Trivia / Pixar

  • Awesome, Dear Boy: Why John Lasseter decided he wanted to be an animator: "I get paid to make cartoons!"
  • Broken Streak: Both of Pixar's 2015 movies. Inside Out became their first film to not open at #1 at the North American box office (due to heavy competition from Jurassic World), although it did have the biggest opening ever for a non-sequel movie and went on to do very well. The Good Dinosaur on the other hand became the first film in Pixar's 20 years of movie-making to lose the studio money.
  • Celebrity Voice Actor: While just as guilty of this as DreamWorks Animation, they tend to get less flack for it because they go for the best-suited voice rather than simply the biggest names on the market. For instance, while Finding Nemo's leads were voiced by Albert Brooks and Ellen DeGeneres, there was little fanfare about it. On the other hand, DreamWorks's Shark Tale was headlined by Will Smith, Angelina Jolie, and Robert DeNiro, whose names dominated the film's marketing and whose characters looked frighteningly like them; this didn't get them many fans for their movie.
  • Doing It for the Art: The staff at Pixar have always held true to the belief that they should enjoy the movie as much as their audience, and it's served them well for nearly three decades.
    • Just to put this in perspective, they were fully aware of their decline in popularity at the start of The New Tens, after the critical failures of Cars 2, Brave and Monsters University and postponed their next film just so they wouldn't continue their streak of mediocre ones. In other words, they are actually aware of their Dork Age and did something about it immediately!
  • One of Us: The Pixar Regulars wear their geek badges with pride and regularly make references to movies, animation, comic books and other things that only true pop culture aficionados would pick up on. It was recently revealed that several of them are even closeted heavy metal fans.
  • Production Posse: See Pixar Regulars for more info.
    • True Companions: Having worked with each other for nearly twenty thirty years (some even longer beforehand), the Regulars are pretty tight-knit.
  • Schedule Slip: Between 2013 and 2015, due to the troubled state of The Good Dinosaur and not wanting to continue their string of less-than stellar releases.
  • Sequel Gap: Several times. Eleven years passed between Toy Story 2 and Toy Story 3, twelve between Monsters, Inc. and Monsters University, thirteen between Finding Nemo and Finding Dory, and fifteen between The Incredibles and The Incredibles 2.
  • What Could Have Been: Of course, the ill-fated Newt. Its plotline is said to be similar to Rio (and Alpha and Omega).
    • Brenda Chapman's version of Brave. We may never be sure why she was laid off, but it seems to have disappointed a lot of people in the industry, including some Pixar employees.
      • In fact, anytime Pixar replaces a director on their films (which so far only happened a few times, thank goodness) will get this reaction. Brad Bird was put on Ratatouille at the last minute and had to work with revising the script and making the rats less anthropomorphic than what the original director had. Of note, Chef Gusteau was to be alive through the whole movie instead of an imaginary being.
      • On the other hand, when Pixar and Disney first merged, part of the deal was John Lassester becoming the new head honcho of the Animation Department. His first order of business was completely overhauling Meet the Robinsons and Bolt, the latter of which resulted in the departure of Lilo & Stitch directors Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois, who moved to DreamWorks. Considering the massive changes made, it'd leads one to wonder what the original product of both films would have been like.
    • Toy Story was almost the victim of Executive Meddling thanks to Jeffrey Katzenberg. Katzenberg continually pushed for a more adult, cynical Toy Story, making Woody even more of a jerkass and relying heavily on insult humor. The result backfired horribly; at a screening for the Disney execs, Roy Disney declared it the worst thing he'd ever seen, and Disney was ready to scrap the whole project until the writers were finally left alone to write the story they wanted to write. The rest is history (Katzenberg dropped the adult subject altogether, and he was gone the next year).
    • The sequel, mandated upon by Disney, was planned to be released Direct-to-Video. However, Pixar put so much effort into it that it convinced Disney to release it theatrically.
    • Later on, Pixar also had to deal with Michael Eisner. During the Disney v. Pixar negotiations, Eisner created Circle 7 Animation, which would have made Disney-brand sequels to Pixar films including Toy Story 3 which would have seen Buzz Lightyear recalled to Taiwan. However, he was fired, the studio got shut down, and Disney purchased Pixar. Eventually, Pixar would create the TS 3 we all know and love.
  • Writing by the Seat of Your Pants: Believe it or not, this is apparently how most of their movies are done, once being described as "jumping out of a plane and hoping we can build a parachute on the way down."

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