Star Wars The Clone Wars: Tropes A to F

The list of tropes used in Star Wars: The Clone Wars from A to F. Tropes G to N can be found here and tropes O to Z can be found here.
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     A 
  • Aborted Arc:
    • At the end of "The Zillo Beast Strikes Back" Palpatine gave Dr. Boll her next instructions: to clone the Zillo. It never came up again.
    • Inverted in Slaves of the Republic arc. Governor Roshti was originally going to be a friend of Ahsoka Tano's parents, but the writers did not intend to bring them into the story so it was cut to avoid making the fans expect them to show up.
  • Absolute Cleavage:
    • Suu Lawquane's shirt is open down the center to her stomach.
    • The Daughter wears a very low-cut dress.
  • Absurdly Spacious Sewer: In "The Jedi Who Knew Too Much" a chase scene involving Anakin, Ahsoka and a garrison worth of clones took place in a sewer system, in a The Fugitive homeage.
  • Absurdly Youthful Father: Cut Lawquane is a deserter clone trooper, who married Suu, a twi'lek woman and adopted her two young children. Cut is chronologically eleven-twelve years old at the most, but due to growth-accelaration, he is biologically about twice that old.
  • Action Girl:
    • Ahsoka, who just as often rescues her Jedi instructor as he rescues her.
    • Whenever Padme actually starts fighting she is as competent as any other character. As was done in the films, which was itself an homage to Princess Leia in the original Star Wars trilogy, she is the most accurate character with a blaster.
    • Other female characters appear more sporadically, but their action scenes are of similar high quality. Even Duchess Satine of Mandalore, an Actual Pacifist, manages to take care of herself while remaining completely non-lethal.
  • Actual Pacifist:
    • Satine is this, being bound and determined to keep her people out of the war. This is somewhat ironic as she happens to be the Duchess of Mandalore, whose people were once some of the most feared warriors in the galaxy. The local rebel group "Death Watch" violently disagrees with her, and hopes to return their planet to its past ways.
    • The Lurmen, a race of Perfect Pacifist People, although they take pacifism a little too far, since their philosophy does not even allow running away from danger.
  • Adaptation Expansion: The whole point of the series was to expand upon the universe, the characters intoduced in the movies, and especially upon Anakin.
  • Advert Over Loaded Future: Coruscant is very heavily advert overloaded, although the series is technically set A Long Time Ago, in a Galaxy Far Far Away... and not in the future.
  • Aesop Amnesia: In the first-season episode "Storm over Ryloth", Ahsoka disobeys orders to pull back and gets most of her fighter squadron killed, which naturally makes her feel like mud. In the season two premier, Ahsoka is in the exact same situation and given just about the same orders, the only difference being that she is commanding troops on the ground rather than starfighters. Obi-Wan tells her that she is putting her troops' lives in danger. You would think this would make her stop and think, rather than continuing to do the same thing that she did in the previous episode, but instead, Obi-Wan and Anakin practically have to drag her off of the battlefield.
  • Air-Vent Passageway: The writers seem to be in love with this trope as everyone seems to escape from fights by way of air vent:
    • In "Duel of Droids" Ahsoka escaped Griveous this way.
    • In "Cloak of Darkness" Ventress used the airvents to infiltrate and sabotage a Republic Star Destroyer unnoticed.
    • In "Holocron Heist" Cad Bane infiltrated the Jedi Temple through the airvents, which are so large they double as Absurdly Spacious Sewers.
    • In "Brain Invaders" Ahsoka and Barriss escape from mind-controlled Clone Troopers by jumping into the air vents. Later in the episode, Ahsoka uses the same vents to travel to the coolant control room and the bridge while she's running from Barriss.
    • In "Assassin" Aura Sing used these to attempt the assasination of Padmé.
    • In "Nightsisters" Ventress and her companions infiltrated Dooku's palace through the airvents.
    • Subverted and lampshaded in "The Citadel". With the entry point the Jedi wanted to use blocked, Anakin and Obi-Wan muse how to get in, and Ahsoka points on the ventilation hatch. Anakin argues that they are too small to gain access, but in response Ahsoka points out that though they might be too small for Anakin, Obi-Wan and the clones, she might be able to squeeze through — which she is, although barely. In the next episode Obi-Wan's entire team tries to escape the Citadel in absurdly spacious airvents. However these had lethally effective security doors, and the warden at least had enough common sense to send at least one drone in the airvents.
    • In "A Test of Strength" Hondo proves he is Dangerously Genre Savvy by immediately recognizing the trick and having smoke bombs dropped into the vents to flush out the occupants.
    • In the unfinished "Crystal Crisis on Utapau" arc. After being captured by arms dealers, the unarmed Anakin and Obi-Wan try to escape the dealers' ship through the airvents. The dealers responded with applying continuous blaster-fire to the ducts, which Anakin and Obi-Wan -due to the lack of space- could barely avoid, and had to use their telekinetic powers on eachother to get to safety.
  • The Alcatraz: The Citadel can be found on a remote, volcanic planet. The tower is full of traps, and guarded by battalions of droids. It is explicitly stated that even if someone manages to escape the institute, they still cannot really go anywhere because the landscape is almost impossible to cross—especially while being chased. And then to get off the planet they need a ship, and still have to cross the Separatist blockade.
  • Alien Non-Interference Clause: The Republic has rules against interfering in the internal matters of a government or planet. The series runs into the usual logical fallacies and misapplications the trope encounters in almost all sci-fi universes, but also examines what happens when the Republic does get involved where it should not.
    • In the Death Watch arc of the second season, the Separatists try to make it seem like they are helping the Death Watch (Which they are, but not the extent they want it to seem) so that the Republic will not see it as a manageable internal Mandalore situation. This would lead to a Republic occupation of Mandalore to restore order, but that would turn the population of Mandalore against the Republic, which the Death Watch could use to rally support and conquer the planet with a mass uprising.
    • In the Onderon arc of season five, the Republic decides to train and supply the Onderon resistance to the Separatist puppet king in order to occupy Separatist resources in combating a costly guerilla campaign. However, as the arc progresses their stated rationale changes to using the resistance because they cannot get openly involved in an internal Onderon matter. The change in motivation is never explained, but leads to disaster for the resistance when the Separatists send in heavier forces and the Republic refuses to commit heavier forces or weapons to fight them. Anakin eventually circumvents the issue by hiring Hondo to deliver heavy weapons to the resistance, giving the Republic deniability.
    • In the Sith/Death Watch arc of season five, the Jedi state that they cannot get involved in the Death Watch takeover of Mandalore since even Obi-Wan (Who does want to get involved) confirms that the Death Watch and Separatists are no longer allies. As a purely internal Mandalorian matter the situation is out of their hands. Obi-Wan goes anyway, and the arc ends with him going back to the Republic to tell them that the Sith are involved, which he expects will lead to a full invasion and occupation of Mandalore.
  • Alien Sky: Used quite often for the various planets the heroes visit. A planet having multiple moons is the most frequent use of this trope.
    • Although just vaguely, in "Mystery of a Thousand Moons" some of said moons were visible from Iego even during the day.
    • Dathomir's sky is blood-red at all times, and the planet has four moons.
    • Mortis's sky was filled with levitating rocks.
    • Lola Sayu's sky has a deep violet color, and it's primary light sourses seem to be the giant, sulfuric-yellow lava-oceans on it's surface, giving it a bottom lighting. Further more, it's planetary ring is visible from the surface.
    • Abafar's orange sky is so thick that it makes it impossible to see the sun.
  • All-CGI Cartoon: It has a quite high quality CGI (both modelling and animation wise) for a TV show.
  • All Planets Are Earth-Like:
    • Almost every planet visited by the characters have atmosphere breathable to them regardless of their species, as well as gravity equal to each other's. The trope is subverted on Umbara: the native Umbarans wear pressure suits on their own homeworld while the Jedi and clones do not, and when one gets his helmet breached, he starts panicking as if the air is dangerous to him. The episode guide for "The General" clarifies that the pressure suits aren't really protecting the Umbarans from their own planet's air; it's actually keeping a gas-based hyperactive stimulant contained, and the Umbaran Militia just seems to be over-reliant on it in a case similar to drug withdrawal.
    • Partially averted with Quarzite. It is said that the planet's surface has a high-pressure atmosphere and only the underground is safely inhabitable, however the atmosphere within those underground tunnels is perfectly fine.
  • All There in the Manual: A lot of major plot points are explained in the opening narration or the webcomics, without being featured in the actual episodes.
    • The most egregious example was between the end of "Dooku Captured" and the beginning of "The Gungan General". "Dooku Captured" ended with pirates attempting to subdue Obi-Wan and Anakin with drugged drinks, but the two notice the attempt and easily avoid it by switching drinks with the pirates they are sitting next to, whom promptly pass out. In "The Gungan General", however, they have both somehow been drugged and imprisoned, with no on-screen explanation as to how this had happened. This was only explained in the webcomic.
    • Other elements involve plot points made more explicit in the Expanded Universe, like the reason Aurra Sing has such a grudge against the Jedi is because she was trained as a Jedi and always resented them and their authority.
  • Always Chaotic Evil: The show took pains to avert this trope, showing several species who had previously only been encountered as antagonists into loyal and committed Republicans, including but not limited to, Rodians (Greedo), Dugs (Sebulba), and Toydarians (Watto). And, as the name implies, as of "Heroes on Both Sides," this aversion even applies to the Separatists.
  • Always Night: The shadow world, Umbara.
  • Amazon Brigade: The Nightsisters.
  • An Aesop: At the opening of every episode is a quote that is to be the moral of the episode.
    • And Knowing Is Half the Battle: Inverted - the Aesop comes before the show actually starts. Some episodes do play this straight, when characters discuss the lessons that they have learned from their experiences.
  • Anachronic Order: Though the show has multi-episode story arcs, stand-alone episodes and arcs as a whole are aired anachronistically. By making each episode mostly self-contained, you are able to discover additional elements that surround a story you had already seen. Even the official episode guides are chipping in, helping with the identification and leading to some All There in the Manual moments.
    • Chronologically the story order surrounding the planet Christophis is "Cat and Mouse" (season 2: episode 16), "The Hidden Enemy" (1:16) and then The Movie.
    • The story around the planet Ryloth seems to go "Supply Lines" (3:03), "Ambush" (1:1) and then the Ryloth Trilogy (1:19-21).
