rule.
** The ''Anniversary'' titles gives players the option to change their Puyo's appearance. These alternate Puyo skins include the MSX game's Puyo, the same game's "Human" set, and the Puyo as they appear in the first arcade game. The games' "Original", "Tsu", and "Sun" rules also use the choppy movement described above, while the other modes use smooth-dropping Puyo.
* RPGElements: ''Puyo Puyo Box'' featured a Quest Mode in which you fight monsters Puyo-style; equipment would boost attack and defense, and heavier equipment would make your Puyo fall faster. Heck, the Quest Mode itself has examples of tropes.
** HeartContainer: They're sprawled around the world and must be found.
** BrokenBridge [=/=] NPCRoadblock: The bridge isn't broken, Schezo's sleeping on it!
** ButThouMust [[InvertedTrope Not]]: You cannot say "Yes" to Satan at the end of the game. Then again, would you want to marry him after all the trouble you went through to get that instead of something cool? I don't think so.
** Said quest mode has a lot in common with the Nazo Puyo spinoffs.
** It's successor in ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle'' is even more blatant, where you can recruit party members and accept sidequests. The battles themselves also use more RPG mechanics like enemy health and character skills.
* RuleOfFun: Highly addictive game that invokes feeling pride about how much you can bury an opponent and how far.
* RuleOfCool: Very first games in the offical series? You're fighting ''demons!'' As a '''''six'''''''-year old girl!''
* RuleOfFunny: {{Satan}}'s here, too! He likes Hawaiian Shirts and loves his pet rabbit that shoots beams out of its forehead, Carbuncle! His sidekick is a jealous girl with [[YouGottaHaveBlueHair blue hair]] named Rulue who owns a pet minotaur and there's dancing fish and cleaning obsessed maids and dragon girls forming fanclubs within the... object's... house...
* RuleOfDrama: B-But everyone's in love triangles, and [[spoiler: in one game, Schezo's [[OffWithHisHead disembodied head]] fights you!]] And people are getting possessed, like [[AssholeVictim Klug]] and [[spoiler: Satan himself!]]
* RuleOfCute: ...But then Sega took that [[LighterAndSofter away]] and made everyone look really cute for no real reason...
** RefugeInAudacity: We don't even think this is possible.
* RunningGag: Many examples. Calling Schezo a pervert, Schezo causing AccidentalInnuendo, Harpy's atrocious singing, Incubus trying and failing to flirt with Arle, Draco's obsession with beauty contests, Satan's Carbuncle or Arle obsession, etc.
* SchizophrenicDifficulty: The way chapter bosses work in ''Puyo Tetris'' is that they tend to be a significant DifficultySpike [[EasyLevelsHardBosses compared to anything that comes either before or after it.]] ''Especially'' Ecolo.
* ScreenToStageAdaptation: ''Puyo Puyo on Stage'', in part of celebrating the series' 24th anniversary.
* SequelEscalation: The first arcade game has 16[[note]]3 Beginner, 13 Normal[[/note]] enemies. ''Tsu'' has at least '''30'''. To be fair, an average playthrough of ''Tsu'' will likely contain around the same number of opponents as a playthrough of the first game's scenario mode.
* SeriousBusiness: Everyone is determined to play Puyo to solve their problems. ''All of them''. Ringo [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this a lot.
* ShoutOut:
** Lagnus Bishasi the Brave resembles the hero from ''VideoGame/DragonQuest''.
** In ''Puyo Pop Fever'' in English, Yu the ghost sometimes says [[Franchise/{{Ghostbusters}} "Who you gonna call?"]]
** In ''20th Anniversary'', Ecolo has an unlockable human form. Selecting him in character select has him say "What are you going to do now?" [[VideoGame/SpaceChannel5 Purge, another Sega villain voiced by Akira Ishida says the exact same thing, also in a similar tone.]]
** The Japanese version's script of ''Minna de Puyo Puyo'' has Arle saying "[[Film/TheWizardOfOz I don't think we're]] [[NotInKansasAnymore in Kansai anymore]]." in the prologue.
