Trivia / Aladdin

Works with their own Trivia pages:

Trivia in general:

  • Actor Allusion: Abis Mal (Jason Alexander) acts as essentially an expy of is George Costanza in terms of mannerisms and personality.
  • The Other Darrin:
    • Throughout the first sequel and the TV series, Genie is voiced by Dan Castellaneta, before switching back to Robin Williams in The King of Thieves, and back again to Castellaneta in the Kingdom Hearts series, then is replaced by Jim Meskimen in Kingdom Hearts Re:coded and Sorcerers of the Magic Kingdom
    • Sultan: Is tied with Genie in this trope.
      • Douglas Seale: First movie.
      • Val Bettin: Sequels and TV Series.
      • Jeff Bennett: More Than a Peacock Princess
    • Jasmine keeps the same voice actress throughout the instalments (Linda Larkin). But her singing is done by Lea Salonga in the first film and Liz Callaway in the sequels.
    • In Japan, after voicing him for years, Akira Kamiya retired Iago in 2001 (about the same time he retired Kenshiro. He's now voiced by Toru Okawa.
  • Non-Singing Voice: Even though Scott Weinger (Aladdin) and Linda Larkin (Jasmine) are pretty decent singers, they did not sing for their respective characters. Brad Kane did Aladdin's singing while Lea Salonga did Jasmine's singing (Liz Callaway in the sequels).
    • One that was oddly used for someone who did do his own singing in all other scenesRobin Williams of all people. Even though Robin Williams also voices the Merchant (who was going to be revealed in the end to be the Genie before the scene was cut), he does NOT sing for him. Bruce Adler does the Merchant's singing.

The original movie:

