Series: Titanic

All the effort put into the cast, and not into historical accuracy.

A full year before James Cameron's Titanic broke box office records, Robert Lieberman directed a TV miniseries about the ill-fated liner. Boasting an All-Star Cast which included Catherine Zeta-Jones, Peter Gallagher, Tim Curry, and George C. Scott, the film was aired in two parts on CBS in November 1996.

The film follows three plots:

  1. Isabella is returning to America after attending her aunt's funeral. On the trip, she meets Wynn, her ex-lover, who begins to rekindle their romance.
  2. The Allison family and their new nurse, Alice Cleaver. Unlike the other two plots, this is based on real-life passengers, but only loosely, as here Alice is portrayed as a mentally disturbed child killer.
  3. Jamie, a down-on-his-luck pickpocket, sneaks aboard the Titanic after lifting a ticket from an immigrant. He meets a missionary family, and a crewman who is planning on robbing the First Class.

Very much in the They Just Didn't Care category, the production was rushed to capitalize on the hype for the upcoming Cameron movie, and is littered with inaccuracies. It also features one of the most random rape scenes in television history.

Despite being released a year before the Cameron film, there are numerous similarities between the two. In particular, the lead character is a young man from Third Class with the initial "J", who boards with a ticket that didn't originally belong to him,note  falls in love with another passenger and uses someone else's tuxedo to mingle in First Class, where he meets John Jacob Astor.

For other works by this name, go here.

See also Hitler: The Rise of Evil, another Canadian miniseries that aired on CBS which was rife with historical inaccuracies.

Tropes featured include:

  • Adaptational Attractiveness: The plain, dumpy Molly Brown is played by glamorous Marilu Henner.
  • Anachronism Stew:
    • Jamie describes to Aase a "moving picture" he saw once, though by 1912 moving pictures were nothing new.
    • Third Class had baths, not showers - rare in the UK at the time.
    • While talking to Astor about "moving pictures," Jamie says he'll invest in the up-and-coming Keystone Studios, which was founded three months after the Titanic sank.
    • First class passengers are seen dancing the tango when in fact there was no dancing for first class passengers on Titanic and the tango was not even embraced by the upper classes until a few years later.
  • Anyone Can Die: Even people who didn't actually die that night, it seems.
  • Artistic License History: The number of historical mistakes here makes any in Cameron's film moot. A note on maritime terminology... 
    • Thomas Andrews is completely absent from the events of the sinking, and his role is merged with Captain Smith. Chief Officer Henry Wilde, Third Officer Herbert Pitman and Sixth Officer James Moody are also omitted. Fourth Officer Joseph Boxhall is shown dying during the sinking when he actually survived (and was on the first boat picked up by Carpathia). First Officer Murdoch, a Scotsman, here has an upper-class English accent and his uniform has three stripes, the markings of a Chief Officer. In addition, Chief Engineer Joseph Bell has a distinct Scottish accent, whereas he was from Cumbria in Northwestern England.
    • Isabella asks to switch rooms, but is told the ship is completely booked. Only half the rooms of First and Second Class were occupied.
    • The ship is shown to be docked on its starboard side in Southampton, when Titanic was actually docked on the port side.
    • J. Bruce Ismay says that his father founded the White Star Line. Actually, Thomas Ismay founded the parent company Oceanic Steam Navigation, and purchased the house flag and trade name of White Star after the line had originally gone bankrupt in 1868.
    • There was no press conference on board before the voyage. In addition, Smith's comment about "shipbuilding becoming such an art that any ship foundering is impossible" was made five years prior on the Adriatic.
      • When asked if he's had any accidents or wrecks in his career, Captain Smith brushes off a few "winter squalls, storms, and fog" as the most noteworthy of his "adventures," seemingly forgetting the collision between RMS Olympic and the cruiser HMS Hawke, which happened under Smith's command barely six months prior to the Titanic setting sail.note 
    • As in most re-tellings of the story, it is stated that Smith planned to retire after the maiden Titanic voyage. There is actually very little contemporary evidence to support this. He certainly never confirmed it to any newspaper reporters.
    • Benjamin Guggenheim and Molly Brown did not board the ship at Southampton, and instead boarded in France. Because of that, they were not able to attend dinner on the first night out.