** Some of the bonus pictures in ''Fever 2'' are parodies of classic movies. You can take a look at them [[http://marisexmas.tumblr.com/post/107509251069/amazing]].
** In ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'', one of the Puyo skins you can buy is [[VideoGame/SpaceChannel5 "Morolian"]].
** The localization of ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' delivers this line in Adventure 2-7:
--->'''Risukuma:''' [[Series/TheSixMillionDollarMan But we can rebuild her. We have the technology.]] ...It's around here somewhere.
* SlapstickKnowsNoGender: Done frequently. Arle and Draco are made to suffer as much as Schezo in ''Sun's'' cutscenes for example.
* SlidingScaleOfContinuity: Anywhere from Level 1 (the ''15th Anniversary'' wishes) to Level 3 (the introduction of new recurring characters), with some potential Level 0 thrown in with regards to ''Madou Monogatari''.
* SNKBoss: ''Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary''[='=]s Challenge Battle is this. In each of the five modes, you're facing against a character with powerful AI, and their drop speed is ''the equivalent to quick drop''. '''None of the modes have that,''' leaving you with a huge speed disadvantage.
* SongsInTheKeyOfPanic:
** When the bottom two-thirds or so of the player's area is completely filled, the game switches to a frantic danger theme, fittingly titled "Warning of Puyo Puyo". Some Sega-era games start the theme early if the player has enough Nuisance Puyo waiting for them to create such a situation. The Compile-era version of the theme is the only ''Puyo Puyo'' song that is retained in ''Kirby's Avalanche''; ''Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine'' changes the tune to a remix of Satan's theme.
** In ''20th'', a distressing theme plays whenever the player's Pair Puyo team is on their last life.
* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Questionable romanizations are as old as the series itself, beginning with Sukiyapo'''''t'''''es instead of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monopod_(creature) Sukiyapodes or Sciapod]] in the first arcade game. There have been enough "Doraco's" over the years for the fandom to generally ignore what Compile and Sega say and come to their own conclusions. This works most of the time, but still leads to a few messy situations. ([[JapaneseRanguage Ekoro/Ecolo/Ecoro]] being the most notable one.)
** As mentioned under BlindIdiotTranslation, ''Puyo Pop Fever'' in general had some strange romanizations that wouldn't be addressed until ''Puyo Puyo Tetris.'' "Raffine" (now Raffina) and "Rider" (now Lidelle) are the two most notable examples.
** After years of calling ''Puyo Puyo'''s resident [[OurGeniesAreDifferent cute, horned genie]] "Jan", western fans discovered that most official romanizations render her name as Jarn or Jarnne. The fandom switched to [[TakeAThirdOption Jarne]]...right after the 25th Anniversary Book rendered it as Jan. (It helps that said book is rife with examples of this trope, including Demon ''[[BlindIdiotTranslation Sarvant]]''.)
** ''Sega 3D Classics Collection'' goes with ''Tsu'''s romanizations (except Satan, who [[InconsistentDub mostly]] gets the "Dark Prince" treatment). The in-game hints, on the other hand, give us "Leroux" and "Scherzo" instead of Rulue and Schezo.
** A ''literal'' example with ''Puyo Puyo Chronicle(s)''. The official title is "Chronicle," but the fandom's initial spelling of "Chronicles" has yet to completely disappear from usage.
* {{Spinoff}}:
** ''Puyo Puyo'' is a spinoff of ''Madou Monogatari''.
** ''Nazo Puyo'' is a sub-series that replaces the competitive elements of the series with puzzle-solving.
** There's also ''Waku Waku Puyo Puyo Dungeon'' (a {{Roguelike}}), ''Puyo Puyo DA!'' (a rhythm game), ''Arle no Bouken'' (a {{Mon}}s game), ''Puyo Puyo Gaiden: Puyo Wars'' (a strategy RPG in the vein of ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars''), and ''Puyo Puyo!! Quest'' (a free-to-play "Puzzle RPG").
* SpiritualSuccessor: Compile's final game, ''Pochi & Nyaa'', was an obvious attempt to recapture the ''Puyo Puyo'' audience. Unfortunately, Compile went under before the game was even published, forcing successor company Aiky to collaborate with other parties to release it.