    • "Clone Cadets" (3:1) takes place before "Rookies" (1:5). "ARC Troopers" (3:2) then continues the story of a particular pair of clone troopers.
    • "Holocron Heist" to "Children of the Force" (2:1-2:3) take place before "Evil Plans" (3:8), "Hostage Crisis" (1:22) and "Hunt for Ziro" (3:9), which form their own arc in that order.
    • "Heroes On Both Sides" (3:10) and "Pursuit of Peace" (3.11) take place before "Senate Murders" (2:15).
    • In season 5, the Onderon and Young Jedi arcs take place prior to events with Darth Maul which open the season, since Adi Gallia is around in the former and Hondo's base on Florrum is still intact (at least until the end of the latter). Averted in the Season 5 DVD/Blu-Ray release, "Revival" is in its correct chronological placement and grouped with the arc it was part of.
  • And Then What?: At the end of the Umbara arc, a dejected Rex and Fives discuss the war. When Fives attempts to cheer Rex up by pointing out that the war will eventually end, Rex wonders what will happen to all the clones once it does. Fives does not know, and cannot think of anyone who does.
  • Animated Adaptation: The fourth animated series set in the Star Wars universe.
  • Animorphism: The Daughter and Son can turn, respectively, into a griffin and a gargoyle at will.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: In "Mystery of a Thousand Moons" Anakin and Obi-Wan immediately dismisses the idea of the planet being cursed/haunted by a phantom called "Drol" as superstition. While they turned out to had been correct to doupt in this case, the fact remains, that they regularly use Psychic Powers granted to them by the Sentient Cosmic Force.
  • Arc Villain: Since the series follows an antology-format of loosely connected Story Arcs, most of the villains have a role only in their own arcs and never show up again. A number of them are small scale dragons to Dooku, instead of independent antagonists with an agenda of their own. Examples of this type include Osi Sobeck, Riff Tamson and Moralo Eval.
  • Arc Welding:
    • As noted above at Anachronic Order, the first half of Season 3 was spent to expand upon and tie together several earlier story lines.
    • The Season 5 storyline involving Darth Maul and Savage Opress forming an alliance with Death Watch tied the Nightsisters and Brothers-arc to the Death Watch-arc of Seasons 2 and the Corruption on Mandalore-arc of Season 3.
    • The show itself is also tied to a couple of other Expanded Universe works:
      • Darth Plagueis showed how Maul's mother handed him over to Sidious, and it also established that Maul had a twin.
      • Fate of the Jedi involves Abeloth who later turned out to have once been the Mother, the fourth member of the family of the Force-wielders.
  • Armed with Canon: George Lucas' approach to many elements of the show, which he sometimes outlines in precise details for the writers to use.
  • Armor Is Useless: In most cases, body armor is not shown providing any protection from enemy blaster fire, or even protection against unarmed hand blows.
  • Army of the Dead: The Nightsisters are able to revive the corpses of their fallen to battle on their behalf. Though effective against droids, Grievous treated them like only a nuisance.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: In "To Catch a Jedi". While Ahsoka was on run after being framed for bombing the Jedi Temple, she recalibrated a holobooth's frequency to prevent anyone from tracing her transmission. Seeing this Ventress sarcastically remarked that, by doing so Ahsoka is adding another act to her own criminal record -a record which by that point included sedition, terrorism and multiple murders.
  • Art Evolution: The show started off fairly high quality, especially for an All-CGI Cartoon, but the art style lend itself to making the characters look like mannequins and outside of action scenes they would be rather stiff. Later episodes improved upon the facial expressions as well as the character movement, in addition to a Jedi costume switch from (easily animated) body armor and gauntlets to the tunics they are seen wearing in the movies.
  • Artistic License – Military: The Republic military has a combined rank structure based on conventional Western military organizations. However, in real life different armed forces sometimes use the same terms to refer to different levels in the order of command, and the Republic combines them regardless. This results in two ranks of "Captain" in the same command structure, one the second-lowest commissioned rank (Above "lieutenant") and the other the second-highest (Below General/Admiral) with no apparent way to distinguish them.
  • As You Know: Dooku in each subsequent episode of the Citadel-trilogy explains the importance of the Nexus-route coordinates to Osi Sobeck, warden of the Citadel.
    Count Dooku: I don't need to remind you...
  • Ascended Extra: Par for the course in a Star Wars production. One episode highlighted Baron Papanoida, who was played by George Lucas in a Creator Cameo in Revenge of the Sith. The particular episode has him going Papa Wolf when his family is in danger, which reflects his efforts to integrate his family with cameos in his movies.
  • Asskicking Pose: Episodes directed by Steward Lee often include the characters striking a badass pose before going into battle, the prime example would be "Defenders of Peace", with Anakin, Ahsoka and Aayla posing in front of the Deflector Shield they set up, to protect the villagers, as the droids close in on them. Other directors used Asskicking Poses as well, but less often, and they are usually more subtle than the ones done by Lee.
  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever: The Zillo Beast in its titular episodes, which directly homage the Godzilla movies with a little bit of King Kong thrown in.
  • Awesome but Impractical: Keeping in line with the movies the Republic walkers. They are large, slow, hard to maneuver, and their weaponry is locked in forward position.

     B 
  • Back for the Dead: A couple of supporting characters would disappear for long stretches of time, only to die upon their return.
    • Duchess Satine was a rather important character in Seasons 2 and 3, but she had only one minor appearance in Season 4. During the "Mauldalore"-arc of Season 5, she's killed by Darth Maul.
    • ARC-trooper Fives, who last appeared in Season 4's Umbara arc once again becomes the central protagonist of his own arc. Unfortunately due to his investigation on Tup's "break-down" induced murder of a Jedi, threatened the plan of the Sith, he's set up by Palpatine, and is killed by his own brethren.
    • Tup, who appeared for the first and last time in the Umbara arc also got a small, but very significant role.
    • Senator Rush Clovis, who hasn't appeared since his debut episode "Senate Spy" in Season 2, got a fleshed-out backstory, and became the protagonist of a trilogy of hisown. He dies after he's played by the Sith.
    • Teckla Minnau (Padmé's aide), who was first and last seen in Season 3's "Pursuit of Peace" got a minor role in the same trilogy before being killed by Embo.
  • Back for the Finale: In the second-to-last episode "Destiny" Yoda sees an illusion of the Jedi Temple in a time of peace. The Jedi appearing in this scene: Quinlan Vos, Saesee Tiin, Mace Windu, Ahsoka Tano, Gungi, Tera Sinube, Aayla Secura, Anakin Skywalker, Kit Fisto, Eeth Koth, Ganodi, Ran Deezy, Zatt, Byph, Tiplar, Ki-Adi-Mundi, Shaak Ti, Adi Gallia, Barriss Offee, Knox, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Qui-Gon Jinn, and Dooku.
  • Back-to-Back Badasses:
    • Just look at the poster, with Anakin and Obi-Wan back-to-back.
    • Satine and Obi-Wan have one of these moments in the episode, "Voyage of Temptation", when, upon being attacked by numerous tiny droids, Satine whips out a droid deactivator and begins firing whilst Obi-Wan defends with his lightsaber.
    • Jedi General Ima-Gun Di and his clone officer Captain Keeli perform this feat during their last stand on Ryloth.
      Ima-Gun Di: Captain Keeli!
      Keeli: I'm not finished yet, Sir... we can do this, General!
      Ima-Gun Di: Then let's make the end memorable!
    • Obi-Wan and Ventress, of all people, have a moment of this in "Revenge".
  • Badass: Chances are that anyone who is not a civilian has Badass coursing through their veins.
  • Badass Army: The clone troopers.
  • Badass Beard: Count Dooku. The designers specifically wanted Dooku's beard to be straight and sharp like a knife.
  • Badass Boast:
    • "Unfinished Business," released in story reel format on the official Star Wars website, has this from Mace Windu to a group of battle droids:
    Mace Windu: My name is General Mace Windu, of the Jedi Order. At this point of the Clone War, I have dismantled and destroyed over 100,000 of you type 1 battle droids. I am giving you an opportunity to peacefully lay down your weapons, so that you may be reprogrammed to serve a better purpose than spreading the mindless violence and chaos which you have inflicted upon the galaxy.
  • Badass Family: Chairman N. Papanoida's family. Him, his son, and his daughter take on an entire bar full of bloodthirsty outlaws and bounty hunters and win.
  • Badass Grandpa: Yoda.
    King Katuunko: [Yoda] is not worth a hundred battle droids, more like a thousand!
    • Count Dooku is a villainous version.
    • Darth Sidious as well, as demonstrated in "The Lawless".
  • Badass Longcoat: Cad Bane.
  • Bad Boss:
    • Grievous regularly destroys and "abuses" the incompetent battle droids under his command out of frustration.
    • The commander of the Citadel executes droids not just for failure, but even for discovering somebody else's failure.
    • Surprisingly averted with Hondo Ohnaka, who appears to treat his men remarkably well. For a pirate boss, anyway.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: Several episodes have the villains coming out on top.
    • In "Cloak of Darkness", Ventress successfully cripples the Republic cruiser and the traitorous Captain Argyus breaks out Nute Gunray.
    • In "Lair of Grievous", Grievous kills all the clones and 1 of the 2 Jedi attempting to capture him, forcing the final one, Kit Fisto, to flee.
    • In "Heroes on Both Sides", Grievous' bombing of Coruscant goes off without a hitch, Padme's bill fails to pass, Mina Bonteri is killed, and the war profiteers get everything they wanted.
    • In "Massacre" (which is an Evil vs. Evil episode), Grievous commits genocide against the Nightsisters, wiping out all but Ventress and Talzin.
    • In "The Lawless", Darth Maul thwarts Obi Wan's rescue attempt, then executes Satine in front of him, just to torment him. In turn, while Obi-Wan escapes Mandalore, Darth Sidious arrives on Mandalore, and kills Savage and captures Maul, making it an example of the even worse guy winning.
    • In "Orders", Fives fails to convince anyone of the hidden conspiracy against the Jedi, is killed by Commander Fox, and Palpatine pins the whole affair on a brain parasite.
    • The whole series in that no one realizes that Palpatine/Darth Sidious is playing both sides for fools, weakening them to the point where he will able to corrupt Anakin Skywalker, proclaim himself Emperor of the Galactic Empire and exterminate the Jedi and millions of others under his heel.
