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  • "Aeris vs. Aerith" from Final Fantasy VII is a canonical example note  that can spawn enough Internet Backdraft to melt the polar icecaps. It is always romanized as "Aerith" in Japan and used internationally in more current works, and some fans even use Earisu (the phonetic transliteration of the Japanese writing, エアリス). Aerith was subsequently chosen as a romanization because it sounds like "earth" when romanized, something that Word Of God confirmed at the time of the game's release in Japan. "Aeris" was chosen for the first English release because Sony handled the English release and their team felt it sounded better. Things got complicated by Square (later Square Enix) once they took over localization of their own titles again - by the time of Kingdom Hearts, Square had switched it back to "Aerith" outside of Japan. Some fans (including the ones editing Wikipedia and Final Fantasy Wiki) have struck a sort of compromise and use "Aeris" in regards to the game Final Fantasy VII and "Aerith" when referring to all other games she appears in. If the game ever is remade, one can only guess how Square Enix and their long-suffering fanbase will handle it.
    • It doesn't help that "Aeris" is a Latin word with many other connotations that could be reasonably applied to the character, though these were unintentional since even the Japanese developers intended to get the "earth" homophone (and early concept art shows other spellings such as "Erith").
    • In Spain, Sephiroth was spelled "Sefirot", which is the Spanish name for the Kabbalah term the character is named after (Sephirot or Səphrṯ). However, just like with Aerith, Square Enix's localization team changed his name to the Japanese romanization in later games.
      • Also, "Safer Sephiroth" and "Bizarro Sephiroth" were supposed to be romanized as "Sefer Sephiroth" and "Rebirth Sephiroth" respectively, which were intended as further references to Sephiroth's name origin. Many still love using the original names mostly because of the ironically funny naming.
      • While Bizarro Sephiroth seems inexplicable at first, "rebirth" and "reverse" are homonyms in Japanese (both are spelled リバース). More than likely, Sony's translators mistook it for "Reverse Sephiroth" and attempted a woolseyism.
    • It was sometimes believed that Aerith and Cloud were meant to be "Alice" and "Claude".
    • Is Tifa's last name spelled Lockhart or Lockheart?
    • Another two weird examples are Zack and Rufus - while their names sound like perfectly acceptable English names, they don't match with the Japanese romanizations - Zakkusu and Rūfausu, which would be pronounced Zacks and Rufaus (rhymes with "house") respectively. Also, Barret (Baretto) is a play on the Japanese pronunciation of "Bullet".
  • Final Fantasy IV has a character named "Rydia". Some fans have thought this was a mistranslation of Lydia. Square Enix has never used any other English spelling, though.
    • Square Enix's handling of Final Fantasy IV's translations are... spotty, at best. These are the same Japanese-version romanizations that give us "Gilbart" (instead of Gilbert, known in the translation as Edward), "Cain" (instead of Kain), and various other spelling differences.
  • Because Final Fantasy V went a long time without an official translation, the fan translations tended to disagree on what the English equivalent of "Kururu" was, the most popular alternative being "Cara". Square (later Square Enix) eventually translated it as "Krile".
    • And then, of course, there's Butz/Bartz. It is still romanized as "Butz" in Japan, though most English speakers and the official western translations call him "Bartz" considering the alternative (that and his name has always been translated as such officially).
    • The villain's name being Exdeath or Exodus seems to be an issue, but it should be noted that everything that's "Exdeath" in English is Ekusudesu (エクスデス) in Japanese; meanwhile, everything that's "Exodus" is Ekusodasu (エクソダス). However, he has been referred to as "Ex-Death" or "X-Death" before settling on "Exdeath".
    • Lenna/Lena/Reina has two official English names and one fan name. Square/Square Enix was rather indecisive about her. To clarify, her name (written as Rena in Japanese) was Reina in the Anthology version, and then changed to Lenna in the Advance version. Given the Japanese pronunciation of her name, Lenna seems to make more sense.
    • While Galuf has always been Galuf, the other three Warriors of Dawn have been very inconsistent; Bartz's father was originally dubbed "Dorgan" in the fan translation and "Drogan" in the PS1 release, before becoming "Dorgann" in the GBA translation. The werewolf has been called "Kelgar", "Kelga", and "Kelgore" before becoming "Kelger". Finally, the king of Surgate has been "Zezae" or "Zeza" before becoming "Xezat". One name translation that everyone agrees on, however, is that Faris's real name is "Sarisa" and NOT "Salsa".
    • Its sequel, the OVA Legend of the Crystals naturally follows in its footsteps. "Bartz" is referred to as "Batz," while Exdeath is "Exodese," and "Cid" is rendered as "Shido." The English dub is even internally inconsistent, as the main male character's name is rendered as first "Prettz" and later "Pritz" by the opening text in different episodes.
    • There has long been debate over Gilgamesh's "bad" sword equivalent of "Excalibur". The first game it appeared in was Final Fantasy V, and the most common translation for a long time was "Excailbur", taken from a fan translation done before the game was finally localized in the U.S. Square's first translation of this was in Final Fantasy VIII, in which they chose "Excalipoor", a name that made sense considering the horrible quality of the weapon. They later flipped back and forth on using "Excalipoor" and "Excalipur", though they appear to have finally settled on the former.
  • One of the examples of Ted Woolsey's videogame translations is the comic recurring enemy Ultros from Final Fantasy VI, who was originally named Orthros. Square Enix seems to go back and forth on whether to keep it or not. A reference to him as a mark in Final Fantasy XII and his appearance as a Bonus Boss in Final Fantasy Tactics A2 and the GBA and PSP versions of Final Fantasy I use "Orthros", but when the GBA version of Final Fantasy VI came out in America with a fresh script, they went back to "Ultros."
    • The character known as "Sabin" in the English version is called "Mash"note  in the Japanese version. Some fans have insisted that Mash is a mistranslation of "Matthew", but this is incorrect since transliterating "Matthew" to Japanese ends up as Mashūnote . The point is moot, since "Mash" is actually his nickname in Japan, his real name being Maciasnote .
    • Another name issue in FFVI is the Atma / Ultima weapon. While Ultima makes sense for all the future games and is therefore now the standard, Atma actually still works because it refers to the soul in Hindi. Therefore, a boss that has its lifeforce entirely in magic would make sense being a soul weapon. However, Atma Weapon was obviously only chosen for space considerations, and only appeared in the SNES version of FFVI where "Ultima Weapon" wouldn't fit. "Atma" doesn't even match the katakana for "Ultima". It's even lampooned in Final Fantasy X-2, where the bestiary entry for Ultima Weapon chides the player, "Whatever you do, don't call it Atma."
      • There is now a type of object in the Final Fantasy XI Abyssea add-ons called an Atma, possibly combining a Shout-Out with the Hindu meaning.
    • The official name of the music that plays in Zozo is スラムシャッフル (Suramu Shaffuru). The most popular way to romanize this is as Slam Shuffle, but スラム can also be translated as "slum", so perhaps Slum Shuffle would make more sense note .
    • Note that Square Enix officially romanizes "Kefka" as "Cefca" (Japanese materials to this day maintain the spelling), but the name is always changed to "Kefka" overseas. It's a very strange case because in Japanese, the hard C needed for this sound would be "ke" and the kana supports "Kefka". Unlike the Aerith/Aeris example, they've continued to leave his name alone in non-Japanese localizations.
      • This was lampshaded in the GBA enhanced port: at a certain point in the game, one of the guards in Figaro Castle will talk about how a certain faction of the Cult of Kefka argue about whether to spell Kefka's name with K's (as in Kefka) or C's (as in Cefca).
  • Seifer of Final Fantasy VIII was サイファー Saifā in Japanese, so the English romanization seems straightforward. The German version, however, compared the other characters' names (which are all either vaguely English-sounding and spelled accordingly or downright English words) and went for Cifer. "Seife" being the German word for "soap" might also have played a role in the decision. In a similar vein, Zell is Xell in Germany. "Zelle" means "cell".
