Trivia / Hanna-Barbera

  • Big Name Fan:
  • Book Ends: Since the duo's first collaboration was with the Tom and Jerry short Puss Gets The Boot (1940), it's fitting that their studio's final production would be the TV short The Mansion Cat (2001).
    • Taken further with Joe Barbera, who directed the final theatrical Tom and Jerry short, The Karate Guard (2005), before his death the following year.
  • Career Resurrection: Subverted. While the name "Hanna-Barbera" was retired in 2001, the studio (or what remained of its assets, at least) never officially went away so much as just not booming before making a big comeback. There are two especially notable examples of this.
    • After middling success in the 1980s, when their runaway hit was the Long Runner The Smurfs that nothing else matched, a shakeup in management, as well as a massive facelift of their production pipeline, led to the production of Cartoon Network's hugely successful Cartoon Cartoons, most of which were HB productions (or at least had their initial pilots produced by HB) and existed under the studio's umbrella until about 2001. Since that time, association between the two has been little to none.
    • As of 2016, while the company Hanna-Barbera operates in name only, Warner Bros. has made another more abundant attempt to jump-start the HB brand was announced with the Hanna-Barbera Cinematic Universe. This seems to be a culmination of several years of back catalog releases doing well to expanding the new Direct-to-Video movies to include more than Scooby-Doo and Tom and Jerry, increasing of other merchandise for sale and the intent of using the animated Scooby-Doo reboot feature to launch a whole film universe. 2017 has brought about another increase in promotion for the anniversary.
  • Continuity Drift or Negative Continuity: Continuity in the Hanna Barbera brand is a difficult subject. As the many of the shows tend to operate on lax rules yet the studio never had a problem producing Crossovers and show off their characters inhabiting a Shared Universe. This creates a weird contrast as to how the shows reference one another but most of their shows operate on one of these two principles or mix and match when needed. In Hanna Barbera, sometimes continuity is in place and sometimes it changes by the episode. One can't say Hanna-Barbera had a strict continuity, but also one can't say Hanna-Barbera had no continuity.
    • From an in-universe perspective, one might consider it a faulty timeline which really can be Hilarious in Hindsight as that gives an excuse to all the mistakes that happen from time to time.
  • Cowboy BeBop at His Computer: As this article tries to show, there is plenty of division on Hanna Barbera but there is an extension of this trope when it comes to a bunch of the shows that aren't headliners. It is not surprising to read some articles on them that are ripe with inaccuracies. Some common things including assuming some shows were more prone to Follow the Leader than they actually were or letting the existence of more obscure ones fall to the way side when they contradict the statement in question.
  • Critical Research Failure: Former HB employee John Kricfalusi was called out on this after claiming that Joe Barbera was apathetic about the Scooby-Doo franchise when he really wasn't. Although later he had added rumors that Joe felt this way about the numerous shows that followed Scooby's lead he co-produced, but none of which being confirmed either, except of course from John K himself. note 
    • Joining in with the above this sometimes crops up in general discussions of the company. Where one can wonder if some people are Complaining about Shows You Don't Watch. For example one would be a fool not to realize Scooby-Doo and Jabberjaw have multiple things in common, but it is a seemingly large jump to claim the show about "four amateur detectives and their talking dog unmasking fake ghosts" and the show about "a band and a talking shark foiling take over the world plots on gigs" are the "same" or are "interchangeable".
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: For most of the library, this is becoming less of an issue. Warner is vastly committed to releasing their holdings. However, odds of the ones not owned by Warner (e.g., The Harlem Globetrotters) are much lower and require some circulating.
  • Playing Against Type: Most of their live-action TV movies (on which Barbera was always keener than Hanna). As the name Hanna-Barbera is often associated with Western Animation, they did in fact attempt to branch out to include live-action material, some with animation components and some with none at all.
    • This also happens with some of the obscurer productions. While everyone can remember types such as Funny Animal and You Meddling Kids cartoons from Hanna-Barbera, such as Devlin being a serious drama and Jokebook being a primetime adult sketch comedy show are so against what people consider Hanna-Barbera's type that you can change a whole course of conversation just by bringing them up.
      • The studio's "Bedrock Productions" subdivision was established in the early 90's to produced more adult-oriented content for TV such as The Dreamer of OZ and the infamous Poochinski pilot.
  • Promoted Fanboy:
    • Fred Seibert, who was head of television production from 1992 to 1993, and president of the whole studio from 1993 to 1996, instituted the What A Cartoon program, and a set of logos celebrating classic Hanna-Barbera characters.
    • Van Partible was inspired to create Johnny Bravo after growing up with the studio's library and even got to work with Joe Barbera himself during the show's first season.
    • Seth Macfarlane grew up watching The Flintstones and Jetsons and would later get his first break with the studio.
