Tear Jerker: Gargoyles

  • The destruction of Goliath's clan. The tears start coming when Goliath returns to the castle in the pilot and sees the devastation, including what he thinks is Demona. He scoops up remains, chokes out 'My... angel of the night...' and then lets out the most heartbroken wail...
    • Goliath pretty much sums up his day with the line; "I've been denied everything! EVEN MY REVENGE!!!"
  • In "Awakening Part 2", Goliath asks the Magus to cast his spell one last time, to turn Goliath to stone alongside the rest of his clan, to wait for the day when they might wake up. On initial viewings, this might be seen as a heartwarming moment. But Word of God states that it isn't — Goliath's grief is so great, he's essentially committing suicide. At that point, there is no way for the spell to ever be broken, because the technology that eventually makes it possible would have been unimaginable in that time. Goliath is choosing oblivion rather than to be alone.
  • The relationship between Goliath and Demona. When flashbacks show their younger selves, it is very obvious that they were in love and were enjoying the happiest days of their lives. However, as the flashbacks progress and the couple ages, one can see how the relationship is slowly crumbling apart due to Goliath and Demona's conflicting views about humanity. By the time the flashbacks end, one can see that the two of them are no longer the same idealistic gargoyles that loved each other. Instead, they are each other's worst enemy. Demona doesn't hesitate in attacking Goliath, trying to kill him, enslaving him with magic, or trying to ruin his life. Similarly, Goliath treats her with greater hostility than most of his other antagonists, showing that even he knows that there is no reasoning with her.
    • Perhaps the most tragic example is in "Vows" where Xanatos' wedding convinces Goliath to attend to it because it reminded him of how he and Demona made their own vows of eternal love. He goes to the wedding, probably intending to reconcile with her. Things go downhill when he brings the half of an amulet that Demona gave him when they made their vows, as the completed amulet can make the user travel in time. Demona uses this occasion to warn her younger self about the destruction of her clan, but ends up disgusting her thanks to her new personality. By the time Demona is restrained, Goliath attempts to give her past self advice to comfort her over the horrible future ahead of her. Once Goliath returns, Demona awakens and reveals that she remembered the advice that he gave her past self but doesn't care. The end of the episode has Goliath reminiscing about the love he and Demona shared but can never have again.
      • The differences between Demona's feelings for Goliath can be seen when she and her past self interact with each other. For example, when both versions of Demona travel in time with Goliath, they both have opposite reactions when they see him on the ground: !Past Demona wants to help him but Demona runs to the recovering Goliath...and kicks him right in the face, knocking him unconscious. It borders on Nightmare Fuel for !Past Demona. Imagine watching your significant other be callously hurt by none other than yourself. Poor Goliath barely lifted his head before Demona's foot caught him on the chin rather than have her extend her hand to help him.
  • Near the end of "Reawakening", Coldstone not only has a change of heart, saving Goliath from the frigid New York waters, but is seemingly killed shielding his rookery brother from his own rookery sister. Thankfully he shows up alive later, if 'alive' is the word...
  • Near the end of "The Price" "Macbeth" blasts the fake Hudson's statue. Goliath has a totally understandable freak out and later grieves for his oldest friend. Thankfully, this becomes a happy tearjerker when the real Hudson arrives alive and well.
  • Goliath and Thailog's first meeting in "Double Jeopardy". After realizing that he has a responsibility to his 'son', Goliath reaches out to Thailog, only for the twisted clone to reject his 'father' and his idealistic views.
    Goliath: (pleading) Join us, join your clan.
    Goliath: Life for a Gargoyle isn't about profit. It's about protecting those you care for.
    Thailog: I considered caring about you. It took some effort, but I arranged for you to join this party because I planned to share the money with you. But our little family reunion disappointed me father. So I've decided to hate you too.
    • There's another way to look at it: Thailog already knew of Goliath's altruistic views hence knowing how to manipulate him, eagerly wanting to meet the one "father" who never exploited him. He was even going to share his profits with him, a considerable show of care given Thailog's values. Unfortunately, Goliath's shock and (understandable but misplaced) anger at discovering his clone shattered Thailog's hopes, who now felt rejected and hated simply for existing, with Goliath's subsequent decision to release him done stating Xanatos was to blame, meaning he still thought of Thailog as a mistake. By the time Goliath approached Thailog to repair things, it was far too late for the composed but vindictive Thailog to see it the same way.
