Superlative Dubbing / English Dubs

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    Puppet Shows 
  • The English dub of Star Fleet is generally more well regarded and remembered than the original Japanese version (part of that being the series failed in Japan, whereas it was loved in the United Kingdom). The English dialogue even fits the puppets mouth movements better than the original Japanese dialogue.

    Video Games 
  • Atlus and NISAmerica are pretty famous for this. Even if a game has the option to change the spoken language to Japanese, you'll rarely do so, the dubbing is so good. Specifically:
    • The Shin Megami Tensei and Disgaea series are incredibly well dubbed.
    • In particular, both Persona 3 and Persona 4 have amazing dubs. Both games feature highly prolific voice actors throughout, like Vic Mignogna, Liam O'Brien, Yuri Lowenthal, Laura Bailey, Karen Strassman, Tara Platt and, of course, Troy Baker. In each of those cases, you could make a serious argument for their Persona roles being the best performances they've ever given, with the help of the amazing scripts. Tara Platt gets past her occasionally stiff typecasting and gives Defrosting Ice Queen Mitsuru a real heart; Vic Mignogna somehow manages to make Junpei not annoying and a best friend you'd want to have; Liam O'Brien combines Adorkable with Blood Knight for Akihiko while still sounding coherent and giving one of the biggest Tear Jerker monologues in the series; Karen Strassman handles Aigis's emotional transformation beautifully and then sounds completely unrecognizable (and adorable) as Nanako; and Yuri Lowenthal (Yosuke), Laura Bailey (Rise) and Troy Baker (Kanji) are clearly just having the time of their lives, knocking all their comedic scenes out of the park, and still managing to bring sincere emotion to their roles when it's called for. Even minor characters like Takaya (Derek Stephen Prince) are unforgettable because of their voice acting.
    • Soul Nomad & the World Eaters with Token Evil Team Mate Gig, whose English performance is largely regarded as superior to the original version.
  • Namco Bandai has some hits and misses. But, boy! When they hit, they hit really hard! Examples would be the Xenosaga trilogy, the Ace Combat series and some of the Tales of... games, especially from Tales of Symphonia and Tales of the Abyss onward. While their dub of Baten Kaitos was terrible, their dub of Baten Kaitos Origins was spectacular, especially in comparison. Highlights include characters actually showing emotion and Guillo's Voice of the Legion being pulled off quite well.
  • The period of 2011~2012 saw the rise of British voice actors dubbing Eastern RPGs; with Xenoblade and The Last Story having some simply superb voice work. The former had several casting issues in the original Japanese (with Large Ham Norio Wakamoto being cast as, of all things, a Smug Snake and Dunban sounding like a hyperactive teenager in battle). The English actors did their own thing with every last one of the characters and they were not afraid to go overboard when required; leading to the creation of many a beloved meme. TLS's British cast, on the other hand, got the memo on how the game is effectively a much more political and far more grown-up version of Final Fantasy and chucked as many JRPG and anime dubbing cliches that they could out the window; with the actors instead going for a big mix of regional accents to convey the class-struggles while writing the English script to convey more of a Dragon Age-style medieval fantasy tone.
  • Final Fantasy's dubs were widely regarded as lacking; partly due to the Lip Lock. Then, along came Final Fantasy XII: which mixed Brits, Europeans and Americans together to create a great sense of cultural variety for the game's world and featured a script that completely nailed how to convey the subtle schemes and plots that the story revolved around.
  • The English dub for Kid Icarus: Uprising set an unprecedented standard for a Nintendo property: after years of shaky performances in Star Fox games, Super Mario Sunshine and Metroid: Other M (released 2 years prior to Kid Icarus: Uprising), we got a dub entirely comprised of well known voice talent such as Cree Summer, Ali Hillis and Troy Baker. With a game this packed with dialogue, good voice acting was a necessity, but everyone involved gave an inspired and enthusiastic performance. Special mention must go to S. Scott Bullock as Hades, playing one of the hammiest villains in gaming.
