Video Game / Hatsune Miku Project Diva

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Hatsune Miku and her merry friends.

It started with one dot...

Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA is a series of Vocaloid-themed rhythm games released by Sega. As the title may very vaguely imply, Miku is front and center, although the other Crypton Vocaloids, Rin, Len, Luka, Meiko, and Kaito, get their share of the spotlight, as well.

The aim of the game is simple. Notes fly toward stationary targets on screen and you press their corresponding buttons when they overlap the markers. This task is spiced up by detailed, unique 3D music videos for each song, as well as quite frankly ridiculous bonus difficulties. The series finally made its overseas debut in August 2013 with Project DIVA F, with the budget re-release of the Vita version following in 2014, but the other games are relatively import-friendly. Project mirai finally made its way over with the release of mirai DX in 2015, so 3DS players can rejoice, too!

The 10th game in the main series, Project Diva X, was announced for a Vita (March 2016) and PS4 (Fall 2016) release in Japan. Also, announced a few weeks later was a version of Project Diva Arcade: Future Tone for PS4 for sometime in 2016, which will be the first Project Diva console release without a corresponding handheld version.

    Games in the Series 

DIVA Series

  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA (PSP, 2009) — The first game in the DIVA series, and the first foray for the then-blossoming Vocaloids into the video game department. Introduces Hatsune Miku, Kagamine Rin and Len, Megurine Luka, MEIKO, KAITO, Yowane Haku, Akita Neru, and Sakine Meiko, as well as 53 Modules and 32 different songs. Introduces the fundamental gameplay mechanics for the series, including the four-button gameplay with three unique difficulties. Known for being very different from its future installments.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Dreamy Theater (PS3, 2010) — Add-on DLC for Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA. This software enables players to link their Project DIVA save data and play the game in 60 FPS high definition utilizing overhauled console-tier graphics, but is otherwise the same game.
  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA 2nd (PSP, 2010) — The second game in the DIVA series. Introduces Kasane Teto as Downloadable Content. Introduced many of the series' mainstay mechanics, including Wide and Hold Notes, a success system based on COOL and FINE notes hit rather than score, EXTREME difficulty, Titles, character edit for PVs, individual DIVA Rooms for every character, a Shop, and Help Items. Expands upon the pre-existing Module and song list, boasting over 120 Modules and 58 songs. Currently holds the highest number of playable songs in the main series.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA 2nd # (PSP, 2011) — Also known as Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA 2nd (Low Price Edition). An Updated Re-release of 2nd that includes a plethora of bugfixes, as well as less Loads and Loads of Loading and all of extend's Modules as a free DLC code.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Dreamy Theater 2nd (PS3, 2011) — Add-on DLC for 2nd. Functions identically to the first Dreamy Theater, allowing players to play 2nd on the big screen.
  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA extend (PSP, 2011) — The third game in the DIVA series. Introduces Challenge Items, equippable modifiers that make the game harder but dispense more DIVA Points. Includes 172 Modules and 38 playable songs.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Dreamy Theater Extend (PS3, 2012) — Add-on DLC for extend. Functions identically to previous Dreamy Theaters, allowing players to play extend through their console.

F Series

  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA (Vita, 2012/2014) — The fourth game in the DIVA series, and the first game to see a worldwide release. Introduces a host of new mechanics alongside the console upgrade, including Scratch Notes, Technical Zones, and the Grade Point system. Also introduces a graphical upgrade as well as greater special effect capacity. Notable for retiring the majority of old content from previous games, only using new songs and Modules save for the V3 designs. Includes 101 Modules and 38 playable songs.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA F (PS3, 2013) — An Updated Re-release of for home consoles. Plays similarly to the handheld edition, except Scratch Notes are now controlled by the analog sticks and all previously-released Downloadable Content is included on-disc. Replaces AR Mode from the Vita version with Live Concert Mode, which allows players to view virtual concert versions of various songs.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA : Best Price Edition (Vita, 2013) — An Updated Re-release of for the Vita. Much like 2nd#, Best Price Edition includes updated graphics and added content.
  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA F 2nd (PS3/Vita, 2014) — The fifth game in the DIVA series, and the second game released internationally. Introduces further expansions to the Scratch mechanics seen in , including Wide Scratch Notes and Scratch Links, as well as adjusting Scratch Note timing windows. Challenge Item stacks are introduced, allowing players to combine up to three Challenge Items at once for even higher payouts. F 2nd makes a return to form, mixing new songs with older content now upgraded to modern standards. Includes 160 Modules and 56 playable songs.

X Series

  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA X (Vita, 2016) — The sixth game in the DIVA series, and the fourth game released internationally. X returns to the gameplay seen in , removing the additional Scratch mechanics from F 2nd while introducing Rush Notes, which grant you bonus points for Button Mashing. Introduces Live Quest Mode, a story mode where the player follows Hatsune Miku on her quest to restore the world of music that she and her fellow Vocaloids reside in via returning power to the Element Gems, representations of the Elements that comprise their world and have lost their strength. Live Quest Mode introduces the Voltage system, where the player must score enough Voltage, or points, to clear a song and unlock new Modules and Accessories. The Shop is retired for the first time since 2nd in favor of the Live Quest mechanics. Includes over 310 Modules, 25 songs and 6 Medleys. Currently holds the highest number of Modules in a main series game, as well as the lowest number of songs.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA X HD (PS4, 2016) — An Updated Re-release of X that brings the series to Playstation 4. Features enhanced visuals that take advantage of the console's capabilities, including improved lighting and shadow effects, revised shaders, and miscellaneous quality improvements in 1080p, 60 frames per second. Introduces Playstation VR support for Concert Edit Mode.

Arcade

  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Arcade (Arcade, 2010) — An arcade installment that brings the gameplay of the DIVA series to arcades. Possesses similar gameplay to Project DIVA, although several changes are made that make it unique to the main series. Aesthetically similar to Dreamy Theater. Possessing an Aime card enables players to link to its interconnectivity service known as DIVA.NET, which allows them to access game records and the Shop remotely, as well as redeem prizes and set game options.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Arcade Future Tone (Arcade, 2014) — The first title update to Arcade. Retains the gameplay of its predecessor while introducing Slide Notes, where the player slides their hand across a glowing bar to complete notes. Introduces Quests, a series of challenges that can be completed for rewards, Cards, collectible virtual trading cards based on in-game content that can be used for various DIVA.NET features, and EXTRA EXTREME, an extension to the present EXTREME difficulty that includes Slide Notes on its charts and are exclusive to select pre-update tracks.

Future Tone

  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Future Tone: Future Sound/Colorful Tone (PS4, 2016) — A console version of Arcade Future Tone. Retains the gameplay and look of the Arcade installments while re-introducing features familiar to the main series, such as Chance Time. Split into two titles: Future Sound, which focuses on main series songs, and Colorful Tone, which focuses on mirai songs and Arcade exclusives.

mirai Series

  • Hatsune Miku and Future Stars: Project mirai (3DS, 2012) — The first game in the mirai spin-off series. Introduces Hatsune Miku, Kagamine Rin and Len, Megurine Luka, MEIKO, KAITO, and Internet Co.'s GUMI in adorable Super-Deformed Nendoroid form as they make their debut on a Nintendo console. Gameplay takes on a different form, opting for a Groove Coaster-esque presentation with notes appearing on a track while absorbing elements from both the main series and Arcade. Includes 43 Costumes and 20 songs.
  • Hatsune Miku: Project mirai 2 (3DS, 2013) — The second game in the mirai spin-off series. Builds upon what the first game introduced, adding 26 new songs and 71 new costumes, as well as introducing new Mirai Room mechanics and Tap Mode, an alternate game mode played entirely with the 3DS' touchscreen. Includes 105 Costumes, 5 additional Costumes for GUMI, and 46 songs.
    • Hatsune Miku: Project mirai Deluxe/DX (3DS, 2015) — The third game in the mirai spin-off series, and the third game released internationally. An Updated Re-release of mirai 2, adding one new song and four new Costumes as well as granting more previous songs new PVs that use the in-game models. Introduces Super Hard mode, a special difficulty unlockable for six select songs that cranks up their difficulty a few extra notches. Also includes additional Mirai Room mechanics, such as Mirai Resort idle events and the Music Player. Introduces Mikudayo as an outfit for Miku.

Mobile

  • Miku Flick (iOS, 2012) — A mobile game iteration of the DIVA series. Utilizes the graphics and PVs featured in Dreamy Theater and Arcade while introducing a more linear gameplay system that involves utilizing an on-screen hiragana keyboard to tap and swipe out parts of the song's lyrics as they're performed. Features 14 songs.
  • Miku Flick/02 (iOS, 2012) — The sequel to the first Miku Flick. Introduces non-Miku songs and EXTREME difficulty for a harder challenge. Adds Interlude Mini-Game, a second mechanic where you tap a large button to notes during instrumental portions a la a standard rhythm game for bonus points, and Fever Mode, a trigger for reaching 100 Combo that increases the points earned per COOL to 100. Features 11 included songs and 63 DLC songs.

This series provides examples of:

