Trivia: The Fall

The TV Series:

The film:

  • Acting for Two: Everyone in the story, sometimes very well disguised.
  • Doing It for the Art: Tarsem funded this mostly with his own money to ensure complete creative control, shot it over multiple continents and locations and used solely practical effects with absolutely no CGI whatsoever.
    • Kinda...there was some CGI work done to remove railings and bystanders in some shots, and the butterfly Wallace chases, and the arrows hitting Ota have a CGI look to them. Still, the overwhelming majority of the film was done practically, which is still an amazing achievement.
    • The on-location shooting alone needs to be emphasized. There's a short montage that features the Great Wall of China for maybe two frames, and it was shot on-location.
  • Enforced Method Acting: Lee Pace spent the first 12 weeks of filming pretending to be a real paraplegic in order to make the story as real as possible for 6-year-old actress Catinca Untaru. He consistently went by the name of "Roy" and only a tiny handful of people on the set knew who he really was or that he could walk, everyone else being told he'd lost the use of his legs in a motorcycle accident.
    • This wasn't as difficult to achieve as it might sound: it was only Pace's second role—and in his first, he played a transgender character—so it was unlikely anyone would recognize him.
    • The first time the characters meet is also the first time the actors met, and the hospital scenes were shot in sequence so that the real relationship would develop and Cantinca would advance just as the fictional relationship and Alexandria did. More punishingly for the other actors, Cantinca was basically allowed to write her own dialogue and "Roy" had to respond in character to get the reactions needed for the scene. Everything involving her is some serious Enforced Method Acting for everyone else.
  • He Also Did: At the time of The Fall's release, director Tarsem Singh was well known for directing the award winning 1991 video for REM's "Losing My Religion".
  • Hey, It's That Guy!:
    • Hey, it's the Pie Maker! ...And he's mentally unstable!
    • Beneath all that make-up, the elderly patient is Davros.
  • Retroactive Recognition: Lee Pace would go on to do The Hobbit films.
  • Sleeper Hit
  • Throw It In: Alexandria's unintentional misreading of Roy's note as "Morphin 3" as opposed to "Morphine") was an actual mistake by the actress in rehearsal that was worked into the film as a plot twist.

The band:

  • Adored by the Network: The Fall were favorite band of BBC Radio DJ John Peel and its was rather good thing for the band to have one of the most respected, beloved and influential radio DJs in the world as their number one fan, as he continuously played the band's records on his shows, giving them a major Colbert Bump. Even though the band played Peel's radio show many, many times before Peel's 2004 death, he and Mark E. Smith only met face-to-face on two apparently awkward occasions.
    • When the band performed "Eat Y'self Fitter" for the first time on Peel's radio show in March 1983, Peel actually fainted from how awestruck he was by the song and his producer had to resuscitate him.
    • Peel kept a large box of singles under his bed containing his favorite singles just in case he had to leave his house and his massive record collection during an emergency. His fans and friends noted that there were absolutely no Fall singles in the whole box. This is because his favorite Fall singles were housed in a completely separate box because there were too many.
  • Black Sheep Hit: The band's biggest UK chart hit is a cover of The Kinks' "Victoria", which is a bit more poppy than their usual sound.
    • "How I Wrote Elastic Man" is a meta-example - about a rock star pissed off that the only song anyone ever cares about is a Black Sheep Hit where they don't even get the title right.
    Everybody asks me how I wrote "Plastic Man"!
  • Throw It In: "Paintwork" goes through a couple of odd, abrupt sound collage breaks where the music suddenly becomes distant-sounding and gets drowned out by a program about astronomy and later, a brief snippet of classical music. This was because Mark E. Smith accidentally taped over parts of the song.
    • A sample of Daft Punk's "Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger" creeps into the intro of "Cowboy George".
  • Word of God: The title of Reformation Post-TLC: the "TLC" part stands for "traitors, liars, and cunts". This was the first album released after most of the Fall Heads Roll lineup quit, so just guess who that was supposed to be referring to...