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Theatre: The King and I
Shall we dance?

"On the clear understanding
That this kind of thing can happen
Shall we dance? Shall we dance?
Shall we dance?"

Originally conceived as a vehicle for actress Getrude Lawrence, Rodgers and Hammerstein's sixth musical tells the story of Anna Leonowens, a schoolteacher from Wales who travels with her son to Siam to teach the children of the King. It covers their entire history. From the beginning, at least according to Anna's account, they had repeated clashes personally, professionally, and culturally. The last two are related, since she was hired to teach his children, wives, and concubines about Western culture and bring Siam up to date, which is difficult when the King believes she is wrong. All the while, in the greatest tradition of adversarial love stories, they fall in love with each other.

In 1956 the musical was adapted into a movie starring Deborah Kerr and Yul Brynner. In 1999, it was yet again made into a movie, this time animated, that has its own page.

See also: Anna and the King.

The King And I contains examples of:

  • Adaptation Distillation: The movie, widely considered to be the best of the R&H screen adaptations (or at least second only to The Sound of Music), taking a Best Picture nomination at the 1957 Oscars. Oscar Hammerstein II called it the finest work he and Richard Rodgers ever produced.
  • Animated Adaptation: The 1999 film.
  • Bald of Awesome: The King's original Broadway actor, Yul Brynner, had his head shaved at the makeup artist's recommendation. Brynner carried this trope on into the movie, and several of his successors have tried to accomplish this in revivals.
    • Additionally, Yul Brynner carried this trope into every other project he did for the rest of his life.
  • Barefoot Poverty: The entire population of Thailand except for the king, and his wives in the scene where they are introduced to the British imperialists.
    • Actually, as the title picture shows, even the king.
  • Based on a Great Big Lie: The author swears it's true. It isn't.
  • Beta Couple: Lun Tha and Tuptim.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The King dies, he and Anna never act on their love, and she and his advisor are the only ones who notice. But his son promises sweeping changes, including ending slavery and prostration before the king.
  • Blatant Lies: When Anna tells the King, doubting her wisdom, that she is much Older Than She Looks.
    • The King has some fun with this and eventually (in his mind) trips her up
  • Catch the Conscience: Tuptim, at the end of "The Small House of Uncle Thomas," declares: "I too am glad for death of King. Of any King who pursues slave who is unhappy and tries to join her lover!" She almost gets carried away before a musical signal reminds her to deliver the bittersweet epilogue of the story. The King does not ignore this insult to his authority.
    • In the movie, the King commanded her to end her speech with a snap of his fingers.
  • Costume Porn: Ladies, at some point you lusted after that pink silk ballgown. Admit it.
  • Culture Clash: The King's manners against Anna's.
  • Dance of Romance: Provides one of the archetypal examples in "Shall We Dance?"
  • Digital Destruction: The 2014 Blu-Ray has a bluer tint than previous home video versions have.
  • Eloquent In My Native Tongue: The King butchers English grammar.
    • Partially subverted in that he learns very quickly and uses what he knows to tremendous advantage.
  • Eskimos Aren't Real: The kids have troubling believing that snow is a real thing.
  • Fiery Redhead: Anna.
  • Glad You Thought of It: Invoked. It's a minor plot point that Anna has to do this because she cannot be seen as offering advice to the King. So she pretends to be guessing what he's going to do - and quite naturally he says that she's guessed right, and then proceeds to do just what she "guessed" that he would do.
  • Love Epiphany: You can actually see it on both their faces as the King puts his hands on Anna's waist when they begin dancing.
  • Mighty Whitey: When you get down to it, this is basically the premise (and the reason why Thailand will never see this or any adaptation of The King and I).
  • Mood Whiplash: As Anna and the King waltz in a moment of shared happiness, a guard reports the capture of Tuptim, creating a heated debate between Anna and the King over whether or not Tuptim deserves a whipping.