  • Achievement System: Every game in the series has Titles, which are awarded for performing certain tasks and are purely cosmetic. Starting with F, the PlayStation's Trophy system was integrated, which (rather redundantly) awards Trophies for acquiring Titles. Mirai uses a Stamp Card that functions equivalently to Titles, but with Stamps.
  • Adaptation Expansion: The Future Tone version of "No Logic" actually added scenes and new dance parts that the mirai version did not have.
  • Advertised Extra: In X, Ultimate Miku is a prominent character in the opening, getting more screentime than even Miku -Original- and all of the other Vocaloids combined. She is unlockable from the last song.
  • Affectionate Gesture to the Head: In those entries that have the Diva Room, one of two ways to raise a Vocaloid's Affinity is by rubbing their forehead. They don't like it if you do it too long, though.
  • After the End: Both "God-Tier Tune" and "Hello Planet" take place after The End of the World as We Know It. In the former case, the world is already over and chibi Vocaloids are trying to revive it with growing plants and cute stuff, while in the latter, we see it happen, and the rest of the song follows Miku's journey to reunite with her long lost master and revive the last surviving plant on Earth.
  • All Just a Dream:
    • "Gigantic Girl"'s music video, featuring a giant-sized Miku fighting Godzilla, is all in her head.
      • Notably, in both "Gigantic Girl" and "Time Machine", where the figurines appear, Miku is building a city diorama...
    • The Chance Time bonus video for "Kagerou Daze" features Miku waking up with a jump every time she dies, making it appear as her last failure was simply a dream. The context of the original song says otherwise, though.
  • All or Nothing: The Do or Die item in Mirai DX instantly kills you if you break your combo, but if you succeed, you get double the Mirai Points for it. It also omits Mercy Invincibility at the beginning of the song, but the point is moot since you have to get a Perfect anyways.
  • All the Worlds Are a Stage: The version of "World's End Dancehall" used in Arcade takes Miku and Luka through numerous existing stages throughout the song's duration.
  • Amazing Technicolor Battlefield: Holy cow, 2D Dream Fever. This song alone should come with a seizure warning installed.
  • An Interior Designer Is You: In all the games except the Arcade versions, there's the Diva Room, which lets you decorate the Vocaloids' rooms.
  • And Now For Something Completely Different: "Kagerou Daze" in F 2nd is perhaps the only song in the series where Chance Time happens right at the start and clearing it affects the entire rest of the level.
  • And Your Reward Is Clothes:
    • Each game has massive amounts of costumes (called "modules") to unlock. At least half the modules belong to Miku in each game. Taken to crazy levels with "Senbonzakura" in Project Diva F, which requires you to play the song multiple times to unlock all of the modules from it.
    • Some of the DLC in Project Diva F 2nd is various outfits, including three costumes for characters who are ALREADY DLC, and one who was merged into another character as of Project Diva F. Notably, one of the DLC costumes in this set is new and exclusive to Project Diva F 2nd.
    • Taken to ludicrous heights in X, which starts with 70 costumes by default, but also has costumes from F and F 2nd for a total of over 300 costumes. In addition, every costume has a special Skill that tweaks gameplay, such as skills that increase the amount of Voltage you earn from Technical Zones or the odds of getting a Rare Module to drop from completing Chance Time.
  • And Your Reward Is Interior Decorating:
    • The games with the Diva Room feature also unlock furniture pieces and room themes though performance whenever you complete a stage at NORMAL or higher difficulty.
    • For some songs, usually the first song to feature a Vocaloid, you also unlock their room, so you can visit any of the Vocaloids.
      • This is removed as of F 2nd, with the main game and the Diva Room being segregated, with both room items and Diva rooms unlocking through normal use of the feature.
      • In Project Diva F and Project Diva F 2nd, Haku, Teto and Neru all use a single room that is unlocked by downloading them.
    • Diva Room was further overhauled for Project Diva X, where everything unlocks by Random Drops, and the number of rooms is condensed from one for each Vocaloid to simply one.
  • Anime Theme Song: All Original Generation, of course. ryo is a popular choice for theme song composers.
    • Project DIVA opened with "The secret garden" by Satoru Kousaki.
    • 2nd opened with "Look This Way, Baby" by ryo.
    • Extend opened with "Sekiranun Graffiti" by ryo.
    • F opened with "ODDS&ENDS" by ryo.
    • F 2nd opened with "DECORATOR" by kz.
    • X opened with "The Name of the Crime" by ryo.
    • mirai opened with "Yumeyume" by DECO*27.
    • mirai 2 opened with "Ageage Again" by Mitchie M.
    • mirai Deluxe opened with "Nice to Meet You, Mr. Earthling!" by pinocchioP.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • On 2nd, Extend and F 2nd, you can unlock anything you already have on the previous game by simply transferring the save data. With F 2nd, this includes the ability to download the Extra Characters DLC.
      • A additional feature for F 2nd's save data is that it can be transferred between versions, automatically cloud saving when needed.
    • In F 2nd, all the Diva rooms are unlocked automatically, instead of requiring you to complete a certain song on NORMAL, and most items for the mode are unlocked through progression in that mode.
    • Want to know how to unlock a particular bonus costume in F 2nd? Each song has a unlock count, plus a new Information Board, which outright explains every single unlockable you still need to get in plain terms.
    • One of the Extra Markers available in F requires a Promo Rare Weiss Schwarz card known as "Nice to Meet You! Hatsune Miku", which depicted Miku backed by AR marker icons. Although the set was released in English, that card in particular never made it overseas. Those curious can alternatively grab a replica off the game's official website.
    • In Arcade and Mirai, a small chunk of your Life Meter is protected by a "Safety" guard for the first 30 seconds of the song, so even if you struggle with the chart you won't immediately go from loading screen to Game Over. How much is protected, on the other hand, is determined by difficulty; Extreme/Super Hard has a considerably small "Safety" zone, while Easy has the largest.
    • Mirai DX comes with the option to switch the note colors between those used by Nintendo consoles and those used by Playstation consoles, for people who prefer the latter, and more common, colors. Also handy for avoiding confusing the placement of buttons on a 3DS with the placement on a PlayStation controller.
    • In addition to the "Clear" bar as a holdover from Arcade, Future Tone also shows you "Great" and "Excellent" bars for the score required to achieve that rank, which Arcade does not have.
    • Future Tone allows you to hit Slide Notes with shoulder buttons if you don't like the Dualshock 4's touchpad.
  • Apocalypse How: The mirai PV for "Hello, Planet" features a scene of Miku watching the world turn to ashes as meteors rain from the sky and devastate the planet.
  • April Fools' Day: 2015 had SEGA feature a video update for Arcade that had Miku performing in the giant Mikudayo head accessory. The head was subsequently made available in-game for 1500 VP.
  • Arc Number: 39, pronounced "sankyu"note , like the English phrase "thank you", can also be read as "miku". As a result, this number runs rampant throughout the franchise; we'd be here all day if every example were listed, but there are some notable ones:
    • There was a limited edition DIVA 2nd Memory Stick PRO Duo that had an advertised capacity of 3.9GBnote  and sold for ‎¥3939.
    • Dreamy Theater 2nd used to cost ‎¥3900 on the PSN Store and has a specifically odd file size of 3939 MB.
    • 39, Miku's anniversary song, whenever she sings san-kyu, has the subtitles displaying "THANK YOU (39)" instead of the phonetic words.
    • Project Mirai 2 includes Puyo Puyo 39 as a minigame.
    • The 39th Stamp in Mirai DX, "Goddess", is for having max Affection with Miku. There's also a stamp for spending 39 hours in-game.
    • A ton of PVs feature the number "39" in some way, shape, or form.
  • Art Evolution:
    • The Dreamy Theater DLC and Arcade installments use a notably different graphic style from its handheld counterparts that involves brighter colors and more realistic lighting, shaders, and physics.
    • F greatly revised the look of the series thanks to the console jump, supporting a new engine that allows for sharper models and less saturation with more vivid colors. This carried on into the sequel, where many old songs were remastered in the new style with enhanced graphical and special effects.
    • Several songs released only in Project Mirai were exported to Project Diva Future Tone, with new P Vs that take advantage of the Diva modules being human scale.
  • Art Shift: A handful of songs use either an alternate style separate from that of other songs, or dedicates portions to this. For example, "World's End Umbrella" in F combines the traditional style with an anime video. "glow" in Mirai DX uses a paper cutout for Miku as opposed to a model, which also prevents her outfit from being changed.
  • Art-Style Dissonance: Mirai DX relishes in the fact that it has the cutest style in the franchise, and then goes and pairs it with some of the most unfitting songs possible. Standout examples include "Invisible", which is straight-up 99% metal, while Aku no Musume/Aku no Meshitukai are quite possibly the darkest pair of songs in the entire franchise. If they had added any of the other songs in either seriesnote , it would have only gotten worse.
  • Ascended Meme:
    • The fan-made derivatives, including Hachune Miku, Tako Luka, Akita Neru, Yowane Haku, Sakine Meiko, and Kasane Teto, all ascended thanks to this series, becoming officially recognized by Crypton. Hachune and Tako appear in numerous songs and in opening movies, Sakine is an alt outfit for MEIKO, and Neru, Haku, and Teto usually appear as Downloadable Content, replete with their own outfitsnote .
    • The "song" "Ievan Polka" involves Hachune Miku performing the "Leek Spin" for the duration of the track.
    • "Watashi no Jikan/My Time" in mirai references "Nice Boat".
    • In Puyo Puyo 39, getting to 7-Chain as Rin or Len causes them to drop in on a roadroller while shouting "ROAD ROLLER!" Miku will also wave leeks around when achieving a 3-chain.
  • Assimilation Plot: The story of "This is the Happiness and Peace of Mind Committee" from F 2nd. A representative of said committee, the Siren (Miku), wants everyone in the world to be completely, unconditionally, and equally happy. Anyone who isn't... well, it won't end well.
  • Auto-Revive: The "Recovery" item in both DIVA and Mirai heals you to max health if you would have died. The former imposes no penalty, allowing you to use it to survive through difficult sections, but the latter negates your high score for using it.
  • Award Bait Song: Several songs, such as "Time Machine" and "Continuing Dream" from F and "Sakura Rain" from F 2nd. It's easier to list the songs that aren't, due to the selection being intentionally some of the greatest hits of the Vocaloids.
  • Background Music Override: Much like its appearance in another SEGA game, the Hang-On Bike from Mirai DX replaces the BGM with the Hang-On theme when used by a Vocaloid.
  • Badass Driver: In "Urbandonment", a half-materialized bridge won't stop Miku from launching off of it, performing a barrel roll in midair in slow motion, and landing safely on her wheels some distance away.
  • Bait and Switch:
    • "This is the Happiness and Peace of Mind Committee" is a slow, soft song set in the middle of a bright park surrounded by trees. Then the first verse ends, the facade disappears and everything quickly dissolves into dystopian hell.
    • "Invisible" is infamous for opening with a jaunty piano piece that sounds like it jumped straight out of a silent film, then suddenly blaring hard rock in your face five seconds later. Players with headphones/speakers at max volume are in for a very rude surprise.
  • Bare Your Midriff:
    • The "Invisible" outfits for Rin and Gumi in Mirai DX. Of course, being Super-Deformed makes the whole point moot.
    • Miku's "Ambivalence" in X.
  • Beach Episode: In Project Mirai DX, you can pay 100,000 MP to travel to and stay at Mirai Resort for 7 days. The resort features an extra-large villa with many spaces for room items, including a bath item slot not available in any of the homes, and boasts many exclusive idle events such as your character sunbathing on the beach and smashing watermelons. Unlike the Penthouse, which is simply treated as yet another home but with a weekly rent, traveling to Mirai Resort takes you to a new map with every service available except Mirai Estates; you won't be able to return to your homes until your vacation time expires or you choose to forfeit your vacation time to leave early.
    • "Fire Flower" and "Summer Idol" in F, whose videos take place at a pair of beach resorts. The "Fire Flower" video includes scenes of Rin and Len (or the chosen characters if other modules are selected) playing on a beach.
  • Bilingual Bonus:
    • The opening of the PV for "Piano Girl" is written entirely in French.
    • The PV for Matryoshka features the title in Cyrillic.
  • Bland-Name Product: In the mirai series, the Yamaha DX7 seen in the DIVA series is replaced by a similarly-named "Hatsune MI9" synthesizer.
  • Boss Rush: The "Ultimate Medley" from X, which includes every single Climax Boss track from its past installments in its set.
  • Break Up Song:
    • "Koi wa Sensou" from the first game is about a particularly bad break-up, sung from the break-uppee's perspective.
    • "Just Be Friends" from 2nd and extend is a softer example, sung from the break-upper's perspective.
    • "Kimi no Taion" in Mirai DX is a fairly sad version of this, but you wouldn't know just by watching the video.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: "Slow Motion" has some pretty meta instances, especially when Miku references how long the song's been going on.
  • The Bus Came Back: X highlights the return of many aesthetics that made the first game stand out from its successors, such as score-based clear conditions (used only in Live Quest Mode).
