That One Boss / Fire Emblem

Just when you're having fun managing an army... these guys show up to dry up all the fun.

Note: Final Bosses and Wake Up Call Bosses are not to be added unless they're overly difficult by their standards. Bonus Bosses are not allowed; they're optional and have no standards for difficulty.


  • Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon
    • In the original Fire Emblem, you had Camus, the boss of Chapter 20. He wields the Gradvius lance, (essentially, an empowered Javelin with more might and 100% accuracy), he is the first boss where Marth can't trivialize the boss fight by himself. Couple in his well rounded stats along with the deadly spear, and you have the hardest boss fight in the original game.
  • Fire Emblem: New Mystery of the Emblem
    • Katarina in Prologue 8. She uses Elfire in a game where most anyone who isn't a mage has little to no Resistance. As a result, her attacks can 2-shot all but maybe 2 people on your team. And since it isn't a Seize map, you'll be forced to bait her to your position and fight on her terms for the first round. Squishy Wizard though she is, it's a difficult fight if you aren't expecting it and it can be hard to get up to her without someone dying, anyway.
  • Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War
    • When it comes to ridiculous Fire Emblem bosses, Ishtar might as well take the cake. Not merely content with being That One Boss, she insists on being a Recurring Boss as well! Not only are her stats absurdly high in each appearance, but she always wields the Mjolnir tome, which has an insane 30 might, +20 skill, and +10 speed. Combined with her maxed out magic and speed stats, Ishtar is able to 1-shot most of your characters with perfect accuracy at 1-2 range. Unlike other bosses sporting legendary weapons, Ishtar has free range of movement every time she appears. Her first appearance is in chapter 8, before most of your units are even promoted; good luck landing a critical hit with Faval's Ichival, or you'll be losing some characters. note  For her second appearance in chapter 10, she's backed up by Julius (who's nearly impossible to kill at this stage of the game), and she won't leave until one of your units is dead. She returns one last time on the final chapter, flanked by three other difficult bosses at the same time. Better hope you have the Forseti tome ready by then!
    • Arvis is arguably even worse. He has an absolutely ludicrous attack power of 70, meaning that he will one-shot a lot of your units. His holy weapon grants him ridiculous defence boosts, and his defences were high to begin with. You'll need holy weapons if you want to give him anything worse than a scratch. Oh, he's also guarding a castle, which makes his evasion skyrocket as well. To add insult to injury, he also has the Awareness skill, which cancels out any chance of a critical hit on your side. If you don't have units with legendary weapons, high resistance, enough strength to actually dent him, and a shitload of healers... godspeed, soldier.
    • Additionally, there is a certain Dragon Master wielding a certain Infinity Plus One Lance that is guaranteed to make any player burst into tears. If the Elite Mooks with Sleep Swords, Slim Lances, and hyper-accuracy due to the Dragon Master's 5-star leadership aura didn't make you rage, the boss himself will. Awareness and good defenses makes him resistant, if not immune, to most tried-and-true killing strategies, and the sadistic combination of Pursuit, Continue, and insane speed means he'll either double your units normally, or double consecutively before you can counter. The only units that will stand a chance against this boss without being ludicrously gibbed are either your legendary-wielding bow-user, or your legendary-wielding sage. Oh, and if you're unfortunate enough to reduce his HP below 10 without killing him? For one turn, he'll dodge everything, and during his phase he'll fly and stab an unfortunate unit in the face. GLARGH.
  • Fire Emblem: Thracia 776
    • Any boss becomes That One whenever Saias is on the field. He has a whopping 10 Leadership Stars, giving +30 Accuracy and Avoid to every enemy on the map. He himself can also pelt you with Standard Status Effects like Sleep and Berserk from anywhere on the map, on top of making it harder to hit and avoid everything. Fortunately, he never stays for the entire duration of a chapter, and only appears in a few chapters. It's also possible to scare him off by using Warp to send someone past a certain map threshhold that triggers an event to make him leave.
    • Reinhardt. Not only does he appear in a chapter with Saias and his absurd Leadership boost (though he leaves eventually), he's got his own Leadership stars, he's on a horse, carries two different weapons that attack twice consecutively in both phases while most weapons of that sort only works at the user's phase, and also has Big Shield so he has a 20% chance to make your attack a No-Sell. Furthermore, he also has Vantage, so he always attacks first even if you initiate combat regardless (which in Thracia 776 allows the user to always attack first). He also has a whopping five movement stars so he's got a rather high chance to move and attack twice in one turn.
      • He is so outrageously cheap that a village in the same chapter gives you a Warp staff, which can be taken as unsubtle nod from the developers that you're better off not fighting him and taking a shortcut to beat the chapter.
    • The Dark Warlords are mostly just annoying, but Bovis and Canis are genuinely very difficult. Bovis is functionally identical to Galzus, meaning he's got high stats and strong weapons, in addition to Astra and Luna. Canis has the same skills as Sara and comes with a Berserk Staff (and statuses in this game are 100% accurate) and Resire, making it difficult to ensure that she actually takes any damage. Canis also has Wrath, meaning that whenever you attack her she responds with a critical hit.
  • Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade
    • Henning, the boss of chapter 8x, is an extremely blatant Difficulty Spike in an otherwise straightforward map. He has stats that aren't out of place for bosses five chapters ahead of him, and is well-equipped: a Hand Axe to strike at range and a Steel Blade to hit hard in melee. Coupled with the throne boosts, there is not really any easy solution to beating him.
    • Gel, the Swordmaster boss of Chapter 19 (Sacae route). Being a Swordmaster is bad enough in a game with low hit rates like this one, but he's also on a Gate (which, while not as bad as a Throne, is still +20% Avoid) and carries a Light Brand so you can't just bombard him from a distance. He's got high skill and speed, too, making it even harder to hit him.
    • Murdock. He has the maximum strength a General can have, maximum Con, effectively 28 defense from being on a Throne, and a Tomahawk to punish ranged and melee attackers. His only flaw is his speed, although that's a given for being a General. He's also over the HP cap your units can attain. Exploiting the weapon triangle is strongly advised.
  • Fire Emblem: The Blazing Blade
    • Maxime, the mid-boss in the already horrifying "Battle Before Dawn". He's a Paladin with ridiculous stats for someone who's not even a chapter boss (the boss of the chapter being Ursula). He's also hidden in a room on the left side of the map, so you have a good chance of being surprised (especially on HHM, where there's Fog of War). Most players will go down the left side in order to protect Jaffar, leaving them to be jumped by this bastard. At least you can avoid him by going down the right side (which also lets you rescue Nino, who you need to recruit Jaffar for the gaiden chapter).
      • While there's Fog of War on all versions of the map, the fact that Maxime starts in a different place on HHM means that it's far easier for him to get the jump on you. Starting closer to your units means that he's much less likely to go after Jaffar, so now you've got to deal with him... and the utterly terrifying stat bonuses that HHM gave him. Most enemies get a slight boost to their stats in Hard Mode, but Maxime is functionally a whole new unit in HHM than he was on previous difficulties.
  • Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones
    • Carlyle from Chapter 14 of Eirika's route. He's a Swordmaster sitting on a throne, which means that he can easily dodge nearly anything you throw at him with his high speed, and he has a very nasty critical rate besides. He's also equipped with a Wind Sword, which does effective damage to flying units, can attack at range, and uses his (not inconsiderable) strength to hit your resistance (which, for physical units, is low). Your best hope is to chip away at him with a high-resistance unit, and since he's sitting on a throne that regenerates his health every turn, this can take a long time.
    • Beran from Chapter 10 of Ephraim's route. He can cover all three ranges with his weapons, and his stats are pretty good for a boss for this point of the game. With his Killer Bow, he has a good critical rate, especially because he's quite fast and can easily double most of your team. Oh, and he has a Lancereaver, when most of your characters are using lances. At least you don't actually have to fight him.
  • Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance
    • The fight with the Black Knight is a full-on Luck-Based Mission. Even if Ike has maxed Strength, Skill, Speed, and Defense, you still rely entirely on him activating Aether enough times to bypass the Black Knight's defense and self-healing. (Technically, if Ike has capped Strength, he can defeat the Black Knight without Aether if he attacks and hits the Black Knight every turn... though that too makes for a Luck Based Mission.) Leveling up Mist, the only healer you'll have access to in the fight, helps, but only so much. Oh, and you have five turns to win. (Fortunately, you're not forced to win to proceed, though you recruit a crappier unit if you don't win.)
  • Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn
    • Dheginsea proves very statistically imposing, with 100 HP, a skill that combines Nihil with passive self-healing, all but Luck and Speed capped, and a base attack of 75. In plain terms, he is a massive tank who will usually kill those he attacks in 2 hits. Just to even reach him, you must fight through a map full of Demonic Spiders (Red and White Dragons) who themselves are capable of taking large chunks of health off at a time, and then hold them at bay while you fight the boss. To wear you down further, he periodically uses a wide-ranging area-of-effect attack that hits the Defense stat, and the damage increases the closer an ally is to him. To cap all this off, attacking him without Nihil or Parity equipped means you risk facing his mastery skill (Ire) which is, well, a death sentence. That in itself, though, is his weakness: by only attacking him with Nihil-users (and Marksmen who can snipe from 3 spaces back without retaliation) and staying healed, actually beating him boils down to doing the math and staying out of a position where you can get overwhelmed from the damage taken. He also will not attack Ena and Kurthnaga at all, even if they attack him, though typically they struggle to do any meaningful damage to him.