    • Some fans have argued that Rinoa's name should be Lenore. A few fan-run websites initially translated her name as "Lenore" before an official romanization was released. Again, Square Enix artwork from before the US release contradicts this. Worth noting: Lenor is a fabric conditioner in the UK and parts of Europe. The equivalent US product is Downy. Whether this was considered by Square Enix's translation team is unknown, but probably not. Still, releasing the game in the UK with the character named "Lenore" could have resulted in mockery. Although Rinoa DOES soften Squall's heart, so...
    • Ultimecia is translated in some other countries as Artemisia.
  • In Final Fantasy IX, there's a recurring enemy called the Ragtime Mouse in the English release. It's almost certainly a mistransliteration of Ragtime Mouth (since the character in question is not a mouse, but does have a giant mouth: behold!)
    • The main character Zidane has been a strong victim of this trope. His name is meant to be "Gitan", which is French for "gypsy". And in the French version, his name was changed to Djidane because Zidane is the name of France's most popular football player. For the same reasons, he's called "Yitn" in the Spanish translation.
    • It doesn't stop there for Final Fantasy IX - many Mythology Gags were ruined thanks to inconsistent translations.
      • The location "Mount Gulug", romanized as "Gurugu" in Japanese, is obviously a reference to Gurgu Volcano from Final Fantasy I (which itself has been alternately translated; as of the PS1 remake it is now called "Mt. Gulg").
      • The name of Eiko's Eidolon, Madeen, is supposed to be a reference to the Esper Maduin from Final Fantasy VI (both are romanized as "Madin" in Japanese), and its attack, Terra Homing, was supposed to be Terraforming ("Terafōmingu" in Japanese).
      • The boss "Hilgigars" is clearly supposed to be "Hill Gigas", which is a recurring enemy in the series.
  • In early Final Fantasy XII translations, Balthier's name originally appeared as 'Balflear', because that was actually his name in the Japanese original (romanised "Barufurea").
  • In Final Fantasy XIII, the villain is named after the mythical creature Baldanders, but Square Enix went with the Latinized name Barthandelus instead.
    • In Japanese, the almighty god of the series appears to have the word "universe" with a B in front of it as a name. Romanized it's Bhunivelze.
  • The Final Fantasy games set in Ivalice started out with a lot of this, sometimes in the same game. As of the re-translations it's mostly cleared up, generally for the better.
    • The most famous example being the original release of Final Fantasy Tactics. The queen is most frequently referred to as Ruvelia, but occasionally the pronunciation is inverted to Luveria. The latter is chosen for the rerelease, but spelt Louveria. And don't get the fanbase started on Tietra/Teta, Orran/Olan, Zalbaag/Zalbag, Isilud/Izlude...
    • Bonus points for Omdoria/Omdolia, where it's possible to see both names ON THE SAME SCREEN.
  • In Final Fantasy X, Rikku's name is spelled and pronounced as Ryukku in Japanese. It was probably changed because Rikku would be easier to pronounce for the English voice actors.
    • Some fans argue that Auron's name should be Aaron, because the romanisation of his name in Japanese is Āron (though the name Aaron tends to be written as Aron in Japanese, with a short A).
    • Tidus vs. Tida. All official English media uses Tidus, with varying pronunciations (Tee-dus in the first Kingdom Hearts game, Tie-dus in the second), though James Arnold Taylor, his English voice actor, decreed that "Tee-dus" was the official English pronunciation. The Japanese, however, spell and pronounce the name "Tīda" (Tee-da), from the Okinawan dialect word for "sun" (Yuna, by contrast, means "moon" in Okinawan). Regardless, "Tidus" is the official English spelling, even though "Tida" would be closer to the original pronunciation. "Tida" was originally going to be used, however, and one can see his name written (in the fictional Spiran script) as "Tidu" on the lockers at Luca Stadium.
  • From Final Fantasy Adventure, a combination of Japanese Ranguage and the translator not really doing the proper research managed to corrupt the name of one of the bosses, Ifrit, into "Iflyte".
  • Tales Series examples:
    • The Fan Translation names from Tales of Phantasia are still in use, with fans outright rejecting the English names after waiting a decade for an English release. There are some legitimate objections to parts of them, in particular "Kangaroo" instead of "Ragnarok," and also that spellings like "Cless" and "Klarth" are used in all the Japanese source, such as manual graphics and even in the credits to the PS remake of the game.
      • It doesn't help that the fan translation got their original names for the main characters from an article in Nintendo Power in the 90s that was profiling the Japanese version, back when the game was brand new. Apparently Nintendo completely changed their minds on their romanizations a decade later when they took over.
      • On the other hand, "Cress" is a perfectly valid romanisation and fits with Mint for some Theme Naming (both cress and mint are plants), so one could easily argue Cress was the intended name.
    • Some names of Tales of Symphonia characters were changed or spelled differently for the western release. Examples: Collet Brunel (became Colette in the translation) and Shihna Fujibayashi (who became Sheena). Genius Sage and Refill Sage got their names changed to Genis and Raine respectively. Also, the place names Asgard, Palmacosta, Luin and Hima were Ascard, Parumacosta, Ruin and Haima in the original (though Asgard makes more sense, as it most likely refers to sgarr, a place in Norse mythology).
    • The still-untranslated Tales of Hearts has generated confusion among its small English fanbase with the character カルセドニー.note  This clearly looks like Chalcedony, which also makes sense when you figure most character names are English names for gemstones. The manual has no answers, but the romanizations on Namco's website use Calcedny.
    • This is a recurring thing in the Tales Series, really. Namco usually changes names in the American version of a game; sometimes they do it for no reason (as any Destiny fan could tell you), but mostly they do it because the original names were just "Western-sounding", not genuinely western. For example (but definitely not limited to), Leon Magnus, whose Japanese name was Lion Magnus; while Lion sounds silly when read in English, in Japanese it is read the exact same way "Leon" is read here. The same applied to many, many games. It has been toned down in recent installments (for example, Tales of Vesperia), probably because the writers started doing some research.
  • In the first The Legend of Zelda game, there was an armored knight enemy called a "Darknut" by the instruction book. It was intended to be Taatonakku, which translates as "Tart Knuck". Compare this with Zelda II The Adventure Of Link's aiannakku which became "Iron Knuckle". There's also a boss enemy named rebonakku that rides a horse. This has simply been translated as "Rebonack" in the Zelda: Collectors Edition Player's Guide.
    • In the Official Nintendo Player's Guide, Ironknuckle was romanized as "Ironnack."
    • Also, the number of people who call Sheik "Shiek" is saddening. However, it is "Shiek" in Germany, because "Sheik" would be pronounced "shike", not "sheek" like it should be.
    • And then we have Zoras vs. Zolas. This worked, though, because they look and behave like two separate species (Zora = tail-headed/nice; Zola = scaly and crested/Always Chaotic Evil [though the Zola King in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past isn't so bad]). In Oracle of Ages, both types are referred to as Zoras; according to an NPC in the Zora village, they're the same species, with "Ocean Zoras" being the friendly variety, and "River Zoras" being the enemy type.
    • The whole "Ganon vs. Gannon" mess from the original Zelda spawned its own meme.
    • Before The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass came out, some websites were translating Link's fairy companion Ciela's name as "Sierra", another L/R issue. "Ciela" is correct due to Theme Naming between the fairies; her name refers to air, and the others refer to earth and water.
    • The Zelda series makes a point of giving normal Anglo names strange Romanizations—for example, Renado from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess could've easily been "Leonard". What makes this even worse is that the Japanese website for the game used such "normal" Romanizations until the English release neared and everything was switched to the "weird" Romanizations.
    • Saria's name was spelled "Salia" in German.
    • The dragon bosses appearing in Zelda II and Ocarina Of Time were actually intended to be one and the same, both being known as Barubajia in Japan. The former got translated as "Barba" in the initial English release, while the latter became "Volvagia".
    • The Italian release of the 3DS version of Ocarina Of Time is translated directly from the Japanese version and calls Rauru, Nabooru and Volvagia respectively Raul, Naburu and Varubaja.