    • John Jacob Astor is mentioned to be "the richest man in the world." However, he was the richest man on board; though still wealthy, he wasn't even the richest man in America.note 
    • It is stated that there was only one pair of binoculars on the bridge for the officers to share around, so Murdoch therefore confiscates the pair from the crow's nest. In fact, Second Officer Lightoller testified that each senior officer had his own set of binoculars. It was only the lookouts' binoculars which were misplaced. Shortly before the ship set sail, Captain Smith brought on Chief Wilde as Chief Officer, which meant Murdoch and Lightoller were each demoted a rank, and Second Officer David Blair was removed from the command roster altogether. When he left the ship, Blair accidentally took with him the keys to the locker in which the binoculars were kept (in other versions, he actually took the binoculars with him or they were left in his cabin). Given the state of optics in 1912, and that there was no moon and a flat calm sea, it is unlikely binoculars would have made a significant improvement.
    • It is implied that the Allisons' nanny is Alice Cleaver, the child killer. In fact she was a different woman.
    • As in many versions of the story, Bruce Ismay is shown to be desperate for the Titanic to break a speed record when he would have known that the White Star Line's ships could not match the Cunard's liners the Lusitania and the Mauretania for speed. Instead, the White Star Line aimed to beat Cunard by offering more comfort and luxury. Furthermore, arriving in New York a day early would not have earned him plaudits but the wrath of passengers whose hotel and travel arrangements were for the following day, not to mention irritating New York customs.
    • Margaret Brown is inaccurately portrayed as a loud cigar chomping, poker playing, oversexed hillbilly. She is seen in the smoking room, which would have been a male only domain in 1912. She was also never referred to as Molly in her lifetime.
    • Frederick Fleet notes a haze on the horizon and then immediately sees the iceberg. Both he and Reginald Lee actually noted a haze about ten minutes before seeing the iceberg, but didn't report it.
    • Fourth Officer Boxhall answers the bridge telephone and relays Fleet's sighting of the iceberg, even though it was Sixth Officer Moody who did this.
    • Quartermaster Hitchens rolls the ship's wheel to the starboard side when ordered "hard-a starboard." In this era, British vessels still used tiller commands, which were reversed: the ship's wheel would need to be swung in the direction the ship was turning while the tiller (which controlled the rudder) was turned to the side that was ordered. Ergo, a hard-a starboard order would mean to turn the wheel fully to port.
    • Captain Smith chastises Ismay by telling him that they have "precisely the number of lifeboats required by the British Board of Trade." In actuality, Titanic carried four more boats than the law required for a ship of her size.
    • The officers see the Californian directly ahead and attempt to signal her from the bridge. The "mystery ship," believed to be the Californian, was actually sighted off the starboard side.
    • As in the Jim Cameron film, this perpetuates the myth that steerage passengers were deliberately locked below decks during the sinking. The gates were meant to ensure that steerage passengers did not gain access to First or Second Class areas, preventing the spread of diseases so that only steerage had to go through health inspections and immigration processing at Ellis Island. Even when locked, they did not bar access to the boat deck. However, whereas the Cameron film demonstrates a sense of confusion, which likely did happen since the crew did not have any idea what the evacuation procedures were for steerage (whether they had their own boats, were allowed to come up, etc.), here they're locked because "lifeboats are for First Class only."
    • The weapons that are removed from the ship's safe are a Smith & Wesson and two Iver Johnson revolvers. However, the guns that the officers had on board were Webley revolvers (accurately used in Jim Cameron's film).
    • Near the end, Captain Smith makes a sanctimonious speech about how the Titans in Greek mythology challenged the gods and were cast down for it. In fact, they were gods, and were overthrown by the Olympians.note 
    • First Officer Murdoch is portrayed as shooting himself late in the sinking, even though there is little evidence to support this.
    • Bruce Ismay escaped in Collapsible C, which was launched from the starboard side of the bridge. However, here, he gets away in a lifeboat on the port side. In addition, there are more lifeboats shown to be readied after his boat is launched, even though Collapsible C was the second-to-last boat to be launched.note 
    • Wireless operators Jack Phillips and Harold Bride are shown jumping off the ship together. However, they separated once they left their cabin, with Bride heading for the overturned Collapsible B and Phillips heading aft.
    • Fifth Officer Lowe reports to Captain Rostron of Carpathia that the ship sank at 2:40am. It was actually 2:20, after sinking in two hours and forty minutes. It was also Fourth Officer Boxhall (who inexplicably dies during this movie), not Lowe, who was the first officer picked up by Carpathia and he relayed this information to Rostron.