  • Bad Guys Do the Dirty Work: After a fashion. The show frequently has characters who are not villains perform actions which are not evil, but which are nonetheless morally grey and provide an ethical dilemma for the other characters.
    • Anakin in "Voyage of Temptation", right after the villain asks, "Who will strike first, and be branded the cold blooded killer?" Made all the more poignant by The Imperial March, Vader's theme song, playing in the background.
      "What? He was going to blow up the ship."
    • Once Captain Rex captured General Krell he was going to execute him to prevent him from being freed by the Separatists. Dogma ultimately pulled the trigger for him.
    • Rex himself got in on the action in the Zygerrian arc. Keeper Agruss bragged that a Jedi could not kill an unarmed man. Rex is not a Jedi, and Agruss really had it coming.
  • Bad News, Irrelevant News: In "A Sunny Day in the Void", Wac informs Colonel Gascon that he has good news and bad news. The bad news is that the ship is flying into a large group of comets. The good news is that he will have an excuse for the council if his mission fails because of it.
  • Bald of Awesome: Mace Windu of course. And many clone troopers shave their heads, Rex included.
  • Bald of Evil:
    • Asajj Ventress is a female example.
    • As of Season Four, Pre Vizsla has shaved his head, and received a nasty scar from a fight with Count Dooku.
  • Barbie Doll Anatomy: The male characters who got a Shirtless Scene all lacked nipples. While this could be handwaved in the case of Rubber-Forehead Aliens like Kit Fisto, Savage Opress, Darth Maul and other Zabrak Nightbrothers as Non Humans Lack Attributes, it would not explain why Captain Rex, a human clone, lacks them as well.
  • Bash Brothers
  • Batman Gambit:
    • Dooku and Ziro's treachery. They create conflict for episodes and even multi-episodes by exploiting how their betrayee will react.
    • In "A Friend In Need", Lux Bonteri barges into a peace negotiation to loudly proclaim that Dooku murdered his mother, for which he is brought before Dooku via hologram. Lux knew that he would be, and brought a signal tracker so he could find where Dooku was hiding. His escape did not seem well thought-out, but Ahsoka did interrupt.
  • Battle in the Rain:
    • The season one episode "Trespass" occurs on an ice-planet during a heavy snowstorm. The episode climaxes in a pitched battle when, against all odds, a peace agreement is reached, which is symbolically sealed when Senator Chuchi of Pantora plunges a spear into the ground between the two battle lines. The storm breaks the exact second that she does so.
    • In "Shadow Warrior" a storm started exactly when Grievous and the gungans started to fight. Both prior and after the battle it was sunny.
    • In the Season 5 episode "The Jedi Who Knew Too Much" it started to rain during Ahsoka's escape from the Republic army HQ. The timing is even more jarring than it would be usually, because Corruscant is a weather-controlled planet.
  • The Battle Star: Several large capital ship-classes serves both as fighter-carriers and battleships. Most prominently featured are the Republic Venators and the Separatist Munificent-frigattes.
  • Bavarian Fire Drill:
    • In "Bombad Jedi" C-3P0 manages to get a pair of Battle Droids to stop guarding a room he was trying to get into by warning about a incoming Jedi and just continuing to walk on past them when they dash off.
    • In "A Necessary Bond", R2 cons his way past a droid security checkpoint by getting belligerent with the guards about his clearance. The leader, taking offense at an astromech droid talking back to him, warns that he could have R2 melted down before letting him go by.
    • In "Secret Weapons", Wack tricks a pair of Super Battledroids into a closet by claiming to be under orders from General Grievous to run a security check, having them "hide" in the closet so he can trigger a power surge without damaging them.
  • Beam-O-War: The Son and Daughter, and later the Son and Father, square off against each other in the Mortis arc.
  • The Beastmaster: Jar Jar, of all people, has a way with animals.
  • Beautiful Dreamer: In "Brain Invaders" Barriss Offee and Ahsoka Tano are trapped aboard a Meat Puppet-infested starship. Barriss is herself taken over and turns against Ahsoka, who can not bring herself to kill her friend. When Ahsoka finally manages to subdue Barriss, she cradles her in her arms and holds her unconcious body until Ahsoka passes out as well and lies with her.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished/Bullet-Proof Fashion Plate:
    • Kalifa is certain dirty enough to indicate that she has been trapped on the Trandoshan hunting word for a long time, but her hair is nonetheless still cut in a perfect and precise bob cut, despite being there longer than anyone else.
    • During the Zygerian arc, an entire colony of togrutas had been forced into a mining facility, and they had been kept there for about two weeks at the least. Despite this none of them had any bruises, scratches or even dirt on their faces when Obi-Wan was sent there too. It's made even more poignant because Obi-Wan was already full of bruises, his tunic torn and singed when he arrived.
  • Becoming the Mask: Discussed when Obi-Wan was impersonating Rako Hardeen.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Satine and Obi-Wan, who are pretty much the Beatrice and Benedick of this series.
  • Beneath the Earth:
    • In "Mercy Mission" R2 and 3PO end up wandering about the cave-system beneath the surface of planet Aleen. There they encountered the inhabitants, who were causing earthquakes, trying to seal the breach between them and the surface because surface air was poisonous to them.
    • In "Bounty" Asajj Ventress and Boba Fett's crew visited a planet, Quarzite, which was inhabitable only below the surface. The two native species, the Belugans and Kages, were engaged in a Civil War.
    • A double-fold, Lost World version is the planet that is the origin of all life, and birthplace of the midichlorians. The planet itself is hidden inside Space Clouds of glowing gases, eminating from countless "geysers" on the planet's rocky desert surface. Below the surface is a gigantic opened space filled with the same gases with Neebray mantas flying through it, between hundreds of levitating islands covered in lush jungles.
  • Berserk Button: You seriously do not want to be the person between Anakin and helping his loved ones. Poggle the Lesser found this out the hard way.
  • Better to Die Than Be Killed: A Death Watch bomber commits suicide rather than be arrested and interrogated.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Jar Jar is as clumsy as ever, but he does show surprising amounts of insight from time-to-time, and and he had actually saved several of the heroes on multiple accounts by combining these traits!
  • BFG: Laser miniguns.
  • Big Bad: Darth Sidious.
  • Big Badass Battle Sequence: Happens every few episodes, interspersed with smaller confrontations and episodes with more personal stakes. Special note can be given to "Landing at Point Rain" where the Republic retakes Geonosis, there isn't any Action Film, Quiet Drama Scene or even a pause in the action where it slows down.
  • Big Brother Instinct:
    • Anakin to Ahsoka and Obi-Wan to Anakin.
    • Between Savage Opress and Darth Maul. Despite Maul's adherence to the Sith code and forceful enforcement of the Master/Apprentice chain, his brother is still the only being he shows legitimate caring and concern for.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies:
    • The can-cells introduced in the movie are dragonflies large enough to carry Anakin and Ahsoka for a considerable distance.
    • The gutkurrs from "Innocents of Ryloth" are essentially two meters tall fleas, with raptorlegs. Also they are carnivorous, and were more than happy to eat the clone troopers.
    • The milodon introduced in "Bounty" are giant centipedes large enough for a group of Kage warriors to travel on their backs, and fast enough to catch up with a hover-subtram.
  • Big "NO!": Used quite a lot, since it is Star Wars.
    • Barriss Offee yells one in "Brain Invaders" when she gets possessed by a Geonosion Brain Worm offscreen.
    • Anakin yells it when Ahsoka is temporarily killed by the Son of Mortis. She gets better, though.
    • Obi-Wan yells it when Savage Opress kills Adi Gailia.
    • Colonel Meebur Gascon yells one when M5-BZ sacrifices himself by opening the airlock and getting sucked out of the ship without even magnetizing himself.
  • Bilingual Bonus: The Aurebesh script used throughout the series is directly translatable to English, meaning every instance of its use is readable.
    • The words stenciled into the gunship commanded by Master Plo Koon as seen in the episode "Citadel Rescue" says "Plo's Bros" above cartoon images of Plo and two Clone Troopers.
    • One of the Clones seen during the Umbara arc has a tattoo on the side of his head that reads, "A good droid is a dead droid."
  • Bilingual Dialogue: A frequent occurance between alien species and droids. When one of them speaks Basic it often leads to Repeating so the Audience Can Hear, since there are no subtitles.
  • Big Eater: Ziro's mother.
  • Binary Suns: In addition to the inavitable Tatooine, in "Gungan Attack" Mon Calamari is revealed to orbit twin stars as well.
  • Bittersweet Ending:
    • The season 5 finale ends with Ahsoka's name being cleared, but she declines the Jedi Council's offer to rejoin the Order, needing to sort things out on her own.
    • The series finale as well. Yoda fights a vision of Sidious on Korriban/Moraband, but Sidious detaches himself from the vision before Yoda find out his identity as Palpatine. Nevertheless Yoda gains a glimpse into the future and accepts that while the Jedi may not be able to win the Clone Wars, the light will prevail in the end.
  • Bizarrchitecture:
    • In the colony town on Kiros, all the buildings are designed after the Togruta's horns. There was an explicit statement that Kiros was populated largely by artists.
    • Cato Neimoidia's cities are built on gigantic simple suspension bridges, suspended between hill cliffs, hundreds if not thousands of meters above the ground. While this alone would be weird enough, in "Sabotage" it is shown that some of them are hanging upside-down from said bridges!
    • Coruscant's undercity is so massive there are skyscrapers hanging down from the layer above.
  • Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism: At first glance, you would not think that Asajj Ventress is actually a female member of Darth Maul's race. Female Dathomirians tend to have chalk-white skin, and if they have any hair, it'll also be chalky in color. Males look more like Darth Maul himself, with red/gold and black skin and a crown of horns on their heads. It originally started out as a Gender Equals Breed, with the Nightsisters originally being humans, who have been crossbreeding with the Zabrak Nightbrothers for generations, and by the time of the Clone Wars they became a race of their own.
  • Black and Gray Morality: Just like in the films, not even the Republic and Jedi Order avoid doing questionable things, and this becomes more apparent in the later seasons. In addition to leading an army of soldiers trained to fight since birth (the moral implications of which are brought up from time to time as early as the first season), there are some senators only out for their own interests, and the Jedi Order has taken some questionable actions such as their willingness to throw Ahsoka over to a biased Republic court when she is falsely accused of murder. On the other hand, while the Separatists have some good people, they have some truly evil people too, and those few good people either do not have any real influence on the Separatist cause or (like Mina Bonteri) get removed. This is all a result of Palpatine playing both sides.