    • It also highlights the (admittedly one-time) return of ryo as a Vocaloid composer with "The Name of the Crime", since his last Vocaloid song was "ODDS&ENDS", the theme song for F.
  • Butt Monkey: Mikudayo in the "Together with Mikudayo!" promo videos for Mirai 2/DX. Pretty much all of the comedy revolves around tormenting poor Mikudayo.
  • Button Mashing: X's Rush Note is a giant note that, upon being hit, allows you to continuously press the button to gain more Voltage.
    • This can crop up with more intensive songs, such as "Nega*Posi Continues" and "Invisible". "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku" is infamous for this.
  • Call a Rabbit a "Smeerp": Points are known as "Voltage" in X. This is plot-relevant, since Voltage functions as an energy source for the Element Gems, and to restore them, Miku and friends must collect Voltage by performing.
  • Call Back:
    • In "Time Machine", the two toys that caused the dream from "Gigantic Girl" are sat on the floor of the treehouse, and Miku is still building her dioramas.
    • The majority of songs from F 2nd are songs that have appeared in the franchise prior to F. You can even get the other games' theme songs as DLC, as well as a "Ha2ne Miku" Module from the first game that depicts a non-idol Miku.
    • "The Ultimate Medley" contains a few references to its predecessor; portions of "2D Dream Fever"'s Extreme chart are reused on the Extreme difficulty, and the outro of the medley is a cleverly modified version of the F 2nd chart of "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku", flipping the chart roughly horizontally and swapping Xs for Os and Squares for Triangles and vice versa at certain points.
  • Calling Your Attacks: Much like modern Puyo Puyo, characters will do this at 3-Chain to 7-Chain in Puyo Puyo 39. If you give Miku the Arle Nadja outfit, she'll mimic Arle's spells and animations instead.
  • The Cameo:
    • F's "Black Rock Shooter" features a quick scene where Miku flies through a fire silhouette of Insane Black Rock Shooter herself.
    • Blink and you'll miss it, but in Mirai DX's "Aku no Musume", the scene featuring Rin surrounded by a crowd of commoners also has two girls sporting Kasane Teto and Akita Neru's hairstyles hidden amongst the crowd. Yowane Haku also appears in "Aku no Meshitukai" amongst the crowd of green-haired commoners encountering the Daughter of Green. This is a reference to a related song not in the game, "The Daughter of White", where Haku's character is revealed to have been among the commoners who saw the Daughter of Green in the square.
    • Although Miku performs "Senbonzakura" solo in Mirai DX, outlines of the other Vocaloids in their respective costumes from F can be briefly seen in the sky in two different shots.
  • Camera Abuse: In "Rolling Girl", the camera is occasionally treated like a second character, and considering Miku is visibly pissed off for most of the video, she doesn't treat it very well.
  • Canon Immigrant: Some songs from the Mirai sub-series eventually made it to Arcade through updates, although they lack the Super-Deformed quality of the Mirai games. Some of them even made it to the main series.
  • Cat Girl:
    • The Kitty Cat Module. Notably, for it's appearance in F 2nd, the ears and tail are constantly twitching and moving.
    • This same trait is shared by other costumes, like Meiko's Lin Xiao-Mei costume, which have ears and tails. Previous games kept any tail parts static.
    • Miku and Meiko's "Koneko no Paya Paya" outfits in Mirai DX. It's literally half the point of the song, even.
  • Celebrity Paradox: Averted In F 2nd. Among the items unlockable using the Extra AR mode are room items which include, of all things, Project Diva, Project Diva 2nd, Project Diva extend and both Project Diva f and Project Diva F, as well as a advertising stand-up Miku for the Miku Graphy Collection, and one of the Gadgets is a genuine Project Diva Arcade cabinet. Notably, Project Diva F 2nd itself cannot appear in the game.
    • Humorously parodied by one of the first modules in Project Diva. The module "Ha2ne Miku" is Miku if she never even became a pop idol!
  • Classy Cane:
    • "Dream-Eating Monochrome Baku" gives the player character one, with Len being the default.
    • "Miracle Paint" in F 2nd gives the player one. Notably, every other version of the song did not have this and merely had the dancer making movements that pretended that it was there.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Vocaloids wearing Quirky/Chaos modules in X toe the line between this and Nightmare Fuel Station Attendant, exhibiting rather...odd behavior in a nasal, high-pitched voice.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience:
    • The colors of the melody icons are obviously the PlayStation symbols' colors. Wide Notes are filled with colors to prevent blending with other types of icons, Hold Notes are bordered with a white outline, and Scratch Notes are yellow. In Arcade and Future Tone, Slide Notes are orange.
    • And of course, the difficulties are in PlayStation colors as well: Green "Easy", Blue "Normal", Pink "Hard", Red "Extreme".
    • Mirai, being on the 3DS, trades the signature PlayStation colors for an alternate scheme based on the New 3DS's buttons. (Though thankfully included an option to change the colors to match the Playstation's for players who were used to Diva and were having difficulty adjusting.)
    • Also used as Leaning on the Fourth Wall in F's "Acute"; harder difficulties tend to sync the notes to the signature color of the character who's singing. When Miku sings, Triangles appear, when Luka sings, Squares appear, and when Kaito sings, Xs appear.
      • Something similar is used for Mirai's "on the rocks" wherein Meiko's parts are played with A (red) and Y while Kaito's parts are played with X (blue) and B.
    • The Elements in X are done this way. Neutral/Classic is Miku-esque cyan, Cute is pink, Beauty/Elegant is violet, Cool is blue, and Chaos/Quirky is a mix of orange and green. The respective stages for the Medleys are also dyed and hued in their associated colors, except for the Chaos Medley. The Ultimate Medley is color-coded as whites with rainbows, representing the amalgamation of the five Elements.
  • Color-Coded Characters: Each character has a particular color they're associated with. In "Aku no Musume/Meshitukai" in Mirai DX, this is also used to represent who is who.
    • Miku = Cyan
    • Rin = Yellow
    • Len = Orange (specific character color)/ Yellow (since they're "twins")
    • Luka = Pink
    • KAITO = Blue
    • MEIKO = Red/ Orange (as Sakine Meiko)
    • Haku = Purple/ White (Haku is named after the color)
    • Neru = Yellow
    • Teto = Red
  • Console Cameo:
    • The music video for "Remote Controller" has a Dreamcast controller as one of the controllers. The color of the controller's logo depends on region, just like the original Dreamcast.
    • A loading screen for F 2nd features a Call Back to "Remote Controller", this time featuring the Famicom controller that appeared in the original PV as opposed to F's.
    • Handheld consoles that look suspiciously like the PS Vita appear in a few songs and some loading screens. For example, "Negiposi*Continues" uses a console that looks like a white Vita, but all of the buttons are completely wrong.
  • Contemplate Our Navels: The lyrics of "DYE" from , in that distinctly Engrishy way.
  • Cover Version: Chaos Medley ~Giga Remix~ uses a Giga-P cover of "1 2 Fanclub" with Miku and Len as opposed to the original, which used GUMI.
    • mirai has this as a feature, where swapping out the lead Vocaloid will play a cover of the current song using the selected Vocaloid. For example, changing the lead to Rin in "Mousou Sketch" will play a Rin version of the song instead.
  • Credits Medley: The song playing during the credits sequence of F is a medley of instrumental versions of some of the game songs.
  • Creepy Doll: Present in "Ashes to Ashes" in F.
  • Crossover: 2nd received some collaboration DLC with Namco's The Idolmaster, which included Modules for Miku, Rin, and Luka based on three of the game's characters, as well as two songs from that game redone with the Vocaloids.
  • Crucified Hero Shot:
    • The player character in "Black★Rock Shooter". They get better.
    • The player character strikes this pose at the end of "Break It, Break It."
  • Cute Mute:
    • Teto outside of songs. In some games, Haku and Neru are also mute except when you clear a stage, and most of the games have no songs for them at all.
    • Averted with Gumi in her guest role in Project Mirai 2 and Project Mirai DX, where she features prominently in several songs.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory:
    • Players who played later games going back to the first game will likely get a few "Worst" notes because they were trying to use the D-Pad to hit them. You can't do that, here.
    • If you played too much F 2nd on the Vita with analog sticks as Scratches, see if you can finish any Hard/Extreme songs in F without touching the stick.
      • On the flipside, Scratch notes were very forgiving, being able to be done by simply flicking the stick constantly on F - they couldn't be hit with the "safe" designation, meaning you just had to hit them in a reasonable area of their appearance to be given a "fine". F 2nd now actually requires you to properly hit the note to get a "fine/good" or "cool", making it much harder to complete Technical Zones or get a Perfect.
    • DIVA Arcade uses a button layout consisting of four buttons in a horizontal line, rather than the two sets of diamonds used by the console and handheld games. Anyone used to the latter, especially someone coming off playing on one of the limited edition arcade-style controllers, will be in for a rude awakening when they attempt Arcade.
    • Going directly from a very fast (or even average paced) song, to a slower song, such as Sakura Rain, can really throw off a player when their still trying to hit buttons at a speed that's twice the speed of the current song.
    • Mirai DX avoids this. The notes are colored to match the buttons on a New 3DS, but there is an option to have them match the PlayStation button colors. Even then, having the 'X' button be the top button instead of the bottom can still be confusing.
    • Mirai is significantly more lenient with button timing than DIVA, to the point where the kind of timing that nets a FINE in DIVA is still a COOL in Mirai, and so forth. This can be detrimental if you play DIVA right after playing Mirai, which may screw up all your timing because DIVA is much harsher when it comes to grading.
    • Mirai also doesn't require Holds, much like Arcade. Hold Notes only care about two things: hitting the note at the start, and releasing it at the end. Between then, you're free to release the button, since holding only earns some bonus points.
    • Have fun playing some of the charts in F 2nd if you're too used to their original incarnations in an earlier game; some of them change just a few notes, which can throw you off especially on Extreme charts.
  • Deal with the Devil: Of a sorts in Dream-Eating Monochrome Baku. Len, a baku (read: dream-eating spirit), makes a contract with a girl to eat all of her bad dreams. After he finishes eating her bad dreams, he continues eating her dreams until the girl can't dream anymore.
  • Deliberately Monochrome:
    • In "Kagerou Daze", any version of the song beyond Normal only uses Circle and X, even on Extreme difficulty. This is a reference to the original PV, which only ever used the colors red and blue; everything else was Deliberately Monochrome.
    • A similar thing happens with "Aku no Musume" and "Aku no Meshitukai", where the characters are rendered as just black figures with the hair and clothes of the character, except for the singer themselves.
  • Demoted to Extra: Very strangely, the opening for X gives everyone not named "Miku" this treatment; their total combined screentime can be approximated to seven seconds. The opening is a minute and thirty seconds long.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • There are several songs in F series where, even though a character may not appear as a selectable module, s/he will still appear in the song. If you select a Vocaloid other than the default, the default character will replace the selected one within the song. The default character will be wearing the appropriate outfit for the song too, if the character they replace had a special outfit (like with "Senbonzakura"). Taken to another level in "Rin-chan Now!", where the selected character's name and color appears correctly on their Twitter-like feed, even Haku, Teto and Neru, as well as Sakine Meiko.
    • In "God-Tier Tune," if you select a Kaito or Meiko module, they'll still have a super-deformed model to replace Miku's, despite not appearing in the song otherwise.
    • If you try to equip a head or face customization item on a module that normally wears a hat or mask, the hat or mask will disappear so the customization item doesn't clip through it, even if you can't normally get a hatless or maskless alt version of that module.
  • Difficulty By Region: Downplayed; the first Technical Zone in F 2nd's "Cantarella ~grace edition~" is ten notes longer in localized versions for no apparent reason. It's possible this is simply a mistake.
  • Difficulty Spike: Puyo Puyo! 39 in Mirai DX can be quite easily cheesed for the first couple stages; creating a Chain higher than three is usually not needed. Then you hit MEIKO, who will send your run down the toilet if you aren't actually good at the game.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: The Daughter of Evil in Mirai DX finds out that the Prince of Blue likes the Daughter of Green more than he likes her. So what does she do? She destroys an entire kingdom. Overnight.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: "Holy Lance Explosion Boy" uses quite a bit of pelvic thrust moves in its routine. The camera even zooms in on the player character's crotch at one point.
  • Double Unlock: Most of the games use a currency system, which allows you to buy items for your Divas, but you must first unlock them by completing a particular Guide Dang It task. Retired in X, which shifts to completing Quests and Chance Time in Live Quest Mode to unlock Modules, Accessories and Presents.
  • Downer Beginning: The opening for X is a lot less cheery than the opening of any other DIVA game, featuring scenes such as the Element Gems losing their power, causing the Vocaloids to lose their strength in return, as well as Miku nearly giving up hope until Ultimate Miku comes to her rescue.