    • On the Californian, Captain Lord and wireless operator Cyril Evans are shown to be much older than they were in 1912; Lord was 39 (and beardless), while Evans was 20. Third Officer Groves was not on the bridge when the Titanic's rockets were sighted, it was Second Officer Stone and the apprentice Gibson. Groves thought the ship in the distance was a passenger liner, but here he changes his mind and agrees with Lord that it is a small freighter or fishing boat.
    • The epilogue mentions "All attempts to raise the Titanic have failed." No such attempt has or ever will be made. Yes, there was the section of the hull they raised in 1996, but a tiny section is not the entire ship.
      • While there were plans to raise or salvage the ship since she sank, none of these passed the conceptual stage, mostly because there was no way to reach or find the wreck. Once the wreck was discovered, it became clear it could never be raised.
  • Artistic License Ships:
    • Quartermaster Robert Hitchens takes the ship out of Southampton, when actually this was the job of the ship's pilot (who disembarked when the ship departed from Ireland).
    • Captain Smith is seen at the ship's wheel, when this task would be the duty of a lower ranking sailor, such as a quartermaster. Furthermore, he allows a passenger to take the wheel, which would never be permitted in reality. Indeed, under White Star Line rules, passengers were not even allowed on the Bridge.
    • Many officers are depicted observing military protocol (saluting, saying "Captain on deck," etc.). This is an aversion, as it was common for sailors and officers in Britain to switch between military duty and merchant marine service. Indeed, the officers of Titanic were members of the Royal Navy Reserve.
    • Smith complains that distress rockets should be red. In fact, there was no specified colour for distress rockets, and white would have been acceptable.
    • On the bridge, Lightoller casually informs Smith that the ship has increased speed on Ismay's orders. The notion that an unqualified civilian could give navigation orders to the engineers and officers on any vessel without even the captain's knowledge or consent is absurd.
    • When Captain Smith decides to retire to his quarters, he tells Lightoller he's "going below." However, the captain's quarters were right behind the bridge. The proper term would be "going off deck."
    • As for the ship itself, the miniseries goes wrong wherever Cameron went right:
      • While the CGI model is pretty good, the exterior sets have no resemblance to the actual layout of the ship. For instance, the bridge set is missing the wings on its port and starboard sides.
      • Attendants are shown placing chairs and decorations the day before departure. However, the ship had already been fitted out in Belfast prior to her arrival in Southampton.
      • The bridge seems to consist of a single room, with an engine telegram at the front, the ship's wheel, and a map table in the back. The actual bridge was a fairly extensive complex. The forward section had the engine telegrams at the front in what was the navigation bridge. The main steering wheel (which controlled the ship's tiller) was enclosed in the wheelhouse in the rear section. The chart room was adjacent to the bridge through the wheelhouse.
      • Titanic did not have a two story tea room with revolving doors and huge windows. There would not have been enough room on the ship for such a structure.note 
      • The glass dome over the grand staircase is absent, and replaced with a chandelier.
      • The First Class smoking room did not have a bar; drinks were served by waiters.
      • The wireless room did not have a service window for the passengers. Messages were sent and delivered via stewards.
      • Titanic did not have a brig or prison of any kind.note 
      • The engineering sections, which took up three-quarters of the watertight compartments, seem to only consist of one room with boilers on one side and valve controls on the other. In addition, a modern klaxon blares throughout the engine room, which the ship did not have. Chief Engineer Bell is in an area that shows flooding, whereas he likely remained in the turbine area with the generators (which did not flood until the ship broke in half).
      • When Simon and Jamie leave to loot First Class, Simon closes the gate and sees that the lifeboats are being loaded. They appear to be walking down the First Class Promenade, which was right underneath the boat deck and thus the lifeboats wouldn't be visible.
      • Speaking of lifeboats, in several scenes they are obviously modern metallic ones instead of wooden.
  • Beard of Evil: Simon, as if being played by Tim Curry wasn't indication enough.
  • Big "NO!": Jamie screams "NOOO!!!" when he accidentally falls into a lifeboat, as he promised the Jack family he would come back for them.
  • California Doubling: Filmed in Vancouver for cost-cutting measures (despite the Titanic having sunk in the Atlantic, not the Pacific).