  • The Blade Always Lands Pointy End In: This happens with Garnac's dagger after Ahsoka kicks it out of his hand in the season 3 finale.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: Satine (blond), Bo-Katan (redhead), and Rook Kast (brunette) are the three major female characters of the Mandalore-saga.
  • Blond Guys Are Evil: Played straight with senate commando Captain Argyus and Pre Viszla, head of Death Watch.
  • Blood Knight:
    • Clone trooper "Hardcase" wields a Z-6 rotary cannon and seems to enjoy standing out in the open hosing down the enemy while bellowing things like "you want a piece of this?" even when ordered to seek cover. Other clones speculate his tank must have been damaged in some way while he was gestating.
    • The Mandalorian Death Watch are made of this trope. They torment droids by taking potshots at them, and they torch unarmed settlements.
  • Bloodier and Gorier:
    • Since The Lost Missions were released on Netflix, they could go significantly more graphic with the violence in a few instances, such as the deaths of Fives and Commander Thorn. Both were killed by blaster-bolts to the chest, however unlike the dosens of other such moments in the series, the camera focused on the gigantic glowing holes left by the blasters.
    • Darth Maul: Son of Dathomir also could take this approach, with getting Grievous's claws covered in blood, and showing Mother Talzin's body rapidly decompose, after being killed by Grievous.
  • Bloodless Carnage: Justified in most cases, as lightsabers and blasters would cauterize wounds instantly, with occasional aversions.
    • Played straight during the Nightsisters arc, Ventress spears and slashes several Nightbrothers, and Savage tears through clone troopers, as well as two Jedi (outright impaling one of them) and not a drop of blood is seen. This is with an ordinary spear, mind you.
    • Averted with Riff Tamson, whose explosive death results in a murky cloud of blood trailing from floating chunks of flesh and his severed head.
    • Averted in the Darth Maul: Son of Dathomir comic, as being a comic adaptation of an unaired story arc aimed at teenage or older fans of the series allowed them to get away with more explicit violence (General Grievous makes a man bleed on him) than what would have been allowed on television (even though the series already got a lot of stuff past the censors even when there was some censorship).
  • Body-Count Competition: "Landing at Point Rain", Anakin and Ahsoka start one up. At the end, Anakin has 55 while Ahsoka has 60. Then Ki-Adi-Mundi says he has 65 and asks what his prize was, to which Anakin responds that it his everlasting respect.
  • Body Horror:
    • Savage Opress's transformation in "Monster", where his body mutates into a larger, more powerful form. His bones audibly crack as they expand, and his horns visibly extend from his skull.
    • Obi-Wan's transformation into "Rako Hardeen" (from "Deception), which involves his skin visibly warping, and his skull reshaping itself to create his new face. Judging from his reactions, the procedure was very painful.
    • Darth Maul's condition in "Brothers". His missing lower body has been replaced with a crude, spider-like apparatus, his horns have tripled in length, he has lost an unhealthy amount of weight, and there are veins visible all over his body. His symptoms are healed by Mother Talzin, and his missing legs replaced with a more humanoid prosthetic, in the following episode.
  • Bond One-Liner: In "Bounty", when Ventress killed a man in a bar, the patrons all look at her strangely. After she delivers a one-liner they all go back to what they were doing.
  • Bond Villain Stupidity:
    • In "Hostage Crisis", the bounty hunters manage to disable and capture Anakin after he tries to stop their invasion of the senate building. However, instead of just killing him, like they did with every other soldier who tried to stop them, they tie him up and leave him with the senators, planning to kill him with a bomb later.
    • The Death Watch in "The Mandalore Plot" manage to knock Obi-Wan unconscious, then put him on the ever-so cliche Conveyor Belt-O-Doom with a rock grinder at the end. Their justification for this is so it looks like an accident. Later, when he is on the run and disarmed, Pre Vizsla shows up with several mooks and he proceeds to return Obi-Wan's lightsaber so they may duel fairly.
    • In "Nightsisters", Asajj Ventress decides to get revenge on Count Dooku after he betrays her, and is given a poison dart that will impair his sight and reflexes so she can defeat him in the ensuing fight. Just making it a lethal poison is never even considered by any of the assassins.
  • Book Ends:
    • The Movie started with Ahsoka becoming Anakin's Padawan. The last episode to air before cancellation ends with Ahsoka leaving the Order, despite the Council calling her worthy of the rank of Knight and offering her a chance to return.
    • The series proper began with a story focusing specifically on Yoda. The un-aired and final season closed with an arc that likewise focused on Yoda.
  • Boom, Headshot: In season three's "Counter Attack", the commander of the Citadel executes a clone trooper with a direct shot to the face during his interrogation of the captured Jedi. Lucky for the rest of the clones, Commander Cody was next in line, so fate had to intervene.
  • Bounty Hunter: Season two was actually advertised as "Rise of the Bounty Hunters". Many Hunters became recurring characters throughout the series, receiving several arcs dedicated to them as enemies of the main cast, or as the protagonists of an episode.
  • Broad Strokes: Typical for Star Wars, though this series has its own place in regular Star Wars canon. Star Wars has a complicated "level" system of canonicity, starting with the films and then working down to include novels, comics, specials and other entries in the Expanded Universe, with each entry receiving its own level determining its place in Star Wars history. Details from the "lower" levels are taken as needed to fit the story of this series, with frequent input from George Lucas on what is or is not an immutable part of official canon.
  • Brought Down to Normal: While not removed of his force abilities, Anakin found himself trying to offset a Hostage Situation without his lightsaber. He is capable of superhuman feats on his own, but without his Weapon of Choice things were much more difficult.
  • Bullet Dancing: In "A Friend in Need" the Death Watch made a bunch of droids "dance" by firing under their feet.
  • Bus Full of Innocents:
    • The medical station that the Malevolence meant to destroy.
    • In "A Friend In Need", the village being held hostage by the Death Watch.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday: Dooku acts like this when discussing the death of Mina Bonteri with Lux. He claims he cannot recall her death since it was so meaningless on a grand scale. It is clear he was just doing it to be a jerk, though.
  • Bring It Back Alive: The Zillo Beast. Inevitably, the beast breaks free and wreaks havoc.
  • By-the-Book Cop: Inspector Tan Divo.
  • By Wall That Is Holey: In the Movie, Anakin gets surrounded by droids, and to make things difficult he has to be careful not to activate even more as he cuts them down. Ahsoka saves him by pulling a wall down on the droids that had a hole in it just above Anakin's position.

     C 
  • Call Back/Call Forward: See here.
  • Camp Straight: Ziro the Hutt.
  • Captain Ersatz:
    • Savage Opress was explicitly created as replacement for Darth Maul, from the same species and given the same form of weapon. Ironically, he became so popular amongst the creative team that they made him and Maul brothers and used Savage to re-introduce Maul into the series.
    • "The Box" episode featured no less than 13 bounty hunters, of which only 5 made it to the end. To avoid killing off popular characters and to save production costs of making new models, quite a lot of them are simply re-colored versions of pre-existing bounty hunters: Jakolli for Greedo, Twazzi for Rumi Paramita (from "The Bounty Hunters"), Mantu for Chata Hyoki (from "Pursuit of Peace"), Sixtat is almost identical to a minor nameless character is "Wookiee Hunt".
  • Captain Obvious: Ahsoka plays this part every now and then.
  • Captain Smooth and Sergeant Rough: Commander Cody (Smooth) and Captain Rex (Rough), especially in the episode "Rookies" where they are paired together without their associated Jedi. Their personalities also mirror their immediate Jedi commanders; Cody reports to Obi-Wan (Smooth) and Rex reports to Anakin (Rough).
  • Cardboard Prison:
    • Subverted in "The Gungan General": Hondo's prison cells were not much of hindrance for Obi-Wan, Anakin and Dooku, but being chained to each other and not knowing the outline of the base was.
    • The Central Republic Prison on Coruscant. Apparently somehow the guards let Aurra Sing in to talk to Ziro, Cad Bane admitted to having escaped from it multiple times, according to Word of God including a case when he broke out Aurra. Then in "Deception" Boba Fett, Bossk, Cad Bane, Moralo Eval and Rako Hardeen staged a mass-breakout, during a prison-riot.
    • The Mandalorian prison. Within the dual-episodes "Shades of Reason" and "The Lawless" there were four break-outs from it, although admittedly one of them the guards wanted to happen. The prisoner saved in the last one did not even get inside the facility!
  • Car Fu: Captain Rex practices speeder-fu, as he saves the Chairman of Pantora from being killed by a Talz by riding over the chairman and knocking back the attacker.
  • Cargo Cult: Some droids set one of these up on a primitive world in "Nomad Droids", with a giant hologram. R2-D2 sees right through it, exposing them and personally kicking one of them out of their Hacker Cave. Then, the natives destroy their facility, which was apparently Made of Explodium.
  • Cassandra Truth: In "The Jedi Who Knew Too Much", Ahsoka quickly realizes that no one will believe she didn't murder Letta.
  • Casual Danger Dialog: Used so heavily the entire war frequently seems to be Played for Laughs.
  • Ceiling Cling:
    • Ahsoka is quite prone to using this:
      • She manages to do this while using the Force to suspend Chuchi off the ground in "Sphere of Influence".
      • In "Ghosts of Mortis" she clighs onto their shuttle's ceiling to escape from Anakin, who temporarly joined the Son.
      • In "The Jedi Who Knew Too Much" after she got framed with terrorism and murder, she used it to avoid a group a clones searching for her in the building of the GAR HQ.
    • In "Eminence" Sugi used it to make the jump on Maul, who was threatening her current employers the Hutts.
  • Chained Heat: Subverted in "The Gungan General". Obi-Wan and Anakin do not become better friends with Dooku, which is really the way it has to be.
  • Chair Reveal:
    • In "Lair of Grievous" Fisto and Nahdar walk up to a chair, in which they though Nute Gunray was sitting. When they turned it around, it was revealed that Gunray was present only via hologram.
    • In "Senate Murders" after Padmé and Bail had been ambushed while investigating the death of Onakonda Farr, they assumed that Senator Mee Deechi set them up and went to confront him. When they turned his chair around, they found him with a dagger in his chest.
  • Character Development:
    • Throughout the series there are hints of Anakin's future as Darth Vader, with circumstances frequently pushing him to more pragmatic and cold-blooded actions during the war. As the war progresses he has engaged in Cold-Blooded Torture and allowed his Clone Troopers to execute prisoners.