  • Downer Ending: The regular ending of the "Hello, Planet" subgame in 2nd, if you fail to acquire the Orb and take it to the secret exit in Level 4. This results in the normal ending as seen in the original song, where Miku is reunited with the boy in heaven, but has passed away.
  • Downloadable Content:
    • 2nd had an enormous amount of DLC, including character birthday packages, two minigames, new songs, Modules, and The Idolmaster Crossover content. Thankfully, extend came with all of it right out of the box.
    • From 2nd onwards, Yowane Haku, Akita Neru and Kasane Teto are available as bonus characters, with one or all of them included in the DLC packs available each game, if not the game itself. From F onwards, a Mikudayo suit was also made available for purchase in non-console versions.
    • F included a package of brand new songs previously unseen in the main series, such as "Senbonzakura", "Rin-Chan Now!", "Dream-Eating Monochrome Baku", and the Mikudayo hat. The console release included these as default content, although they are optional and not tied to any non-DLC content.
    • F 2nd also brought back numerous songs such as "ODDS&ENDS", "Tell Your World", "Sekiranun Graffiti", and "Look This Way, Baby?" as DLC. There were even some special DLC promotions initally only available in the localized version.
    • X introduces Snow Miku 2016 as a DLC Module, and adds Unlock Keys and Unlock Sets due to the staggering amount of unlockable content the game has to offer.
  • Dualvertisement:
    • The music video for "The MMORPG Addict's Anthem" takes place at the ARKS Shop Area Stage. If you succeed at Chance Time, Miku is depicted acquiring a Rare Item, which the PV displays as the Rappy Wedding Cake Room Item. Afterwards, this item is made available in the shop for purchase. Notably, this is one of the few items that can still be unlocked even if the song is completed on Easy, since Miku unlocked it within the song...
    • While the song "Black★Rock Shooter" was an original song that inspired the anime of the same name, the version used in F is the one from the anime as opposed to the original, and the PV used features set pieces inspired by the anime.
    • The Song "Tell Your World" was originally created for Google to advertise how Hatsune Miku has become a worldwide phenomeon. In the first Project Diva game to come to the West, the song is included. Say it with me. A song made to advertise Miku's popularity worldwide, where she sings of how she wants to sing to everyone, is included in Miku's first worldwide game release, and also appears as Live Mode DLC for the second, with a translation that makes it impossible not to feel you're part of something special...
    • The Module "CA Style A" in X gives Miku a stewardess outfit. It can be acquired from a product code distributed by Japanese airline AIR DO, or by purchasing the game on the Japanese PSN during the first month.
  • Dub Name Change: Tends to flip-flop between doing this or not:
    • A handful of song names in F got more liberal translations that were different from more literal fan-established one. "Torinoko City"note  became "Urbandonment", and "Netgame Addicts Sprechchor"note  became "The MMORPG Addict's Anthem", to name a couple.note 
    • In Mirai DX, most titles are left completely untranslated. The end result is that some titles can be a mouthful for an English speaker not learned in Japanese pronunciation, such as Arifureta Sekai Seifuku (Common World Domination) or Gaikotsu Gakudan to Riria (Skeleton Orchestra and Lilia). Also averted with the Puyo Puyo! 39 minigame, rather surprisingly. In any localization of Puyo Puyo that wasn't a Dolled-Up Installment, the franchise was always called Puyo Pop prior to Mirai DX.
    • Some songs also manage to escape this process for the sake of not sounding awkward in English. In these cases, the Japanese title more or less remains intact. For example, the song "Sekiranun Graffiti", which is rarely, but usually English-translated into the strange-sounding "Cumulonimbus Graffiti", is simply "Sekiranun Graffiti" in F 2nd. Other examples include Tengakunote , "Kagerou Daze"note , "Akatsuki Arrival"note , and oddly, "Roshin Yuukai"note .
    • In X, Areas became "Clouds", Neutral became "Classic", Beauty became "Elegant", and Chaos became "Quirky". Live Edit Mode also became "Concert Editor" to better reflect what the mode actually does.
  • Dummied Out: In Japanese versions, F had a special DLC track that was "Popipo" from previous games, but with the addition of Playstation mascots Toro and Kuro as Miku's backup dancers. This is the only song to not have made it outside Japan, thus rendering it lost for international players.
    • The demo versions of Project Diva, prior to X, removed the ability to unlock anything, instead gifting you with the modules immediately. Project Diva X subverts this with the new unlocks system being included virtually intact.
  • Duet Bonding: "World's End Dancehall" from has Miku and Luka facing off in a heated dance battle, only for them to hit it off at the end when they realise the crowd loves it.
  • Early Installment Weirdness:
    • Project DIVA has a whole laundry list of quirks that were excluded by 2nd. These include:
      • Score-based success. 2nd swapped this for different system based on COOL/FINE notes hit, which was later expanded upon with additional mechanics. The only games to revive this system are Arcade and X.
      • Very few "story" PVs, a hallmark of the series that became more abundant in 2nd and gave many songs more identity. Some PVs weren't even dances and were simply slideshows.
      • Hold and Wide Notes didn't exist. These were added in 2nd.
      • The D-pad could not be used to hit normal notes, which is a punch in the gut for left-handed players.
      • Hard was the highest difficulty. Extreme, the series' most iconic difficulty, only came about in 2nd.
      • Songs were divided into different categories. The first song in each category was unlocked from the start, and to unlock every song, you had to complete each category individually. While this mechanic wasn't completely removed for future games for sake of having more starting tracks, future games dropped the categories and simply put songs into different sets that would unlock new songs within the same set if the song before it was completed. The only game to renew this mechanic in its entirety is X, which dubs the categories "Element Areas", and further categorizes songs by assigning them an Element.
      • Only Miku had a Room. This was diversified in 2nd, which renamed "Miku's Room" into "DIVA Room" and gave every Vocaloid their own Rooms.
      • The main game was known as "Free Play". This was later renamed to "Rhythm Game". X brought back the term "Free Play", but now uses it to distinguish itself from "Live Quest"; while the latter uses a new set of progression-based mechanics, Free Play Mode plays much closer to older installments.
      • Many of the songs are simply repeats of the same song sung by a different Vocaloid, and the majority of songs were done by one of four composers who make up almost the entirety of the song's setlist; later games make an effort to include a much larger variety of composers.
    • Games before F did not contain Scratch Notes, Technical Zones, Chance Time bonus scenes, customization items... or rock paper scissors.
    • F 2nd adds two new types of Scratch Note, one of which requires you to scratch two-fingered, the other requiring you to complete a combo, often slightly out of tune with the song itself.
      • The new star note mechanic also ties into Chance Time, where you can actually cancel the bonus animation by doing the final star note with both fingers or analogue sticks.
    • X adds the rush note, where you have to mash the corresponding button as much as you can before the note expires.
  • Earn Your Fun: To unlock a song's Hard chart, you have to clear its Normal chart first. To unlock the Extreme chart, you need to clear the Hard chart first.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: The secret ending of the "Hello, Planet" DLC subgame in 2nd. If you pick up Water, you can use it to feed the potted plant in your inventory as opposed to healing yourself. If you keep doing this until the counter above the plant reaches 50, it will dispense an orb. This allows you to access the secret exit located behind the regular one in Level 4. This takes you to a secret Level 5, and if you complete it alive, Miku makes it to the boy's grave intact, but trips, falls flat on her face and drops the potted plant, causing the pot to shatter. This causes an angel to appear, who summons the corpse of Miku's master to her. Miku, with the power of the orb and seven rainbow melodies, then begins to sing a slower reprise of the chorus of "Hello, Planet", which causes her deceased master to come Back from the Dead. The credits then shows the two regrowing the Earth's plants together.
  • Easter Egg:
    • When you pass the Extra Mode AR marker scan over an image of the box art of any of the first five games on F 2nd, the game scans it, and creates a Bland-Name Product version of all five games as items you can put in the room.
    • In the mirai series, Miku can obtain an Arle Nadja outfit. If you then start up Puyo Puyo! 39 while Miku is wearing it, her voice clips and animations will be based off of Arle, including her spell names, as well as her combo bursts.
    • In mirai, put a Vocaloid to sleep, and wait for a while. Given enough time, they will eventually start doing things in their sleep, such as sleepwalking, rolling out of their bed, tossing and turning, and sleepdancing.
  • Easy-Mode Mockery: Playing on the Easy difficulty in F and F 2nd prevents you from unlocking the Hard versions of songs, and some modules and items. Additionally, if you choose to use a help item, the rank shown will have a green heart beside it. Some help items go further and automatically give you the CHEAP/LOUSY/SO CLOSE rating regardless of performance, preventing you from unlocking new songs.
    • One of the cheapest, in gaming terms, help items was removed for F 2nd, which allowed you to, on any difficulty, play it with only the basic note types of Easy Mode.
  • Engrish: As the Vocaloid 3 modules were only finished a few weeks before the release of Project Diva F in English, all the songs but one are only translated in that Romanji is used on the karaoke bar. Also, All the Vocaloids, when, as of recent updates, all of them have a english voice bank, still use the original engrish victory announcements. Several fans of Project Diva have took it upon themselves to remix, using the Vocaloid 3 English voicebank, several of the songs from Project Diva F and have so far shown almost half the songs sound just as good, if not better, in english!
    • This is slightly averted by the song 'DYE', in that the song is sung in very poor Engrish throughout, so didn't need translating.
    • The lack of english is averted, in a very cute fashion, in F 2nd... Luka uses the english Yankee Doodle chant for the new minigame, in all regions, purely since she's always spoken passable english!
      • Then averted even more in a shocking move, as SEGA announced that the subtitles now have an option on all but ONE song to translate faithfully the lyrics into full English, approved by Crypton and the original composers, for the western release!
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: "Kagerou Daze". Speeding truck? Discarded liquor bottle? Steel pipes from said truck? Car crash? Slippery staircase? Conveniently broken bridge railing that falls apart when someone leans on it? Averted in the lyrics, where the only improbable death is being impaled by a falling steel pipe, quite viciously.
  • Fake Difficulty: Quite a few examples. Even if you know a song by heart, some song charts practically require the player to be familiar with them to not slip up on its notes.
    • Any song with a PV with a lot of colorful movement going around in the background, making it more difficult than it should be for the targets and incoming beats to be seen. 2D Dream Fever is infamous for this; in addition to a particularly nauseating color scheme, the PV often switches between pitch black on 80% of the screen and a color explosion.
    • Songs with extended endings. A particularly evil example happens with World's End Umbrella just after the Chance Time star. The title card appears, the song goes completely dead, as if the song is over. PSP veterans would put the controller down and consider the song over, and that they missed some notes... when actually, it's a fake ending, and, on Extreme, they'll miss several notes anyway! Aku no Meshitukai also does this, although it's easier to catch because the 3DS's bottom screen tells you the song's duration.
    • Overlapping notes. One egregious example is in Luka Luka Night Fever in F 2nd. On Normal/Hard, the "Lu-ka Lu-ka" (Night Fever) parts of the song are overlapping A-B-A-B notes (e.g. square-X-square-X). A little sneaky at first, but entirely manageable after the first instance or so. On Extreme, this trend continues, with the slight twist of making the B-notes doubles instead of singles... until you get to Chance Time, where the notes randomly switch to an A-B-B-A format instead. While still overlapping. Completely out of nowhere. Fake Difficulty at its finest.
    • In F 2nd, gimmicky linked star notes. It's not really clear how fast you need to flick a sequence of linked star notes until you experience it for yourself. One of the best examples is in F 2nd's Knife, which has a simple two-linked-star note sequence, symbolizing a sword slash. There's a fairly long line in between the two notes, but the star travels along the line blindingly fast, so you actually have to flick twice in rapid succession, and not with a pause in between as the line between them would have you expect.
    • Adding to the above, there's also linked star notes that overlap. Thankfully, since you're just flicking either way and these usually still follow the beat of the song, combined with the fact that the timing on star notes is more relaxed than regular notes, these usually aren't too bad.
    • A lot of these are lampshaded in the Extreme version of the tutorial song, Ievan Polkka.
    • In the Mirai spin-off series, notes appear along a line that meanders around the screen to the general mood of the song rather than all over the screen, which alleviates most of the fake difficulty, but not all. In some songs, such as "Piano x Forte x Scandal," the line will frequently turn very sharp corners with notes on either side, making it difficult to visually gauge the timing, and in many songs, the line will often go off the edge of the screen while notes are spawning on it, giving the player very little time to react when the screen catches up.