* StoppedNumberingSequels: Inverted. Sega basically gave up on the [[PunnyName Punny]] naming scheme by ''Fever 2'' and especially ''7''.
* StylisticSuck: The [[http://www.vgmuseum.com/end/msx2/a/puyo.htm MSX game's ending]]...we think.
* SugarBowl: Primp Town is very bright and colorful, and according to ''Fever 2'' lore, is said to have pleasing climate and good harvest in spite of being secluded by terrain. If any sort of conflict happened, it was resolved quickly with no effect on the town.
* SummoningArtifact: The Bookmark Of The Sun, the Lamp of the Stars, and the Rock of the Moon[[spoiler:[[AerithAndBob AKA some moisturizing cream.]]]] They're used to unseal Klug's book. See "MillionToOneChance" above.
* SuperpoweredEvilSide: The boss of ''Puyo Puyo~n'', [[spoiler:Doppelganger Arle.]] For some reason, Arle [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone pretty much became a lot friendlier and kinder]] after this game.
* SuperTitle64Advance: Basically all of the Super Famicom ''Puyo'' games, as well as ''Puyo Puyo CD'' and ''CD Tsu'' for the PC-Engine CD and ''Puyo Puyo Sun 64''.
* SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute: Compile Heart resorted to this trope for ''Sorcery Saga''. They basically gave the old characters new names and designs.
* ThatCameOutWrong: Every time poor Schezo tries to say something in the newer games, he blurts out "[[{{Catchphrase}} Be my desire!]]", and has to clarify just ''what'' he desires. (hint: it's never sex)
* ThemeMusicPowerUp: Entering [[LimitBreak Fever/Henshin]] mode changes the music to a more up-beat song.
* ThinkNothingOfIt: ...and Amitie realizes that she just lost out on a reward for finding the magic cane.
* TitleScream: Present in most of the games. The first one is notably delivered by the Puyo themselves.
* TooLongDidntDub:
** Unlike ''Puyo Pop Fever'' (and [[DubNameChange especially unlike the English arcade game]]), the UsefulNotes/NeoGeoPocketColor port of ''Tsu'' doesn't translate the Japanese words that are used in character names. Even the four-letter abbreviations that appear above the characters' preview window are purely based on the Japanese names, despite the fact that nearly every other version of ''Tsu'' uses English words for those. (Sasoriman usually becomes "SCOP", Uroko Sakana Bito becomes "MERM", and Mamono becomes "DEMN")
** The same game's manual retains "OJAMA" as the name of the garbage Puyo as opposed to "Nuisance".
** Taken to the extreme for the Wii VC and ''Sega 3D Classics Collection'' ports, which are the Japanese version with absolutely nothing touched.
* TrailersAlwaysSpoil: The website for Puyo Puyo Tetris obscures the final character, X on the character page, but the wallpapers and Twitter icons both show X's appearance prominently, however, his name is not given anywhere on the site.
** The english website though borders on LateArrivalSpoiler, in that it actually gives him a full profile(!), but keeps the shadowed appearance, while the Japanese site just used question marks.
* TrashTalk: Happens before each match in the single player mode of the first arcade game. The English version dials this up a notch, though not to the level of ''Mean Bean Machine's'' HurricaneOfPuns.
* TwoTeacherSchool: In the original series, there was a preschool, but the rule seemed to have stuck. In Fever, Accord's the only teacher to ever show up.
* UnsoundEffect: ''Puyo Puyo Tetris'' is rife with these in its translation.
--> *robo-sigh*
--> *crowd-gone-wild cheer*
--> *thinking sounds*
--> *[[LampshadeHanging screaming loud enough to be heard in the]] [[SpaceIsNoisy vast vacuum of space]]*
--> *princely cry*
* VagueAge: In regards to the original series, it's averted. Arle is 16, Rulue is 18, Schezo is 180, Lagnus is 10 or 17, and so on. The age for the post-Fever cast, however, is very ambiguous. The only real clues we have is their status in magic school. Lemres is a senior magic student, meaning he's the oldest when compared to the Primp Magic School students and is senior to Feli. Ringo and Maguro attend Suzuran Junior High, meaning their age is no older than 14 or 15. Risukuma, who attends the same school, has seniority over them, but never states how wide the age gap is.