    • Asajj Ventress gets some in "Nightsisters". Before that, she was just a Card-Carrying Villain in the show, although in her earlier portrayal in the Dark Horse comics she had more depth.
  • Characterization Marches On: In Pre Vizsla's first appearences, he was a political terrorist bent on rebuilding the Mandalorian warrior culture. When we see him again in Season 4, he has become a psychotic madman who burns down villages for fun after his time in exile.
  • The Chessmaster: Palpatine's manipulating almost everybody to make sure the war lasts as long and becomes as intense as possible. "Duchess of Mandalore" is perhaps the only episode where he suffers a real defeat.
  • The Chew Toy: If you're a battle droid, then it sucks to be you.
  • Child Soldiers:
    • Ahsoka. Some characters have called attention to it, but nobody really sees a problem with sending a fourteen-year-old into fatal situations when, by the very definition of being a Padawan, she has not yet even completed her training. This is especially evident in the early episodes, when Ahsoka would become depressed and self-critical after a defeat, showing that she is unable to cope with the emotional toll of warfare. After the short timeskip, the older Ahsoka instead seems to be more annoyed that Anakin has apparently realized this himself, and is holding her back from the more dangerous missions.
    • In "Arc Troopers," during a Separatist invasion of Kamino several troopers wind up in the barracks for the still-children clones undergoing basic training. The cadets are armed and brought into the fight as part of a trap set for the droids sent to kill them and the other clones still being trained.
    • Technically all the clone troopers, since they are around 12-13 years old at the most.
  • Chronic Backstabbing Disorder: Dooku and the Separatist Generals have a persistent habit of screwing over the local leaders and/or populations they ally with for help in taking over systems - sometimes for failing to fall in line as utterly as they want, sometimes for no real reason at all. Given that it's run by a pair of Sith Lords, the all time masters of backstabbing once they no longer need people (or even because they need people), it's not surprising.
  • *Click* Hello: "Roger, Roger." BLAM.
  • Clones Are People Too: The series has several episodes which highlight the casual way that clones are discarded, but it comes to a head in the Umbara arc. The clones begin to resist after they continuously receive horrible and incompetent orders; they do not mind dying for the cause, but dying pointlessly is going too far. They ultimately turn on their leader, claiming that they are not droids, but men.
  • Cloning Blues:
    • In seasone one's "The Hidden Enemy," the question of a problem during the cloning procedure is raised in order to help explain the actions of a rogue trooper.
    • The blues are revealed to be an expanding issue in season three. With Jango dead, the cloning agents do not have fresh genetic stock, so Jango's stored template has been used more than intended. While they seem to be pretty good at keeping problems to a minimum, there are defective clones.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: Played with in a few episodes. The risks inherent to doing this are notably (and shockingly for a cartoon) touched upon in "Cargo of Doom" where the subject dies during the interrogation.
  • Cold Sniper:
    • Aurra Sing in "Hostage Crisis".
    • An unnamed Mandalorian warrior in "Duchess of Mandalore".
  • Colour Coded Armies:
    • The clones' uniforms tell who they serve under. Blue for members of the 501st, which can usually be seen alongside Anakin, and orange for the 212th attack battalion which is under Obi-Wan's command. Grey is for Plo Koon's Wolf Squad, and green is the marking of the troops serving under Luminara Unduli. Red is for those stationed on Coruscant.
    • In "The Carnage of Krell", the Clone Troopers are members of the 501st and thus wear blue, and the enemy Umbarans wearing stolen uniforms wear yellow. Except the "enemies" are clone troopers, as well, and both sides have been told the other were impersonators so they would wipe each other out.
    • Usually the blasters of the side for which the audience is supposed to cheer for are firing blue laserbolts, and the "antagonists" are firing red. Becomes a bit jaring when Hondo's temporarly split-up gang starts fighting: those who remained faithful to Hondo are using blue, while the traitors are using red. Once they reunite all blasters turn blue, even though earlier they used red.
  • Combat Breakdown: In "Hunt for Ziro" Obi-Wan and Quinlan Vos fight Cad Bane. They initially all use their primary weapons (Lightsabers vs. blasters) but are all disarmed one after the other. They eventually resort to just their fists....and jet-boots, the Force, wrist flamethrowers and all the other miscellaneous gadgets two Jedi and a bounty hunter have at their disposal.
  • Combat Pragmatist:
    • After some time trying to figure out how they were going to portray General Grievous, he was eventually made to be more than willing to use cheap tactics and sic magnaguards on his target before going in himself. It makes his presence much different than Asajj Ventress or Count Dooku and makes him different than a straight-up badass.
    • Cad Bane lives this trope, since he is a non-Force user who often finds himself fighting Jedi.
    • Pre Vizsla will not hesitate to use blasters, flamethrowers or his jetpack to get the edge in a fight with a Jedi.
  • Comic Book Fantasy Casting: Cad Bane is explicitly modeled on Lee Van Cleef, star of many westerns in The Sixties.
  • Comm Links/Subspace Ansible: Often they are used exactly in the manner described on the trope page: a tiny Super Wrist Gadget, with only a few buttons, yet the caller always calls the right "number", and the callee is always available. They also work between characters star-systems away from eachother and between spaceships while they are traveling in hyperspace.
  • Compilation Movie: An ascended pilot, as it were, the pilot episodes earned a theatrical release after being praised by George Lucas.
  • Concealment Equals Cover: Zig-zagged quite egregiously. Sometimes hiding behind a wooden table can protect someone from blaster-fire, while at other times the same blasters can shoot straight through a body and still leave glowing a hole on the wall behind. Walls seem to provide effective cover, yet on at least one occasion the clones could destroy support pillars made of solid stone with hand-held blasters.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: Carries over elements from the films. The droid army outnumbers the clone army, but the clones can be creative. And of course, there are the Jedi.
  • Continuity Cameo:
    • "Witches of the Mist" starts with a short appearance by Delta Squad.
    • The season three finale has one with Tarfful, the Wookiee Chieftain that fans of Star Wars: Republic Commando should also immediately recognise. Also, some of the Trandoshans use the energy shotguns from that game.
  • Continuity Porn: The series is so full of Continuity Nods that they are sharing with Shout Outs on a page of their own.
  • Continuity Snarl: The Star Wars Expanded Universe is not a single hard-and-fast canon. If George Lucas gives his consent for a production to be canon, then that production can supersede different portions of the EU, which is separated into separate levels. This series is "T-canon," which is one level higher than the Expanded Universe, but one level below the films. The original microseries was "C-canon," which is the same level as comics, books, etc. All works are canon, but some take precedence if there is a conflict. See here for more information. This means that even characters, planets, etc. that originated in the EU, like Asajj Ventress and Ryloth, can have their backstories changed for the purposes of an episode or two. Word of God has said the novels are the canonical sequels to the Original Trilogy, as most of the recent productions which directly spring from Lucas are placed within the era of the prequel films and earlier.
    WIRED: What about the reports that Episodes 7, 8, and 9 - which exist in novel form - will never reach the screen?
    GEORGE LUCAS: The sequels were never really going to get made anyway, unlike 1, 2, and 3, where the stories have existed for 20 years. The idea of 7, 8, and 9 actually came from people asking me about sequels, and I said, "I don't know. Maybe someday." Then when the licensing people came and asked, "Can we do novels?" I said do sequels, because I'll probably never do sequels.
  • Continuous Decompression:
    • In "A Test of Strength", Ahsoka plans to get Hondo's pirates off her ship by firing the engines to disrupt the seal on their docking clamp. The resulting lack of pressure will suck everyone back through the docking tube. Aside from dragging one unfortunate pirate through the hole, this plan works pretty much as intended.
    • Used in "Point of No Return" to clear a room of buzz droids.
  • Contractual Immortality: No matter how dire the situation, we already know Anakin and Obi-Wan are going to live, as well as everyone else who was in Revenge Of The Sith.
  • Convection Schmonvection: Zig-zagged in "Citadel Rescue". Characters hang mere meters over the lava with no problem in one scene, yet the burial cloak for a Jedi burns before it even touches it. Animals die instantly, yet said Jedi's wrapped corpse somehow floats downstream and the worst that happens is it is still on fire.
  • Conveyor Belt-O-Doom: Still in vogue on the moons of Mandalore, apparently.
  • Cool Bike: Speeder-bikes, the Star Wars equivalent, make frequent appearances. They come in non-armed "swoop" configurations, blaster-wielding military models, and even with gunnery-mounted sidecars on occasion.
  • Cool Old Guy:
    • Yoda's always there if someone needs advise with the Force, and he's not above having some fun, if the situation allows it.
    • Tera Sinube embodies this as well. His lightsaber hilt is built into his cane.
  • Cool Ship: The Twilight. At least, that was what it was intended to be when it was introduced in The Movie. It never got a warm reception from fans, so it was used less and less as the series progressed. By the time of its final appearance, in "The Lawless", it is in extremely poor shape and falling apart as Obi-Wan lands it on Mandalore. Obi-Wan decries its many deficiencies and claims that he will never borrow a ship from Anakin again.
  • Corporate Warfare: The Separatist army is an amalgamation of several corporate armies.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: The Trade Federation and especially the heads of the Banking Clan, both of whom cheat both sides of the war for massive profit - on Dooku's orders, no less. The Clovis arc involves removing the old, corrupt heads of the Banking Clan, only for their successor to discover that Dooku will manipulate anyone in their position to become like them or die no matter what.
  • Crazy-Prepared: When the Duchess Satine discovers a warehouse filled with smuggled, possibly toxic tea, she orders her guards to burn it down to display her disgust and refusal to accept corruption. Her guards, whose general duties are her personal protection and who currently are performing a criminal investigation, walk to their speeders and pull out flamethrowers that they apparently always carry.
  • Creepy Souvenir:
    • In "Lair of Grievous" it is revealed that lightsabers are not the only things collected by General Grievous. He has about a dosen Padawan-braids on full display, all collected from the ones he had slain.
    • In "Hidden Enemy" clone trooper Chopper was forced to reveal that he has been collecting the severed fingers of battle droids as trophies.
    • After capturing her, Cad Bane took one of Ahsoka's silka bead braids as a trophy that he hung from his belt. She takes it back after the situation reverses.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Quite a few:
    • In the first aired episode of the series, Yoda beats Ventress using nothing but the force, not even deigning to move or draw his lightsaber. Essentially, the entire scene showed that she would never be a threat to him.