    • X's "Hikkyou Sentai Urotander" is the embodiment of this trope, true to the song's title. The fifth note is a Scratch Note flying at sonic speed without warning, and it only gets worse from there. Overlapping notes that are the same and different? Notes spaced so far apart you can't tell that they're consecutive? Notes deliberately placed along the edge of the screen, then arrive from the same edge? Notes coming from multiple sides at the same time with little warning? Speed manipulation? It's like a bad nightmare, multiplied by ten.
  • Fake Longevity:
    • To unlock a song's Hard chart, you have to play its Normal chart first. To unlock its Extreme chart, you have to play its Hard chart. This quickly becomes a hassle if you've played other games in the series and can get PERFECTs on Extreme charts, because you're forced to play through charts you are far more than capable of clearing just to get to the challenging charts.
    • It's worse in the original: You can only unlock the Hard chart by getting a GREAT rating. If you only get a standard... Looks like you're playing it again!
    • Unlocking 100% of the Modules in the original PSP game requires clearing all of the songs sung by Miku (32 of the 36) and getting either 5 Normals or 1 Great... per character! This also has to be done six times, using a character's original module for each run, making it almost a waste to use any of Miku's other costumes.
    • F 2nd restores this aspect somewhat with the Information Board challenges, which include cumulative score or note totals. Notably, some of the challenges are to get NO notes of one of the types. Most of them aren't any worse than having to clear a song 5 times or play it once on each difficulty, but a few in particular require double-digit clears while "I'll Miku-Miku You (For Real)!" has one that requires a minimum of 20(!) clears.
    • X features over 300 Modules, including both original and F series outfits. There's no Shop anymore. You can unlock exactly one Module for every song you play.note  Not to mention Accessories, which you can unlock a handful of per song, depending on how much bonus Voltage you accumulate. There is DLC for this to make this far less of a hassle. And to unlock all the crystals that lift all of the drop requirements, you'll have to be playing every song at least eight times.
  • Fanservice: Every game is obligated to have one song that features the lead girls in swimsuits, such as "Summer Idol" from F. Doesn't stop those songs from being difficult, though.
  • Final Boss: Each game has a song considered this, although it's not necessarily the last unlockable track.
    • DIVA didn't have one, due to the non-linear way the tracks were unlocked. "The Disappearance of Hatsune Miku" can be considered this by some, though, due to being the toughest song in the game.
    • 2nd had "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku".
    • Extend also used a non-linear unlock schedule, but "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku" is considered this.
    • F had "Sadistic.Music∞Factory".
    • F 2nd had "2D Dream Fever".
    • X had "The Ultimate Medley", which is all of the above in one track, plus "Two-Sided Lovers".
  • Fission Mailed: Obtaining the Chance Time bonus in "Sadistic.Music Factory" leads to the bad ending that involves failing to escape from the factory.
    • Several Item Events have "Fail" versions where the character messes up what s/he is doing in some fashion.
  • Four Element Ensemble: X introduces five Elements and the Element Clouds that together make up the world that the Vocaloids live in, those being Classic, Cool, Cute, Elegant, and Quirky. In gameplay, each of the Element Clouds is inhabited by songs of that Element, and using Modules and Accessories with matching Elements give you a boost to Voltage Rate.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: The potted plant from "Hello, Planet" can be briefly seen in exactly two shots near the beginning of "Negaposi*Continues".
  • The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You: The entirety of the ending of "Sadistic.Music∞Factory" can be summed up as this.
  • Funny Background Event: During the video for "LOL -lots of laugh-" in Mirai 2, Miku is riding a teacup ride. Briefly in the background, the rabbit leading her through the candy-filled amusement park is flailing around madly in her own teacup.
    • Luka tripping over and falling on her face in Senbonzakura.
  • Funbag Airbag: Happens to Rin in one of the gallery images in F 2nd as she dives for a beach ball and ends up with her head on Miku's chest.
  • Gameplay and Cutscene Segregation
    • Almost every time a Vocaloid is shown in the opening cutscenes, they are wearing their default costumes. This is subverted with Project Diva, where Miku begins wearing the Ha2ne Miku module, later associated with the opening video, and Project Diva X, where Miku is visited by herself wearing the Ultimate Miku module you earn by completing the game.
    • All the cinematic music videos depict the Vocaloids doing several things, like Miku's diorama building, and in places that are not represented by Room Themes or items available in any of the games.
    • Partially subverted by The MMORPG Addict's Anthem, where the Chance Time event shows Miku winning an item for her successful concert... which is indeed unlocked for completing the song, even on the lowest difficulty, which normally unlocks only the costume.
  • Gameplay Grading: Being a rhythm game series, this is obviously present, though with worded grades rather than letter grades. From worst to best, they are MISS×TAKE (DROP×OUT in F's English release), CHEAP (LOUSY in F's English release or SO CLOSE in F 2nd's English release), STANDARD, GREAT, EXCELLENT, and PERFECT.
    • Project Mirai forgoes the words and simply uses Rank Inflation, ranging from D to SS/S+.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: Really, it's amazing what kinds of songs can sneak past the radar.
    • In Project Diva F 2nd, we have songs which include very intimate Les Yay, several different ways to kill someone, sex, (possible) suicide, Blackjack, more sex, prostitution, borderline drug-induced rape, and a recipe for a cocktail, almost all of which are fully translated into English.
    • Mirai DX, while overall more lightheared than the main series, also has fun themes like sex ("Romeo and Cinderella"), aforementioned cocktail ("Clover Club"), beheading ("Aku no Musume" and "Aku no Meshitsukai"), flat-out genocide, homicide, and incest rape, none of which (quite conveniently) is translated. Note that this game has a lower rating than that of the main series.
    • X continues the trend by adding "Holy Lance Explosion Boy" and "Chaos Medley ~Giga Remix~". For the former, the song is basically about a womanizer and littered with fairly explicit innuendo and sexual euphemisms, whereas the latter includes "Pink Stick Luv", which contains very unsubtle references to masturbation, and the infamous "Gigantic O.T.N.", which is entirely (and unsubtly) about sex. Much like it's predecessor, they're also translated.
  • Global Currency Exception: Unlike DIVA, which uses the same currency across all in-game purchases, Mirai DX uses the 3DS' Play Coins for purchasing Items. While it's entirely possible to play the game without ever spending on items, three of the possible items also boost overall Mirai Point acquisition, which can make it tempting to spend on them.
  • Goggles Do Nothing: It's GUMI's trademark, of course. Some outfits swap out her goggles for other head accessories.
  • Good Times Montage:
    • The majority of "Time Machine" is a reel of the viewpoint character's memories with Miku, up until he/she has to depart and leave Miku behind.
    • "Fire Flower" is also similar, as it looks back on Len's memories with Rin while Len is performing on stage for her.
  • Gory Discretion Shot: In "Aku No Musume" and "Aku No Meshitsukai", when the evil princess Rin (actually Len in disguise) is executed, there is a cut to a black screen with a falling ribbon as the guillotine falls.
  • Gotta Catch 'Em All: Arcade has tons of special trading cards you can collect by completing challenges, which can then be used with an online Mini-Game.
  • Grass Is Greener: "Negaposi*Continues". Turns out living in a video game isn't all it's cracked up to be.
  • Gratuitous English: The original PV for "Kokoro" had a very Engrishy text scroll at its end that doesn't translate well to a native English speaker. When F 2nd redid the PV, the Japanese version got a Surprisingly Good English revision that was retained for the international release.
  • "Groundhog Day" Loop: Miku gets stuck in one in the "Chance Time" version of Kagerou Daze.
  • Guide Dang It: Averted in F 2nd. A new feature adds a Information Board which tells you what unlockables you can unlock in a song, in a easy to read format. Of course, so it's not TOO easy, it only reveals them in stages.
    • Also played straight in the same game's Diva Room unlocks as there are several unique items unlocked outside of the songs that are only obtained through certain numbers of various events such as visiting it daily, accepting requests and even making up with each Vocaloid after making them angry with no real way to track progress.
    • In mirai, non-song-related outfits and some unlocks fall straight into this category.
      • Miku's Snow Miku series of outfits. You need to place the corresponding Nendoroid in a Mirai Room.
      • Getting a particular Vocaloid's Pajamas. You need to raise a Vocaloid's Friendship to a high enough level, as well as put them to sleep for at least a certain number of hours at least once.
      • The bonus faces. Hatchune Miku requires getting all of the Miku outfits, Super KAITO requires getting all of the KAITO outfits, and Mikudayo requires getting all the outfits.
      • The game's very last unlockable. To get it, you must possess every single outfit in the game and achieve maximum friendship with Miku. This unlocks the "Otoro Cushion" Medium Room Item.
  • Hammerspace: In the "Hello, Planet" game, Miku can apparently hold a ton of stuff that goes apparently nowhere, including a whole hot air balloon.
  • Harder Than Hard: Extreme difficulty, home to some of the toughest charts in the series, like Negaposi*Continues, Sadistic Music Factory, and The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku.
    • Arcade takes it up a notch with Extra Extreme, a bonus difficulty that includes reworked charts with Slide Notes for older songs that didn't previously have Slide Notes.
    • Mirai DX introduces Super Hard difficulty, its equivalent of Extreme in the DIVA series. However, only six songs have the option, and the player must both beat the game and achieve an S Rank or higher on that song's Hard chart to unlock it.
  • Hazardous Water: In "Hello, Planet", Miku's life drains when she's in rain due to being a robot, although she prevents it by picking up an umbrella partway through. In the corresponding game, rain does indeed hurt you, as well as small pits of water. After picking up the Umbrella, you can stop rain damage by equipping it, but while holding it, you can only walk. However, it also causes you to descend a half speed after a jump.
  • Healing Potion: In the "Hello, Planet" game, Miku can pick up bottles of clean water. Using one restores a whole heart to your life gauge.
  • Hero of Another Story: Yowane Haku, who makes a very brief cameo in mirai's "Aku no Meshitukai", is a related character in the scope of the "Aku no Musume/Meshitukai" story who is an observer to all of the story's events, but not an active participant.
  • Hope Sprouts Eternal: Kami Kyoku/God-Tier Tune revolves around chibi Vocaloids tending to the last plant on Earth in order to awaken Goddess Miku.
    • Hello Planet. Miku is tending to the last viable plant on Earth. In either ending, her faith is rewarded at the eleventh hour.
  • Hotter and Sexier: F and F 2nd bring us much more fanservice-geared songs such as "Hm? Ah, Yes.", "Nostalogic", "Blackjack", and "Envy Catwalk".
    • An intentional example in extend as "Colorful X Melody" featuring Miku and Rin appears midway down the list, then a reprise with Luka and Meiko titled "Colorful X Sexy" appears near the end.
  • Intercourse with You: A lot of the songs. To name a few, there's "magnet", "Romeo & Cinderella", "Hm? Ah, Yes.", "Iroha Uta"...
  • Interface Spoiler: Did you buy a physical copy of Project Mirai DX? Don't look at the song AR cards unless you want most of the songlist spoiled for you.
  • Jerkass Gods: The goddess of fate in "The Name of the Crime" curses a girl with deformity and ugliness just for the hell of it. She gets better.
  • Jiggle Physics:
    • Meiko and Luka got it going on in . Even the modestly-endowed Miku gets in on the action, depending on the outfit.
    • The game even uses some jiggle physics on the hair of Miku, Luka, Haku and Neru, so their ponytails bob about almost realistically.
    • Averted with Mikudayo, who moves like someone wearing a heavy mascot costume would.
  • Jump Scare: Early in the mirai video for "LOL -Lots Of Laughs-", a bunny mascot's face abruptly fills the screen with no prior warning. If you weren't expecting it and are the kind that gets spooked easily, expect it to throw off your rhythm.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall:
    • In the intro for Project Diva F, the DX7 synthesizer is uncovered, gathering dust, that appeared in the PSP intros, and Miku is depicted as moving on, reflecting the fact F and F 2nd are PS3 and Vita games, instead of the original system of a PSP game alongside a Dreamy Theatre upscaling program.
    • Expanding from this is that the first three games are portrayed as being set at a exclusive academy, while Project Diva F and F 2nd are set after they have graduated, with the iconic synthesizer absent completely from F 2nd.
      • In Sakura Rain in Project Diva F 2nd, Miku is shown walking around this academy, with several locations seen in the various intros shown prominently.
      • To take it a notch further, the song itself is about saying goodbye after graduation, and that hopefully they'll return to meet again someday.
    • One of the Gadget items for Project Diva F is the plainly named Project Diva Arcade Machine, which is a genuine arcade cabinet for Project Diva Arcade, which can be used to play the credits game constantly. Annoyingly, The Gadget list misnames it as 'Game Console' when selected in the Diva Room.
