Trivia / Dumbo

  • Cross-Dressing Voices: Casey Jr. is actually voiced by a woman, but used a vocoder to alter it into a male electronic voice.
  • Name's the Same: A meta example of this happens in the Japanese dub used in all home video releases of the film: The Preacher Crow is voiced by a much older voice actor named Yuuichi Nakamura. He's completely unrelated with the much younger one and with Yuichi Nakamura, a TV actor who played Yuto Sakurai/Kamen Rider Zeronos in Kamen Rider Den-O.
  • Old Shame: Was this to Walt, who produced this and The Reluctant Dragon on a whim to recover money from 1940's failures, and there was also the fact that it was made during the devastating 1941 studio strike—Walt also left to travel during South America during the bulk of the movies production, giving him less hands on involvement with the movie like he had with his previous films. He sent it to television rather early, and this was why Dumbo, along with Alice In Wonderland, were the only single-story animated films to be released on video prior to the 1984 management shift that saw Michael Eisner, Jeffrey Katzenberg and Frank Wells arrive at Disney. Ironically, Dumbo's one of the most popular Disney Animated Classics with both audiences and critics.
  • Playing Against Type: Normally Bill Tytla animated large imposing and often villainous characters, however for this film most of his animation was for the titular character a cute baby elephant, he reportedly did this to show his colleagues that he could do characters other than big scary villains.
  • Tribute to Fido: It is implied that Dumbo's father is Jumbo, a famous elephant that appeared first at the London Zoo then at the Barnum and Bailey Circus. Dumbo was supposed to be named Jumbo Junior, but ended up being known by a mocking nickname instead.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: Disney's first film set in the Present Day, Dumbo contains some generally subtle references to the contemporary 1940s, such as the line "I heard a fireside chat". The Spinning Paper at the end has a side story titled "Britain in Greatest Offensive" (with a smaller headline below reading, "Berlin Attacked as London Spurred By Lend-Lease Bill"). The newspaper itself is dated "Thursday, March 13, 1941", placing the events of the film in early 1941. However, following the 2017 closing of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, the film's biggest example of this trope may be its setting in a traditional American-style circus, a setting which promises to look increasingly antiquated as the years go by.
  • What Could Have Been: This movie was originally going to get a Direct-to-Video sequel, but it was cancelled, and it may have been among the ones that got shot down by John Lasseter and his team. Though, considering the reputation of Direct-to-Video Disney sequels in general, this may have been for the best.
    • One might feel ridiculously tempted to add the Big Damn Heroes trope to John Lasseter and team for this action.
    • Dumbo was supposed to be just a short subject—but got expanded to a full movie because Disney was suffering a budget crisis and desperately needed money to stay afloat.
  • Write What You Know: The clowns singing "Hit the Big Boss (For a Raise)" was based on the Disney Animators' Strike in 1941.

  • At 64 minutes, this is the third shortest film period and the shortest single-story in the Disney Animated Canon.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Trivia/Dumbo