    • The Final Boss, Ashera is a doozy. Unlike any other Fire Emblem final boss, you have to destroy eight barriers surrounding her. Each barrier has 90 HP, high evade, can only be damaged by certain weapons, and will send half of any damage she takes back to you unless you use the Nihil skill (there are only four of these) or the Parity skill (there are only two of these, and they have the side effect of neutralizing your support bonuses). In addition, she recovers 40 HP each turn (a third of her HP), and the constant reinforcements will heal her even further. Meanwhile, the boss herelf cycles between an area attack that targets Defense, a 1-3 square range single attack that targets Res, another area attack that targets Res, another single attack that targets Def, and yet another area attack that silences everyone. All three area attacks hit everyone and can kill most weakened units very easily. The boss has 35 Def, so only the strongest physical units can deal decent damage, and to make matters worse, 50 Res, meaning your mages are dealing single-digit damage. To twist the knife further, you have to defeat her in nine turns, and if you don't, she inflicts Stun on everyone, leaving your party powerless for several turns and able to be picked off by their mooks. Finally, if the boss isn't defeated by a certain overpowered mercenary leader, she will only get back up, recovering all 120 of her HP. The bright spot to all of this is that for the most part, none of these enemies are likely to get critical hits.

  • Fire Emblem Fates (Conquest path)
    • Haitaka, a Hoshidan Spear Fighter. He serves as the boss of Chapter 9, and is considered a Wake-Up Call Boss. He has a weapon that has 1-2 range with very minor drawbacks, and on harder difficulties, he has skills like Strong Riposte which boosts the damage of his counterattacks, and Seal Def, which would deter the player from trying to tank his attacks. Something notable is that he can come in handy for the next chapter, as he can be captured by Niles. However, given how fragile Niles is and how tough Haitaka is, this may prove to be quite a task.
    • Iago, the boss of Chapter 26. Iago sits in the center of the map, and is able to use staffs, despite the Sorcerer class being unable to. Making matters worse is that he has the enemy only skill Staff Savant, allowing him to use his staffs for as long as he likes. He can assail the player's units with status effects such as Freeze (immobilzing a unit) or Enfeeble (reducing all stats by -4), and on Lunatic, he adds a Hexing Rod to his roster, which can halve a unit's HP. With his massive, central staff range, he can easily debilitate any of the player's units. This is on top of what is already a hard level, reaching incredibly frustrating levels on Lunatic (as the other staff users also get Staff Savant). Finally, fighting Iago himself may prove to be a bit dangerous, given his high stats and his weapon's high Crit rate.
    • Hans, who also shows up in Chapter 26. He's in a room full of super sturdy Generals and hard hitting Bersekers, so trying to single him out is already difficult enough. He comes with a bunch of skills that make him dangerous on either phase, as on Lunatic he can have skills like Death Blow and Armored Blow to bolster his very high Crit and give him some extra defense when he's initiating on the Enemy Phase, and he can also have Counter and Countermagic to deter melee attacks and magic attacks on the Player Phase.
    • Ryoma, in any chapter he's fought in. In Chapter 12, he is at the very least optional, but given that he stands in the player's way and yields a valuable Secret Book, there's an incentive to fight him. In Chapter 25 however, the player is forced to fight him, or at least forced to survive against him. His stats are insane, and is the perfect example of a Lightning Bruiser. Certain builds of Corrin, like ones focused on axes or bows, may be completely unable to fight Ryoma. At that point, the player will have to defeat Saizo and Kagero to open the doors to Ryoma's chamber and rescue Corrin, and have another unit engage Ryoma. However, with skills like Astra and Rend Heaven on higher difficulties, this is a very dangerous prospect. The only saving grace is that Ryoma's room does have special properties that reduce both damage given and taken, and the player does have 20 to 25 turns until Ryoma moves, but a confrontation is inevitable.
    • Takumi, in any chapter he's fought in. He's the boss of Chapter 10, and while he does not move, he still screws the player over through the use of his Dragon Vein, making it easier for the enemies to advance towards the defend point. Should he be fought however, he will have the Point Blank skill. This skill will allow him to counterattack at a range, which bows and yumis normally cannot do. On harder difficulties, he'll have Wary Fighter, which prevents the user and the foe from performing follow up attacks, making it even harder to dispatch him in a single round. Takumi shows up again in Chapter 13, and he's already promoted to the Sniper class. He will chase the player down immediately, and his yumi's effect allows him to ignore movement terrain costs. On higher difficulties, he also has Pass, letting him move through the player's units. In Chapter 23, Takumi shows up yet again, and he has the Vengeance skill, and on higher difficulties, Rend Heaven. They have high activation rates thanks to his high Skill, making him a very dangerous opponent to face.
    • The final boss. He has an area of effect attack that damages the player's team heavily unless a Dragon Vein is used to soften the blow, but even then, it will still leave quite a mark. To say nothing of the hardest level in the entire game, simply reaching the final boss is a daunting task in and of itself. Once the player has reached him, the player has to contend with his massive 1-5 range weapon and is effective against fliers. He has Dragonskin, which mitigates any damage taken, almost requiring Corrin's Shadow Yato to break through, Draconic Hex to debuff all of any assailant's stats by -4, and on higher difficulties, skills like Vengeance and Lifetaker. Finally, what makes the final boss particularly special is that he is paired up with a clone of himself and has the skill Bold Stance, which lets him fight with the benefits of both Attack Stance and Guard Stance, being able to do extra damage and also potentially block attacks. He is easily one of the toughest bosses in the game and is an incredibly dangerous opponent to face. It's none other than Takumi, making his appearances as a boss to a total of four times, culminating in him being the final boss, and he makes for one hell of a boss fight every time.
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