  • Dr. Light (ライト) from the Mega Man series had his name variously rendered as Light, Right, or Wright in the early games; it wasn't until 4 that it was standardized as Dr. Light in the English games. Similarly, Dr. Wily (ワイリー) was sometimes referred to as Dr. Wiley (or even Dr. Willy) in the early games.
    • In Japan, Dr. Light is officially spelled Dr. Right, with the logo of his lab being a capital "R" in the Famicom game Rockboard. When the Light's Lab logo first appeared in English, it became a capital "L".
    • Mega Man 2 had Crash/Clash Man.
    • The Mega Man Battle Network games address the Light/Right mixup: the main protagonist's grandfather is called Tadashi Hikari, which pretty much translates to "Right Light" in English. Apparently Capcom thinks either version is fine for them at this point.
      • The names of the main characters in the Japanese version are officially "Netto" and "Meiru", which are the Japanese pronunciations of the English words "net" (as in internet) and "mail" (as in e-mail). The English translation dealt with this by renaming Netto to Lan (as in LAN, Local Area Network) and calling Meiru "Mayl", which keeps the pun as well as looking like a girl's name. (The English dub of The Anime of the Game ruined it a bit, as they had to call her "Maylu" in order to match the mouth flaps).
    • Averted with Mega Man Zero's Big Bad, Dr. Weil (Vile in Japan). Before he was unveiled in part 3, fans thought this was Capcom USA's worst translation botch ever, that they somehow got Dr. Wily's name wrong. Further more, his Japanese pronunciation is actually Bairu (バイル), which sounds like While/Bile/Vile so there was plenty of naming issues to Fan Wank over before MMZ3 was released and revealed...Dr. Weil as a completely separate person. "Weil" is presumably with a Germanic V-sounding W, thus keeping the pronunciation more or less identical.
    • In a Mega Man X manga adaption there's a mermaid character named Marty, however people find this either stupid or a translation error as the character it question is female, causing quite a few variations to the name: Marti, Martei, Mary, Marit, and Merit.
    • In Mega Man X5, one character chastises the player character for what they did to someone named Octopardo, which had most players replying "Wait, who?" Turns out it was actually referring to Launch Octopus, a boss from the second game, using the Japanese name of the boss (Launcher Octopuld) and mis-romanising it.
  • The protagonist of the original Fire Emblem appears to have been named for Mars (The god of war), however the Super Smash Bros..' series localized his name as Marth. The Japanese aren't any help in this — the debug menu for Melee has "Mars" in English, but the artbooks put out for Monshou no Nazo, as well as the official trading card game clearly have "Marth" written in English, yet the same card game also writes "Minerva" as Minerba", "Jeorge" as "Jorjue" and "Scorpio" as "Scopio".
    • Nintendo also likes to completely change names for no apparent reason. This usually leads to mass confusion when new titles come out because there's always been enough delay for fans to have translated the names themselves. To be fair, Nintendo does have reasons for it occasionally, usually to eliminate names that sound strange in English (like Beeze) or to try and get them all to sound consistent in one universe. However, changing "Soanevalke" to "Stefan" came back to bite them when his Japanese name was actually a hint to the character's origins in Radiant Dawn.
      • Nintendo also screwed up with the name of the Dragon King. It's spelled "Deghinsea" in Path Of Radiance, then spelled "Dheginsea" in Radiant Dawn (however, this was fixed in the PAL version, which uses Path of Radiance's spelling).
    • Now that Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon is out in the U.S. and Europe, it's even more obvious that one hand was not talking to the other. Since the original "Marth" games were not officially translated until late 2008/early 2009, fans had accepted certain spellings years ago out of necessity, so you can also add "changes" that may not have deliberately been changes at all. While you can find a much more extensive list of names elsewhere, certain changes deserve special mention here.
      • First off, the legendary paladin of suck, Crutch Character Jeigan is now "Jagen" worldwide, but his Japanese name will forever be used for the archetype he spawned in the JRPG community.
      • Marth's Pegasus Knight friend/lover is "Sheeda" in Japan, "Shiida" in Europe, and "Caeda" in North America (though pronounced the same - the name is Gaelic).
      • Navarre has the most variations thanks to fans, companies, and Nintendo refusing to pick one name and stay with it. So officially, in English, he's both "Navarre" (US) and "Nabarl (Europe)". Other official spellings in the past were ADV's translation of "Navahl" for the anime, and Super Smash Bros. Brawl translation of "Nabaaru" (a straight transliteration of the name's katakana), as well as some alternative fan names used for fan translations. Meaningful names don't help here either, Nabal is a character in the bible, Navarre is a region in Spain.
      • The character romanized with "Cheini" and fan dubbed as "Chainy" became "Xane" in both English versions.
      • Marth's homeland is "Akaneia" and Super Smash Bros Melee translated it as that (a debug menu also showed "Akaneia" as a stage). The American release uses "Archanea".
      • Likewise, the enemy country of Dolua became "Dolhr" in the US and "Doluna" in Europe.
      • The country named Macedonia in Japan became known as Macedon by NOA, and Medon in the PAL regions. Grunia also became known as Grust in the Western and PAL regions, and Orleans became known as Aurelis in those same regions.
    • The fourth game, Seisen no Keifu (or Genealogy of the Holy War), was never released outside Japan, which results in the usual fan translation weirdness. Like Yurius and Yuria versus Julius and Julia, and the Gayborg spear (should be Ge Bolg).
      • Gayborg is actually the official Japanese-English spelling; it was replaced with Gae Bolg in the fan translation years ago anyway. A more topical example would be the legendary thunder magic Tor Hammer, which numerous people consider to be a mistranslation of Thor Hammer when it is actually theme naming along with the other legendary magic. Fire Emblem Awakening just calls it Mjlnir.
    • As mentioned, even official translations can be a bit dodgy. The seventh game, Rekka no Ken ("Blazing Sword"), or just plain Fire Emblem outside Japan (as it was the first Fire Emblem game that got through Japanese shores, despite FE 6 originally made for an international release), has a serious Matter of France theme to its names (Roland, Durandal, and so on) but for some reason Turpin and Almace became Durban and Armads. Then again, the original Turpin was an archbishop who followed his emperor to war and Durban is a bloodthirsty berserker.
      • Fa's name from Fuuin no Tsurugi also got changed to Fae in Rekka no Ken, and Dragon Riders were renamed Wyvern Riders for plot differentiation. Also, in FE 6, Alan could be called by the name Aran or Arran (which would interfere with One Steve Limit), Astol could be called Astohl, Idoun could also be translated as Idenn, Brenya could also be called Brunya, and worst of all, the first Dark Magic-user you obtain could either be called Ray (direct translation), or Lleu (Theme Naming with Lugh, his brother). Awakening, once again, took a third option and named him Raigh.
    • Even the official Japanese subtitle of the original Famicom game has been subject to variation due to the different readings for the kanji for "sword". Some official sources use Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Ken, while other sources uses Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi.
      • And then you have the conflicting translations of those titles. "Sword of Seals", "Sealed Sword", or "Binding Blade"? "Sword of Flames", "Blazing Sword", or "Blazing Blade"? "Dark Dragons and the Sword of Light" or "Shadow Dragons and the Bright Blade"? "Sword of Flames/Blazing Sword/Blazing Blade" was dropped from the title entirely for the American release, and the DS remake of the first game was simply called "Shadow Dragon". Jeebus.
    • To put it this way: in this series, the only names that CAN'T be a different form of itself would be the original kanji which all these translations came from.
  • The Phantasy Star series has several examples, the most egregious of which involve the complete name change of a character present in the first two games, Noah in the first game, Lutz in the second. While the name used in the second game is the correct one, it was so long before the change was identified that many fans of the series are convinced the character is actually two separate people who look alike. A large body of Fanon was created to support the idea. Note also: Dark Force/Darkfalz/Dark Phallus.
    • In PSO, there is a weapon named Rika's Claw. PSU has a weapon named Falclaw. Both weapons look identical...because they reference the same character, a Newman named Rika in English versions of Phantasy Star IV, and Fal in Japanese versions. Similar, but less severe, violations include the weapon named Sato in PSO which is named Shato in PSU, and the enemy named Gigobooma in PSO and Jigo Booma in PSU.