    • Savage Opress single-handedly demolishes a batallion of clones and slaughters two Jedi in "Monster".
    • Anakin simultaneously taming the Son and the Daughters, embodiments of the Light and the Dark side of the Force.
    • Darth Maul and Savage curb-stomp Obi-Wan in "Revenge", with Maul distracting him, then Savage getting the drop on him, brutally overpowering Obi-Wan, and ending with both of them beating Obi-Wan unconscious.

     D 
  • Day in the Limelight: Many episodes will be dedicated to minor characters. "Bombad Jedi" and "Shadow Warrior" has Jar Jar, "Lair of Grievous" has Kit Fisto, etc.
  • The Dead Have Names: When Aurra Singh and Boba Fett send Mace Windu a video threatening to execute hostages if Mace does not come face them, they demand one of the clone's name before executing him. He contemptuously replies that he is CT-411. Anakin, watching the video with Mace, sadly comments that he was 'Ponds'.
  • Deadly Euphemism: When Count Dooku orders a pair of criminals to kill Padme, he says that she should be "taken out of the game".
  • Deadly Graduation: After the tests to determine the strongest Zabrak on Dathomir, and then the use of Nightsister magic to brainwash him and make him even stronger, the final test of Savage Opress is to kill his brother Feral, whom he had previously sworn to defend. He does.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Obi-Wan sure loves dispensing sarcastic quips, even in the middle of a battle.
  • Death by Materialism: Gha Nachkt, most notably.
  • Death Is Dramatic: When recurring characters die, they usually either get a bridge dropped on them, or this trope. If it's this option expect them to give a Final Speech. One-shot characters also often get a Dying Moment of Awesome, to make-up for the audiences lack of familiarity with them.
  • Decapitation Presentation:
    • In the film, the heads of the bounty hunters Jabba hired to rescue his son are brought back to him to show their obvious failure at the rescue attempt.
    • The Talz plant their spears in the ground to mark where they have defeated their enemies, placing decapitated droid heads or the helmets of killed clones troopers on the ends of the spears.
  • Deconstruction: The tie-in novels written by Karen Traviss can be considered deconstructions of many aspects of the series. No Prisoners in particular calls attention to the problems with the orthodox Jedi code and leadership, among other things.
  • Deliberate Injury Gambit: Captain Tarpals allows General Grievous to run him through with a spear in order to get close enough to disable Grievous in turn.
  • Depending on the Writer:
    • In "Hostage Crisis" (written by Eoghan Mahony), Anakin makes a large speech about how Padme is the single most important thing in his life, whereas she seems preoccupied by the duties and responsibilities of her office and their obligations to the Republic. However, in "Senate Spy" (written by Melinda Hsu), their positions are diametrically reversed, and Padme becomes upset when Anakin lectures her on the nature of responsibility and the duties they have that supersede their personal desires.
    • The Nightsisters, introduced in the EU novel The Courtship of Princess Leia, were regarded as "witches" because their planet had lost the knowledge of the Force and could only explain their power through magic and witchcraft. With the exception of using verbal "spells" (which worked because they thought that was the only way to get their magic to work), they had none of the trappings of stereotypical witchcraft. In The Clone Wars, they have all the trappings of Hollywood Witches - they refer to their groupings as "covens", use potions and cast spells upon weapons.
  • Determinator:
    • Several Jedi have shown remarkable determination. Bolla Ropal, Evan Piell in particular resisted severe Electric Torture, but refused to co-operate with their captors, which in Master Ropal's case resulted in his death.
    • Anakin was also shown on several occasions that once he makes up his mind, there's no standing in his way.
    • Darth Maul combined this with the Power Of Hate to simply refuse to die, when Obi-Wan cut him in half way back in The Phantom Menace.
  • Deus ex Machina: The Father simply negating Anakin's conversion to the Dark Side in Ghosts of Mortis.
  • Diabolus Ex Machina: In "Bound for Rescue", the Jedi younglings report Ahsoka's capture to Obi-Wan, who insists they stay put while he arranges a rescue. It takes less than a minute for Separatist warships to hyperspace in and attack his fleet, negating his ability to help, while the younglings find their ship will explode if it does not land, forcing them to go to Florrum anyway.
  • Die Hard on an X: Anakin channels John McClane when Cad Bane takes some hostages in the Senate Building. Though because of a complicated set-back he finds himself without his lightsaber, limiting his normal strategy and leads to an interesting situation that forces him to fight an assassin droid bare-handed.
  • Disaster Democracy: In "Nomad Droids", after R2-D2 and C-3PO accidentally kill the leader of a group of Lilliputians, they want to put the droids in charge, and C-3PO holds an impromptu election. The three candidates proceed to beat each other up afterwards while the droids leave the system.
  • Dispense With The Pleasantries: When Count Dooku calls Osi Sobeck, he tells him to "dispense with the propietaries."
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?:
    • According to the official site, Chairman Chi Cho's behavior, accent, and dialogue were supposed to bring to mind apartheid-era South African dictators. The battle itself is similar to the Battle of Isandlwana in the Zulu Wars. In Isandlwana you have a clear tech advantage in the hands of the British that is wasted due to an arrogant commander stretching his forces too thinly for their superior firepower to overcome the enemies' superior numbers and arguably superior tactics, which is exactly what happens.
    • The New Mandalorians, who are a race of tall, mostly blond, blue-eyed humans with long, angular facial features desperately trying to distance themselves from their ancestors' reputation as brutal conquerors. Opposing them are the Death Watch, who want to return to traditional Mandalorian ways, and whose über-Aryan-looking leader wears his hair in a slight variation of the stereotypical Wehrmacht cut.
    • "Sabotage" has the Jedi being protested for their involvement in an increasingly unpopular war. Any number of real-world war protests could apply.
  • The Dog Bites Back: Savage Opress predictably turns on Ventress, who treated him even worse than Dooku did either of them.
  • Don't Make Me Destroy You: Nahdar Vebb uses the line verbatim when facing General Grievous. However, instead of indicating that Nahdar wishes not to hurt Grievous, it demonstrates Nahdar's arrogance and presumption that he is in control of the situation.
  • Doomed by Canon/Restricted Expanded Universe: All the material set chronologically after this show has pretty much guaranteed that most of the main cast and supporting cast will either die/be Put on a Bus or survive anything that comes their way. Examples include: General Grievous and Anakin being unable to meet face to face, due to Revenge of the Sith being their first actual meeting; any so-called "decisive blow against the Republic/Separatists" being doomed to failure; and all of Padme's attempts at a diplomatic solution being sabotaged or ineffective.
    • Ahsoka had to disappear one way or another by the time of Revenge of the Sith. In another sense, the purpose of her being assigned to Anakin in the first place — to eventually teach him to let go and work on those pesky attachment issues — had to fail. She leaves the Order at the end of season 5 after being framed by a friend and abandoned by the Council, which serves to make sure Anakin's personal issues and distrust of the council carry on to Episode III.
    • In the opening arc to Season 6, Fives could not reveal the truth about the clone's origins or brainwashing.
  • Doomy Dooms of Doom: Not just any droid factory, but a droid factory... of DOOM! And Cargo... of Doom!
  • Double Speak: Averted - a bill being considered by the Senate to take certain measures that would invade people's privacy is called the "Enhanced Privacy Invasion Bill".
  • Double Standard: Abuse, Female on Male: Averted. The Nightsisters' cruel abuse of the Nightbrothers, to the point of brainwashing and forcing one to murder his own brother so they can use him as a pawn in a scheme to kill Dooku, is not portrayed as ok. Savage turns on Ventress rapidly for her abuse and tries to Force strangle her.
  • Downer Ending: The resolve of the Order 66 arc. Tup dies and Fives dies too, having found out about the conspiracy against the Jedi, but being unable to convince anybody about the truth. Meanwhile, Darth Sidious and Count Dooku celebrate their victory.
  • The Dragon: There is so much Man Behind the Man stuff on the Separatists' side that the only person who really resembles the role is Asajj Ventress, who is sent out specifically to make the heroes' job harder in Dooku's name. Grievous clearly thinks he has this role, but whenever they are in the same scene it is very clear who is really Dooku's top subordinate. However, since Ventress' abandonment, Grievous has definitely taken up the role.
  • Dramatic Irony: This, perhaps more than anything else, is the signature staple of the series (although its thoroughly awesome battles run a close second). The tension between audience knowledge and what the audience hopes (or fears) will happen leads to some exquisite television. It is impossible to ignore the fact that Anakin will turn into Darth Vader and end up killing all of the people he helps, and the Clone Troopers will be transformed into the Stormtroopers of the Empire.
    Anakin: You must know I will never join the dark side willingly.
  • Drill Sergeant Nasty:
    • In the episode "Clone Cadets", the troopers of Domino Squad are under the charge of Master Chief Petty Officer Bric, a Siniteen bounty hunter with an oversized brain and a scholarship to the R. Lee Ermey school of drill instruction. He does not seem to actually have his troops best interests at heart, but his tough style seems to work and get the troopers motivated to pass their exams.
    • Averted with his Arcona counterpart El-Les, who is rather caring for a drill instructor.
  • Driven to Suicide: A Twi'lek slave, after a failed assassination attempt on her master, throws herself off a balcony rather than continue being a slave.
  • Dual Wielding:
    • Kit Fisto picked it up on the fly and it was awesome.
    • Asajj Ventress does this as her schtick.
    • General Grievous goes even farther by double dual wielding. He has four arms and is capable of using a lightsaber in each one.
    • Starting in season three, Ahsoka Tano gets in on the action. She carries two lightsabers, wielding one in a Reverse Grip.
    • General Krell dual-wields double-bladed lightsabers!
    • Obi-Wan tends to perform the feat whenever he is with another Jedi who is disarmer or killed, picking up their lightsaber. In "Grievous Intrigue" he picks up the energy staff of a destroyed Magnadroid and briefly wields it and his lightsaber against Generel Grievous.
    • Darth Sidious join the list in season five, carrying two lightsabers up his sleeve.
    • Anakin Skywalker and Bariss Orfee in the season five finale.
  • Dwindling Party: Domino Squad. In their first appearance in "Rookies" they lost Droidbait, who was the first to be killed by the invading droids, Cutup was eaten alive by a Rishi eel, and Hevy was forced to pull a Heroic Sacrifice when the bomb's remote had a malfunction. When the survivors returned to Kamino they lost 99 an "honorary" member of their squad, just before they were made ARC-troopers. Then came the Citadel arc, which left Fives as the Sole Survivor of the squad. The Order 66 arc took him as well.
