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So Bad Its Good: Western Animation

Kids these days..they'll watch anything the TV shows 'em. Back in our days, we had nothing but crappy cartoons, and by gum, we liked 'em!
  • Dennis the Menace has an in-universe example. In "The Price of Stardom", Dennis becomes the prop man for a Heidi-esque play starring Margaret and Mr. Wilson. During the performance, Dennis turns on a giant fan, has Mr. Wilson dress in a swimsuit for a costume change, drops a bag of fake snow on Margaret and opens a trap door that Mr. Wilson happens to be standing on at the time. The audience laughs throughout the entire performance and cheers when the play ends.
  • Most aspects of the French animated series based on Donkey Kong Country actually aren't all that bad. The characters are accurate to their game counterparts and have likeable personalities, some of the jokes written for the show are genuinely funny, and though the mere presence of singing in the show can be unsettling to new viewers, the songs themselves aren't bad. However, it still tends to be mentioned in these sorts of situations because the animation, perhaps the first thing people notice about cartoons, really is So Bad It's Good, and in some people's opinions has thus become by far the biggest reason to watch the show. The badly-deformed character models fall into the Uncanny Valley with such force, they bounce back out of its depths and end up looking hilarious, rather than scary.
  • G.I. Joe Extreme. Between the laughable live-action sequences, the hammy acting, and the pitiful animation, it has something for everyone to laugh at.
  • Once you strip away the Nostalgia Goggles, He-Man's appeal boils down to this. All the Accidental Innuendo and Ho Yay certainly help.
  • Jibber Jabber. The characters crawled out from the deepest pit in the Uncanny Valley. The whole series is ridiculously cheesy. That's what makes it so hilarious!
  • Johnny Test. The animation is unbelievably stiff and jerky (to the point of Uncanny Valley), the main character's an annoying douchebag, the jokes mainly consist of Lampshade Hanging, it's full of cliches, stereotypes and nonsensical plotlines, and manages to get even the simplest math and science facts completely wrong. All of this is thrown together seemingly at random, coated with "X-TREME", and set so loud and fast that it surpasses raising questions about the creators' drug usage and instead becomes a drug in itself. It's gotten to the point that few people watch it unironically.
  • The Mel-O-Toons shorts from the early 1960s are yet another unholy union of low budget animation and voiceover. Like the Paul Bunyan and David and Goliath shorts. Just try to keep a straight face as you learn all kinds of amazing things about Paul Bunyan that they didn't teach you in grade school. When watching the latter, pay particular attention to Goliath's booming voice, frightening battle stance and grisly death.
  • The entire premise of the animated series The Mighty Ducks. The series was about a group of hockey-playing, crime-fighting anthropomorphic alien ducks from a hockey obsessed planet called "puck world" in another dimension. Despite the utterly ridiculous set-up, though, the series is surprisingly much, much better than it sounds. Unfortunately, no one seemed willing to give it much of a chance. And it was cancelled after only one season.
  • Ladies and gentleman, The Mighty Hercules. Voice acting to make Resident Evil proud, a shoestring budget, and some serious Ho Yay make this one so unforgettably bad that just about anyone will enjoy it. Just try and watch an episode without peeing yourself in laughter. Here's one; go for it, you know you want to.
  • Mission Hill has an In-Universe example in the episode "Plan 9 From Mission Hill". It turns out Wally made a Sci-Fi movie years ago that starred Gus, was full of plot holes, lousy special effects, and had a hat for a flying saucer. He has made every effort to make sure it is never seen by anyone until an old revival theater gets a hold of it and the movie gains legions of followers for how entertaining it is.
  • There is a Mr. T. animated series. It features the T-man delivering live-action segments at the beginning and end. It's spectacularly Anvilicious... and the opening credits feature T. spinning a crocodile over his head. Consult The Agony Booth for more information.
  • Mutilator: Hero of the Wasteland is an early 90s animation project in two parts. It is horrible in every way imaginable: the art looks like something out of Liquid Television that didn't age well with perspective and anatomical issues up the hole, the sound is poorly mixed (with voices barely audible), and the plot is even worse: a man with a mechanical arm kills things in the wasteland. Yet somehow, the combination of these poor elements is nothing short of hilarious today. A cursory look through the YouTube comments reveals a general attitude that this was too good to last.