  • The English dub for Fire Emblem Awakening really really splurged, just like in Kid Icarus: Uprising. While both games were handheld (which are typically given much less standards to voice acting than other video games), looking at the voice credits, you can really see that they spared no expense. While they do have a few actors playing multiple characters, almost all of them manage to make their characters sound very different from each other. The one exception is Tara Platt, who voices Miriel and Flavia (and it's pretty obvious that they're the same person, given how often you're likely to hear Miriel and Flavia's Voice Grunting and voice clips). The fact that the game has so little voice acting compared to other titles (like Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep and the PSP Star Ocean remakes) makes the dub even more impressive. Of the voices in the game, Laura Bailey's Lucina seems to be one of the most lauded, thanks to her voice acting embodying the character's strength, beauty, determination and cuteness all at the same time.
  • No More Heroes is an unusual case: when the game was originally released in Japan, it featured English voice acting with Japanese subtitles instead of the usual Japanese voice acting. The voice acting was quite good, though, with Robin Atkin Downes as the Otaku Blood Knight Travis Touchdown (pulling off an amazingly convincing Fake American accent, at that). The trend continued with No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle, and the voice acting was still amazing. Then the original NMH was given an Updated Re-release on the PS3 which included Japanese voice acting, and in a strange turn of events, players preferred the English voice work to Japanese. Is it a case of players being too accustomed to the English VA work, or was it just plain better than the Japanese VA work? Whatever the answer, the fact remains that the English voice work is quality stuff.
  • It took a long time for the Sonic the Hedgehog series to find vocal talent that didn't piss off at least some contingent of the fandom's infamously Broken Base, but the decision to bring on Roger Craig Smith as Sonic was a good one ? while a bit deeper than expected, he nails Sonic's attitude perfectly. Perhaps an even better decision was to keep Mike Pollock, the one member of the 4Kids voice cast to be universally beloved, as the nefarious Dr. Eggman.
    • The Unpleasable Fanbase reared its ugly head though and complained enough that Smith often pokes fun at them. However, there were the least amount of complaints when Smith was brought on to voice Sonic, compared to when Jason Griffith was brought on or when Ryan Drummond was brought on. Outside of Sonic as a character, Kate Higgins is said to be the best Tails in the franchise's history, and same with Laura Bailey and Omochao ? though Omochao is still The Scrappy of the franchise, he was tolerated in Sonic Generations rather than outright hated.
      • As of 2014's Sonic Boom: The Rise of Lyric, the only voice anyone seriously has issues with is Kirk Thornton's Shadow. Say what you will about the game itself; it has probably the best voice acting in the entire series.
  • The English cast of the Metal Gear series is among some of the best in the industry, particularly when the original Metal Gear Solid was released, back in a time when English voice acting in games, dubbed and domestic, tend to range from "tolerable" to "laughably bad". There's no two ways about it: David Hayter is the war-weary chain-smoking Solid Snake. The other voice acting powerhouses behind Solid, including Paul Eiding as Colonel Roy Campbell, Jennifer Hale as Dr. Naomi Hunter, and Cam Clarke as the villainous Liquid Snake, also bring their A-game.
  • Fist of the North Star: Ken's Rage has an excellent English vocal track. The nuances of the characters are retained, as is the overall feel of the game. Kaiji Tang's deep, sober-voiced Kenshiro, Lex Lang's polite and calm Toki, a surprise Richard Epcar with a nicely psychotic Zeed and Doug Erholtz giving us a tragic and obsessive Shin, all come together to make for a very enjoyable English dub of the first game. Impressively, almost everyone manages to pronounce the Japanese names of their Signature Moves properly. The sequel/remake doesn't have an English track, unfortunately.
  • NieR had a peculiar development cycle where the scripts for the Japanese and English versions of the game were written side-by-side, fundamental translations aside since it IS a Japanese game. This led to a pretty good script, with some pretty cool bouts of Woolseyism. The voice actors are all very memorable and likable in their roles, particularly Liam O'Brien as the haughty and arrogant Grimoire Weiss.
  • Odin Sphere has a most stupendous dub. While some may criticize it for it sounding overly dramatic, it actually works for a game where the cutscenes produce an aesthetic not unlike Shakespearean plays.
  • While the voice acting in Working Designs games were what you would expect from people who were literally hired off the street (some horrible, a few gems like John Truitt's Ghaleon, but most mediocre or bland), their song dubs, almost all sung by Jenny Stigile, were excellent, especially for their time. Of particular note is Wind's Nocturne from Lunar Silver Star Story, which even got Jenny's performance some attention from 2channel, resulting in the "Shii's Song" meme.