      • In Phantasy Star Zero the spelling has been changed once more, this time to "Chato". Maybe it's an inside joke on the part of the localization team.
    • Related, Phantasy Star Online quests would have a trader character as "Garon" or "Gallon", while both are literally "Garon" in Japanese. As such, many would not relate the person dealt with in "Gallon's Shop" to the man who appears in the offline / single player quests. So, as above, some players remain convinced that there are two large men dressed in purple who want more money and hate you when you don't do perfect work.
    • Phantasy Star Universe has a particularly odd example, renaming "Techniques" to "TECHNICs".
    • Phantasy Star Portable 2 Infinity introduces a new race, but unfortunately, the game never got released outside Japan. This inevitably left the translation of the race's name up in the air. A translation spelled it as "Dewman", although "Duman" is an acceptable spelling too. The players ran with it until Phantasy Star Online 2 gave us the correct spelling in a cutscene: "Deuman".
  • Amazingly the American Command & Conquer series suffers from this. Character names are often not consistently spelled in the manuals, credits and ingame tooltips. Shephard/Sheppard, Slavik/Slavic and even the incorrect spelling of CABAL as KABAL in the credits of Tiberian Sun, even though it's an acronym.
  • Castlevania can beat you over the head with this one if you're not careful. For simplicity's sake, lets just focus on the North American/European games:
    • The Belnades clan have their name spelled in several ways thorough the Castlevania series. Belnades, the most common spelling in the English games, was originally used only in the manual for Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse; the game itself actually spelled it as Velnumdes, and for some reason it was castilianised to Fernandez in Castlevania 64. The literal romanization is Verunandesu (ヴェルナンデス), since the Japanese tend to use the "V" sound only when they mean it to spell that way too. Best to just split the difference and say Velnandes, thus making no one happy.
    • A new timeline has identified Sypha as "Cipher", and Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance translated Sypha's Charm as "Cipher's Charm". Only to fix her name back to 'Sypha' in Castlevania: Judgment.
      • For Sypha, her name is a Punny Name, for "cipher", as in a secret, which Sypha's gender was at first.
      • The same timeline also gave Maria Renard's surname as "Larnett", though the recent PSP remake/port of the games she appeared in went back to Renard, casting doubt on the accuracy of the rest of the timeline's (numerous) spelling changes.
      • If the Japanese site for Castlevania: Judgment is any indication, it's spelled Renard. And the other character is called Sypha... Belnades. (Aside from Ralph and Belmondo, that appears to be the only difference.)
    • Others that are translation issues but haven't caused inconsistencies (yet): Maria Renard/Learned/Larnett, Soleiyu/Soleil Belmont, Christopher/Christophe Belmont, Eric Lecard/Ricardo, Grant DaNasty/Dinesti/Dynasty, and of course Belmont/Belmondo/Beaumont.
      • Dynasty and Beaumont were single-instance print media typos. And Grant's last name would be "Danesti" were that not a case of research failure, if he is meant to be a descendant of Dan II.
    • Rover/Lauber Mansion from Castlevania II Simons Quest, and Garuga/Gallagher (Castlevania: Bloodlines).
    • In the games with explicitly named enemies, a certain type of agile, dual-dagger-wielding enemy was given the name "Skeleton Blaze", starting with Symphony of the Night. Although it is fairly obvious to all involved (except the translators) that this should be "Skeleton Blades", the localization teams have kept this the same throughout the entire series, presumably for continuity.
    • In Kid Dracula, the main villain is called Garamoth. In Castlevania: Symphony of the Night and subsequent games, he is known as Galamoth.
  • Angol Moa/Angolmois from Wild ARMs.
    • There are debates over whether "Zeikfried" in the first game is supposed to be "Siegfried." The fact that his appearance in the third game spells it Siegfried appears to be nullified by Alter Code F's "Blind Idiot" Translation that reverts it back to Zeikfried.
  • Happens each time UDE decides to transliterate the Konami names for Yu-Gi-Oh! cards instead of renaming them, and sometimes even when fans try to translate OCG-only cards themselves. Some memorable ones include Gors/Gorz/Gooz/Goes and Goggle Golem/Google Golem/Giant Ogre Golem.
  • Prier/Priere from the Disgaea and La Pucelle games. Her name is only spelled with the last "e" in the former, where she appears as a Bonus Boss. Not helping the situation at all is that both versions work within the Theme Naming of the series {Prier = "To Pray", Priere = "Prayer").
    • Also in Disgaea, the overlord Laharl's name is a subject of debate. Though Laharl is the official spelling in all of the games, "Lahar" would make more sense; it is a term related to volcanoes and would be in keeping with the other volcano-related names, like Etna and Vulcanus.
  • Not a character name, but Fatal Fury (and The King of Fighters after it) has Geese Howard's first Desperation Move. Because of how he yells the name, translators have spent ages trying to work out if it's "Raging Storm" or "Raising Storm". Fatal Fury Battle Archives says "Raging"; Capcom vs. SNK says "Raising". Most move lists go with "Raising Storm". Fans, on the other hand, universally go with "Raging Storm". Or a long string of profanities, but that's almost certainly not the official name.
    • For that matter, a LOT of attacks used by Fatal Fury characters have this problem. In large part because for most of them no one's even sure what they're saying, let alone how to spell it.
      • Terry Bogard is especially bad about this.
      • But Duck King is the undisputed champ. "Wahn gooh fuh buh-huh looOOOOOOhh!"
  • This can become a hot issue in Pokmon fandom in the run-up to a new generation as the romanisations used by the most popular fansite are technically correct but not always the best. (A big one was Rukario for Lucario, which is a direct transliteration of how Lucario is written in katakana.)
    • There was a snag when Manectric's Japanese name, ライボルト, was fan romanized as Raibolt. However, the official romanization is Livolt.
    • Then there's Togechick (トゲチック), which is incorrectly translated as Togetic overseas. People were "tic'd" off by this since it was announced.
    • One of the player character's rivals in Pokemon Black And White is ベル; this has been variously written as Beru, Belle, Bell, and Bel. Her Dub Name Change to Bianca makes this mostly a non-issue, however.
      • The last is more likely because "Bel" is the Russian word for "white"; her male counterpart is named "Cheren", the Bulgarian word for "black".
    • You'd think that while romanising the Japanese names can be a difficult task, there wouldn't be any issue with the English names, right? Wrong. The Pokdex entry for Mawile in Ruby version spells its name as "Mawhile" (except in the European version).
    • Don't forget Geechisu/Geechis/Geetis/Geecis/Geotis/G'Cis/Ghetsis/Dennis/Whatever-the-heck-his-name-is-tis!
      • Or the prehistoric bug robot that his criminal team revived from a fossil: is it Genesect or Genosect? Either works as a pun on the DNA theme (Gene or Genome), with the second spelling giving rise to rumors that it was for "Genocide", and the declaration that "Genosect killed off the dinosaurs". The English translation settled on the former.
    • The anime series episode "Island of the Giant Pokmon" actually romanizes the franchise's name as "Pocke Mon" (which, given the full title of the series, may actually be more accurate) in the Japanese dub. Foreign translations of the series change this to the more common spelling.
  • Fanon of Super Robot Wars is big on this, with Ibis Douglas often being spelled "Ivis" even though, the first time you see her in-game, it's outright written in English as Ibis. Examples of names that are supposed to be real foreign-language words getting fan-romanized into Engrish abound, including "Geshpenst," (Gespenst, German for "ghost"), "Sladegelmir" (Thrudgelmir, a Norse giant), and one from the official translation, "Alfimi" ("Alchemie," German for "alchemy").
    • The kicker is another character's possible names, Levi Tolar, Rebi Torah, and Rabbi Torah, as all of them fit the character in terms of language and meaningfulness... and all three are spelled the same in Japanese.
    • Zengar Zombolt gets a little pass, since it was first spelled in katakana that way, as the Japanese pronunciation of the actual spelling, Sanger Zonvolt. Silly German.
