Trivia: Clerks

  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!: Randal says "No time for love, Dr. Jones." to the man who forgot his keys. However, the actual line in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is "Hey Dr. Jones, no time for love!"
  • Dawson Casting: Marilyn Ghigliotti was 33 when she played Veronica, a student in her early 20s.
  • Enforced Method Acting: An unintentional case. According to the commentary, Jeff Anderson apparently screwed up Randal's "The Reason You Suck" Speech that was directed toward Dante multiple times, so that in the finalized scene when Randal snaps Anderson's rage is 100% real, fueled by how many times he had to do it over.
  • Executive Meddling: One of the good examples. The original Downer Ending had Dante being murdered by a holdup man but it was never included in any versions of the film beyond the original cut (included in full as an extra on the Blu-ray). The change was motivated by film guru John Pierson and Brian O'Halloran (who plays Dante,) not any execs, though.
  • Follow the Leader: Many critics have compared Kevin Smith's success with that of the Sex Pistols, in that they inspired countless directors to get their friends and shoot their own scrappy indie movies.
  • Missing Episode:
    • The scene during the wake, which was later adapted as a comic and an animated short, but was never going to be in the movie at all.
    • A better example would be a scene in Big Choice Video, where Randal interacts with a hypercompetent employee named Chet. The footage was burned on the editing machine and mangled beyond use. What little footage survived was used before Caitlin first appears. Some of the audio survived, and can be heard in Snowball Effect, the Clerks making-of documentary on the tenth anniversary DVD set.
  • Recycled: The Series: Two episodes of Clerks: The Animated Series were broadcast on ABC before it got cancelled. The entire series, including the unaired episodes, is available on DVD.
    • A pilot for an attempted live-action series was being filmed around the same time Smith was directing Mallrats, without his involvement whatsoever. It was reportedly so bad that it wasn't even completed.
    • Actually, it's been uncovered. See for yourself.
  • Romance on the Set : Jeff Anderson (Randal) and Lisa Spoonauer (Caitlin) dated and later became engaged.
  • Serendipity Writes the Plot: The Quick-Stop wouldn't let Smith shoot inside during the day, so he had to film the vast majority of the interior shots at night. To hide this, he came up with the idea of someone putting gum in the locks on the shutters, necessitating them staying closed all day.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: Entirely grunge soundtrack? Check. Doc Martens and acid wash? Check. Video store stocked wall-to-wall with VHS? Check. It's the early '90s all right!
    • This is forgivable, though, considering that there was no possible way for Smith to cover up anything too contemporary with the budget and schedule he had. As he put it, "It could only take place in the time it was shot."
  • Wag the Director: Jay's dance to "Violent Mood Swings" was based on something Jason Mewes did to amuse Smith and his friends, but come shooting, he was so struck with stage fright that he asked that the rest of the crew go inside RST while he and Smith filmed the scene on their own.
  • What Could Have Been: The first draft was a completely non-comedic surreal horror film in the same vein as David Lynch about a convenience store clerk on the graveyard shift who encounters increasingly bizarre characters. This later showed up as a gag in the final episode of Clerks: The Animated Series.
    • The original name for the movie was "Inconvenience"; this changed to "Rude Clerks", before settling on the final name.
  • Write What You Know: Three guesses as to what Kevin Smith did for a living before (and during) the making of this film.
    • Write Who You Know: Most, if not all, of the characters were based on friends of his, many of whom show up in the movie. Randal, in particular, was based on his friend Walt Flannigan, whom Smith frequently claimed he wished he was as cool as.
      • Smith has also said that Silent Bob was partially inspired by his father, who only ever spoke up when he had something particularly witty to say.