    • The words and music for The Disappearance Of Hatsune Miku and Tell Your World are incredibly meta, the first having her sing about how she's terrified of the end of the song, and the latter having Miku singing about the fact she's on the stage right now singing for the world.
      • Intense Voice Of Hatsune Miku also has very meta lyrics, in that she outright declares that the song itself is a 'answer' song to Disappearance, which talked of the end of her shelf life, declaring that she has no shelf life, as long as Vocaloid exists. Ever since its english localization, Every revision of Vocaloid has a version of Miku. Yes, Miku, You Are Alive.
    • The music video for Sadistic Music Factory is about someone having escaped a tyrannical factory owner. As the song continues, it's revealed that the person she's looking for is the player themselves!
    • One of the new aids given for The Intense Voice Of Hatsune Miku is that, from halfway through the song, the music video itself, if you complete Chance Time, changes to allow you to more clearly see the arrangement of the notes, purely since the notes might have changed, but the speed most definitely hasn't...
  • Level Grinding: X is atrocious about this, forcing you to grind for Voltage to gather crystals, and due to the game having the shortest list of songs since the first game, be prepared to have to play the same song again. And again. And again. Depending on how good you are at getting Voltage, you may have to end up going through the entire setlist the game has to offer at least eight times before you've unlocked anything, and that's only if the Random Drops have been working in your favor.
  • Licensed Game:
    • In two ways. It's themed around the Crypton-produced Vocaloids (this unfortunately means no Gakupo, for instance) and a few fan derivatives, and technically, every single song is a licensed song, since they're preexisting songs made by producers who are not SEGA or even Crypton staff. The fact it uses so many licenses made the localization of Project Diva F a shock, especially since almost none of the songs are cut, only removing a special download-only version of PoPiPo, presumably since SEGA couldn't renegotiate the rights to use Toro and Kuro.
      • A surprising licensing issue cropped up with Sakura Rain, in that it was unable to be licensed for inclusion in ANY games after the original Project Diva up until it appeared again, finally, in Project Diva F 2nd.
    • The inclusion of Akita Neru, Yowane Haku and Kasane Teto, as well as modules specifically for them, Sakine Meiko, Tako Luka and Hachune Miku is purely since piapro licensed every single one of them under the Crypton Future Media banner. Ever since, they have appeared, legally, complete with songs specific to them, in the Project Diva games. This licensing does not extend to use of Kasane Teto's voice, which is created using UTAU, which piapro cannot license, meaning she has no songs or bonus modules on any Project Diva game, and was not added to Project Diva Arcade until much later.
      • This was averted in F 2nd when she got a new Sweet Camouflage Jacket module, her first extra module EVER, and was given Swimwear, finally, alongside the other Divas, who have had some since Project Diva 2nd...
    • Gumi has only been licensed as a exclusive cameo character for Mirai 2 and Mirai DX, and only appears in duets. She has not yet been licensed for any Project Diva game, including Future Tone.
    • Project Diva F 2nd uses, for Japan only, piapro's own music archiving website to archive the music for Edit Mode, allowing gamers to optionally attach the song file to a PV, removing one of the bugbears of Edit Mode, namely that you can't always find the song. Due to there being no equivalent service in the West, even from Piapro themselves, the feature was axed.
    • Another licensing problem came with F and F 2nd coming out in English at all, since they needed to get approval to do the english lyrics. When Project Diva F was successful beyond all expectations, Crypton approved SEGA meeting with the composers to create the licensed translations the fans wanted.
      • However, Mirai DX still uses the original translation style.
  • Life Meter: Like in many other rhythm games. However, depending on the game, clearing a song requires you not only to get to the end of the song but fulfill an extra requirement:
    • In Project Diva and 2nd, a certain percentage of notes must be scored as COOL or FINE.
    • In F, F 2nd, and X's Free Play mode, you must also score at least 80 out of a 100 grade points by hitting COOL or GOOD/FINE notes, (up to 89 points) and completely technical zones (3 points for each zone) and chance time. (5 points)
    • In X's Live Quest, you must also hit a certain Voltage limit to pass.
  • Lighter and Softer: The PV for "Kagerou Daze", compared to the song itself.
  • Little Bit Beastly:
    • Several versions of this are available in F and F 2nd including rabbit, dog, fox and cat parts, with F 2nd adding parts for a nekomata and nine-tailed fox.
    • The costumes for "Animal Fortune-Telling" in Project Mirai 2 and Deluxe, as well as "Amatsu Kitsune". "Animal Fortune-Telling" has Miku as a koala, Luka as a sheep, Rin as a tiger, and Meiko as a Tanuki. "Amatsu Kitsune" has Rin as a fox.
  • Logo Joke: The logo screen has Miku singing "Se-gaaaa!", similar to how older Sega games had the "Se-gaaaa!" yell. Later games had Rin, Len, Luka, Kaito and Meiko join in randomly.
    • Recent trailers expand on this by having Miku sing the jingle as a chord, which better captures the original jingle.
  • Love Triangle: "Acute" from F has one between Kaito, Miku, and Luka. As if to drive the point home, the stage is even shaped like a triangle! It doesn't end well, either.
  • Luck-Based Mission:
    • The room items in the original game are unlocked by random chance after clearing a song. Many of them require a Great but even then aren't a 100% guarantee. This was averted in F and F 2nd, where they are unlocked by simply completing the songs on NORMAL or higher.
    • Getting a lot of the Mirai Room stamps more or less borders on random chance, as in, the Vocaloid actually has to use the object in question, which is completely decided by the AI. Some stamps take it a step further and require a certain result from using a specific item, which is even more luck-based than getting your Vocaloid to use it in the first place. Then there are the idle events...
    • Provided you aren't great at Puyo Puyo, the fourth opponent in Puyo Puyo 39 basically amounts to hoping that he/she doesn't get a three or four chain.
  • Lyrical Dissonance: The standard Chance Time footage for Kagerou Daze depicts a goofy video of a very strangely dressed Miku trying to get to her concert without dying somewhere along the way, where all deaths are Played for Laughs. The song itself tells the tragic tale of a boy stuck in a "Groundhog Day" Loop for decades on end while hopelessly trying to save a girl who repeatedly dies in increasingly gruesome ways.
    • Notably, The lyrics vanish completely when you're playing the song in English, due to the gruesome nature.
  • Male Gaze:
    • Present in Meiko's song "Nostalogic" in Project Diva F. The camera often locks on or swing pasts her midriff, rear, or chest.
    • Made even more hilarious if you get the Chance Time for Nostalogic, which causes the camera to become glued to the player character's chest.
    • Luka's "Blackjack" in F 2nd brings this back in full force. Many songs (such as "The World Is Mine") focus on a female Vocaloid's butt every now and again.
    • Songs in Project Mirai DX focus on the female characters' rears again...except they're all Super-Deformed and don't have anything to show off as a result.
  • The Many Deaths of You: Kagerou Daze's "Chance Time" video has Miku dying in numerous different ways, including being hit by a car, crushed by steel pipes, falling down a staircase, being in a car crash, or getting crushed by stage props.
  • Marathon Level: Mirai only uses full versions of songs, unlike the main series, which cuts some songs for time. This mostly sounds like a positive, until you get to tracks like "reverse rainbow" in Mirai DX, which clocks in at just over five minutes, in a franchise where hitting four minutes runtime is already considered quite long.
    • Project Diva X introduces the Medleys, six medleys of songs by various composers, which are much longer than normal, as the final concerts in each area. The Ultimate Medley by legendary producer Cos Mo takes the cake; it clocks in at just under four minutes and has a total note count of a whopping 1047 notes, the highest number of notes of any official chart to date.
  • Market-Based Title: Mirai Deluxe is Mirai DX outside of Japan. Despite this, all versions of the game have Miku saying "Mirai Deluxe!" when you highlight the game's icon on the 3DS's Home Menu.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • The mirai in Project mirai is a reference to the Alternate Character Reading of "未来", which can also be pronounced "miku".
    • Hikyou Sentai Urotander is a Super Sentai parody about a group of Sentai who use dirty and cowardly tricks to win fights. True to its name, the note chart pulls off the only case of invoked Fake Difficulty in series history, including notes that come out blindingly fast while you're distracted by another note, or notes that are lined up along the edge of the screen and arrive from the same edge, making it irritatingly difficult to tell when a note begins and ends.
  • Mercy Invincibility: In Project DIVA Arcade and the Project Mirai series, you're granted a brief period of "safety" at the beginning of the song; your Life Meter is restrained from falling below a certain amount until the safety wears off.
  • Mini-Game:
    • F has Rock Paper Scissors. There's also Mini-Game Credits that you can repeatedly access upon purchasing a Project DIVA Arcade machine.
    • F 2nd brought back Rock Paper Scissors, and added a Patty Cake minigame. The Mini-Game Credits were also brought back, but significantly tweaked to not require repeat plays.
    • Mirai DX has Puyo Puyo! 39, which is Puyo Puyo with Vocaloid characters and background music. You can also play Mikuversi with your Vocaloid partner, even if their name isn't Miku.
    • Arcade has DIVAPronote , an online sub-game where you collect trading cards from playing Arcade, then register them and arrange them into squads so they can perform at venues and gain EXP and stats. This is currently the only purpose for the cards.
  • Modesty Shorts: Miku's De:MONSTAR outfit has red spats underneath the skirt, although it's barely noticeable.
  • Money for Nothing: Play the game often enough, and you'll have way more Diva Points/Mirai Points than you'll know what to do with. Somewhat subverted with the latter as well, since if you decide to move into the Penthouse or the Resort, you'll have to keep feeding the Vocaloid an extremely gratuitous value of Mirai Points per real-time week to keep staying. Also heavily averted with Arcade, which dispenses Vocaloid Points at such a paltry rate that you'll have to grind for VP at least once every day if you intend on buying all the available outfits.
  • Motor Mouth: To varying degrees based on the song, from short spurts in "Secret Police" to constant and nigh-indecipherable in "Rin-chan Now!", "Sadistic Music Factory" and "Two-Sided Lovers". Most blatant in the infamous "Intense Voice Of Hatsune Miku" from 2nd, which not only features high-speed singing in long bursts, but also makes you tap buttons at the same speed. It was later reintroduced in F 2nd, but the difficulty was greatly reduced with a new note chart that features far fewer notes than before.
  • Multiple Endings: The Bonus Events from the F series create a form of this; depending on whether or not you succeed at them, you can get alternate scenes and endings for the video. Averted in "Kagerou Daze", where the Bonus Event trigger occurs at the start of the song, and succeeding completely changes the subsequent video.
  • Mini-Game Credits: In F's closing credits, you play as Hachune Miku, throwing leeks at the credits to score points. Amusingly, after you complete the game on NORMAL, you can buy an item that lets you play it whenever you want, and new features are unlocked as you play the credits game multiple times.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • In F 2nd's version of The World Is Mine, if you score the "Chance Time" event, you get a bonus scene of a posing Miku mimicking the now-famous pose from the original video.
    • The video for magnet has a segment that mimicks the album cover. F 2nd's version adds butterflies for the final segment as its Chance Time bonus event.
    • The PV for "The World is Mine" in mirai uses a new stage based on the single's album cover. Right before the track's bridge, the curtains slide away, the checkerboard tiles on the floor disappear and a platform from the ground rises up, transforming the stage into the one used in the mainline Project DIVA series.
    • Saki Fujita is often employed as the narrator for the series' TV advertisements, a reference to her role as Miku's voice provider.
    • In the opening for mirai 2, the words MITCHIE M appear in the dressing room, with the same font used on his official content. This is a reference to Mitchie M, who composed "Ageage Again", the theme song of mirai 2.
    • In the opening for mirai DX, Pinocchio-P's mascots appear as a Freeze-Frame Bonus. Pinocchio-P composed the theme song of mirai DX, "Nice to Meet You, Mr. Earthling!".
    • The absolutely final unlockable in mirai DX is the Otoro Button, a giant, plush otoro sushi that appeared in the mirai 2/DX "Together with Mikudayo!" promo trailers, and is also Mikudayo's Trademark Favorite Food. It may make its signature "ding dong" sound when interacted with.
    • The ending shot of "1925" involves Miku kneeling in front of a graphic that forms behind her, causing the final scene to resemble the original accompanying art for the song.
    • "LOL -lots of laughs-" is the only mirai-original song that also launched in the main series. However, X gives this version an alternate costume entirely unrelated to the bunny costume seen in mirai; this is a reference to the original PV, which featured two Mikus in different costumes.
      • Notably, a unique back accessory for Miku's X costume is what seems like a promotional backpack of the rabbit from the mirai version.