      • Unfortunately the Japanese don't help and this gets even more confusing with Zengar'sSanger's mech, as the joke is that he shortens "Dynamic General Guardian" in Japanese to "Dai-Zen-Gar"... Big Zengar. However, in English the joke doesn't work at all (you can't squeeze "Sanger" out of "Gen-Guard" unless you read "Sanger" with a German accent and "Gen-Guard" with a Japanese one - and even then it's a stretch) and fell flat in Atlus' translation of OGs.
      • The Fan Translation of Alpha Gaiden choose "Sombold", because that was the closest thing that was an actual German name.
    • Oh, and there's Sleigh/Surei/Srey/Slaye Presty/Presti.
    • And let's not forget poor Latouni/Latooni/Ratouni Subota/Zuvota. To make matters worse, she doesn't even have an official Romanization (before the English version was released, at least), since her name in Japanese material, when it's not in katakana, is always rendered in Cyrillic as "латунь суббота". That generates another issue, since the Cyrillic provided is missing the "i" syllable in her given name (it becomes Latoun or any other variation thereof).
    • Original Generation Gaiden makes fun of Banpresto's own mistake by having the boss of R, Duminuss finds out that her name is actually Dynamis (greek for power), Banpresto has simply mispelled it while making R.
    • There's also Tootie/Tytti/Tutti Noorbuck/Norback/Nolbach... Since she's supposed to be Finnish, the most likely correct version would be Tytti Norrback (with two R's).
    • The newest and probably most ridiculous one would be the new Loli protagonist of Super Robot Wars Z. Most formal people call her 'Mel Peter', but some just go on ahead and call her Male Beater...
    • And after all the above, the confusion over Psybuster and Cybuster seems downright tame...
      • People render it as Cyberstar, despite that not matching the kana unless you kind of squint and are really drunk.
      • And then there's the official Japanese translation of Cybaster.
    • Speaking of Z, how about "The Edel," who takes the time in-game to explain that he calls himself The Edel to make it clear that he's more important and more powerful than any of his Alternate Universe incarnations. This doesn't stop some people from spelling it "Ji Edel."
  • As an example of this trope occurring even when transliteration is not involved, the infamously bad OHRRPGCE game Magnus can't decide on whether its Squishy Wizard is named "Quio" or "Ouio."
  • EarthBound features a villain named Pokey in the U.S. version, who threatens to come back for revenge in the ending. He makes good on his promise in Mother 3, and this incarnation makes a cameo as a boss in Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Problem? His name was originally meant to be Porky, referring to his bloated belly and pig-like nose, and the pig theme continues with his army in Mother 3. Brawl uses the name Porky, obscuring the connection to the EarthBound villain.
    • You cannot grasp the true form of the name of the first two games' final boss. It has been transliterated as "Gyiyg" or "Geeg", but the localizers for Earthbound Zero used "Giegue". Early promotional material for Earthbound actually referred to him as "Geek" before it was modified/finalized into "Giygas".
    • Nintendo can't even seem to make up its mind about the name of the Mother 3 village - in the US Super Smash Bros. Brawl, one of Lucas's trophies refers to it as "Tazumily". The PAL version changes it to the more common spelling of "Tazmily".
    • Then there's the party member Lloyd/Loid/Roid from the first game in the series. An older official encyclopedia writes it as "Roid", while "Loid" relates to a potential Japanese pun on his Nerd Glasses, and "Lloyd" seems the most natural for an American character. Brawl officially writes his name as "Lloyd". A less-debated example is Ana/Anna from the same game. It turns out to be "Ana" according to Brawl, though.
  • Protagonist Roid/Lloyd Clive in the first Front Mission game. Roid being the original Japanese spelling, Lloyd being the fan-translated version. Proponents of either version were surprised when his name was officially translated as Royd.
  • Clark Still, Ralf Jones' partner from the Ikari Warriors and The King of Fighters games, has had his surname misromanized by fans as "Steel", even though the Japanese spelling of his surnamenote  doesn't have a long vowel mark, which would be the case if his surname was truly "Steel"note . There's a popular misconception that his surname was originally "Steel" as a Shout-Out to Superman, but was changed to "Still" to avoid any potential copyright infringement. However, the "Still" surname has been used for the character since the Japanese version of the first Ikari game (see here). All of this didn't prevent Terminal Realities from misspelling his surname as "Steel" in The Orochi Saga Collection.
  • Kevin Rian from Garou: Mark of the Wolves, is supposedly a distant relative of Blue Mary of Fatal Fury and KOF fame, even though Mary's surname is romanized differently in the KOF series (Ryan).
  • Gantz/Guntz from Klonoa 2: Dream Champ Tournament and Klonoa: Beach Volleyball respectively. His name was romanized differently in each game.
    • The character who is known as "Joka" in the original game is changed to "Joker" in the Wii remake.
  • The Atelier series gets a whole helping of a ton of the above issues, featuring both a character with the katakana of "Norudisu" (leading our friends at Tokyopop to spell it as both "Nordith" and "Nordis" during the print run of the Atelier Marie & Elie spinoff manga) and the fact that the setting for the first three games (if not many of the others) is a variation on Renaissance Germany, with many words being pronounced in a kind of pseudo-Gratuitous German fashion. Gust Inc., makers of the games, like to call the principality "Salburg" (and even run a website with that name); several fan translators and Tokyopop go with "Zarlburg" due to the katakana used to represent the German pronunciation of "s". Latter games, especially those still unreleased in the West, have a host of other pronunciation issues.
  • In the arcade version of Rival Schools', Shoma has his name romanized as "Syoma", which is from a non-Hepburn romanization system used by the Japanese. It was changed to "Shoma" in the PlayStation version.
    • The sequel, Project Justice, cleverly uses this trope to diferentiate between similar characters. In the story, the hero Batsu is plauged by a look-a-like who is actually by Big Bad Kurow going around ruining his good reputation. The fake Batsu can be fought against and eventually can be a playable character, so to differentiate him from the real Batsu, Capcom took advantage of the ambigutity in B and V sounds in Japanese and named the fake hero "Vatsu".
  • While not a mistranslation per se, Blizzard has recently decided that all names should be translated to the respective language in World of Warcraft, while the initial release, Warcraft 3 and all novels simply used the English names. Thankfully, it's possible to download a language pack to play it in English altogether. If only the same could be said about the novels...
  • The male lead of Star Ocean: The Second Story has the official name of "Claude" in the US, but his name is officially romanized as "Crawd" in Japanese. No English speakers actually use the name "Crawd", though, because it doesn't sound anything like an actual name — it's generally accepted that tri-Ace really did mean for him to be named Claude, and just messed up the romanization.
    • To make things more confusing, the game uses voice acting during battles. Sometimes his name is pronounced "Crawd," and sometimes "Claude."
      • And for whatever reason, they went and changed every single name in the PSP remake of the first game so that none of them match up with the sequel anymore. Even though the original game has perfectly legible English names for every single major character in its end credits.
  • Silhouette Mirage is heavy on the Judeo-Christian Theme Naming of its characters, but the names of the protagonist's seven weapons got lost in translation. They are named after the Seven Deadly Sins using the Japanese equivalent of the English words. The names were taken literally from the transliterations, leading to the following: Surosa (Sloth), Priday (Pride), Angara (Anger), Rasti (Lust), Cavitas (Covetry or Greed), Grattoni (Gluttony), and Envia (Envy).
  • Kirby's Dream Land had a blimp-like boss named Kaboola, which was absent in the Kirby Super Star sub-game Spring Breeze, which was mostly a remake of Kirby's Dream Land (some other features were also absent). The remake of Kirby Super Star for the Nintendo DS, Kirby Super Star Ultra, added the sub-game Revenge of the King, which is basically a harder version of Spring Breeze. In it the formerly missing boss returned with an altered appearance, as well as an altered name: Kabula.
    • The Combo Cannon (which recently had appeared in Super Smash Bros. Brawl) was renamed Main Cannon #2 in Super Star Ultra. Not too many fans were happy about that.
      • Heck, many names in the remake were incorrectly translated or even renamed, including Cavios to Cavius, Mecheye to Mekkai, Kaboola to Kabula, Iron Mom to Iron Mam, and so on.