    "Well, I should have known no copy could live up to the original."
    "That copy was a living being...and we all failed him." - Xanatos and Goliath
  • The four-parter "City of Stone," with the flashbacks to Demona and Macbeth's origins and interactions.
    • The flashback scene in which MacBeth must leave his family and country forever. It gets even worse when later on, it shows that his leaving did no good whatsoever and his family was still murdered.
    • The moments between Macbeth and Gruoch, his wife, as she goes from shock and horror at his resurrection, to happiness at his survival, to sadness that he's got to leave forever. Between the actors and the animation, it's gloriously heart-wrenching.
  • Demona gets a tear-jerker at the end of "City of Stone" as well. "The access code is...'alone'."
  • Derek Maza. Pick an episode featuring him anywhere from Metamorphosis to the first half of Season Two. Any episode within that time.
    • The first episode is a total Downer Ending. Brooklyn has a crush on Maggie and prevails on the others to offer Maggie sanctuary with the clan. She still sees him as a monster and violently rejects him. He is heartbroken at the end of the episode. Derek basically pulls a That Man Is Dead on his sister Elisa and she spends the end of the episode just crying her heart out.
      • Not to mention Derek trying desperately to hide his true identity from Elisa, establishing the ongoing subplot. He slips almost immediately, and she realizes exactly who he is.
      • It's also the only episode which ever succeeded in making this troper outright hate Xanatos and wish for his head on a pike.
  • The Magus's entire sub-plot in "Avalon." He watched the girl he loved slowly fall for a somewhat younger man (who is pretty much the Magus' surrogate little brother), and pretended to be happy for them in a classic I Want My Beloved to Be Happy. He mentions (to Elisa, an outsider) that without his magic he has nothing to offer her, but that's not his true reason. It's because of the guilt he felt over cursing the Manhattan clan to remain stone for a thousand years. He's actually punishing himself for a crime that has been forgiven and forgotten long ago. The arc culminates with his Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Seeing what happened to the Captain. It becomes a Heartwarming Moment when he finally redeems himself and gets to ascend to the afterlife.
    Captain: Thank ye, Goliath.
  • The episode where Broadway is playing with Elisa's firearm, accidentally shoots her, and his resulting freak out.
    • What made it really bad was that this troper was surprised by the whole episode, and was paying attention the entire time. Broadway's guilty sobbing lasts longer than the scene itself, implying it was originally longer and more painful.
  • No mention of how The Gargoyles are revealed to the world at large... and thought to be a menace? Especially Angela's reaction
  • The Emir.
  • Angela's reaction to learning what kind of person her mother is.
  • Seeing This Troper's favorite of the Manhattan Clan blinded by what must have been a horrific off-screen mutilation, shedding hopeful tears from empty eye sockets at Goliath's return, being shot in the back protecting Goliath, then MUSING ABOUT THE SUNRISE before dying in Goliath's arms is flat-out HEARTBREAKING. This stood out in "Future Tense," an episode so frigging dark that Goliath being struck by lightning is one of the least disturbing moments.
    • Pretty much the entirety of "Future Tense" genuinely hurts. My favorite happens to be Lexington, and... that episode. All Just a Dream or not, it doesn't matter. Seeing him so utterly damaged and fucked-up, to the point where he hurtles off the Moral Event Horizon, betrays everyone he once loved including, indirectly, baby Alex, and essentially damns the entire world - all starting ostensibly because of Goliath's devastating "abandonment" of him and the clan... I still have a hard time watching "Future Tense". Baby, Lex, my sweet little geek-goyle, what happened to you?
  • When Fox's mother Anastasia reveals her true nature as Titania, Queen of the Third Race and wife of Oberon, and is describing her relationship with Fox's father, Halcyon Renard ... and dismissively states he was unable to hold her interest. "Truthfully, no one can, save Oberon." After we've already seen (earlier that episode) how dismayed he was to hear she had remarried. Ouch.
    • While neither had behaved like saints, I'd imagine any mother and father could sympathize with how helpless Xanatos and Fox must have felt after Oberon made his intentions to take Alex known.
    • What makes it worse? It's the first time we've ever seen Fox crying!
