!!The Doyle Canon
* AdaptationOverdosed: Holmes might very well take the ultimate crown here. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adaptations_of_Sherlock_Holmes The Other Wiki]] says he is the most frequently-portrayed character in the history of cinema, having been played (by some counts) by over 75 different actors in 211 films. In a book on the subject, Holmes scholar Ronald B. [=DeWaal=] lists an astonishing '''25,000''' Holmes-related productions and products. Or just look at the [[Franchise/SherlockHolmes Franchise page]] for our list.
* BeamMeUpScotty:
** In the original novels, Holmes ''never'' actually uttered the exact phrase "Elementary, my dear Watson". He uses the phrase 'elementary' on occasion, and often refers to Watson as 'my dear Watson' but never combines the two. The phrase actually comes from a Creator/PGWodehouse novel.
** Nor did he ever cry, "Quick, Watson, the needle!" That phrase probably comes from parodies of Gillette's 1899 stage play.
** Likewise, the [[IconicOutfit deerstalker cap and Inverness coat]] are never mentioned in the stories proper, and while Sidney Paget did at times draw him wearing one or the other[[note]]a deerstalker in "Silver Blaze", an Inverness coat in "The Blue Carbuncle"[[/note]], he never put them both together. Nor would Holmes, despite his recurrent flakiness, have worn such a countrified outfit in the middle of London.
** Lampshaded in the recent ''VideoGame/SherlockHolmesVersusJackTheRipper'' game, in which at one point Sherlock asks Watson to "bring [him] that old deerstalker [he] never wear[s], but everyone seems convinced [he] wear[s] all the time".
** And [[PlayingWithATrope played with]] in the second season of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' BBC, where Sherlock [[spoiler:pulls on a deerstalker cap in an attempt to avoid paparazzi, and merely ends up with the press considering him the "man with the funny little hat" with pictures to back it up.]]
** Parodies of Sherlock Holmes stories often have titles in the form "TheCaseOf...", but the titles of (most of) the actual stories are in the form "The Adventure Of...". Only one story title ("A Case of Identity") even uses the word "case".
** "The game's afoot!" seems to have become something of a CatchPhrase for Holmes, despite the fact that he utters it ''once'' in the entire canon.
* {{Fandom}}: Before ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', before ''Series/DoctorWho'', before even Tolkien, there were people who would write letters, fan-fics, pastiches and overanalytical articles pertaining to Holmes and "The Game" using the LiteraryAgentHypothesis.
* FollowTheLeader: Many later detective characters -- Literature/HerculePoirot, Literature/NeroWolfe, Series/InspectorMorse, etc. -- were influenced by Holmes in one way or another. Of course, Holmes himself was inspired in no small measure by Poe's Literature/CAugusteDupin. This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Watson in the first novel, although Holmes dismisses the resemblance with characteristic smugness. There's also a possible ShoutOut in the new movie, where Watson's fiancée mentions that she likes detective novels and lists Poe as one such author.
* GenrePopularizer: Other detectives had come before, but Holmes is arguably responsible for popularizing the detective story in its modern, standalone form.
* MagnumOpusDissonance: Conan Doyle respected Holmes enough to avert [[DroppedABridgeOnHim dropping a bridge on him]] in "The Final Problem", feeling the character deserved to go out with a bang. He did, however, resent that the character was so large that nothing he, Doyle, ever wrote would ever be able to crawl out from under Holmes's shadow.
* MoneyDearBoy: One of the reasons Doyle eventually brought Holmes back was because of the enormous sums of money editors were offering him.
** It didn't help that even Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's ''mother'' [[AlmightyMom complained about Holmes being killed.]]
** Also, Holmes' primary motivation for becoming the King of Bohemia's henchman, in 'A Scandal In Bohemia.' God knows there wasn't a shred of honor in it.
* RecycledScript:
** "The Crooked Man" is essentially a rehash of ''The Sign of the Four'', albeit with a sympathetic suspect and [[spoiler: a mongoose's footprint instead of a cannibal's]].
** "The Three Garridebs" recycles the premise of "The Red-Headed League", with an unusual surname taking the place of an unusual hair color.
* US President Franklin D. Roosevelt once made a [[WildMassGuessing WMG]] that [[http://books.google.com/books?id=9LGvL2WcXX0C&pg=PA404&lpg=PA404&dq=franklin+roosevelt+sherlock+holmes&source=bl&ots=fnk7VRLhg4&sig=cBzqBFUwBsmlxFgA6lhtEBrabCY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=lsEDT-eLOMWYiQKF1b2EDQ&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=franklin%20roosevelt%20sherlock%20holmes&f=false Sherlock Holmes was born an American]].
* ScienceMarchesOn:
** In "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle", Sherlock determines that a man is intelligent by his hat size, reasoning that a man with a big head has a large brain, and therefore is smarter than average. While there is some dispute among modern scientists as to whether there's any correlation brain size and intelligence, any correlation would be subtler and less pronounced than the one Holmes claims.
** BrainFever, which is not real, appears in several stories.
** In several stories Holmes attributes things like personality and interests to genetics.
** The science in "The Creeping Man" is flawed, to say the least, unless you consider the effects of the "potion" to be psychosomatic, and Professor Presbury a highly suggestible lunatic. The idea of using serums taken from animals for rejuvenation and invigoration was taken quite seriously by many scientists in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
** The biology in "The Speckled Band" is also flawed. Snakes do not work that way.
* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: This series practically defines the England of the late nineteenth century for most readers. The state of politics and science nails the period down, and decades of fans have generally been able to pinpoint the exact years most of the years were set in.
* WordOfDante: Holmesian fanon (known amongst fans as The Game, since long before the existance of the internet) is varied and has many varied sources from many mediums. The three main sources, however, are William Stuart Baring-Gould's ''The annotated Sherlock Holmes'' and ''Literature/SherlockHolmesOfBakerStreet'', and Leslie Klinger's ''The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes''.
** Irene Adler is now frequently considered to be Holmes' LoveInterest thanks to this trope and PromotedToLoveInterest.
** Similarly, Mycroft Holmes and the Diogenes Club have been expanded by later pastiches (notably ''Film/ThePrivateLifeOfSherlockHolmes'') into the Head of the Secret Service and one of its fronts respectively, when in the original canon they're little more than what Doyle presents them as (a BrilliantButLazy low-level civil servant and a club for reclusive eccentrics).