* VanityPlate:
** From ''20th Anniversary'' onwards, Arle, Amitie, or Ringo will imitate the classic "SE-GA!" call as the game boots up. After going through the opening demo at least once, the game chooses another character (this time from the entire cast) to say it.
** Compile's recurring jingle shows up sporadically in the earlier titles. It is the coin-recognition jingle in ''Sun's'' arcade version and becomes the All-Clear jingle in at least one of the handheld games.
** The Game Gear ''Madou Monogatari'' games have Carbuncle parody the classic [[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer MGM]] lion.
* VictorGainsLosersPowers: ''Pocket Puyo Puyo~n''. Unlike the console versions, where Arle can only borrow a Super Attack from one of her "party members" (Draco, Seriri, Witch, Chico), the GBC ''Yo~n'' lets her obtain any character's power by defeating them.
* VictoryQuote: A staple in the games, but in ''20th'''s Pair Puyo mode, their lines will change if you play with a certain character combination such as TrueCompanions Arle and Carbuncle, ChildhoodFriends Ringo and Maguro, even Klug and Feli who are [[ArchEnemy Arch-Enemies]]!
* VideoGame3DLeap: Discounting ''DA!'', ''Chronicle'' is the first Puyo game to be presented fully in 3D. Gameplay is still the traditional rule sets, but the cut-ins are now 3D models, much like how ''39'' presented theirs. ''Chronicle''' RPG mode also utilizes a 3D free-roaming overworld.
* VideoGameLongRunners: ''Madou Monogatari'' started in either 1989 or 1990 (depending on whether you count ''Episode II Carbuncle'' as a full release or a very large demo), ''Puyo Puyo'' started in 1991.
* WakeUpCallBoss:
** Either Harpy (whose stage features the first drop speed increase) or Sasoriman (who doesn't use Harpy's gimmick AI) in the first game. In fact, choosing "Difficult" on the main menu will jump straight to Harpy's battle.
** Nohoho or Uroko Sakana Bito in ''Tsu''. If you manage to get by without battling either of them, then your first opponent on the third floor will definitely count.
** You can play ''Tetris''[='=]s Adventure Mode sub-competently until 2-10. Tee ''will'' kick your ass if you have no idea how to set up Back-To-Back Tetris chains.
* WeWantOurJerkBack: Two instances in ''Tetris'' involve characters being ''relieved'' when another one is being a jerk like usual. The first one is Tee when Ess was bawling that she was lost and alone; the second one involves Amitie when Raffina was freed from her mind-control.
* AWinnerIsYou: The MSX/FDS game.
* WizardDuel: Puyo matches in-universe amount to this, according to ports of the first arcade game; the spell Owanimo is used to convert four similarly-colored creatures (such as Puyo) into energy that attacks the opponent. [[MST3KMantra Probably best not to think too hard]] about how an UnSorcerer like Rulue can not only play the game, but be pretty good at it.
* WizardingSchool: Primp Town's Magic School.
* WizardsLiveLonger: Mentioned by Ms. Accord, saying that everyone uses anti-aging magic. This is especially true for Dark Wizard Schezo, who's been around for 180 years and hasn't aged a day past young adulthood.
** Notably, this also handwaves how Arle has been around 16 years old since the first game, but (first) completed school during the Madou Era.
* WrongfullyAttributed: "Moo" Niitani didn't create ''Puyo Puyo''. That would be Kazunari Yonemitsu, the man also responsible for Creator/StingEntertainment.
* YourCostumeNeedsWork: In ''15th'' during Satan's storymode, Klug says that Satan's wearing a costume, more or less saying he isn't really who he is. [[spoiler: Let's ignore the fact that Klug said Satan was a myth, but let's focus more on the fact he's saying that our green-haired villain is wearing a costume of a guy from ''[[GameWithinAGame an entirely different section of Puyo Puyo's history.]]'' Which he got '''''from a book about another dimension.''''' ...Unless he means the [[{{Satan}} real Satan...]]]]

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