  • Another great example of dubbed songs done right would be Wild ARMs 3, all of the songs lyrics were faithful to the original meaning but flowed and rhymed, and Samantha Newark's powerful performances of the songs easily surpass the original Japanese versions.
  • Both Bayonetta and Bayonetta 2 have terrific voice acting, with Helena Taylor as a sultry, sexy, and ultimately emotional Bayonetta. Yuri Lowenthal also gets to have a lot of fun as Luka, Grey DeLisle as Jeanne, and Enzo and Rodin are quite enjoyable to listen to as well. Hey, even Crispin Freeman plays a part in the sequel!
  • Elsword is one of those rare moments where a Korean MMORPG have select character voices that doesn't sound like they hired random people from the streets. Instead, they hired the voice actors that are actually from Viz Media's talents along with a great ADR director Michael Sorich. There is an actual option in game to switch languages from Korean to English, and the majority of the people don't actually mind playing with the English Voice Overs.

     Visual novels 
  • Rumbling Hearts: Every character sounds perfect, and the script is unbelievable. Even in the midst of all sorts of crazy melodrama, each and every character sounds like someone real - especially the high school/college-age kids, which anyone will tell you is particularly unusual in anime dubs. This is quintessential in a series that plays itself as a "slice-of-life" drama. Particular highlights include Kevin Connolly as stoic-yet-sensitive Takayuki, Carrie Savage both playing and powerfully subverting her typecast role as the "shy, delicate moe girl", the always-great Luci Christian teaming up with Monica Rial to deliver a collectively hilarious performance as Ayu and Mayu, and Colleen Clinkenbeard, who does one of the best performances running the gamut between spunky and high-spirited tsundere and desperate, emotionally broken woman since Allison Keith as Misato Katsuragi (see above). By contrast, the Japanese cast was lifted from the corresponding hentai game, and as such delivers with all the subtlety and passion you might expect.note  The script is fantastic and filled with extremely well-done Woolseyisms. You know who wrote it? Eric Vale.

     Western Animation  
  • People from the UK who grew up in the '80s will remember the animated shows produced by Spanish studio BRB Internacional thanks to their wonderful English dubs. The fact that these shows were produced with an international audience in mind (which was, and still is, pretty rare for shows produced in Spain) definitely helped.
  • Code Lyoko is generally agreed to have a good dub, as it was in fact dubbed by the very company who made it in France.
  • Speaking of French shows, Miraculous Ladybug has a quality English dub containing an Allstar Cast. The incomparable Cristina Valenzuela is the star of the show, making Marinette ditzy and adorable in her civilian identity, and as Ladybug she's noticeably more confident and a Large Ham. Bryce Papenbrook manages the opposite, giving Adrien a calm, somewhat stoic tone and an Adorkable, hammier side as Cat Noir, who's just earnest enough that his terrible puns come off as endearing rather than grating. Mela Lee as Marinette's Fairy Companion Tikki is utterly Moe with her high-pitched voice and giggles that's in contrast to her usually bratty or cruel characters. Keith Silverstein channels pure Saturday morning cartoon villainy with Hawkmoth, and seems to be enjoying every second, and yet manages a reflective, even sad moment in the episode "Simon Says". Carrie Keranen is the perfect supportive girl friend any girl would want her age that still has a lot of sass. Due to being animated around an English demo, there's a lot less Lip Lock than usual, making for some cheecie, but rarely awkward dialogue. While the script is admittedly goofy, the changes were done with the creator's oversight, which only enhances the comic book inspiration. It's so widely watched by English-speaking fans it's assumed you're talking about the dub, having to specify the French cast when you aren't.
  • The Smurfs and the Magic Flute: Both English dubs (UK and U.S.) of the original French film are equally strong, as well as entertaining, but the U.S. dub from 1983 tends to stand out the most.note  Today, only the UK dub can be locally found on DVD releases from Shout! Factory and Imavision, as well as streaming on Netflix and iTunes. But it is believed that the U.S. dub is still in someone's warehouse.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/SuperlativeDubbing/EnglishDubs