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Useful Notes: James Monroe
In my defense, "Quincy Adams Doctrine" simply doesn't have the same ring to it.note 

"James Monroe's colossal nose, was bigger than Pinocchio's."
Animaniacs, the Presidents Song.

James Monroe (April 28, 1758 — July 4, 1831) was the fifth U.S. President, serving from 1817 to 1825, immediately after James Madison and before John Quincy Adams, and was the last of the Founding Father presidents. The third president from the Democratic-Republican Party. Before becoming president, Monroe fought in the Revolutionary War and later opposed ratification of the Constitution because of the powers it gave to the federal government (he later changed his mind). Then enjoyed a prosperous career as a statesman, holding several positions. Was, at various points, a Virginia Senator, the Governor of Virginia twice, the American ambassador to France and, later, to Great Britain, and both James Madison's Secretary of State AND Secretary of War during the War of 1812.

His eight years in office are known as the "Era of Good Feelings" because, despite the number of important issues affecting the nation at the time, a wave of nationalism and unity swept the nation following the War of 1812 and the different political parties were on very good terms with each other. To help bring the nation together, Monroe went on a well-received national tour. The Panic of 1819 started during his first term, becoming one of the first serious economic crises in American history, though it ended less than five years later and the economy continued to expand. The Erie Canal began construction mere months into his presidency, and ended mere months after he left office. Monroe signed the Land Act of 1820, which lowered the price of acres in the West and played a pivotal role in increasing the population west of the Appalachian Mountains. Five states were admitted to the union while he was in office (Mississippi, Illinois, Alabama, Maine, and Missouri; more on those last two later), and Florida was bought from Spain after a complicated matter involving Native American tribes along the Florida border and attacks on said tribes by General Andrew Jackson. Basically, Monroe ordered Jackson to stop the Seminole tribe from Spanish Florida from attacking American soil, but Jackson went a step further and invaded Florida, angering the Spanish. Monroe wanted to avoid war, but demanded that Spain either stop the raids themselves or give Florida to the United States. Spain chose to sell Florida, largely because it was busy fighting to keep its Latin American colonies.

Speaking of that, Monroe is probably most well-known for proclaiming what is now known as the Monroe Doctrine, which was actually written by his Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, in 1823. For most of the previous decade, the European colonies in Latin America took up the United States' example and started to fight for their independence. By 1823, all of Latin America except Honduras, the Guianas, Uruguay, and most of the Caribbean colonies had successfully freed themselves from European control. The United States was the first nation to recognize these countries and establish diplomatic relations, and Monroe proclaimed before Congress that the United States would oppose European interference in the affairs of these newly freed countries. (Meaning that if any meddling needed done in the western hemisphere, the U.S. alone would do it.) The policy, named the Monroe Doctrine, at first confused everyone, as the U.S. at the time was a dinky, third-rate power without the resources necessary to enforce the doctrine. However, The British Empire quickly supported Monroe's move and announced that it would back it up with the Royal Navy. (The doctrine of non-interference was beneficial to Britain for trade reasons. Spain had maintained a mercantilist policy with regard to its Latin American colonies, severely limiting their trade with countries other than Spain, and assuring their continued independence meant that they would follow more liberal trade policies, which was good for British merchants.) The importance of Britain's approval to the Monroe Doctrine's success can not be overstated, and their support significantly helped improve relations between the two countries following the War of 1812. This policy would eventually extend to the Soviet Union by virtue of it being in Europe. It should be noted that, as Monroe and Adams intended, the Monroe Doctrine was only meant to prevent the European powers from interfering, not as a way for the United States to dominate the Latin American nations. It would be later presidents, such as Theodore Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy, who would invoke or add to the Monroe Doctrine to carry out their foreign policies.