    • No, what makes it really bad is the fact that Xanatos, the man who has tropes named after his cleverness just stands there, feeling helpless against this overwhelming supernatural force.
  • Yeah yeah, I know we don't consider the Goliath Chronicles canon. But c'mon, who didn't shed a tear at the ending to Genesis Undone?
    Goliath: Thailog, I wanted to tell you...
    Thailog: I know, I know. So much to say, so little time. Before I go, I have a something for you Goliath. Courtesy of the good doctor. How I, how I did enjoy... causing you grief...
    • Moments later Goliath pulls off a roar that hasn't been heard since the very beginning of the series, when he first saw the remains of his clan in the pilot.
    • Then there is Sevarius' reaction to the death of his 'son'. In the words of Hudson, "He almost makes me feel sorry for him."
    • Early in the episode, while debating whether or not to help the clones. Lexington argues that while the clones are stuck dealing with Sevarius, they have a choice to opt out. But one look at the poor state of the clones is enough to make all the gargoyles decide to take the risk.
    • That and all the Gargoyles coming across each of the clones, as they (permanently?) turn to stone.
  • While the animation was poor, the Goliath Chronicles episode "For It May Come True" stood out as one of the darkest and most heartwrenching episodes of the season.
    • Pretty much the entirety of "For It May Come True" is enough to bring genuine tears, both happy and sad. Goliath finally gets his wish to be human, and be with Elisa... and everything goes downhill from there. While it was thankfully All Just a Dream created by Titania, seeing Goliath so utterly helpless. Watching helplessly as Xanatos crosses the Moral Event Horizon, killing everyone Goliath loves including Elisa.
    • This exchange between the now human Goliath and Hudson, after Hudson fails to recognize him.
    Hudson: Go home to your family, human!
    Goliath: You are my family!
    • Goliath's confession to Titania about how good it felt to be a human. To be accepted by human society and with the woman he loves.
  • Quite a few moments in the Bad Guys spinoff:
    • Sora telling Yama that he is lost to her, because he will not allow her to be shamed by accompanying him on his quest for honor.
    • The dramatic irony of the reader of the comics knowing that Oldcastle, who acted as Dingo's only parent for much of his childhood, actually murdered Dingo's mum. The comic never mentions if or how Dingo found out the truth.
    • Jason and Robyn Canmore's estrangement from their little brother.
    • Tasha's suicide. What really made it so awful for this tropette was the sight of Thug comforting Erin... and Benny (the woodlouse/roly-poly/pillbug) curled up into a ball, trying to shield himself from what was presumably a traumatic thing to witness.
  • Obviously, the destruction of the clock tower is one of the most tragic moments of the series. Hudson getting hurt makes it worse.
    Hudson: Leave me lads, the next attack...
  • Mentioned before, but the Goliath Chronicles did have its saving graces when it came to emotion. Hudson in particular.
    Hudson: Hudson, face the facts you old fool. You're going blind.
    • He sounds like he's on the verge of sobbing before the sun rises on him.
  • When Goliath fails to rescue Elise near the end of the "Hunter's Moon" arc. The scene plays out like a twisted version of when they first met, only with Goliath failing catch her this time.
    • Everyone's reaction to her loss, poor Angela just sat down and cried.
  • In "Ransom", seeing Fox worrying over her and David's son, Alex after he is kidnapped until a gargoyle is presented.
    • The scene gets more heartbreaking when she breaks down in tears. In her son's room. While holding his panda bear.
  • Your heart has to break for Gruoch, Macbeth's wife. She witnesses Canmore killing her husband and her son, Luach, taking on the crown of king of Scotland, Macbeth rises from the dead before her, and then must leave Scotland, and her, forever, as he's declared dead and his son is now king. Worse still is that historically, a year later, Luach dies in battle. According to Greg Weisman, Gruoch commits suicide after this. Trauma Conga Line doesn't begin to describe it.
  • "Deadly Force," when Broadway finds a thug threatening someone with a particle-beam emitter: "What's this?! A new kind of gun?!?! A new way to kill people?!?!" Bill Fagerbakke's voice acting did a great job conveying Broadway's grief for Elisa in that scene in particular.
    • The single, maybe two-second shot of Broadway crying his eyes out after accidentally shooting Elisa. It's such a small thing, but so effective. The Gargoyles crew were wonderful at this.