    • Before the Kaboola/Kabula incident was the case of Mr. Frosty, who was inexplicably named "Mr. Flosty" in Kirby and the Amazing Mirror.
    • Meta Knight's name is sometimes spelled Metaknight or Meta-Knight by fans unaware of the canon spelling.
    • The Galacta Knight is called Galactic Knight (Gyarakutikku Naito) in Japanese. Also, Marx was called Mark (Maruku).
    • Kirby's Dream Land 2 had a recurring enemy in the series referred to as Load Kibble, clearly meant to be Lord Kibble, but the enemy in question is typically known as Sir Kibble in English and not Lord Kibble.
  • Leisure Suit Larry 7: Love For Sail includes a character named Xqwzts. The writer of the game intended for it to be pronounced "X-squats," but the actor that plays Larry couldn't get it right. That gave the writer the idea to have every character intentionally mispronounce the name any crazy way they could think of. In fact, throughout the whole game, only one character (not Larry) says it "correctly".
  • A recurring villain in the Bomberman series is Bagular/Bauglar/Buggler. While all are legitimate translations of the name "Bagura," Hudson Soft seems to have a hard time picking which one to go with. The confusion only gets worse when 2 games were released at the same time (Bomberman Hero and Bomberman World), each one referring to the character by a different name...or two (Hero had both of the first two spellings).
    • Bomberman Fantasy Race has the name as Bugglar in the credits, even in the Japanese version. The translators chose to translate it as Burglar, however for whatever reason.
  • Mathematicians call a Tetris piece a tetromino, by parallel with "domino". The Tetris Company once called it a "tetramino" before settling on "tetrimino".
  • Bubble Symphony aka Bubble Bobble II: Its flyer stated the name for the orange female bubble dragon as "Cururun". The game itself says it's "Kululun". Chalk one up to C/K and R/L confusion.
    • There's a reason to avoid trusting the flyer anyway.
  • In Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga and Super Smash Bros.. Brawl, you might notice that the starfish character appearing in both goes by the name of "Stafy". Well, his game series is finally being brought overseas as... The Legendary Starfy (ie: Starfy). His cameo in Mario & Luigi called it The Legend of Stafy, mixing up the title of his series as well (the title of his English debut is a direct translation of the series's Japanese name, Densetsu no Starfy, literally "Starfy of Legend"note ). Make of that what you will.
  • Nobody can seem to decide whether the Amazon princess of Seiken Densetsu 3 is supposed to be called "Lise", "Riese", or "Riesz".
  • Gray Fox from the Metal Gear series has had his real namenote  translated as "Frank Jaeger" or "Yeager", depending on the game. Incidentally, Yeager is an Americanized form of the German surname Jaeger. His codename also varies between "Gray Fox" and "Grey Fox".
    • But that's just a matter of American spelling versus British spelling. The same thing happens with Gray Mann from Team Fortress 2: he's often spelled Grey Mann because that's the British spelling of the word. Word Of God uses the American spelling.
    • The MSX2 versions of Metal Gear and Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake had a few romanizations for some of the characters' names that are different from the ones used in the later Metal Gear Solid games. Roy Campbell was originally called "Roy Kyanbel", Holly White was "Horry White", George Kasler in the PS2 version is known as George Kesler. Gustava Heffner and Johan Jacobsen were originally called Natasha Marcova and Yozef Norden respectively, which were legitimate name changes to the characters and not different romanizations of the same name. Natasha was likely changed due to the introduction of a later character called Nastasha Romanenko, but Yozef's was unexplained
    • The names of the bosses in the first two Metal Gear games for the MSX2 were mostly mangled pop-culture references: there's "Arnold" the cyborg (as in Schwarzenegger), "Coward Duck" (Howard the Duck), "Black Color" (from Blackcollar, an obscure Timothy Zahn novel about space ninjas), "Ultra Box" (Ultravox) and the "Predator". Not surprisingly, almost all of them (with the exception of Running Man) were changed in the remade versions.
  • That guy with the pointy hat in Mortal Kombat: is he Raiden or Rayden? Justified in that "Raiden" is a legitimate Japanese name, but the developers were forced to alter the spelling to avoid confusion with the other Raiden. Or the Shoot 'em Up series Raiden.
  • An example born out of the game's TV adaptation slightly changing the name of the character in question: Tlaloc/Traloc.
  • Lord Raptor's name from Darkstalkers is spelled "Lord Rapter" in the third game, Vampire Savior. Despite being a Japanese game, this is a purely western example; Lord Raptor's name in the Japanese version is named Zabel Zarock.
  • In SNK vs. Capcom: SVC Chaos, Genjuro Kibagami gets his name spelled as "Genjyuro Kibagami", while "Juli" becomes "Juri" (which would unknowingly make things a bit confusing when, years later, there actually was a SF character named Juri).
  • In Samurai Shodown III, Rimururu's name is spelled "Rimnerel" on the instruction card.
  • The King of Fighters 2001 mistakenly refers to "Chang" as "Chan".
  • A few Street Fighter and Final Fight examples.
    • Rolentonote  from the original Final Fight had his name spelled "Rolent" in the SNES sequel, Final Fight 2. "Rolent" spelling doesn't show up in any other game, except in his ending in Street Fighter Alpha 2.
    • "Shadaloo" note , the name of M. Bison's organization in the Street Fighter series, is alternatively spelled "Shadoloo" or even "Shadowlaw."
    • The intended spelling of Guy is actually Gainote  according to several sources note . "Guy" is actually an approximation of how his name is supposed to be pronounced (likely done to avoid the Accidental Innuendo). Unfortunately, there are fans who end up mispronouncing Guy's name as "Gwee."
    • Chun-Li's and Fei Long's names are sometimes spelled as one word. ("Chunli" or "Feilong")
    • On the credits of the Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie, Cammy's and Dee-Jay's names are spelled "Cammie" and "DJ".
  • The NES version of Double Dragon has an enemy character whose name is spelled "Rowper" in the game's versus mode and "Lopar" in the manual. His name is actually intended to be a nod to Roper from Enter the Dragon, since one of the other mooks in the game is named Williams. To make matters even more confusing, the names "Roper" and "Lopar" are used for two different enemy characters in Battletoads & Double Dragon, neither of them actually resembles the actual Rowper/Lopar character from the original game (one of them is really just a renamed Machine Gun Willy).
    • The name of Billy's girlfriend also seems to vary between "Marian" and "Marion" depending on the game. The manual for the Sega Master System version actually calls her "Mary-Ann"
  • Langrisser II and Der Langrisser never had official translations, so some names are completely inconsistent, not just between translations, but within translations themselves. Is it Kalxath, Kalzas or Karzas? Liana or Riana? Lana or Larna? Boser, Bozel, or Bosel?
  • In Thunder Force III, the upgraded version of the Twin Shot has been spelled out as both "Sever" and "Saber." The latter spelling is a bit funny because the upgraded Back Shot is called "Lancer".
  • In Valis II for the Turbografx CD, Valis is sometimes pronounced "Varis", thanks to "Blind Idiot" Translation.
    • Valia's name is sometimes written "Varia." The Sega Genesis version of the first game uses both spellings.
    • Valis IV suffers from this, as the only English version, Super Valis IV, is a mediocre translation of a mediocre SNES port that cuts out most of the characters and plot scenes. A walkthrough from the Japanese Monthly PC Engine magazine has what might be the closest thing to official romanized character names: the villain is "Gal-Gear" ("Gallagher" according to Super Valis IV), and the heroes are "Lena," "Amu" and "Ash-Far" (whose katakana would suggest "s" rather than "sh").
  • In the Sega Master System version of the first Ghostbusters game, Gozer is transliterated "Gorza".
  • While not a mistransliteration, Lisa from Backyard Sports has a last name that has been said to be either Crocket or Crockett. Neither of which are meaningful. Even the developers aren't sure.
  • Tekken: Dr. Bosconovitch's name is sometimes spelled "Vasconovich." In Tekken 3, his name was spelled as "Boskonovitch," but it resumed its original T1/T2 spelling in Tekken 6 (thanks to his daughter Alisa) and Tekken Tag Tournament 2.