  • Cheerful Child: Loraine Alison, who has boundless excitement for going into a lifeboat.
  • Cheshire Cat Grin: Simon gives one to Jamie. No surprise, as Simon is played by Tim Curry.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Beyond most adaptations, J. Bruce Ismay is portrayed as casually undermining Captain Smith's authority, even going behind his back to order more boilers lit and the ship's speed to be increased.
  • Crazy-Prepared: Simon changes his plan to loot First Class very quickly, even bringing a sheet along so he can be disguised as a woman and sneak into the lifeboats.
  • Deadly Deferred Conversation:
    • Shortly before the collision with the iceberg, Astor's maid comes to him to say that the Allison's maid is actually a child killer. As it's late at night, Astor says that he'll talk to Mr. Allison about it in the morning. Neither Astor nor Allison survives.
    • On the night of the sinking, Smith promises to deal with Ismay and his orders to increase Titanic's speed in the morning.
  • Despair Event Horizon: Aase goes over one after getting raped by Simon.
  • Disaster Movie
  • Disguised in Drag: How Simon gets into a lifeboat, though it's more Hiding in a Hijab.
  • Dolled-Up Installment: Some foreign video distributors marketed this miniseries as a sequel to James Cameron's Titanic.
  • Dramatic Shattering: Part One of the movie ends shortly after the collision with a unattended glass sliding out of the frame and onto the deck.
  • Driven to Suicide: Just like the Jim Cameron film, this features First Officer Murdoch shooting himself after killing someone trying to get into a boat. However, this is far more malicious as it depicts him coldly shooting a stoker without any provocation.
  • Dull Surprise: The default setting of anyone who's not excessively panicking at the mere sight of water in the ship.
  • Dutch Angle: The sinking is done in near-total Dutch angles, trying to show the sinking without moving the sets. It gets a bit comical when actors are trying to be off-balance when they're on level ground, not to mention it's used soon after the collision (when the tilt was not apparent yet), with along with varying between scenes and even giving the impression that the ship is heavily listing (beyond what was reported).
  • The Edwardian Era: Big hats, tailcoats, and everything in between.
  • Evil Brit: Tim Curry.
  • Face Death with Dignity:
    • Captain Smith
    • The Band
    • The gentlemen in the First Class Smoking Room
  • Fatal Family Photo: Even if you did not know that Captain Smith doesn't survive, this makes it more obvious by showing Smith keeping a picture of his wife and daughter.
  • Foregone Conclusion: The ship sinks.
  • Gallows Humor: Harold Bride calls the band playing "music to drown by." Interestingly, this line popped up in the Jim Cameron film.
    • The bartender in the First Class Smoking Room says that all drinks are on the house. To this, Astor replies "I'd ask for ice, but this is ridiculous."
  • Gorgeous Period Dress: Like most of its counterparts, pretty much anyone in first class.
  • Heaven Seeker: The Jack family and their saved Scandinavian, Aase. Aase is so into God, she does not care about the "incredible new" moving pictures.
  • Heroic BSOD: Surprisingly, averted. Captain Smith, who by many accounts became distant and indecisive upon realizing the gravity of the situation, is remarkably coherent. He criticizes Murdoch on his handling of avoiding the iceberg like someone a century later would.
  • Historical Villain Upgrade: Bruce Ismay, the chairman of the White Star Line who was savaged by the press for merely surviving the disaster is here portrayed to be a deranged speed obsessed lunatic, undermining the crew at every turn and even going as far as heading down into the boiler room (something that could never happen in reality) and screaming at the stokers to light more boilers. Once Titanic hits the iceberg, Ismay is shown to be a sniveling, panicking idiot who snakes his way into one of the last lifeboats.
    • He also gets a small Historical Hero Upgrade. One scene has him berating officers for lowering boats half-full and demands that they be filled, even though this was something that Thomas Andrews did.
  • Hope Spot: This depicts the Titanic and Californian seeing each other and attempting to signal via morse lamp. However, the Californian crew is either too stupid or too tired to think about turning the wireless back on to communicate directly.
  • Hysterical Woman: Alice is this, due to her nightmares/premonitions about the sinking. Bess Allison also becomes this when Alice takes Trevor, essentially screaming "MY BABY! WHERE'S MY BABY?!!"