  • Dying Moment of Awesome:
    Battle Droid: Do we take prisoners?
    Hevy: I don't.
  • Dynamic Entry: One of the droid commando squads enter a fight by throwing the basic battle droid at the clones.

     E 
  • The Easy Way or the Hard Way: Plo Koon offers Aurra Singh the options "we can do this the difficult way or the simple way, the choice is yours" when he confronts her looking for the hostages she has taken. She inevitably chooses the difficult way, and he quickly demonstrates that it is not difficult for him.
  • El Cid Ploy: Jar Jar Binks needs to dress as Boss Leoni when the Gungan leader is in a coma after being brainwashed into leading the Gungans into war against the rest of Naboo.
  • Electric Jellyfish: The Hydroid Medusa from the Season 4 premiere. Justified since they're half-machine.
  • Elite Mooks: The coldly effective droid commandos, who display a level of competence and ruthlessness far above and beyond that of their hapless B-1 cousins. Their commander actually uses a freaking sword. There are also a few others like the super battle droids, droidekas, and tactical droids.
  • Emergency Impersonation: Jar Jar puts on a Jedi cloak he found and is quickly mistaken for being a Jedi.
  • Enemy Mine:
    • In "Revenge", Obi-Wan and Ventress team up against Maul and Savage, and later Obi-Wan teams up with the Death Watch member Bo-Katan, who had gone against Maul's take-over of the Death Watch and Mandalore. Bo-Katan even Lampshades this when she does an earlier Enemy Mine with Satine.
      Bo-Katan: The enemy of my enemy is my friend.
    • Ahsoka and a couple of Jedi younglings teamed up with Hondo and his pirates in order to fight General Grievous and escape Florrum.
  • Enemy Rising Behind: In "Tipping Points", a damaged droid gunship is still active enough to level its blaster at Ahsoka while she is distracted.
  • Enhance Button: Used egregiously in "The Academy", where Ahsoka is able to use her handheld computer to enhance a hologram of a voiceless, cloaked figure, adding his face when it was never recorded in the first place. No amount of factors given by the hologram could have reliably allowed her computer to do such a thing.
  • Ensign Newbie: Rex explicitly points out to Ahsoka that, regardless of what her technical rank is, experience and knowledge in combat is what really counts.
  • Establishing Character Moment:
    • In "Hostage Crisi" Cad Bane and his team effortlessly infiltrate the Senate and take numerous Senators hostage. When he declares them to be his prisoners, one of the Senators states that he won't tolerate this "insolence" and walks past him, trying to leave. Bane promptly shoots him In the Back, without even turning to look.
    • Aura Sing had one in the same episode, which was her series debut, although it is chronologically her last appearance. After Bane killed a bunch of guards with a hand-grenade, seeing a survivor crawling towards the door, begging for help, Sing with a cold smile shot him on head.
    • The slave pen warden in the episode adaption of Slaves of the Republic has one when he drops a band of slaves down into an inactive volcano, killing them through the sheer drop, just to make a point to Obi-Wan of how he intended to break his will.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: He might be the personification of the dark side, but the Son still shrieks in horror and flees when he accidentally stabs the Daughter, his sister, with the one weapon which can kill her. When the Father later stabs himself, the Son pleads for him not to die, even though he had tried to kill him earlier.
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • Cad Bane saves Rako Hardeen when Moralo Eval tries to kill him. Not because he cared for Hardeen, but because Eval purposefully cheated Hardeen out of victory then caused the floor to fall out beneath him. Bane felt that Eval should at least give him a fair fight.
    • The pirate Hondo Ohnaka hates Sith Lords and Separatists (mainly because they cannot be bargained with like reasonable people) and also claims he does not like taking children into battle.
  • Everything's Better With Duchesses: The Duchess Satine is a focus in three arcs, and cameos in several individual episodes.
  • Everything's Deader with Zombies: The "Legacy of Terror" episode had alien insect warrior zombies, followed by clone trooper and Jedi zombies (well, just one Jedi zombie) in the next episode. Nightsister zombies make an appearance two seasons later.
  • Evil Chancellor: Besides Palpatine, there is also the prime minister of Mandalore.
  • Evil Detecting Giant Monster: Word of God says that the Zillo Beast knew Palpatine was evil and set out to hunt him down when it escaped the lab, though its unclear whether or not he was serious.
  • Evil Laugh:
    • When Anakin takes off on Dooku's speeder bike to save Ahsoka in the movie, Dooku is said to be "(LAUGHING MALICIOUSLY)" according to the subtitles.
    • Riff Tamson seems determined to laugh evilly once for every 5-10 lines of actual dialogue he has.
    • Once General Krell admits that he is a traitor, he laughs deeply in every following conversation.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: Savage Opress gets a deeper voice after the Nightsisters take control of him with their magic. Being voiced by Clancy Brown helps too.
  • Evil Versus Evil:
    • The Nightsisters arc is a villain-focused arc which featured numerous instances of Nightsister vs. Separatist fighting. The factions remained at odds throughout the series until The Separatists exterminate the entire clan.
    • The Mandalore arc in season five featured numerous odds of Sith/Death Watch vs. criminals, Sith and Death Watch vs. each other, Death Watch vs. Death Watch, and ultimately Sith vs. Sith. Obi-Wan eventually gets involved in the final episode of the arc, but ultimately can do nothing.
  • Exactly What I Aimed At: In a fight with Pre Vizsla, Ahsoka slashes his jetpack. He commends her on the close call, only for her to explain that she didn't miss. He quickly realizes that his jetpack is about to explode and ditches it.
  • Extranormal Prison: The Citadel was a prison built by the Republic to contain Dark Jedi and other Force-using criminals. The Separatists found that it is perfectly capable of holding good Jedi.

     F 
  • Face-Heel Turn: Senate Commando Captain Argyus, Clone Sergeant Slick, Pong Krell and Barriss Offee (in the Season 5 finale).
  • Faceless Goons: Subverted. Though their bodies and voices are identical, many clones are portrayed with a surprising amount of individuality. A great deal sport varying tattoos and haircuts when seen without their armor. Some episodes will deal with the differences in certain clones' personalities, occasionally as a main plot point. For example, while most clones are depicted as totally believing in the cause of the war, others do not like it but simply go along with it. Others still have become extremely disillusioned with the war and develop a level of pacifism that borders on desertion or treason, which actually does in at least two episodes.
  • Face Palm: The battle droid commander does one in the very first episode in response to the stupidity of one of its subordinates.
  • Fade Out: "The Wrong Jedi" and "Sacrifice" both end with the screen slowly fading into black. These are the only two episodes of the series to end this way, the former being the television series finale while the latter is the bonus episodes finale.
  • Failure Is the Only Option:
    • There are several episodes dedicated to capturing Grievous, which never work. Obi-Wan notices and lampshades this trope at the end of "The Deserter", and you can see how much it disgusts him.
    • Just about any of Padmé's attempts to stop the war are doomed to fail. This is subtly lampshaded (and maybe exagerrated) in "A Friend in Need", in which her peace talks with the Separatists go downhill within the first five minutes of the episode.
  • Fake-Out Make-Out: In "A Friend in Need", Ahsoka went Undercover as Lovers with Lux to the Death Watch's base. When they were left alone she started chewing out Lux for trusting Death Watch. Noticing that Pre Vizsla's headed for the tent, Lux kissed her to shut her up.
  • Fake Special Attack: Despite his skills in many other fields of combat, Cad Bane apparently has no ability when it comes to wielding a lightsaber. When he picks up a lightsaber during his fight in "Hunt For Ziro", even though he delivered a confident and mocking laugh he got a total of three moves in before Obi-Wan disarmed him.
  • Faking the Dead: The Jedi hire a sniper to shoot Obi-Wan, who takes a drug to make it look like the shot killed him. Then they use Magic Plastic Surgery to make him look like the sniper and have him sent to prison, so he can infiltrate a plot to assassinate the Chancellor.
  • Family-Unfriendly Death:
    • Grievous graphically killed an alien mechanic/hacker with the lightsaber blade visibly tearing through his chest!
    • When Barriss Offee is being attacked by a mind-controlled clone she takes out her lightsaber and guts him, with a close-up of the sword impacting the clone.
    • They really turned it up to eleven with flamethrowers being used on Geonosians. They burn and scream the whole scene and some of them got especially lucky with being sliced in vertical halves by the Jedi.
    • The season three "Nightsisters" arc is rife with this. Most notable are the many ways in which Asajj dismisses unsatisfactory Nightbrothers when she is selecting her future minion from among them, and said minion's test of loyalty.
    • During an escape scene in "Counter Attack", a clone dies in a rather horrible way: being cut in half by a vent's security doors, thankfully blocked out by a convenient door closing just prior.
    • Even Piell in the same trilogy gets mauled by an alien hyena-wolf-thing. Though they skipped on showing the wounds he should have had, it is quite clear that it nearly tore out his throat.
    • Riff Tamson got blown to bits, with his severed head shown on screen.
    • In his first appearance in the show, Cad Bane snaps a guard's neck.
    • In "Bounty", Dengar kills two Kage Warriors by sticking remote explosives to their chests and detonating them; only the camera angle saves the viewers from the Ludicrous Gibs that could have been. And later, Krismo Sodi takes out Major Rigosso with an electrified sword through the gut.
    • In "Eminence", Savage Opress decapitates a room full of Black Sun vigos when they refuse to side with Darth Maul.
    • In "Shades of Reason", Darth Maul decapitates Pre Vizsla in a blatant execution.
    • In "Revival" Savage Opress rams Adi Gallia with his head, stabbing her chest with his horns before delivering the death blow with his lightsaber.
    • In "Carnage of Krell," not only does Waxer have tearful last words, but Krell suddenly stops using his lightsabers on the clones and breaks a clone's back over his knee. At the end, Dogma executes Krell onscreen.
  • Fanservice: Several female characters wear rather revealing outfits in the show, the most prominent examples are Aayla Secura, Suu Lawquane, the Daughter and Ahsoka. Well-muscled males also get Shirtless Scenes, including Captain Rex, Kit Fisto and Savage Opress.