  • The Zoids games suffer from all the misspellings the anime series do, and dozens more besides. Including the occasional screwup of an anime character's official English name...
  • Everyone who appears in the Touhou games have their names in Japanese, then a handy English Romanization next to it. This has helped quite a lot over time with names, even the ones that are actually Japanese. For example, the second kanji in Tenshi's name is more commonly read as "ko;" the Romanization cleared up quite a lot of confusion (although "Tenko" is still a popular Fan Nickname for her). There are exceptions occasionally though, when ZUN starts using foreign names. Is "Parsee" was pronounced "par-sii," or "par-seh-eh" (the former is the correct based on the katakana).
    • Special notice must be given to foreigner Maribel/Mariber/Maeriberii Hearn/Haarn/Haan (mix and match as you will). As she only appears in the music CDs, not the games, there is no official Romanization of her name. This is even lampshaded by her (most definitely Japanese) friend Renko Usami, who can't even pronounce her full name, and always calls her "Mary." Even that can be Romanized as "Merri," "Merii," or "Merry" instead. The poor girl just can't get a break.
    • Characters like Inubashiri Momizi/Momiji, Kotiya/Kochiya Sanae, and Kazami Yuka/Yuuka. These particular differences in romanization are because ZUN doesn't want to pin down just which one (there are multiple romanization schemes) he wants to use.
    • An interesting variation of this problem is Inaba Tewi, who uses an archaic character "wi" (ゐ) which was legislated out of the language by the Japanese government in 1954 (she's more than 1300 years old). Even in its original, the name would roughly be a homonym of "Tei" (てい). There has been at least one unofficial translation of Imperishable Night that used "Tei" but officially only Phantasmagoria of a Flower View uses "Tei."
      • Similarly, Scarlet Weather Rhapsody has final boss Tenshi Hinanai, whose surname can also be written as Hinanawi. In this case, fandom usually settles on the former spelling.
    • Hong Meiling knows what it's like to not have anyone know her name.
    • Even though Flandre appears to be the most common spelling of this vampire's name, it has been spelled Frandle, Frandoll, Frandale, Frandre, etc.
    • Wakasagihime gives us a version based on translation, rather than transliteration, for once. Her name is officially romanized as Wakasagihime, but 'Wakasagi' is written in hiragana and 'hime' in kanji, which would normally indicate that they're seperate names. But 'hime' can be the title 'princess'. So she's either 'Wakasagihime', 'Hime Wakasagi', or 'Princess Wakasagi', and no one is quite sure which.
  • When Pac-Man was first released in Japan, it was known as "Puckman" (pronounced Pakkuman). However, the name had to be changed for its U.S. release because the "P" could be vandalized making the name offensive to people. Namco found another romanization of the same pronunciation, and "Pac-Man" has since become the official English spelling of the name in Japan.
  • Jak and Daxter's Erol had his name's spelling changed to Errol in Jak 3, then back to Erol in Daxter. Some fans have joked that the extra "R" stands for "robot", given his "enhancements" in the third game.
  • The Dragon Quest series had Slime-like enemies called Babbles and Metal Babbles, which look more bubbling than babbling. Newer translations have them as Bubble Slimes and Liquid Metal Slimes.
  • In Tsukihime, レン has had issues with her name. Until the release of Melty Blood, she had no official romanization. But Melty Blood gives Len as her official romanization. There was a dispute about this, fans insisting that her actual name is spelled Ren, citing that Type-Moon sometimes "messes up". But considering that it's been Len throughout the series...
  • Lots of these in the Ys games: Rea/Lea/Lair, Luta/Luther, Dark Fact/Dulk Fukt, Duless/Dalles, Varestain/Valestine/Ballacetine, etc. Doesn't help that many of the games weren't officially translated. And others had their names completely changed. Not to mention that the first U.S. release on the Sega Master System spelled the title Y's.
  • Back when Kingdom Hearts Birth By Sleep was announced, fans translated the name of the new heartless style monsters as Unbirths. This spelling spread widely and no one thought anything of it until Word Of God corrected fans that it was Unversed, meaning one "who is not enlightned" rather then the "oppostie of human life". Many fans still insisted it was supposed to be "Unbirth" and that the English version was censoring it.
    • Which is a good thing, considering "unbirthing" is apparently a vore fetish.
      • Its actually a translation issue as the Japanese language didn't have an equivalent romanji for the letter "v" and used "b" instead.
    • One of the Ansem Reports in Kingdom Hearts II mentions the names of his apprentices. In the North American version, Dilan, Aeleus and Braig are written Dilin, Eleus and Bleig. This was corrected in the PAL version.
    • Kingdom Hearts II also has some Heartless in the Tron world (Space Paranoids) named "Magnum Loader". While it sounds like a fitting name for an enemy in a computer program, the Japanese spelling of its name (Maguna Rōdā) and the general appearance and behaviour make it clear that the name is supposed to be "Magna Roader", as a Shout-Out to the enemies of the same name from Final Fantasy VI.
    • In the English release of Kingdom Hearts Re:Chain of Memories, Sora's sleight "Rīsaru Furēmu" was mistranslated as "Lethal Flame". It should be "Lethal Frame", since the attack has nothing to do with flames whatsoever, and involves freezing an enemy while attacking it multiple times (hence "frame" as in a frame of movement).
    • The name of Riku's mode in the same game is a deliberate reference to this trope. The mode was simply titled "Ribāsu" in Japanese. Since this can be rendered as either "Reverse" or "Rebirth" in English, and since both were just as applicable as each other, the translators decided to just use both, and thus the mode was called "Reverse/Rebirth" in English.
  • Journey To Silius is supposed to be "Sirius".
  • The cover of the Japanese version of Yoshi's Island actually spells the game's title as "Yossy Island".
  • The intro to Sonic the Fighters infamously misspelled Dr. Robotnik's name "DR. ROBOTONIC."
    • This also applies to Sonic Colo(u)rs, the name slightly changes depending on how the word colours is spelled in the region the game is being sold in. A wise decision on SEGA's part.
  • Everyone knows the Vic Viper is the main ship in the Gradius series (barring the odd name changes made by Konami's localization staff, like the "Warp Rattler" or the "M.A.X."), but what about the Player 2 ship that appears in Salamander spinoffs. Is it the "Lord British" (a possible intentional Shout-Out to Richard Garriott of the Ultima franchise), the "Road British" or the "Load British"?
    • When it doubt, believe in the heart of the cards. And if you don't trust children's card games, Solar Assault also makes "Lord British" its name.
    • Gradius's title is itself a Japanese misspelling of "gladius". Some material refers to the Spider Tank enemy as the "Club(Crab) Spider".
  • Knights in the Nightmare has this in spades. No one can seem to agree whether the princess' name is Pisce, Pische, or Piche. The other princess is Arlier, Arlie, or Alier. The archer general is Aculienne, Aqualine, Acqueline, or Aquina. Zolgonark has been spelled with a C at the end. How many Ls are in Yelma, or is it an R? Is it Vienna, Vienya, or Vinya? And that's not even the complete list.
    • Likewise, Blaze Union. The only new character whose name is certain is Garlot.
    • Put simply, Sting Entertainment has a bad habit of choosing As Long as It Sounds Foreign names and then not telling America how they're supposed to be spelled.
    • Thankfully, in Gloria Union, whenever a character leads a Union, their name shows up on the attack confirmation screen. Unfortunately, Sting decided not to spell "Minnesota" correctly, as they did it with just one N. And seeing as the character with that name is an Indiana Jones Expy...
  • Star Fox Command retconned Panther Caroso to Panther Caruso for unknown reasons. And since there hasn't been a new Star Fox game after it, most fans will probably still use Caroso.
    • The original put all boss names in the manual and in game except for the Slot Machine, who's never named at all. They contradict with three bosses: Atomic Core/Base, Professor Hangar/Hanger, and Galactic Riders/Rider. It's confusing as to which source is canon, most notable with the Galactic Rider(s), as it can refer to either the singular escape pod or the bikers piloting it. To make it even more confusing, the Boss Subtitles in the manual support its plural spelling and the game's listing as the weapon is the bikers themselves. Hanger/Hangar... doesn't really help with the arguing. Those names are easily interchangeable.
