Trivia / Alan Moore

  • Approval of God: Saturday Morning Watchmen and the Justice League Unlimited adaptation of "For the Man Who Has Everything" are the only adaptations of his work that he likes. He's also expressed appreciation for Sam Hamm's treatment and David Hayter's 2001 script for Watchmen...mainly because they take major liberties from the source material, and prove his point that Watchmen primarily works for the comics and not for the movies.
  • Artist Disillusionment: In a 2013 interview with The Guardian, Alan Moore admits that he "hates superheroes" and that he no longer feels that the genre has any value and meaning. Of course, this only applies to the tired superhero genre - he has stated that he loves the comics medium more than ever.
    • More recently, Moore expressed worry that this Millennial generation will produce no culture at all — it will remain trapped forever in the gravity of the 80s. He views the superhero movies craze as a symptom of a culture that refuses to grow up.
    • Moore has also, more than once, criticized creators for paying homage or creating follow ups to his old stories, when he wanted them to follow his lead and do something new.
  • Common Knowledge: In the wake of the Before Watchmen controversy, a number of comics pundits (such as Moviebob and others) have called out Moore for complaining about people working on derivative work when so much of his work is derivative too. In response, Moore pointed out that much of his output actually does focus on original characters such as The Ballad of Halo Jones, V for Vendetta, Brought to Light, A Small Killing, Top 10, Promethea and even Watchmen which while drawing on Charlton and MLJ comics are otherwise quite radically different in concept and tone from their inspirations, while From Hell is Historical Fiction. His work on licensed characters (which he always did with the permission of creators as he points out) is only one part of his career and not the whole, and in the case of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen most of his cast is public domain characters which he is "stealing" as he insists into new contexts, rather than using an earlier IP to sell as a rebranded sequel.
  • Creator Recovery: Moore has admitted that he was going through a period of depression while writing Watchmen. Most of what he's written since (with the exception of From Hell) has been much more optimistic, although Neonomicon and the later volumes of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen have made his early 2010s very grim. He has often described that much of his work in The '80s came from being in a bad mood.
  • Disowned Adaptation: Any adaptation of anything he's ever written — EVER.
    • V for Vendetta: Moore specifically requested that his name be removed from the production after Joel Silver (the film's producer) lied about Moore's enthusiasm for the shooting script. This, and the rather poor quality of previous adaptations of From Hell and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, prompted his (in retrospect, possibly hasty) decision to have his name removed from any and all adaptations of works he has no ownership of, and his pseudo-royalties distributed amongst the relevant artists. Hence, he has received no money from the filmmakers behind V for Vendetta, Constantine, or the Watchmen movie.
    • Zack Snyder, director of Watchmen once said that the best-case scenario of ever getting Moore to watch his movie was that there might come one odd day where Moore accidentally puts the DVD into his player and turns it off after a second. Moore replied to this by saying Snyder was giving the movie too much credit.
    • One of the confirmed exceptions is For the Man Who Has Everything.
  • Magnum Opus Dissonance:
    • In interviews, Moore has suggested that he considers A Small Killing to be one of his most personal works and Brought to Light as his best satire. In recent times, he's stated that he thinks his novel Jerusalem will be the work he's most remembered for. He has also stated that he considered key issues of Promethea to be the wildest and most experimental things he ever did in comics (namely Issue #12, and the final issues), and the summit of all he wanted to achieve in the medium.
    • As mentioned elsewhere he doesn't consider The Killing Joke to be among his best works. He believes that his other Batman story, Mortal Clay (focused on the Preston Payne Clayface) to be better, and the only DC Stories he is entirely satisfied with are the Superman ones, Watchmen and Swamp Thing.
  • Money, Dear Boy:
  • Old Shame: He's publicly said that he doesn't want his very early strips from Sounds magazine, Roscoe Moscow and The Stars My Degradation, ever reprinted.
  • Running the Asylum: Alan Moore criticizes the fact that contemporary comics seem to be written more by fans who long for their childhood comics heroes rather than professional writers with craft and skill. However, he admits that he himself was this. The young Alan Moore was a serious comics collector who affirms that Superman was his favorite character growing up. His love for the latter character and identification with its creators struggle, led to his famous, poignant story Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? which Neil Gaiman noted was a farewell to the Superman that existed in Moore's heart and who he believed would fade away with the Cosmic Retcon that followed afterwards. Which, to be fair, is exactly what happened.
  • Schedule Slip: Happened to a number of his comics: Miracleman, V for Vendetta, Lost Girls, and From Hell which were all heavily delayed due to problems with publishers/publications collapsing, but were eventually finished. All of them were projects he began and conceived in the late '80s, but would arrive in their final form by the late-'90s and The Oughties.
  • Screwed by the Network: He and David Gibbons don't get any royalties from Watchmen. Their deal with DC stated they would get the rights back if the book was out of print for more than two years, and it's never been out of print since.
    • In DC's defense, this isn't entirely their fault. Almost thirty years after its publication, Watchmen continues to enjoy massive popularity - Moore made it too good to ever be out of print. The market for reprint collections is also something few saw coming in the mid-eighties.
    • At the time, the TPB collection did not exist and the idea of publishing the full 12 issue run in bulk did not enter into the debate and conception of both Moore and Gibbons, who saw it as a limited mini-series rather than "graphic novel", a term that came into being at the end of the 80s. So in their view, the rights returning them after the miniseries run made sense. Moore regards the later reprints of Watchmen as Moving the Goalposts on the part of DC, and this is partly why he hates the term "graphic novel".
    • You're mistaken about the royalties. According to this interview he and Gibbons did receive them, at least as of 2012 when the interview was conducted.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • He was asked to write for Doctor Who in the late 1980s, as then-script editor Andrew Cartmel was a big fan. Sadly, he declined, mostly because Moore doesn't like Doctor Who, and feels that the series peaked in its original run. He was asked to write the script for Robocop 2, but passed on it.
    • When Moore first started working for DC Comics, there were a number of projects and proposals he considered, and which he mentioned in early interviews. One of them Twilight of the Superheroes was later published, but others include a lengthy series on Challengers of the Unknown that in Moore's view could have provided Canon Welding for the entire DC Universe. He also floated a series on Bizarro set in the Bizarro-world, but then things changed with DC.


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