Those Two Bad Guys: Western Animation

  • Grim and Hildy Gloom from The 7D.
  • Bogel and Weird on The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo, whose purpose was to serve the Monster of the Week.
  • Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog has Scratch and Grounder, Dr. Robotnik's incompetent henchbots, who would later become a Fountain of Expies for other such duos.
    • Sonic Underground gave us Sleet and Dingo, a pair of bounty hunters Robotnik hired to take down Sonic and his siblings.
  • In the second season of Adventures of the Gummi Bears, Duke Igthorn is given some ogres that are different from his normal unnamed Mooks: Gad (who is purple) and Zook (who's green with orange hair). The two are always seen together and, as the series progresses, becomes much more prominent.
  • Poodle and Batty from Almost Naked Animals.
  • #88 and #89 from American Dragon Jake Long.
  • Xin Fu and Master Yu, the two bounty hunters hired to track down Toph, from Avatar: The Last Airbender.
    • Mai and Ty Lee could be considered this to an extent.
  • Rocko and Henshaw, Joker's occasional duo of henchmen in Batman: The Animated Series.
  • The Vreedle Brothers from the Ben 10 franchise.
  • Professor Pyg and Mister Toad in Beware the Batman. According to Word of God, they're a direct homage to Mr. Kidd and Mr. Wint from Diamonds are Forever.
  • Mr. Wink and Mr. Fibb of Codename: Kids Next Door (a homage to Mr. Wint and Mr. Kidd).
  • Danny Phantom's Guys in White are a subversion; They don't even try to be civil and clearly dislike one another. The X-treme Ghostbreakers aren't much different.
  • Frizz and Nug from The Dreamstone. Sometimes Sgt Blob and Urpgor take this role as well. Reconstructed with Rufus and Amberley, who play a similar role at times, but are Hero Antagonists.
  • The Fairly OddParents
    • Though more jerkasses than true bad guys, Tad and Chad fit this role.
    • HP and Sanderson.
    • On the few occasions they've teamed up, HP and Anti-Cosmo.
  • Goof Troop has Spud and Wally, a pair of criminals who appear in three episodes and provide minor conflicts for the characters.
  • Two-Badd in He-Man and the Masters of the Universe (1983). They even have the name down. They're also a subversion, starting out (in the 2002 series, at least) as rival bounty hunters Tuvar and Baddrha hired by Skeletor to bring down He-Man... before they're turned into a two-headed monster for screwing up the mission.
  • Invader Zim: Almighty Tallest Red and Purple. An interesting example, because they're technically the Big Bad Duumvirate, but since Zim is the main villain trying to take over the Earth they mostly just act as MacGuffins, exposition or comic relief.
    • This is probably because they're not actually particularly interested in conquering Earth; on the big map of the galaxy where they've got Operation Impending Doom Two laid out, Earth is a post-it note stuck to one side.
  • Sharky and Bones from Jake and the Never Land Pirates.
  • Skulk and Sammy from The Little Flying Bears.
  • Whittany and Brittany Biskit from Littlest Pet Shop (2012).
  • Looney Tunes had the two thugs Rocky and Mugsy.
  • Dumb Muscle Korg and his Butt Monkey Zet in Magi-Nation.
  • Peppermint Larry and Candy Wife in the later episodes of The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack.
  • Gutsman and Cutman in the Ruby-Spears Mega Man production. Shame about their IQs. Elecman and Bombman are a less frequent but definite evil duo.
  • Portia and Gwen from The Mighty B!
  • The two criminals/burglers in Mr. Bean.
  • Ratty and Mole from Mr. Bogus. Also, Jake and Butch.
  • The Flim-Flam Brothers from My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic give us this and a catchy Villain Song!
  • Gila and Diesel from Night Hood.
  • Bunk and his lackey from Poochini.
  • Rufus and Twig, the Dweasels, from Princess Gwenevere and the Jewel Riders.
  • Hack and Slash of ReBoot. Or at least, they would be if they weren't so dumb.
  • Citrocet and his gorilla friend from The Ripping Friends.
  • Boris and Natasha from Rocky and Bullwinkle.
  • Killer and Diller on The Ruff & Reddy Show would be reused and renamed in the Yogi Bear cartoon "Big Brave Bear."
  • In Seabert, Carbon (whose name rhymes with "brawn") and Sulfuric.