  • Nerf: Between 2nd and F 2nd, "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku" (Hatsune Miku no Gekishou) received a severe nerf in the sense that the abnormally long high-speed chains at the end of 2nd's version were replaced with a series of much shorter chains punctuated by a few spaced-out notes. The song is still difficult, but not nearly as much. It's probably because of this that in F 2nd it became the second-to-last song instead of the final, of which F 2nd's is definitely no slouch.
    • Notably, Intense Voice has it's last played notes on EXTREME be a 18-note Technical Zone which goes by at the same speed as the original Extend version's chains... and this one isn't one single type of note. X brings it back, but makes it easier by replacing two chains with Rush Notes.
    • And the Arcade version's last notes are a chain which literally has you needing to dance your hands over ALL FOUR NOTES, with seemingly three notes at once needing to be played. Two hands, three notes. Surprisingly, some players HAVE managed it.
  • Never Say "Die": Both played straight and averted in "This is the Happiness and Peace of Mind Committee". An entire portion of the song is dedicated to Miku listing off the numerous ways she'll kill you, but the last word has been partially censored in a form of a Leet: "[)34[)". Same way as in the Japanese version where the kanji of that word is replaced by a circle.
  • Nintendo Hard: Although the games have a fairly simple learning curve, the game gets to be this whenever you have to press different buttons in succession. Additionally, while many games simply have a stage clear requirement of "have this many points" or "keep your Life Meter from hitting zero", in this series both of them are in effect, so you can make it to the end of the song but still fail it.
  • No Fair Cheating:
    • A lot of the stronger Help Items limit your maximum rank for a song. For example, in F, Star Killer and Double Killer, which lets Scratch Notes be performed with regular buttons and removes W Notes respectively, prevent you from earning higher than a Standard. Simple Rhythm, which changes all inputs to be Onote , and Training Wheels, which turns all BAD and LOUSY into SAFE, prevents the song from being counted as complete.
    • In the Project mirai side series, Recoverynote  prevents your score from being counted, as does Role Modelnote . Averted with Auto-Spinnote  and Specialnote , which only increase MP rewards but not score, as well as Do Or Dienote  which is the opposite of an assist item anyway.
  • Nostalgia Level:
    • Project DIVA F 2nd brings back updated versions of past songs, such as "Packaged" from the first game, "Romeo & Cinderella" and "Intense Voice Of Hatsune Miku" from the second, and "Thousand Year Solo" from extend...
    • This extends to the modules in the same game, with confirmation of the Nyanko and Heart Hunter modules from the PSP games, the latter being well known due to it's use with videos of the first game's rendition of "Two-Sided Lovers", which returns with the PV and module it used in extend.
  • Oddball in the Series: Arcade takes a few liberties from its handheld and console counterparts:
    • Your success or failure is determined completely by score, like the first Project DIVA game. The game helps with this by showing you a visual guide of how many points you have compared to how many points you should have at that point to get a minimum clear.
    • The buttons are arranged in a line, rather than a diamond like the signature PlayStation diamond. Anyone not accustomed to this button setup is advised to play on lower difficulties first to adapt to it.
    • The safety mode at the beginning of each stage.
    • The game runs at 60 frames per second instead of 30. The main series didn't hit 60 FPS until X released on Playstation 4.
      • Not that it didn't stop a arcade-perfect PS4 version coming out in 2016.
    • The game utilizes a graphical style more in line with Dreamy Theater than the actual DIVA series.
    • Holds are no longer mandatory. Holding a hold note down simply gives you bonus points, up to 3000 per hold note if another note of the same button doesn't appear early enough to interrupt the hold.
    • "Chord" notes now use different buttons. On harder difficulties, chords of 3 and 4 buttons are not uncommon.
    • Normal mode actually uses all four buttons.
    • There are no Technical Zones or Chance Times. This factors in to how you succeed at Chance Time mentioned below.
      • This is the only change for Project Diva Future Tone, where Chance Time is restored.
    • The newer revisions of the game have a version of the star note from F, the Slide Note, indicated by a bar across the top of the control area that you slide one direction or another to complete the note.
    • Netting the "Chance Time" ending of a song only requires you to hit the notes highlighted in rainbow; anything before that is completely irrelevant to whether you get it or not.
  • Off with His Head!: The Daughter of Evil's or rather, her servant who looks identical to her ultimate fate in Mirai DX's "Aku no Musume" after a coup overthrows her as ruler. Naturally, the game uses a Gory Discretion Shot.
  • Oh Crap!: Miku has this reaction when being invited into a haunted house in "LOL -Lots of Laughs-" in Mirai DX.
  • Old Save Bonus:
    • Having the original game's save on your memory stick will net you all of its costumes for free, plus an exclusive DIVA Room poster and title, in the sequel. Likewise, having a 2nd save will get you all of its costumes and such for extend.
    • Due to the console jump, F doesn't allow this. Its sequel, F 2nd, does however, in that possessing save data from F unlocks those Modules in F 2nd.
    • In a particularly interesting cross-region one, because the portion of the fanbase that imports these games is quite considerable due to Vocaloid culture's roots in a very Japan-oriented community, F 2nd allows you to import your Japanese save if you've uploaded it to the server.
  • Once an Episode: "Sekiranun Graffiti"'s stage is modified every game to display the logo of the game it's appearing in. This even includes the Dreamy Theater expansions.
  • Once a Season: The settings of focus for the games' openings change with every sub-series. The DIVA series opted for a very realistic "modern-day Japan" world with high school and trains. The move to the F series updated into a modern-future fusion with contemporary cafes and standard housing mixed with Tron Lines, hover scooters, and space elevators. X then transferred into a "world of music"-esque setting to tie into the now-existent plot, featuring concert halls and The Power of Rock linking worlds apart, together.
  • One Game for the Price of Two: Played with; Future Tone has two versions that, combined, make up the entirety of the Arcade tracklist. However, both games have completely different individual tracklists, and both have more songs than any DIVA game. Also, possessing both games will grant you the ability to combine content, allowing you to use Modules and Accessories found in one title in songs from the other.
  • Original Generation: Some songs are created specifically to appear in this series. Highlight examples include most of the theme songs, "Nega*Posi Continues" and "Ageage Again".
  • Pacifist Run: Enforced in the "Hello, Planet" game. Miku's only "weapon" is a bubble blower that shoots giant bubbles. The bubbles cannot actually kill enemies, but traps them for a few seconds, allowing you to walk past them unharmed.
  • Painting the Medium:
    • If you succeed at Chance Time in the F 2nd version of Intense Voice, the video will flash boxes and circles across the screen corresponding to the location of notes moments before they appear, allowing the player to anticipate the notes.
    • Lots of Square notes appear in Sakura Rain, simulating pink petals falling from the cherry blossom trees.
  • Panty Shot: "Satisfaction" can potentially deliver this if you have certain Modules on, averting Magic Skirt during a very particular frame.
  • Parental Bonus: The lyrics for Clover Club include a recipe for the cocktail the song is named after, done in such a way that only someone aware of what Miku is saying would be able to mix one up.
  • Pinky Swear
  • Play Every Day: Arcade deposits a DIVA Ticket into your account for every day you play the game. These can be exchanged on DIVA.NET for VP packets, special items, skins, and titles.
  • The Points Mean Nothing: The mirai PV for "Hello, Planet" features a completely non-functional score system in the top left of the screen. This score display syncs up exactly to the one used in the original video.
  • Proper Tights with a Skirt:
    • Rin's Trad School module in F and Miku's Noble module in F 2nd.
    • Miku also uses tights with the FOnewearl costume just like the default FOnewearl from Phantasy Star Online 2, when the normal default version omits them.
    • Rin's "Astray" from X.
  • Punny Name: The "Ha2ne Miku" Module from DIVA and F 2nd is a play on the pronunciation of the character "tsu", which sounds similar to the English number "2". It also references how it depicts an alternate version of Miku. Note that this change is only in the English versions; DIVA simply called it "Hatsune Miku", minus the word "-Original-" to differentiate it from her standard outfit.
  • Randomly Drops: The revised Module acquisition system in X turns unlocking new Modules into this for Live Quest Mode, where succeeding at Chance Time may additionally grant you a random Module, accompanied by a Transformation Sequence and a big honking on-screen display shouting "MODULE GET!". Certain Skills can increase the odds of a Module appearing, such as Miku's "School" Module, which comes with Rare Module UP Lv.1, a skill that slightly increases the odds of acquiring a rare Module.
  • Readings Are Off the Scale: In Extend, "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku" had the special distinction of having red stars for its difficulty scale as opposed to the normally-white stars, just to remind you how stupidly difficult it is.
    • This also applies to both Intense Voice again and 2D Dream Fever in F 2nd.
  • Rearrange the Song:
    • Almost all of the songs in the "Hello Planet" subgame either sample the song of the same name or are this.
    • Medleys do this to a lot of well-known classics. Shout-out to Cool Medley -Cyber Rock Jam- in this department; it takes five typically-rock or hard rock songs and injects them with 100% pure electronic rock. And it's badass.
  • Relationship Values: Every iteration of DIVA Room features these, with a separate gauge for each character. You can raise these with Item Events, giving them gifts, or simply interacting with them. The Derivatives do not have access to these features in the F series.
    • mirai also uses this system, although it is no longer measured. It is instead kept track of based on the pattern of the wallpaper backing a character in the Partner Select menu. Increasing their friendship through giving them Mirai Points, giving them food, and simply interacting with them is relevant to unlocking new items.
  • Retraux: True to sasakure.UK's Signature Style, "Hello Planet" and "Negaposi*Continues" use chiptune as BGM.
  • Revenue Enhancing Devices: Don't like repeating songs a gajillion times to unlock every single Module and Accessory in X? Don't worry, you can buy Unlock Keys! For ¥500 each, you can unlock every Module of a particular type, and for ¥250 each, you can do the same for Accessories. Or you could pay ¥1500 and ¥1000 for Unlock Sets, which unlock every Module and Accessory, respectively. This only serves to save time; everything can be unlocked in-game for free, but it's a lot of work.
  • Rhythm Game: Yes.
  • Sarashi: Rin wears this over her chest in her "Ame" outfit.
  • Satire: The entirety of "The MMORPG Addict's Anthem" is a satirical take on the life and culture of an online gamer, while being set in an online game, Phantasy Star Online 2.
  • Scoring Points:
    • Pre-X games have primarily two systems:
      • The first scoring system is the traditional points system. You get points for hitting notes on time, and you also get bonus points for hitting notes during Chance Time and holding down notes.
      • The other is the Grade Point system, which is simply an overall percentage of your note accuracy, with a few bonuses for completing Technical Sections and Chance Time.
    • X uses Voltage in Live Quest Mode, which functions identically to points in both Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA and Arcade, where completion is determined by score. Voltage gain is augmented by both Voltage Rate Bonus acquired by equipping Modules and Accessories and a naturally increasing multiplier that goes up as you perform well. Once you hit the "Voltage Clear!" mark that clears a song, you will enter bonus points territory, where you can continue earning extra Voltage to acquire Accessories and Room Goods. In Free Play, the Grade Point system is reused.
    • The Project Mirai spinoff games features "SP" segments: Occasionally, you'll encounter yellow lines and if you combo every note including the glowing note at the end, you'll get 2500 points. Like X, there's no Chance Time or Technical sections. Compared to other games in the series, holding down hold notes gives very few points.
  • Screw Destiny: "The Name of the Crime" can be summed up as this in the most literal way possible.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge:
    • Challenge Items are designed for this. They will make the game harder in exchange for adding a multiplier to your Diva Point acquisition at the end of the song — if you succeed. Highlights include COOL Perfectionist, which reduces your health every time you hit a note with something other than a COOL, Micro Target, which makes all the targets really tiny, and Drunken from X, which makes notes behave very erratically. F 2nd onwards allows you to stack Challenge Items for even tougher charts and even higher multipliers.
    • On another note, getting a Perfect. There's absolutely no gameplay benefit to it - no awards are given other than a title or a trophy - but landing one is much harder than it sounds as long as the "safe" designation exists...
  • Sequel Difficulty Drop:
    • The second game, 2nd, makes the acceptable hitboxes for each note far more lenient (in exchange for populating charts with more notes in general); it also rebalances Normal mode to have far fewer fast-paced sections.
    • An unusual case where it applies to a single level. In F 2nd, "The Intense Voice of Hatsune Miku"'s insane difficulty was greatly reduced from "god-tier" to "possible for most people", although it remains extremely difficult.