  • In addition to the usual "Blind Idiot" Translation, Resident Evil 2 had many gross misspellings, including "dust shoot" and "mugnum parts".
  • In the manual for Syphon Filter, Girdeux is misspelled "Girdeaux".
  • In Remember11, the first main character has her name spelled "Cocoro" in the opening credits, but the translation in the game itself uses "Kokoro", which renders it using standard romanization spelling
  • Metal Slug 3's Stage 4 boss is named ソル・デ・ロカ in official artwork. That name is often romanized as "Sol Dae Rokker", even though it's clearly "Sol de roca" (Spanish for "sun of rock"; that thing is made of rock and looks like a sun)
  • In SaGa2 / Final Fantasy Legend II, it is usually taken for granted that the character named Lynn in the west was called Lin in the original Japanese version. However, the romanization of the game on the 2009 remake's Japanese website lists her name as Rin.
  • Armored Core has had it bad, especially after changing hands from Agetec to Sega to Ubisoft. Last Raven brings us Zinaida kana  (a common Cyrillic name, although the kana spelling is nonstandard), which has been argued to be Schneider (totally missed it), and from Nexus onwards, we also have Genobee kana  which has been suggested to be originally Shinobi (implausible) or Zinovi (another common Cyrillic name, very likely). Those are examples of pragmatic translations; Sega and Ubisoft were more...lax. Then again, who can really blame them for being divided between Abu Marche and Abe Marsh kana ?
    • Then again, Agetec did mess up big time in the first game and rendered the pilot of Valkyrie, Rossweisse/Roweie kana  as "Losvaize". It may have been excused on the grounds that Rossweisse is an allusion to one of the Valkyries in Die Walkuere and Agetec didn't know that, but her name is displayed on her own emblem! *headdesk*
  • In Ōkami, there is a character named Ishaku. In Ōkamiden, he is inexplicably now named Isshaku.
  • The NES version of Hydlide only describes the plot in the manual, unlike the original PC-88 version. The English manual renamed the Big Bad Boralis, though his name is still displayed as Varalys in the game's status window.
  • The Legacy of the Wizard manual names the mother, son, grandmother and grandfather "Meyna", "Roas", "Jiela" and "Douel" respectively (though the mother is "Mayna Worzen" in the credits), whereas the intro screen for the MSX2 version (Dragon Slayer IV: Drasle Family) names them Maia, Royas, Geera and Dawel. The English version changed the name of the Final Boss to Keela, but in Japan its name was either Dilgyos or Dilguios.
  • Fate/stay night does not really have official spellings for names like Ilyasviel Von Einzbern, leading to spelling her name both Ilya and Illya. FSN used Ilya while the translators for Fate/hollow ataraxia are using Illya. There is, however, an official Romanization for Saber's real name — Altria, as opposed to the fan translation's Arturia.
  • Persona 4: The Golden adds a new female character named マリー. There were fights over whether she'll be known as Marii, Mari, Mary, or Marie in the English edition, with the localisation settling with Marie
    • In Persona3 we get Aigis, whose name is derived from an ancient greek word, which correctly would be spelled "gis". As the "" symbol would be too hard to read for most players, the development team commonly romanizes the name as "Aegis" when necessary. The localization team didn't get the memo and went with the (equally correct) "Aigis" instead. Fans are fighting over which is the "correct" spelling to this day.
  • In the original Japanese MSX2 version of Aleste, the name of the supercomputer gone wrong was romanized as "DIA 51." The supercomputer was written out of the translated Sega Master System version, Power Strike, but the out-of-game material for M.U.S.H.A. refers to it as "Dire 51." (This was likely because the Japanese version of Musha Aleste wrote the name using ateji instead of romaji.)
  • Compile's little round mascot has appeared under two different names: Randar (Golvellius: Valley of Doom) and Lander (The Guardian Legend).
  • Seen on the title screen of Harvest Moon 64: "1999 Natume Inc." The company is more commonly translated as Natsume, although both "tsu" and "tu" are valid transliterations of the kanji in question.
  • In Magical Cannon Wars none of the characters have the same name in the dialogue as they do in the credits so apparently nobody could decide what their names were.
  • In the manual of Space Harrier 3-D, Uriah is spelled "Euria."
  • Kaidan Alenko from Mass Effect often has his name spelled "Kaiden" by both Mass Effect fans and even BioWare themselves.
    • Not to mention Shepard themself. Shepherd, Sheppard, Shephard, Shepperd... The last three are admittedly rather rare examples, but the first is quite common when it comes to misspelling Shepard's name, as another popular game has an important character going by the name of General Shepherd. Commander Shepard, General Shepherd... you can see how this can sometimes cause confusion.
  • In the PC-88 version of Super Pitfall, Quickclaw is spelled "Quick Crow."
  • In HAL Wrestling for the Game Boy (a Spiritual Successor to Pro Wrestling for the NES), one wrestler's name is spelled both "Super Cyber" and "Super Civer."
  • In the English version of the NES port of the original Might and Magic, the world Varn (which is actually an acronym for Vehicular Astropod Research Nacelle) that the game is set in is mistranslated "Barn", apparently due to the back and forth transliteration.
  • The localization of Lunar: Dragon Song is plagued with inconsistent transliteration of NPC names, some of which (Laban/Raiban, Balam/Bram) are bound to confuse players trying to figure out who they have to Fetch Quest for.
  • The Portopia Serial Murder Case originally had the katakana for "Portopia" split into two words, so it may have been intended to be "Port Pier."
  • Possibly one of the longest-running examples in video game history. The spell "Cure", which appears in various Role-Playing Game series, mostly by Square Enix, is actually a mistranslation - the Japanese romanisation of the spell is "Kearu", which approximates to the English word "Care". Since "Cure" is so firmly ingrained in the Western consciousness by now, though, it's likely that changing it to "Care" would cause fan outcry, even though that was the original name for the spell all along (and also "Cure" arguably makes it clearer what the spell actually does than "Care").
  • Technosoft spelled their name "Tecno Soft" in their earlier Japanese games. The H was first added to their name in the exported Sega Genesis versions of Thunder Force II, Thunder Force III and Herzog Zwei.
  • The North American version of Shining Wisdom had to do this. Sega (who had most Shining games) had the license to use the names but the game itself was licensed by Working Designs, Sega forced them to rename everything that appeared in Japanese/European versions; for instance, Parmecia became Palacia.
  • Zap Dramatic can't make up his mind if one of his games is titled Sir Basil Pike or Sir Basel Pike.
  • In Veigues: Tactical Gladiator, the naming of the enemy base "Mizgals Serpent" is a result of mistransliterating "Midgard" from Old Norse to Japanese to English.
  • The official romanizations of the Panel de Pon characters シャーベット, セレン, サナトス, and コーディリア are "Sharbet", "Seren", "Sanatos", and "Corderia" respectively (even in English, Seren being used to refer to a sticker in Super Smash Bros. Brawl); the Fan Translation translates their names as "Sherbet", "Selene", "Thanatos", and "Cordelia".
  • The House of the Dead has two involving agent Thomas Rogan:
    • Some arcade cabinets misspelled his name as 'Rowgun', despite the game itself sticking with Rogan.
    • Very strangely, in House Of The Dead 4 Special, if G gets a high score, he'll remark that he's probably 'better than Logan.' Since there is no other character named Logan in the series, he's probably referring to his old partner.
  • The heroine of the Sega Dreamcast Action RPG Napple Tale is named Pōchi. The creators knew that word can be rendered in English as "pouch", "porch" or "poach", and picked it because it has so many potential meanings. ...Which is fine in Japanese, but really complicates the poor girl's name in English.
  • Baldur's Gate, in the original English with no translation involved, can't decide (in the dialogues) whether its Big Bad Wannabe is called "Rieltar" or "Reiltar" Anchev.
  • The PC Engine version of Puzzle Boy has " ATLAS" on the title screen. At least Atlus didn't develop or publish this version of their game (Telenet Japan did).

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