  • The Simpsons has two groups, claiming to be on opposite sides of the law: the Springfield Police Department's Lou and Eddie ("Maybe we don't want to give you a ticket.") and the Legitimate Businessmen's Club's Legs and Louie. That other guy? He doesn't count.
  • Static Shock
    • Specs and Trapper.
    • Puff and Onyx, too, a little.
  • The Twins from Superjail have this sort of dynamic at times.
  • Hip and Hop (Lemmy and Iggy) from the Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World cartoons.
  • The Troublemakers from Team Umizoomi.
  • In Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2003: Mr. Touch and Mr. Go.
    • Bebop and Rocksteady at times fell into this role in the 1987 series.
    • In the 2012 series it's now Dogpound/Rahzar and Fishface, then Bebop and Rocksteady make an appearance proper in season 3.
  • Badlands Meeney and J. Skulking Bushwhack from Terrytoons' The Adventures of Lariat Sam.
  • Transformers
    • Megatron and Starscream in various incarnations would count if they'd stop insulting each other in the midst of their exposition.
    • Beast Machines has Obsidian and Strika, legendary generals.
    • And various pairs like Rumble and Frenzy and all of the Decepticon Targetmasters, Headmasters, and Duocons, the G1 Scorponok and his partner Lord Zarak arguably being the most iconic example.
    • Transformers Animated also has Blitzwing and Lugnut, who tend to hang out together even when they aren't actually fighting anyone. The funny thing about that is, because of Blitzwing's near-Literal Split Personality, they can either be brains and brawn (Lugnut and "cold" Blitzwing), brawn and brawn (Lugnut and "hot" Blitzwing), or brawn and WTF!? (Lugnut and random Blitzwing).
    • Runabout and Runamuck, an inseparable pair of Beavis and Butt-Head-like delinquents.
    • Perhaps most emblematically, Spaceshot and Blackout, the mismatched pair who operates one of the most powerful weapons of the Decepticons' entire fighting force, the Decepticon Anti-Aircraft Base. Spaceshot is dutiful, dedicated, and heroic (yes, there are heroic Decepticons), while Blackout is a cowardly, spineless, would-be deserter. What's more, as Micromaster Combiners, they each transform into one half of a vehicle mode, with the other one turning into the other half.
    • Ransack and Crumplezone in Cybertron.
    • And every incarnation of the Dreadwing and Smokescreen molds from G2, including the originals, BB and Starscream from Beast Wars II, Gigant Bomb and Smokesniper from Robot Masters, and Smokejumper and Dreadwind from Robots in Disguise and Armada. While the various incarnations have their idiosyncracies, the constant is that they're Brains and Brawn who pal around to cover up their weakness in either area.
    • Similarly, the original Dreadwind and Darkwing, as well; Like Dreadwing and Smokescreen, they can also combine. (Their combined form is called Dreadwing, but isn't to be confused with the other Dreadwings. Well, not all of them, anyway.) Also, Dreadwind and Darkwing each has an organic partner who powers them up. However, they don't get along with their partners so well.
    • Transformers Prime: Knock Out and Breakdown; this ends once Breakdown is slain by Airachnid.
  • The Venture Bros.
    • Watch and Ward, who are constanly bickering and trip each other up at every turn. Dr. Girlfriend and the Monarch might qualify, too.
    • Kevin and Tim-Tom, Dr. Mrs. The Monarch's Murderous Moppets, definitely fit all known qualifications for this trope.
    • A Lampshade Hanging:
    #21: Could you sign this, boss? It's for 24, he got knifed by the Moppets.
    The Monarch: Which one is 24 again?
    #21: What?! You're kidding, right? Let me give a hint: you know how every time you talk to me, there's usually another guy next to me. That's 24.
    The Monarch: Right, right, right, the one that sounds like Ray Romano. I like him.
    • Just any duo voiced by Hammer and Publick might qualify for this.
    • Inverted by Mr. Doe and Mr. Cardholder, the OSI operatives sent to Jonas Venture, Jr. to help defeat The Monarch. And then played straight in the Season 4 finale when it turns out they are Guild moles.
  • Dick Dastardly and Muttley were popular enough on Wacky Races to get their own show the following season.
  • Kip and Beidermen from The Wild Thornberrys.
  • Lash and Nash from the 1999 Woody Woodpecker series.

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