!!Other films:
* AFIS100Years100MovieQuotes:
** #65, "Elementary, my dear Watson"
* AwesomeDearBoy: Creator/BasilRathbone on playing Sherlock Holmes:
-->"Ever since I was a boy and first got acquainted with the great detective I wanted to be like him ... To play such a character means as much to me as ten 'Hamlets'!"
* IAmNotSpock: Creator/BasilRathbone became perhaps the most famous actor for his portrayal of Holmes, usually with Nigel Bruce as Watson.
* PromotedFanboy: Creator/BasilRathbone was a big fan of Holmes.

!!The [[Series/SherlockHolmes Granada TV series]]
* ActorAllusion: Charles Gray also appeared as Mycroft in ''The Seven Percent Solution''.
* BeamMeUpScotty: Subverted quite nicely - you really have to hand it to Granada for their cleverness.
** Holmes never once says "Elementary, my dear Watson." Instead, ''Watson'' says "Elementary, my dear ''Holmes''" teasingly at the end of "The Crooked Man".
** Jeremy Brett smokes the non-canonical calabash pipe ''only'' on the trek through the Swiss Alps. Remember that the duo left their luggage on the boat train in England, so Holmes was probably happy to take whatever pipe he could get.
** The deerstalker cap is only semi-canonical, as Sidney Paget was taking a bit of artistic liberty with Doyle's description of a country-bound Holmes. For the first time in the history of Sherlockian film and television, Sherlock Holmes did ''not'' wear a deerstalker in London - only a topper or homburg. Brett's Holmes wore the deerstalker in the country ONLY, but, even then, the solid grey cap looks more stylish than practical (considering the original use for the design).
** Entirely averted with the Inverness - Jeremy Brett never wore it on-screen. He wore frock coats and greatcoats, and, when he was in the country, he wore a [[BadassLongcoat light grey longcoat]].
* DyeingForYourArt: David Burke's hair was actually grey.
** While Edward Hardwicke was bald and wore a wig for the role of Watson.
** Plus, Jeremy lost several pounds to acquire Holmes's slender look.
* TheOtherDarrin: Between the first and second series, Edward Hardwicke replaces David Burke as Watson. (Burke actually suggested Hardwicke to the producers.) The distinction is quite sharp - The Final Problem uses Burke, but Holmes returns to Hardwicke in The Empty House (they even reshot a few scenes with Hardwicke for flashback purposes). Overall, David Burke came across as much younger, more naive Watson, albeit one who resembled the original illustrations. Edward Hardwicke, however, was older, more distinguished, and more ex-military. Most fans agree Hardwicke was the more memorable Watson.
* RealLifeRelative: After a fashion. In the adaptation of ''The Problem of Thor Bridge'', the role of Neil Gibson is played by Daniel Massey, whose sister actress Anna Massey had been married to Holmes actor Creator/JeremyBrett from 1958 to 1962. Although the couple had divorced, due to Brett's [[BiTheWay bisexuality]], the split had been amicable, and the two had [[AmicableExes remained friends]].
** In the adaption of ''The Eligible Bachelor'', the role of Lady Helene is played by Anna Calder-Marshall, the wife of David Burke. Unfortanly, the episode is filmed after Burke left the role of Watson.
* WagTheDirector: Holmes kicks his cocaine habit in "The Devil's Foot" because Creator/JeremyBrett became concerned about the example the character was setting for younger viewers.[[note]]Instead Holmes buries a used cocaine syringe about an inch deep in the sands of a public beach.[[/note]] Though it should be noted that Holmes ''did'' eventually give up cocaine in the original stories, in ''The Missing Three-Quarter'', which this series did not adapt.

!!Other television adaptations:
* Two actors who have portrayed Holmes share a birthday. [[Series/TheAdventuresOfSherlockHolmesAndDoctorWatson Vasily Livanov]] and Creator/BenedictCumberbatch were both born on July 19th.

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