  • Celebrity Voice Actor: The Trope Codifier for animated films, with Robin Williams getting star billing.
  • Cut Song: Tons. By both songwriters. Many were reinstated in the stage adaptation.
  • Dueling Movies: One of the most convoluted examples ever with Richard Williams' The Thief and the Cobbler, which had been in production for over two decades when this film's production started and was not released until long after this movie was completed and became a big hit, by which point the movie had been taking out of Williams' control, shipped off to overseas studios for rushed completion and drastically re-cut to be an Aladdin knockoff.
    • This has led to some dispute amongst animation fans as to whether Disney shamelessly plagiarized Williams' film or if it only borrowed some ideas as homage. Williams had shown footage of Thief to the animators on Roger Rabbit in hopes of recruiting them, which certainly didn't help.
  • Executive Meddling: One of the contractual agreements Robin Williams had was that they not make a big deal about him being in the movie (Toys was coming out the following month, and he didn't want this film to overshadow Barry Levinson's pet project), which included the requirement that the poster not have the Genie take up more than 25% of merchandise. Just look at the image. While he doesn't technically exceed the maximum allowed amount of space, he's still by far the most obvious character. Robin Williams was livid and refused to ever voice the character again. Michael Eisner went as far as to purchase an original Picasso for Williams as an apology, but Williams still refused. This was one of the major factors in studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg being forced out of the company (he OK'd the process), and after he left Disney, Williams and the studio patched things up and he returned for Aladdin and the King of Thieves.
    • There's more to it than just that. Williams did not grant permission to use his voice in commercials or in any merchandising (such as talking Genie dolls). Disney promised they wouldn't do any such thing, but did anyway.
    • Williams also worked for union scale, the lowest amount allowed for professional actors.
  • Fake Brit: Jonathan Freeman as Jafar.
  • Harpo Does Something Funny: The animators and writers managed to accommodate Robin Williams during his extensive ad-libbing, no small feat when you see how many celebrity impressions, sly one-liners, and wild transformations they managed to work in.
  • Mean Character, Nice Actor: Jonathan Freeman, Jafar's voice actor, on the DVD extras appears as the total opposite to his evil character: he's funny, nice, gentle, chubby and nowhere near as tall! He's also terrified of birds, which became something of a "Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?" moment when live parrots were actually brought into the studio to better assist the animators in animating Iago.
  • Older Than They Think: Aladdin is actually the fourth attempt at the "three wishes" rule for genies by Disney; it had been used twice on Ducktales, on one regular episode and in that show's feature film; the "three wishes" concept was also used on a Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers episode as well.
  • The Other Marty: Aladdin himself: Aladdin was originally drawn as a scrawny 12-year-old. (Or thereabouts.) It was only after animation had begun that they realized they needed a more buff look for their hero. However, it was too late to re-do the animation that had been done already, and the 'scrawny' Aladdin can be seen in the "Friend Like Me" sequencenote . In fact, Aladdin's original design was based on Michael J. Fox, which would make him an Other Marty for the original Other Marty.
  • Promoted Fanboy: Will Finn is the self-proclaimed world's biggest Gilbert Gottfried fan and was ecstatic to have him working on the film, which meant he got to meet his hero. He and Gottfried remained close friends after the film finished.
  • Release Date Change: The insert for the 2012 Lady and the Tramp Diamond Edition Blu-ray says that Disney once planned to have Aladdin join the line in Spring 2013, until the release of the Peter Pan Diamond Edition pushed back Aladdin's induction, to October 2015. The UK did receive an Aladdin BD in April 2013, but with no Diamond Edition banner (the front cover instead duplicated that of the 1993 Walt Disney Classics VHS).
  • Screwed by the Lawyers: Disney began arranging plans for a live-action Genie prequel as an origin story, but it got locked away when Robin Williams's estate informed the company that Williams's will included a clause that bars any further usage of voice recordings and likenesses that had not yet been made available to the public through earlier releases such as the three home media releases note  for 25 years after his death, meaning Disney cannot move forward with using Williams's likeness until August 11, 2039. Disney also had plans to make a third sequel with unused Robin Williams recordings, but it ended up being scrapped for the same reason.
  • Screwed by the Network: Re-releases of this film after its Walt Disney "Black Diamond" Classics VHS/laserdisc release tend to have the bad luck of coming too late to hop on whatever premium format Disney experimented with at the time, leaving it un-viewable on IMAX, theatrical 3D, and now Blu-ray 3D. The IMAX version of The Lion King actually had an Aladdin preview attached to its run, but the low grosses of IMAX DAC moviesnote  prompted Disney to cancel Aladdin's engagement.
  • Throw It In:
    • As stated in Exact Words, the 'Applause' sign on the Genie's back after "Friend Like Me".
    • Many scenes are Robin Williams ad-libbing, particularly the opening one with the Peddler. Gilbert Gottfried also did it at times, a notable example being the line "gotta pack up the guns, the weapons, the blades, and how 'bout this picture, I don't know, I think I'm making a weird face in it." line shortly after Ali Ababwa/Aladdin unveiled Jafar and Iago's treacherous ambitions to the Sultan.
    • There was so much ad-libbing, Aladdin was disqualified from any screenplay Oscars.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • Patrick Stewart was up for the role of Jafar. He wanted to do it, too, but fitting it into his schedule (which included the weekly Star Trek: The Next Generation) proved too difficult. He considers not voicing Jafar one of his biggest career regrets.
    • Tim Curry, Kelsey Grammer, John Hurt, Christopher Lloyd, and Ian McKellen were all considered for the role of Jafar.
    • The Peddler who tells the tale is voiced by Robin Williams. One idea was that when freed, Genie would become the Peddler. It must have been thrown out late, because they have similar clothing, facial hair and even faces. This was passed over because... well, because.note 
    • Eddie Murphy and Steve Martin were both considered to provide the voice for Genie.
    • Aladdin was originally gonna have a trio of friends (named Babkak, Omar, and Kassim) who would help him out. They were written out, and became the villains Minos, Fatima, and Aziz in the TV seriesnote . They would eventually appear in the stage musical adaptation as Aladdin's sidekicks, subsequently replacing Abu.
    • Indie animation legend Bill Plympton was offered a six figure deal to animate on the film, and only turned it down when he learned that Disney held intellectual rights over any ideas he had while working for them.
    • Originally Genie was able to grant unlimited wishes, but he was changed to the standard three-wish genie to raise the stakes.
    • According to the "Pop-Up Fun Facts" on the DVD, Genie was originally going to be purple. They changed his color to blue to better fit the film's color scheme (Blue signifying "Good", Red signifying "Evil", and Yellow signifying "Neutral").
    • There was originally supposed to be a scene where Jafar quizzes the Genie on all the animals that appeared in the Prince Ali song, finding out that the Genie had turned Abu into an elephant in the process. In the final version of the movie Jafar doesn't find out that the Genie did this until right before he sends Aladdin, Abu & the Magic Carpet to the arctic.
  • Write Who You Know: Jasmine is based heavily on Mark Henn's (her leading animator) younger sister.
  • "A Whole New World" is one of the most popular audition songs in American Idol history.
  • This is the first animated feature to break the $200 million mark in box office, and it's also the highest selling title in the original Walt Disney "Black Diamond" Classics video series (though this is due to being the semifinal release in the line; after the next release, The Fox and the Hound, it was left recumbent.)
  • That tape opens with the 1991 green F.B.I. warning screens, then a teaser trailer for the next classic, The Lion King. It then plays a home video trailer (which starts with the Gold Walt Disney Home Video logo) for Pinocchio, which returned to video earlier that year note  The Pinocchio trailer is followed by the lilac-blue cursive handwritten Feature Presentation bumper, then the tape plays the 1992 distorted Sorcerer Mickey Walt Disney Classics logo, then the 1990 Walt Disney Pictures logo, and then the movie. Aladdin's Classics VHS was the only way to see the movie until 2004, when it became the last Classics title to get a reissue, as part of the Walt Disney Platinum Editions series; it subsequently became the last of the current "Untouchables" lineup to get a Blu-ray release as the apparent Grand Finale of the Walt Disney Diamond Editions series ANOTHER 11 years later (meaning that the Classics and Platinum editions were the only home media versions for a long time).

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