  • Fanservice Pack:
    • Ahsoka, being a teenager, understandably got a more feminine body figure after the Time Skip. Notably, while this trope is often accompanied by the character getting more Stripperiffic, since Ahsoka's first outfit was already very questionable, the model-change came with a more reserved wardrobe.
    • The Season 5 episode "The Lawless" revealed that Soniee and Lagos, the female cadets from the Season 3 episode "The Academy" were hit by puberty rather hard over the Time Skip.
  • Fantastic Flora: Quite a few planets seem to have flora a bit on the "weird" side.
    • Maridun with its vast savannah and gigantic trees is probably the least abnormal among them.
    • Rugosa from "Ambush" is mostly covered by giant coral forests. These were once submerged territories, but the ocean dried up. Despite this, according to the Expanded Universe, the coral is still alive.
    • Felucia's jungles are filled with luminescent plants. According to the Expanded Universe a vast number of these "plants" are actually giant fungi.
    • Dathomir is filled with creepy, skeletal trees that sprout weird, approximately human-sized, fleshy "fruits".
    • Umbara has a surprisingly dense jungle for a world permanently cut off from sun light. And all of these plants are—once again—glowing. The flora also includes Man Eating Plants.
    • Carlac has trees with coral-like Cherry Blossoms, in the middle of winter.
  • Fantastic Racism: Chairman Cho and his hatred of the "savage" Talz.
  • Fantastic Slurs: 'Tinnies' and 'Clankers' for droids, while Boyle calls the Twi'leks "Tail Heads" rather disparagingly in "Innocents of Ryloth".
  • Faster-Than-Light Travel: Hyperspace-jumps are (ab)used quite egregiusoly, since they often appear to take no time at all. One specific inversion to this was the Malevolence's attack against the Kaliida Shoals Medical Station. Due to the size of the ship, it had to take the longer hyperspace-route around a nebula, which took more time than it took for Anakin's bomber-squadron to navigate through the nebula.
  • Fauxshadow: The episode "The Deserter" gives an almost assured impression that Cut Lawquane would be killed by the episode's end in a sort of Heroic Sacrifice/Last Stand. He deserted the clone army on Geonosis and that he thinks Rex would view him as a coward for doing so, but he mentions that if it came down to it he would die to protect his adopted children. When they are later attacked by droids Cut elects to hold them off himself, leaving Rex as the last line of defence between them and his family. He lives to the end, and Rex leaves him in peace with his family.
  • Fem Bot: The BD-3000 "Betty Droid" that was in the Galactic Senate building.
  • Finagle's Law: The opening quotation of season three's "Counter Attack" is "Everything that can go wrong will."
  • Five-Bad Band: The Confederacy of Independent Systems
  • Five-Episode Pilot: Four, actually, and the source of the theatrical release. The first episodes produced were to be a four-episode arc revolving around Ahsoka's introduction as Anakin's Padawan and the kidnapping of Jabba the Hutt's son. This arc was ultimately combined into a single whole and released theatrically after George Lucas saw the footage.
  • Flanderization Yoda. In the movies, he occasionally talks backwards for emphasis. In the TV series, practically every sentence it is.
  • Flaunting Your Fleets: Part of the massive amounts of Scenery and Techo Porn in the series, there are numerous shots of the various star fleets. The two most massive examples are the Separatist fleet orbiting Serenno in "Massacre" and the Republic fleet protecting the Carida Space Station in "Point of No Return".
  • Flying Saucer The signature ships of Hondo Ohnaka and his pirate gang.
  • Force-Field Door: They show up sometimes, though not as often as one would expect. Probably the most notable instance of this being used occured in the episode "Citadel", when the entry point the Jedi wanted to use to infiltrate the titular prison had been blocked by a ray-shield.
  • Foe-Tossing Charge: Almost anyone who fights Savage Opress gets tossed around like a ragdoll.
  • Foil: The sixth season story "The Disappeared" pair up the unusual duo of Mace Windu and Jar Jar Binks. Mace proves to be rather humorless, upfront and impatient, contrasting Jar Jar's friendly demeanor making him better liked on the planet they were on. Notably, the two become Fire-Forged Friends over the ordeal, as Windu comes to respect that side of him.
  • Foregone Conclusion: None of the heroes are going to realize that Chancellor Palpatine is playing both sides for suckers until it is too late, and characters who appear in later films or works will also survive.
  • Foreshadowing: Also Call Forwards. Anakin's future role as Darth Vader is particularly foreshadowed.
    • In "Brain Invaders", mind-controlled clones open fire on Barris and Ahsoka. When they manage to incapacitate Barris, one of the clones, Edge, remarks that if there is one thing the clones know, it is how to stop Jedi. The same episode sees Anakin torture Poggle the Lesser via Force Choking to force information out of him regarding the parasites.
    • In "Voyage of Temptation". "Who will strike first and brand themselves a cold-blooded killer?" Cue lightsaber through the chest from Anakin, complete with a subdued section of "The Imperial March" as the background music for the scene.
    • "Assassins" deals with Ahsoka having terrifying visions and premonitions about Padme Amidala dying, and becoming increasingly intent and stressed in preventing the horrible future from coming to pass. There is even a scene where Ahsoka visits Yoda for help sorting out the visions, in a clear reference to a similar scene in Revenge Of The Sith... but Ahsoka's less secretive and more open way of relating her fears and confusion to others, a greater trust in others and her clearer head cause her to deal with the issue with much less turmoil.
    • In "Overlords", The Daughter — the personification of the Light Side — tells Anakin he is forbidden to touch her, while The Son — the personification of the Dark Side — has no such reservations. In the same episode, Anakin is shown by the son in a vision what he will become and in his efforts to prevent that harm, he turns to the dark side just like he is later convinced to do over preventing Padme's death.
    • In "Clone Cadets", Shaak Ti comments on how one of the clones, Echo, fails to adapt to the training simulation known as The Citadel. The first episode of the later Citadel arc opens with the moral "Adaptation is the key to survival", and Echo dies later in the arc.
    • In "Citadel Rescue", as Tarkin and Anakin shook hands before parting, a short section of "The Imperial March" was used as the background music.
  • Forgot About His Powers: Quite often, the Jedi need to gain hold of something just out of reach and, instead of grabbing it telekinetically like they did thirty seconds ago, they will instead try to grab it manually.
    • In "Children of the Force", Mace Windu literally steps into a painfully obvious trap to get the Holocron, while he could just as easily have used the force to grab it and not sprung the trap.
    • In "Lightsaber Lost", even though Ahsoka lifted, pulled and pushed numerous opponents throughout the episode, she never just uses the Force to grab her lightsaber from her opponent's hands.
    • In the first season episode "The Blue Virus", both Anakin and Obi-Wan make awesomely dramatic leaps to catch thrown vials of the incredibly deadly eponymous virus, both times allowing the bad guy to (temporarily) make his escape.
  • Frameup:
    • In the movie, Dooku framed the Jedi in front of Jabba for the kidnapping of his son, Rotta.
    • In "Duchess of Mandalore" Satine was framed for murder when the Death Watch assassin hunting her shot the informant she was having a meeting with.
    • In the final arc of season 5. Ahsoka is framed for the bombing of the Jedi temple and the murder of Letta, who was used as a proxy to deliver the bomb. She is then aided in escaping but made to look like she murdered several clones. On top of that, the real bomber then knocks out Ventress and borrows her helmet and lightsabers, in order to fool Ahsoka into thinking that Ventress is the bomber. To their credit, both Plo Koon and Anakin find it a tad convenient that Ahsoka just happens to be found next to a huge cache of explosives when they do catch her.
    • Subverted in "Orders". After he found out about the inhibitor-chips implanted in every clone, Fives is taken to Palpatine, so he can make his case, and ask the Chancellor to have each removed. Palpatine instead privately tells Fives, that it was him who ordered the chips to be implanted, as well as their purpose. Hearing this, Fives attacks the Chancellor, and gets framed for being insane and unstable, as the result of the removal of hisown chip.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus:
    • In "Monster" Ventress had a couple of blink-and-miss-it Panty Shots, while fighting Savage and the other Nightbrother competitors.
    • In "Escape from Kadavo" Ahsoka had a very smug grin on her face when Anakin released her from her cage, but it was literally only two or three frames long.
    • Ahsoka also had a very brief Panty Shot while dueling Pre Vizsla in "A Friend in Need".
    • In "Revival" Adi Gallia's tunic is drenched with blood after Savage impaled her on his horns. The scene is so brief and is shot from an angle that is very easy to miss.
    • In "Shades of Reason" Pre Vizsla losing his head is clearly visible in slow-motion or on freezed frames. On normal speed, the camera moves behind Bo-Katan too quickly, so her back blocks the execution from view.
    • Palpatine's eyes go Sith yellow for a few moments in the season 5 finale during Barriss' rant against the Jedi.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: Tarkin is introduced as a mere Republic naval captain, albeit one who remarks that he has become good friends with Chancellor Palpatine. Apart from being somewhat arrogant and uncooperative, he has neither the power nor the goals of the Grand Moff that would later destroy an inhabited planet just to prove a point. As the series progresses, his rank and importance increase - and so does his ruthlessness.
  • Frontline General:
    • The Jedi Knights were given the rank of generals in the Republic army, and they prefer to fight side-by-side with the clones. Discussed during the Umbara arc; the clones are disgusted by Krell's tactics and risks, but Rex points out that some of Anakin's plans seemed just as risky. That is countered when the other clones point out that Anakin is with them when they take those risks, instead of waiting at the rear like Krell.
    • Despite his general cowardice that will lead to him flee at the moment the situation turns again him, General Grievous is often amongst the very first troops to board an enemy ship, and fights on the front lines with his droids.
  • Full Name Ultimatum: General Krell refers to Rex as CT-7567 most of the time. However, when he is sufficiently impressed by Rex's nerve, he calls him Rex. He also uses Sergeant Appo's nickname, probably because Appo has not ticked him off as much as Rex has yet.
  • Fugitive Arc: The Season 5 finale has Ahsoka framed for sedition, terrorism and multiple murders, and she has to go into hiding while searching for proof of her innocence.
  • Future Me Scares Me: Though time travel is not involved, Ahsoka is clearly scared by the vision of her older self warning her of the Dark Side. The same thing happens to Anakin when he sees what he will do as Darth Vader: he is so terrified, he cooperates with The Son. He figures that being evil now is far better than the monster he will become. Ultimately, he does not remember at the end of the episode and continues on his path unchanged.