    • Imagine, if you will, Rob Liefeld's drawing used as a starting point, and then animated by the same people who made the Philips CD-i Zelda games, on a shoestring budget, while everyone involved was high as a kite, and you'll get close to understanding the animation style.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic has an In-Universe example. In "The Show Stoppers", the Cutie Mark Crusaders decide to perform an "epic rock ballad" for the local talent show. The performance is an unmitigated disaster, with off-key singing, poor choreography, many special effects failures, and costumes straight out of The Eighties. At first, the crowd watches in stunned silence, but howl in laughter when it's over. The group ends up winning an award... for "Best Comedy Act."
    • Out of all the sucky outfits the other ponies forced Rarity to make in "Suited For Success", fans generally agree that Rainbow Dash's really did look cool. They just don't agree on who that helmet reminds them of: Spartans? The Rocketeer? Flash Gordon? Magneto? Judge Dredd? Space Marines? Sangheili Elites?
      • Her helmet seemed to be re-used for her Commander Hurricane role in "Hearth's Warming Eve", however.
      • That is to say, cool for a superhero. For a formal dance... perhaps not so much. Then again, her reason for attending was to crash the Wonderbolts' performance with her flying moves, so it makes sense she initially thought the dress would work.
    • The live show at the 2011 Calgary Stampede. Unfortunately, unlike the other examples, this is not Stylistic Suck.
    • Twilight's very awkward dance from "Sweet and Elite."
  • NFL RushZone: Guardians of the Core. It reaches The Room levels of this. The animation sucks, the characters are either dull, or blatant stereotypes, and the plot is a muddled mess. But, it's so awful it becomes very entertaining, and fun to riff on. Oh and the main character, Ish (yes, that is his actual name) looks like Michael Jackson, which is how it gained the nickname "MJ FOOTBALL".
    • The 2nd Season kicks this up a notch with the presense of Wild Card
  • An in-universe one happens in Rocko's Modern Life (Wacky Delly of course).
  • The 1960s Spiderman cartoon counts. While the show did have many geniune fans, it also has a large So Bad It's Good fandom. All the camp of the Adam West Batman show (being as it, like the Batman show, crawled out of the goldmine of So Bad It's Good that was the Silver Age) add to that the most unsuitable voice ever for the guy who plays Spider-Man, low budget animation, and stock footage used over and over again, and it's very difficult for most viewers not to laugh at the hideous result. A monstrosity IN COLOR!
  • Tiny Toon Adventures had an in-universe example when Buster, Babs and Plucky decided to make a non-comedy film. One of the studio's heads actually mentioned the trope. He didn't like it enough to the point of giving them other serious roles but enough to readmit them in comedy.
  • Gene Deitch was quite brilliant in his 1950s stylized modern work; he took the stodgy, flagging Terrytoons in an interesting direction. But when he took on the Tom and Jerry franchise in the early 1960s, it went in a whole weird Eastern European-filtered direction.
  • Tony Hawk's Boom Boom Sabotage. The villain is a demented circus ringmaster, and his dragon is a vicious, snarling midget pirate; they have many Ho Yay moments. The heroes consist of five teenage skateboarders and Distressed Dude Tony Hawk. The storyline is utterly disturbed and often takes a backseat to skateboarding sequences, the subtitles often render dialogue as 'unintelligible', and the animation... is satisfactory. Only because of all this is it worth seeing (with the subtitles on for maximum amusement!).
  • Toxic Crusaders, which ditched the R-rated qualities of Toxic Avenger and replaced them with hilariously ridiculous dialogue, plots, and animation. Many things made no sense whatsoever: Toxie went to live in the town dump after his mom suggested it, even though she had no problem in later episodes visiting him or boasting that he's her son. He also mentions later that he and his friends need to "pay rent" — to the dump?! All the mutants were called, every single time, "hideously deformed mutants of superhuman size and strength." There were constant ass pulls: when a Mad Scientist creates french fries that turn anyone who eats them into nearsighted, forgetful old people - his own words - it turns out that putting pepper on them turns the mutagen chemicals into bubble gum, which negates the process. There is also a Running Gag in which the Big Bad's main henchperson Psycho will predict, with eerie accuracy, exactly how their plans will be foiled. The Big Bad never listens; once, he tells Psycho to stop spoiling things for him. There's also lampshade-hanging galore.
    Junkyard: Do we have time for a flashback?
    Toxie: Oh sure! It'll probably take Killemoff some time to come up with a new plan to destroy us.
    • After Killemoff loads a giant monster truck on a barge which predictably (Psycho said it would) sinks the whole thing to the bottom of the river:
  • This is what most animated adaptions of video games tend to be.
  • Wild Grinders has cliched plots that make no sense and pretty much should be called teen stereotype TV. It has gotten to the point to where everyone who watches it watches it to laugh at how bad it is.

WebcomicsSo Bad, It's Good    

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