  • Mooning: The King's wives perform a quite accidental version thanks to Anna dressing them up in huge hoop skirts to greet the English ambassador. When the King arrives and they all prostrate themselves before him as usual, Anna, standing behind them, gets a first-hand reminder that she forgot to provide them with undergarments. With no time to correct the mistake, all she can do is instruct them to "keep your backs to the wall". Later, when the ambassador arrives, they see his monocle and become frightened of "the evil eye", lifting their skirts as they run away.
  • Painful Rhyme: Lampshaded in-universe when Anna sings "Shall I Tell You What I Think Of You?", mispronouncing "employee" to rhyme with "pay" and "libertine" to rhyme with "concubine"... and then correcting herself.
  • Pimped-Out Dress: Oh My God. Anna's costumes weighed over forty pounds apiece. Deborah Kerr lost twelve pounds during filming as a result.
    • Crosses over with Gorgeous Period Dress - those huge skirts of the 1850s are straight out of the history books.
    • However, the over-the-elbow ("opera") gloves that Anna wears during the banquet scene are totally wrong for the period in question (the 1860's). Women in that era wore wrist-length gloves for both daytime and evening; long gloves, which had last been the mode in the Regency/Romantic period (up to the 1820's), did not come back into fashion until the 1870's.
  • Please Spare Him, My Liege!: Anna pleads with the king not to kill Tuptim.
  • Private Tutor: Anna is hired as a private tutor for the King of Siam's children .
  • Rule of Three
    • "Who who who?"
    • "Eateateat!"
    • "Put it on finger." Putiton putiton putiton!
    • "Down down down!"
  • Scenery Porn: The sets in the 1956 film are spot on, especially the palace.
  • Show Within a Show: The Small House of Uncle Thomas.
  • Stairway to Heaven: Little Eva dies, is given wings, and ascends an onstage staircase, up through the clouds, to Buddha.
  • Unresolved Sexual Tension
  • Urban Legend: Yul Brynner dancing with Deborah Kerr after having a lung surgically removed. Unfortunately, one of the Rodgers and Hammerstein tributes on the Sound of Music Blu-Ray speaks of this legend as something true.
  • Verbal Tic: After Anna explains the phrase "et cetera" to the King, he acquires a tendency to insert it into several of his demands, songs, conversations, et cetera. King Mongkut really did use this in his English writing, although there's no evidence either that Anna taught it to him or that he used it when speaking English.
    • "What-what-WHAT!"
  • Very Loosely Based on a True Story: The musical was based the non-fiction novel Anna and the King of Siam which was filmed in 1946. These in turn were based on two books by the real Anna Leonowens, The English Governess at the Siamese Court and Romance of the Harem, although these have been criticised due to a lack of objectivity.
    • Not to mention outright lies. The story of Tuptim, which Anna admits was "based on palace gossip", never happened. Unfaithful concubines in the time of Mongkut were simply dismissed. Anna herself was not all that she appeared to be. She took great pains to conceal from the world that she was half Indian, changing her name repeatedly and repudiating family members who could out her. Also, all the film and theatrical versions of her story are based on Margaret Landon's novelized adaptation of Anna's books, Anna and the King of Siam, and not even on Anna's own work.
  • War Elephants: The King plans to send War-Elephants to help Abraham Lincoln.
  • Your Normal Is Our Taboo: Is it EVER. Just to name a few examples, we have the King's promise to give Anna a house adjoining the palace, which he conveniently forgets; normal for a Siamese monarch, but apparently not for a British one. Anna also sees polygamy as this (perhaps erroneously, considering her own country's history of polygamous monarchs). Then there's the whole beating-of-Tuptim arc—definitely a European taboo. On the other side of the coin, the way Siamese women dress would be considered a European taboo, as would the fact that they apparently don't normally wear undergarments.

Just MarriedCreator/ 20 th Century FoxThe King Of Comedy
Keating The MusicalThe MusicalKismet
Von Ryan's ExpressCreator/Magnetic VideoPatton
The KillingFilms of the 1950sThe Man Who Knew Too Much
Around the World in Eighty DaysAcademy AwardThe Ten Commandments
Lady of WarImageSource/Live-Action FilmsGorgeous Period Dress

alternative title(s): The King And I; The King And I
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