Trivia: Bemani

  • Before Naoki Maeda composed music for Dance Dance Revolution, he went by another identity, "Ensoniq Maeda", and composed music for other Konami games, such as Salamander 2.
  • Some of the BEMANI musicians play their own games, with varying degrees of success. REFLEC BEAT sound director DJ YOSHITAKA has shown himself to be able to play his own game very well, and DJ TOTTO is a Kaidennote -level beatmania IIDX player. Meanwhile, pop'n music sound director wac is somewhat notorious for his appearance at JAEPO 2013, where he shows that his pop'n abilities...have a lot of room for improvement. (To be fair, he did play Ongaku [EX], one of the hardest charts in the entire pop'n series.)
  • Bad Export for You: Arcade BEMANI games are released not only in Japan, but also other Asian regions, such as South Korea, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia. Unfortunately, only the Korean versions are translated; players in other non-Japanese eAMUSEMENT regions don't get translated versions.
  • Fan Nickname
    • 185 BPM is known by some as the "Yoshitaka constant" or variants thereof, due to DJ YOSHITAKA's strong tendency to use this speed in a large number of his songs.
      • In fact, it's such a prominent constant in his songs that people initially thought that Rche was DJ YOSHITAKA's alias simply because of the use of repetitive chords and its bpm.
    • "Soflan", a term used for sudden and dramatic BPM changes. The term originates from "SOFT LANDING ON THE BODY" from beatmania IIDX 2nd Style, which shuffles between 79, 159, and 318 BPM. Bonus points if the song itself does not actually change BPM but the scroll BPM does.
  • Fanwork Ban: From 2011 to 2015, the online service Programmed World allowed players on current BEMANI cabinets in countries not served by the eAMUSEMENT network to enjoy functions and features that are otherwise exclusive to eA-connected machines. Unfortunately, in March 2015, Konami sent a cease-and-desist order to arcades running PW-connected cabinets as well as the PW staff, forcing the service to go offline. It is speculated that Konami is planning to expand eAMUSEMENT service to outside of Eastern and Southeast Asia, as on the same weekend, the eAMUSEMENT website announced plans to provide global website service to players outside of Japan, although whether this will actually lead to global eAMUSEMENT service has yet to be seen. (Hint: it won't.)
  • No Export for You: If you were to make a pie chart of the number of BEMANI games released in Eastern and Southeast Asia and the number of BEMANI games released overseas, the result would be Pac-Man with a nearly-closed mouth. It got worse in 2012 when Konami started requiring BEMANI games to be connected to the eAMUSEMENT network, as well as making their games lease-only as part of the eAMUSEMENT Participation program rather than outright purchasable. There are efforts to run a third-party clone of the eAMUSEMENT network, but see Fanwork Ban above for what this can lead to.
  • The Wiki Rule:
    • BEMANIWiki, for Japanese speakers.
    • RemyWiki, one of the largest resources for English-speaking BEMANI fans. (The name comes from its founder, Dan "Remy" Dickinson.)