  • Idiot Ball: The Californian crew are portrayed as having this, seeing rockets and attempting to signal by Morse lamp, yet just shrugging it off.
    • The Allison family also have this, as they literally wait until all the boats are gone to get their daughter into a lifeboat.
  • Informed Attractiveness: For the ship itself. Several characters comment on the beauty of Titanic, though the number of inaccuracies about the ship makes these rather laughable.
  • It's All About Me: Molly Brown yells at the officers who effectively force her into a lifeboat, saying she's going to have a word with Captain Smith about this.
  • It Will Never Catch On: Inverted. Wynn says that soon people will be flying across the Atlantic in airplanes, a full fifteen years before this first happened, in a year when airplanes were still being fine-tuned.
    • Played straight when Jamie chats with Astor about investing in the up-and-coming "moving picture" business, which the latter is skeptical about.
  • Jerkass: The crew is even more snobbish and disrespectful towards steerage than they are in the Jim Cameron film. Late in the sinking, one of them just walks past a locked gate and snickers at the steerage passengers trapped there, saying the lifeboats are for First Class only.note 
  • Jitter Cam: The first half of the miniseries uses this to simulate the ship rolling while at sea, even though the voyage was remarkably smooth and calm. Naturally, none of the actors try to compensate for walking on a rolling deck.
  • Justified Criminal: Jamie, who plans to rob the ship with Tim Curry, but has a change of heart and decided to help save the other steerage passengers instead.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Tim Curry's character rapes Aase, loots the First Class staterooms during the sinking, and then gets into a lifeboat disguised as a woman. After a scuffle on the lifeboat following the sinking, he is hit by an oar, which breaks his neck and he falls into the ocean, with all the money he stole floating on the surface.
  • Love Triangle: Isabella with Wynn and her husband, Edward. Edward is not present for most of it, though.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Just before she leaves the ship in a lifeboat, Isabella reveals that Wynn is the father of her daughter.
  • Made-for-TV Movie: By Hallmark and aired on CBS.
  • Men Are the Expendable Gender: Due to the women and children first policy when filling the lifeboats. One of the most famous Real Life examples: almost 75% of the female passengers survived, compared with less than 20% of the men.
  • Missed Him by That Much: While fleeing for the lifeboats with baby Trevor, Alice passes Mr. Allison in a stairway and calls out to him, but he doesn't hear her.
    • Third Officer Groves on the Californian offers to listen in on the Titanic's wireless traffic around midnight, but the power for their set runs out just as Phillips is sending the distress signal.
  • Mr. Exposition:
    • Captain Smith and J. Bruce Ismay. A good number of their lines are facts about the Titanic, from how much food they are carrying to the horsepower of the engines.
    • Mrs Foley serves the same purpose, pointing out notable First Class passengers and their back stories.
  • Nouveau Riche: Molly Brown. But, as Mrs Foley puts it, "too rich to ignore".
  • Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping:
    • Tim Curry's Irish accent.
    • A number of characters are played by American or Canadian actors with dodgy English accents, notably Mike Doyle as the Dick Van Dyke sounding Cockney Jamie.
    • Averted by George C. Scott, who doesn't even bother giving Captain Smith an English accent.
  • Photo Montage: The opening credits feature a series of photographs of the Titanic during its construction.
  • Pretty in Mink: A number of the dresses on the first class ladies feature this.
  • Racist Grandma: Mrs. Foley mentions that the Strauss are Jewish in a hushed voice, demonstrating mild antisemitism.
  • Ramming Always Works: Captain Smith chastises First Officer Murdoch for not hitting the iceberg head-on to minimize damage. The entry for this trope on RMS Titanic goes into more detail, but in summary, at best, ramming would have likely killed many of the people who were sleeping in the bow. Not to mention, the first instinct of any competent sailor is not to ram their ship into an obstacle.
  • Rape as Drama: Probably the most jarring and random example ever.
  • Retirony: Captain Smith.
  • Shout-Out: One wonders if they gave Chief Engineer Bell a Scottish accent simply so they could have the rather forced line of "The pumps cannae take much more, Cap'n!"
  • Shown Their Work: One of the few things they actually got right is Titanic splitting in two, making this technically the first film to accurately depict the sinking. Of course, the film barely shows the ship splitting apart.