    • Linda Cardellini, as stated before, was cast as Velma in the live-action Scooby-Doo movie and its sequel. She would also go on to voice Marcie Fleach in the 2010 series Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated.
  • Screwed by the Lawyers: Marvel Comics' Funtastic World of Hanna-Barbera comics are unlikely to be reprinted now that the Hanna-Barbera characters are owned by Warner Bros., parent of DC Comics. It was made even more unlikely when Marvel was bought by Disney.
    • The studio's sister company, Ruby-Spears, has received some of this by way of how the Turner buyout merged their library into the Hanna Barbera library. Some of their cartoons are branded in the Hanna-Barbera Classic Collection, some are not. However all claim Hanna Barbera as their owner in the legal crawl on the back, because legally now they are. note 
    • There were reportedly negotiations involving a DVD release of The Fantastic Four (1967) shortly before Disney bought Marvel Comics.
  • Screwed by the Network: In its original run, the studio suffered from this in regards to Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, which was cancelled in response to the negative feedback it got from Moral Guardians who cited it as inappropriate for younger viewers.
    • In later years, the history of the studio's catalog and Cartoon Network is a turbulent one, to say the least. As originally reruns of HB (and Ruby-Spears) made up a good chunk of the schedule, making it a resource in a way. But in the early 2000s more and more lost their places on the network. Some were able to find semi reliable space on Boomerang while others did not. As a result, some shows on the main page were victims of the Keep Circulating the Tapes trope for over a decade and some still are.
    • Several of Cartoon Network's commercials actually pointed this out, with one featuring Yogi Bear not being allowed into the building without an ID, even though they featured his poster behind the scene, Another one had Ugh from Dino-Boy having to help Edd find the recording room of the office. He spends the whole time complaining that he has next to no work there anymore since it "got crowded". The most famous (and notable) one, though, had Scrappy-Doo making a similar rant, in which he outright snaps at the Cartoon Cartoons for them being treated like "the kings and queens of this network".
    • Some specific shows are cited as been caught in the middle of this. Cave Kids was a new show made for the network and it was cancelled after only a few episodes. Meanwhile, it is reportedly the reason why shows like 2 Stupid Dogs and SWAT Kats were cancelled as the studio wanted to shift their focus towards producing shows for Cartoon Network.
    • And finally, to top it all off, Hanna-Barbera was shut down by Time Warner in 2001, giving Cartoon Network the complete rights to H-B's final cartoons as it became its own separate studio from there on out in a way divorcing the newer entity from the old.
    • This last note is again to both HB and RS. While a good chunk of their shows appeared at some point on Cartoon Network or Boomerang, recent revelations by the Warner Archive proved some shows from both parts of the library have legally been theirs the whole time that never were shown on Cartoon Network or Boomerang. Why exactly these got the snub is still a mystery.
  • They Also Did: While not all HB alumni found much fame outside the company, many of them were still involved with some notable works in the industry.
    • Before becoming the chairman of the studio, producer David Kirschner had a promising résumé with films like Child's Play and An American Tail, the latter of which he also co-wrote.
    • Mark Jones the writer/director of Leprechaun and some other quirky movies was also a writer at both Hanna Barbera and Ruby Spears. While his works are often a bit more adult, when watching his movies with this knowledge the influence is noticeable. And just to be clear, yes the man who created Leprechaun has some credits on Scooby-Doo.
    • Illustrator Clark Haas was the creator of Clutch Cargo and the founder of Cambria Productions. He spent the rest of his career with Hanna-Barbera after his studio's closure.
    • Warren Tufts had also previously worked for Cambria as a writer, producer, animator, and voice actor for Captain Fathom and tagged along with Clark when he moved to HB.
    • Animator Butch Hartman note  provided some early development art for Crash Bandicoot (1996) during his employment with HB.
  • Vindicated by Reruns: A lot of Hanna-Barbera shows only lasted one season, but it's near universal that HB shows were quite easy to get rerun slots, first on Saturday morning and so on. In the 1990s, Cartoon Network was mentioned as a larger source for rerunning a lot of these shows and no doubt a reason for their continued fandom building.
    • Given that in recent time home media has overtaken cable as the thing to get if you like watching reruns of older programming, it is also evident that Hanna-Barbera is the area of Warner Bros. Animation's library that routinely gets the most releases each year.
      • The Hanna Barbera Diamond Collection in 2017 was a surprising move that cemented this. Warner Bros seemed to have been moving the majority of their older property sets into the Warner Archive over the previous years. The idea that they made actual new season discs for most of the previous at retail HB sets just for a 60th anniversary (and three years before the theatrical push begins) wasn't a forseen event by many a fans. In the current climate this is a clear sign of confidence to the brand as a whole.
  • What Could Have Been: Enough for an entire sub-folder.

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