    • X is significantly less intensive than the F series. Not only are Wide Scratch and Scratch Links excised, but the presence of Scratch Notes as a whole is severly limited; some songs only have a single Scratch Note, the Chance Time Star. Normal difficulty is also comparable to Easy in the F series, and Extreme charts feature far less button-switching and mash-fests. Depending on the song, Extreme is even comparable to F's Hard!
  • Sequel Difficulty Spike:
    • The final PSP entry, extend, may very well be the hardest game in the series. Songs on Extreme are now filled with high-speed rapid chains.
    • F 2nd's Normal mode is much, much more difficult than the previous game, bearing more resemblance to that game's Hard mode. Strangely enough, Hard is about the same, while F's is mostly the same with a few charts being even easier.
    • Arcade can be very difficult compared to the main series, as it includes heavy Button Mashing on Extreme and many three-Wide Notes. This is coupled with a score-based success system that heavily penalizes you for screwing up a lot. The ranking system is also a lot tighter; just a handful of notes can mean the difference between an Excellent and a Great.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: Len's default outfit for "Monochrome Dream-Eating Baku" in F, complete with a matching Nice Hat.
  • She Is All Grown Up: Rin's Future Style module.
  • Shout-Out:
    • "Remote Controller"'s BGA features a Sega Dreamcast controller, which replaces the Famicom controllers in the original PV because you can probably guess how Sony would feel about Nintendo copyrights in games on their systems.
    • "Nyanyanyanyanyanyanya!" has a scene where the lead singer is picked up by a handsome cat with a personal cruise liner. The lead singer is then shown standing on the bow of the ship with arms outstretched, mimicking the iconic scene from Titanic. The handsome cat even holds his/her torso like DiCaprio did.
    • Hm? Ah Yes... is a fractured version of Cinderella, complete with the 'clock striking at midnight' and 'glass slipper' motif, except Miku destroys the entire ballroom, instruments, clock and all.
    • This loading screen from F 2nd has the Famicom controller from the "Remote Controller"'s original PV plastered in the dead center of the image. The controller wound up getting recolored with PlayStation colors, but it retains its Famicom controller shape.
    • Initally, the Project Diva intros featured a Yamaha DX7 synthesizer somewhere in them, including Project Diva F revealing Miku's one has the voice settings for 37-39 read 'Best Friends Forever'. This same synthesizer is one of several instruments that are built into Miku's outfit. Unfortunately, in Project Diva F 2nd, The DX7 is not present.
    • Being licensed by SEGA, every game is obligated to have at least one Module from a SEGA game.
    • Due to it being used in one of the songs, you can use the Stage portion of the ARKS Shop Area in F's Edit Mode.
    • A clever double-shout concerning the Nagisa Replica; in the Japanese version, it is called "Nagisa Repca". "Repca" is a common naming convention for borrowed outfits in Phantasy Star Online 2.
    • The bonus level for the Mini-Game Credits in F is called the Fantasy Zone Stage.
    • In Project Diva ARCADE, and Project Diva Future Tone for PS4, There are versions of Magical Sound Shower, FINAL TAKE OFFnote , and the theme song for Quartet remixed with full vocals.
    • How does Miku defeat Godzilla in "Gigantic Girl?" With Chun-Li's lightning kick!
    • The description for the roadroller item in Mirai DX was just about pulled straight out of Jojo's Bizarre Adventure.
    • In "Ageage Again", Miku mimicks the iconic disco pose from Saturday Night Fever during the line "SATURDAY kyo no kibun wa FEVER".
    • The PV for Watashi no Jikan makes good on a couple of old memes, mainly Nice Boat and Leek Spin.
    • Several Room goods in Mirai DX are ripped directly out of SEGA franchises, including a statue of Sonic the Hedgehog, an Opa Opa, and a both working Hang-On Bike and a Virtua Fighter arcade cabinet that your Vocaloids can play with.
  • Sibling Rivalry: "Remote Control" in F just screams this for Rin and Len, though they most-often get along very well in their other duet songs.
  • Significant Reference Date: In the mirai PV for "Kokoro", the date that flashes on a hex the moment Rin receives a heart is December 27, 2007, the real-life date that the Kagamine Rin/Len software was released. During the "run" portion of the PV, the date that appears after December 27, 2007 is March 3, 2008, the real-life day that "Kokoro" was first uploaded to Nico Nico Douga.
  • Silly Love Songs: Several. "Melt" and "Ai Kotoba", for example.
  • Singing Voice Dissonance: Pretty much everyone in extend's secret movie sounds somewhat different from their songs. Justified in the sense that Vocaloids oftentimes do not sound like their voice providers.
  • Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer:
    • MEIKO and KAITO were literally absent from every DIVA openingnote  until the F series. Even farther back, Luka, Rin, and Len don't exist as far as the first game's opening is concerned.
    • GUMI doesn't appear in any of the openings for the Mirai subseries, even though she has top billing in several songs. She also has not been licensed as even DLC for Project Diva, and is completely excluded from Future Tone.
  • Sleep Cute:
    • The end of the anime video of "World's End Umbrella".
    • Invoked by the Alarm Clock room item, in that the Vocaloid themselves goes to sleep so that, when the alarm goes off, they wake up with you.
  • Space Elevator: The opening to F 2nd depicts a train that travels to space.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Despite "1 2 Fanclub" being named a Rin song in Mirai DX, Rin herself is the backup while Gumi does most of the singing.
  • Stalker with a Crush: Miku and Luka big-time for Rin in "Rin-chan Now!"
  • The Stinger: Played with. In "World's End Umbrella", after the movie ends, Miku walks outside to an idyllic ruin beyond the movie theater much like the one seen at the end of the movie. However, the song isn't over, which can catch players off guard if they weren't paying attention.
  • Stripperiffic: Some modules are borderline, but the clearest example is definitely Meiko's Blue Crystal: Her breasts are covered only by a belt!
  • Stock Shout-Out: In the '393 Quest' diva room theme, the message box above the bed will periodically display, "Thank you Miku! But our diva is in another castle!"
    • Notably, with the '393 Quest F' version, the line is changed to read 'Stage' instead of 'Castle', and is the only English string on any version of the theme, the rest of the text being untranslated.
  • Stylistic Suck: Miku's animation in Mirai DX's "Hello Planet" is very choppy to emulate a retro game sprite animation until the end, when she reunites with the boy in heaven, tying into the whole "retro video game" aesthetic of the video and the song itself.
  • Super-Deformed:
    • God-Tier Tune in F uses chibi models for Rin, Len, Luka, and the lead singer.
    • The Mirai subseries uses Nendoroids as a basis for its style. The original game's appearance at Tokyo Game Show also lead to the appearance of Mikudayo, which was supposed to be this... save for the fact that she was disproportionately chubby and lacked a neck, causing the whole outfit to come off as chillingly creepy. After it went memetic in the Japanese fanbase, it later became an Ascended Meme, appearing in every subsequent DIVA and mirai game starting from F as a customization option.
  • Surprisingly Good English: Luka's rap in "Ai Dee". Notably, this is one of the few songs where her English is perfectly understandable to a native English speaker. She even says "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" correctly.
  • Suddenly Voiced: The secret movie in extend recuts the opening, but now fully voiced courtesy of the Vocaloids' individual voice providers.
  • That Russian Squat Dance: Miku and Meiko briefly during "Koneko no Paya Paya" in Mirai DX.
  • Three Minutes of Writhing: Some of the music videos are this. To name some examples, there's "magnet" and "Change me" from 2nd,"Hm? Ah, Yes." and "Nostalogic" from , and "Brain Revolution Girl" from X.
  • Three-Point Landing: In Puyo Puyo 39, KAITO will do this at 6-Chain.
  • To the Tune Of: "Cendrillon" and "Adolescence" in Mirai use the exact same song, the difference being that the former is performed by Miku and KAITO, the latter by Rin and Len. They also have different lyrics. This is referenced in the PVs themselves, which use an identical dance routine save for the opening, which reflects the theme of the song. They even use the same splitting note track, but a different path is taken depending on the song.
  • Token Mini-Moe: Rin and Len, of course.
  • Too Long; Didn't Dub: The lyrics in F were subject to this due to requiring licences. Averted in F 2nd, which acquired the necessary licences to translate almost every song except "Kagerou Daze". Mirai DX also does this with its lyrics, which notably affects plot-heavy songs like "Aku no Musume/Meshitukai", which make far more sense if you know what the song's actually saying.
    • Seems to be re-averted in X, as early screenshots of the localisation show lyrics displayed in English.
  • Too Many Mouths: The default stage and Miku's costume for "Babylon" in X feature giant dentures, referencing the song's original illustration.
  • Transformation Sequence:
    • In the first few games, the openings were obligated to have a Vocaloid transform into their performance outfit from their school outfit or casual clothes with a flashy animation. This tradition was dropped by F, when the school setting was replaced and everyone simply wore their normal outfits by default.
    • Acquiring a Module in X is depicted by a scene cut from the video into a view of the five Element Gems merging into the player Vocaloid, transforming them into the Module you just acquired.
  • Translation Correction: Some slight instances of Engrish were corrected for the English release of F. For example, "Rest X Notes" seen during a Technical Zone became "Notes Left: X".
    • For F 2nd, further translations were done, with the vague 'WORST/AWFUL' note designation now being called 'MISS', and the 'LOUSY' rating being replaced by the more optimistic 'SO CLOSE'.
    • Subverted in Mirai DX, where "MISS" notes are suddenly "WORST" again, and "COOL?" notes (hitting a note with the wrong button) become "MISS" notes.
  • Trash the Set: Tengaku from F has the stage where Rin is playing burst into flames and begin to collapse as part of the Chance Time event, to the point where she's standing in flaming ruins.
  • Truer to the Text: The DIVA PV for "Hello Planet" utilizes a loose adaptation of the original PV that paints a more cohesive tale, but excises the video game aesthetic. Conversely, the mirai PV is a nearly 1-to-1 recreation of the original PV, just with a few added scenes and extensive use of voxels. As well as Miku's new 3D model, of course.
  • Twin Switch: How the Servant saves the Daughter of Evil in "Aku no Meshitukai"; he switched places with her at the last second so he would be killed in her place.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: Break the Limit mode in Miku Flick. Unlike the standard difficulties, where you only have to hit highlighted syllables to pass, Break the Limit allows you to hit every syllable. In addition, you cannot fail out of Break the Limit, and the number of notes you hit in Break the Limit is tracked as a high score. The former stipulation could be interpreted as a form of mercy, since in the first game, The Disappearance of Hatsune Miku is a playable song.
  • Unflinching Walk: Luka does this briefly in "DYE" in Diva F as columns of ice shatter around her.
  • Updated Re-release:
    • 2nd# fixes several bugs and niggles, speeds up load times, and comes with a free DLC code that gives you all of extend's costumes to use. extend could be considered this to 2nd, especially seeing as how its working title was Project DIVA 2.5, but its song list is somewhat more divergent than the usual instances of this trope.
    • Project Diva Future Tone is an updated rerelease of Project Diva Arcade, restoring common Project Diva features and transferring it to the PS4.
    • Literally, some songs are redone using newer voice banks to make them sound more natural, like the 1st generation song "Koi Suru VOC@LOID", which sounds very different in X due to the song being reproduced in the Hatsune Miku V3 engine.
  • Variable Mix: Missing a note in some of the games will cause whatever vocals corresponding to that point in the music to not play. Miss notes repeatedly and the characters will sound like they forgot the lyrics. Some games, like Extend and the Mirai subseries, do not have this. Additionally, you can turn it off in games it appears in.
  • Wave Motion Gun: The train in Mirai DX's "Senbonzakura" has one, used for exorcism, for some reason.
  • When She Smiles: The opening movies for the games are some of the few instances where Hachune Miku actually smiles.
  • Wholesome Crossdresser: Len's Phoenix Moon module, a feminine kimono, and Rin's Ame module, a masculine happi coat, in F, their default outfits for "Kagamine HachiHachi Flower Fight".
  • Who Wears Short Shorts??: Miku's Yellow module in 2nd, extend and F 2nd, Rin and Len's sport-themed modules in F.
  • Word Salad Lyrics: "PoPiPo"'s English verse is absolutely full of this.
    Let's take, you are lovin' it!
    Vegetable juice
    You must love this drink, I've decided now!
    So take now, with true heart, vegetable juice
    It costs just two dollars!
  • Wretched Hive: "Babylon" in X is about one.
  • Writing Around Trademarks: Although nearly everyone should be well aware of the characters' nature, since "Vocaloid" refers to the Yamaha-owned software engine and not the Crypton-owned characters, the games are extremely careful to avoid using the word (except when it appears in lyrics or song titles). This gets taken Up to Eleven in X when Live Quest Mode has to tiptoe around by referring to Miku and her friends as "singing existences".
  • Zettai Ryouiki: Miku and Luka in their default outfits. Most of the other characters also get in on this with their optional modules. Even Len!
    • The nameless girl from "World's End Umbrella" has Grade D.


Alternative Title(s): Hatsune Miku Project Diva2nd

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/HatsuneMikuProjectDIVA