Monroe also signed the Missouri Compromise, which was the first major slavery incident in U.S. history. The Missouri Territory wanted to be admitted as a slave state, which would have upset the equal balance of slave and non-slave states in the Union. Eventually, Representative Henry Clay helped negotiate a compromise that satisfied both the North and the South. Missouri would be admitted as a slave state on the conditions that Maine, up until then a part of Massachusetts, gets admitted as a non-slave state and that no territory north of Missouri's southern border would be admitted as a slave state in the future, with the obvious exception of Missouri itself. At the time, the only American territory south of the Missouri border were present-day Oklahoma and Arkansas, so there wouldn't have been much territory left that could have been made into slave states. The Missouri Compromise satisfied both sides of the argument at the time, though it would eventually prove problematic after the Mexican-American War saw a large increase in the amount of American soil south of the Missouri Compromise Line.

Monrovia, the present-day capital of Liberia, was named after him. The American Colonization Company colonized the region that is now the capital in 1822 as a haven for freed blacks, and named the settlement after him in 1824. It was argued that they would have more freedom there than they would in the United States. (This was during a time when questions of slavery and emancipation were starting to become major issues in American politics.) This and other similar colonial settlements in the region eventually united as Liberia in 1847, with Monrovia as the capital. Monroe strongly supported the founding of these colonies, believing that it could help quell down the slavery issue. For the record, Monroe owned slaves for much of his life and owned a plantation.

The already-wobbly Federalist Party (the only other significant political party at the time) collapsed during the election of 1820, and Monroe basically ran for reelection unopposed, the only president to do so besides George Washington. He still didn't win 100% of the vote. An elector from New Hampshire cast his vote to John Quincy Adams, who wasn't even running. According to Urban Legend, this was not because of petty partisan politics, but because he felt that Washington deserved the honor of being the only man elected unanimously. That, or he was hinting that Adams could be up next as a potential candidate. In reality, the Elector in question didn't like Monroe's policies.

Monroe was generally more of an administrator than an executive; his main skill was making sure every piece of the federal government was running smoothly and doing its job rather than having to taking direct action himself. It helped that he made generally excellent appointments. He died on Independence Day (the third president in a row to do so), terribly in debt, largely because of his ill wife. Monroe was the last president to wear powdered wigs, and he died before photography was a thing, so he's the last president to have never had a picture taken of him during his lifetime. He was also the last president elected in a year ending in "0" (1820 in this case) who didn't die in office until Ronald Reagan—164 years later! (And even he had to literally dodge a bullet to make it out of office alive.)

Tropes relating to James Monroe:

  • Early-Bird Cameo: Appears holding the flag in "Washington Crossing the Delaware"
  • For Science!!: Thomas Jefferson talked him into placing his house's kitchen under his bedroom because Jefferson wanted to see if it worked... and didn't want to risk Monticello.
  • Gag Nose: As the Animaniacs page quote implies, Monroe did have an infamously large nose.
  • Happily Married: Monroe and his wife Eliza were married for 44 years until her death in 1830; they loved each other deeply, and by all accounts they were seldom apart for more than brief periods of time.
  • Landslide Election: Running unopposed does this.
  • Last of His Kind: last of the Founding Fathers to be president.
    • Also the last president to fight on the battlefield in the American Revolution, which is why one of his nicknames is "The Last Cocked Hat."
  • Only a Flesh Wound: Monroe took a Cannon Ball to the Shoulder during the American Revolution, the metal continued to expand and cool inside Monroe's shoulder
  • Magnum Opus: The Monroe Doctrine.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: The Monroe Doctrine protected North and South America from any further colonization or exploitation by European powers (at least by direct means). Which is great for North and South America. For Africa and Asia, toward whom the nations with colonial ambitions turned their attentions instead...not so much.
    • Note that the Monroe Doctrine didn't stop the United States itself from meddling in the affairs of South and Central American nations.
    • The Missouri Compromise may have resolved the issues of 1820, but it still didn't put a definitive end to slavery: it merely said slave states could not be formed from territories north of the Missouri border. All this did was encourage the increasingly cotton-obsessed southern states to try everything - private invasions into the Caribbean and Central American nations called filibusters, occupying liberating and then annexing Texas away from Mexico, then a war with Mexico itself to claim more territory to the Pacific Ocean - to expand south of that line.
  • Urban Legend: The Elector who voted against Monroe did not do it to uphold tradition, but because he genuinely didn't want to vote for Monroe.


James MadisonThe PresidentsJohn Quincy Adams

alternative title(s): James Monroe
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