    • Despite the many inaccuracies mentioned above, the miniseries does reference a number of obscure events about the sinking. There was a lifeboat drill scheduled for Sunday morning, which was cancelled for unknown reasons (suggested here because Captain Smith "didn't want to interrupt the Sunday services"). Also, wireless operators Phillips and Bride did fight with a stoker who attempted to steal their lifebelts just as they were about to leave for the boat deck.
  • Skewed Priorities:
    • Bess Allison. After Alice runs out with baby Trevor, screaming about how they're going to drown, she stands in the hallway yelling for Alice and saying she doesn't have his sugar water.
    • Ismay chides the officers for arming themselves during the sinking because many of the passengers are very influential, even though the ship is already sinking and at least half of those aboard are going to die.
    • Mrs. Foley is more concerned with having her dog accompany her in the lifeboat than her husband. The following morning, when it is apparent that many aboard Titanic have not survived, she complains loudly about her losses: her entire Paris wardrobe, twelve pairs of good shoes and she doesn't even have any face powder.
  • Tempting Fate:
    • Count the number of people who mention that the ship is unsinkable.
    • Ismay insists to reporters in Southampton that "we're not going to need lifeboats".
    • Smith describes his career at sea as "uneventful" and not worth writing about.
  • That Mysterious Thing: Isabella tells Madeleine Astor that her husband, "Helped me at a terrible time in my life." We never learn what this "terrible time" was about.
  • There Are No Coincidences: Wynn claims it is fate that he and Isabella should be reunited on the maiden voyage of the Titanic. Turns out it wasn't, and he already knew that she would be on board.
  • This Cannot Be!: Captain Smith's reaction to learning that they've hit an iceberg.
  • Too Dumb to Live: The Allisons, for waiting until the last minute to put their daughter on a lifeboat.
    • In real life, Alice did not take Trevor and get on the first boat to be lowered. She escaped late in the sinking, adding to the confusion of the rest of the family.
    • Mr. Dickie boasts about his ticket for the Titanic to a guy who just came in hiding from the police. In fairness, he does seem to be very drunk.
  • The Unfair Sex: Isabella gets a very easy ride for someone who, after a two day fling with an old flame she hadn't seen in years, decides to divorce her husband (whom she admits is a decent man who helped her at a difficult time in her life) and give up her daughter in order to go gallivanting off to Bolivia with said lover. Then when the lover dies during the sinking and she is reunited with her family, she apparently decides to carry on as if nothing happened.
  • Unspoken Plan Guarantee: Simon explains his plan for robbing First Class to Jamie. They'll stake out the staterooms while everyone is at dinner, then clean them out on the last night of the voyage. Afterwards, they'll hide the loot in Mr. Astor's loo and Simon's plumber friend onboard will sneak them out in his toolbox. This plan gets shot to hell once the ship starts sinking, so Simon simply goes ahead with looting the staterooms and Purser's Office while everyone is fleeing for the lifeboats.
  • Villainous Breakdown: Ismay becomes a sniveling coward the moment he learns the ship will sink.
  • Villain Protagonist: Jamie, a thief who steals his ticket to get on Titanic, steals John Jacob Astor's wallet and plans to rob the First Class state rooms and purser's office with Simon. He does eventually do a Heel-Face Turn though.
  • Yank the Dog's Chain: Mr. Dickie has saved all his money to buy a ticket aboard the Titanic, and it's stolen the night before the voyage. He shows up at the dock right as the ship is leaving, meaning he's either spent all morning trying to go to the police, or he just woke up, in which case he'd have missed the ship anyway. Either way, it's unlikely he'd have survived the sinking.
  • You Are Too Late: Captain Rostron and the Carpathia were among the heroes of the night, but they arrived too late to help 1500 of the 2200 aboard Titanic.
    • Captain Smith tells the Allisons that there are no more lifeboats once they finally realize they need to save their daughter.
  • You Have No Idea Who You're Dealing With: Ismay threatens Lowe in this fashion after Lowe scolds him for interfering in the lifeboat launch. It doesn't work and Lowe puts him in his place.
    Ismay: Do you know who I am?
    Lowe: I don't care if you're the bloody Prince of Wales, you move back or I'll knock your teeth down your throat!
  • Your Cheating Heart: Isabella. She meets her old lover Wynn on board, rekindles their relationship and decides to end her marriage to be with him, even sending a telegram informing her husband. Then Wynn dies in the sinking and once in New York, she discovers that her husband never got the telegram, so she gets away scot free.