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Tabletop Game: Stars Without Number
A science fiction tabletop game written by Kevin Crawford and published by Sine Nomine Publishing.

In the distant future, humanity has spread to distant stars with the spike drive, which allows hyperspace travel. Not easy hyperspace travel - fail to keep it under control and your death will not be fun - but hyperspace travel. While the Terran Mandate ruled the galaxy until a few centuries ago, a psionic disaster known as the Scream rippled across the galaxy and shattered society, killing massive numbers of humans and aliens and throwing the galaxy into chaos. Only recently have ships begun to ply the space lanes again, and with the psionic-aided jump gates no longer usable, very little large-scale shipping between the systems is viable. A lot of travel is due to small groups of explorers scouting out systems to find technology and resources left behind by the pre-Scream culture.

Of note is its retro-inspired sandbox playstyle; it was written so that dungeon modules from other games could be grafted into a session with less than twenty minutes' work by, say, replacing Orcs with Hochog mercenaries and setting it on a space station instead of in a dungeon complex.

A free version of the corebook is available here.

Stars Without Number contains the following tropes

  • Anyone Can Die: Stars Without Number does not believe in softball. There are pages that recommend turning up with spare character sheets, and first level characters are likely to die to a couple of bullets.
  • Apocalypse How: The Scream is Galactic, and its effects ranged from Societal Disruption to Extinction depending on who you were and what happened to you.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Psychics who have run out of points can burn their stats to fuel their powers, a process known as torching.
  • Class and Level System
  • Eldritch Abomination: The Shibboleth go just a little bit beyond Starfish Aliens, due to their aversion fields - psychic effects that cause humans to actively ignore their presence unless they've suffered a very specific kind of brain damage or surgery to replicate the effects of the same.
  • Even Hochog Have Standards: the Hochog will cheerfully bomb planets back to the Stone Age if it can get them reputation, but they do not stand for any form of unnecessary cruelty.
  • Fighter, Mage, Thief: The classes are Warrior, Psychic and Expert.
  • Hyperspace Is a Scary Place: Using spike drives is a risky thing to do, although having an Expert with a good Navigation score can mitigate it a bit.
  • Lost Technology: Pretech is just plain better than postech.
  • Mad Scientist: Tiberius Crohn, the inventor of spike drive.
  • Magnetic Weapons: TL 4 handheld projectile weaponry has one gyrojet weapon and three magnetic weapons - the mag pistol, the mag rifle, and the spike thrower, which is a magnetic shotgun. You can also get vehicle-mounted and even ship-mounted rail weapons.
  • Planet of Hats: The alien creation chapter deals with "lenses", the major traits of alien culture.
  • Random Number God: The sector is constructed based on random rolls.
  • Recycled IN SPACE!: A lot of the standard playstyle is Dungeons & Dragons IN SPAAAACE. You can also literally recycle adventure modules from other games, and the ruleset is designed to make this as easy as possible.
  • Technology Levels: Seven of them. 0 is Stone Age material, 1 is medieval, 2 is steam power and gunpowder, 3 is contemporary tech or slightly above, 4 is spike drives and interstellar travel, 5 is the stuff that was lost in the Scream like psitech and jump gates, and 6 is vanishingly rare and incredibly powerful.
  • Total Party Kill: If you're going to use a spike-enabled ship, have an Expert. Have that Expert take Navigation. Use a re-roll if necessary, because you do not want to fail a Navigation roll.
  • Wide Open Sandbox: Created to support this playstyle. A lot of its backwards compatibility, by Word of God, was introduced so that the GM didn't need to work on the patrol patterns at a fort the players might never visit, but could instead grab a handy D&D module and reskin it.
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