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Rune Scape: Tropes H to P
aka: Tropes H-P
  • Half-Human Hybrid:
  • Hammerspace: In addition to the typical Bag of Holding mechanics, lots of Emote Animations involve pulling things out of Hammerspace. Many of the skillcape emotes are guilty of this; for example, the fletching emote has you pull a log, a knife, and a bowstring out of nowhere. The fishing emote produces not only a harpoon, but a small dock and a pond as well. And so on.
  • Hand Cannon: Available as a weapon after "Forgiveness of a Chaos Dwarf".
  • Harmless Freezing:
    • The God Wars dungeon and combatants inside seem to be perfectly fine after being frozen for thousands of years. Averted, however, with the Ancient Magicks freeze-you-in-an-ice-cube ice spells, which are some of the deadliest combat spells in the game.
    • There's a handicap called Randomly Freeze in the Dominion Tower. All it does is stops you from moving and stops you from attacking until you click on a target or you retaliate.
  • Have a Nice Death: Dungeoneering:
    • "Crafting Calamity" — Killed yourself with a chisel.
    • "Spontaneous Combustion" — Burnt yourself to death (due to a screwup with a firemaking door).
    • "Fishing Folly" — Died in a hilarious fishing accident. "You have a hilarious fishing accident that you would have told your grandchildren some day, had it not killed you."
  • Healing Potion: Saradomin Brew, a yellow potion which will restore player's lifepoints, and is one of the few items that will boost lifepoints above their skill level defined maximum: however, it has the drawback of each successive dose lowering the player's combat stats slightly.
  • Healing Shiv: When you use elemental spells against elemental wizards at south of Falador with their respective elements.
  • Healing Spring: The Oo'Glog spa pools can cure disease and poison and restore you to full health.
  • The Heavy: Several antagonists in the series serve as a villain in their respective quest series, such as the Culinaromancer in the Recipe For Disaster quest.
  • Heel Realization: After the events of The Chosen Commander, Juna ended her friendship with Zanik because of religious reasons; Zanik defied her species' god. Juna was utterly devoted to her own god, Guthix, and considered this to be the correct way to behave. After the events of The World Wakes, Juna was reminded that this kind of blind devotion was one of the things Guthix went to great lengths to stop. She now hopes to see Zanik again, and that she can be forgiven for the way she treated her.
  • He Knows About Timed Hits
  • Hell Gate: The Pest Control minigame has players cooperate to destroy interdimensional portals that are vomiting out deadly alien invaders.
  • Hellhound: A standard demonic foe. Special mention goes to Bouncer, General Khazard's particularly vicious pet Hellhound.
  • Helmets Are Hardly Heroic: Many occasions, but lampshaded with the examine text of the dwarven officer in Goblin Flash Mobs.
  • Hero of Another Story:
    • Several quests, such as Dream Mentor, have the Player Character team up with other NPC adventurers. After you part ways, they go off on their own adventures.
    • The nine characters the player encounters in Player Owned Ports, who each have their own adventures, with varying degrees of heroism, in the East. They eventually start working with each other, culminating in taking down a Seasinger named Quin. Meanwhile, the Player Character stays behind to manage the Port and their travels, playing the Big Good.
  • He Who Must Not Be Named: Zaros.
  • He Who Fights Monsters: The moral of the grandmaster quest "The Void Stares Back".
  • Hidden Elf Village: Lletya.
  • High-Class Glass: A TzHaar playing the role of a rich guy in a theatrical production wears a monocle for his costume.
  • Hints Are For Losers: In Dungeoneering, you can enable Guide Mode, which highlights the rooms you need to go through to reach the end. It gives you a large XP penalty.
  • Hive Queen: Oodles of them. You've got the Kalphite Queen, Penance Queen, Pest Queen, Jadinko Queen, Mother Mallum, and the most powerful of them all, the almighty Queen Black Dragon. They're all huge disgusting bug things, too, with the exception of the QBD, who is of course a dragon and the Jadinko Queen, who's actually a fairly attractive, graceful lizard person; she's the only one who's an ally, fittingly enough.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Both the Stone of Jas and Staff of Armadyl eventually come round to bite Lucien in the ass.
  • Holiday Mode: Special events happen every Halloween, Christmas, and Easter and all give out appropriately-themed costumes, emotes, and items.
  • Holy Hand Grenade: Sacred mines.
  • Homing Boulders: Quite frequently, in fact. Happens to most projectiles (including some literal boulders), apart from some special types. As for non-exceptions, they will hit you, even if you teleport away.
  • Hopeless War:
    • Crux Eqal and the Guardians of Armadyl's war against the Mahjarrat and their followers has so far been worse than fruitless. In the span of two quests, seven heroes lost their lives in battle against the Mahjarrat and one became enslaved by them. To make matters much worse, Guthix dies at the hands of Sliske in The World Wakes, demoralizing Crux Eqal even further and leaves Gielinor at the mercy of both the Dragonkin and the Mahjarrat.
    • In a meta example, averted with the never-ending struggle against macros (or "bots"). Every time a "bot nuke" comes out, it temporarily has a drastic effect, which then fades as soon as bot users shift to a different or newer technology. This came to a head with the release of Runescape 3, which removed every bot in the game (seemingly) for good.
  • Horny Vikings: The Fremennik.
  • Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Referenced in the Stronghold of Security dungeon, with its four levels: War, Famine, Pestilence, and Death. The 2011 Deathcon II event reveals that they exist as characters as well.
  • HP to One:
    • One of the Nomad's attacks hits your maximum life points minus one, so you must be at full HP (or higher) to survive.
    • The Warped Gulega does it slightly differently, hitting your current life points minus one.
  • Hufflepuff House: This was Armadyl at first; while stated to have been a powerful god, very little was known about him or his exploits. The most his following amounted to were some bird people in a dungeon and a group of people guarding his Staff, which isn't even his staff; it's a weapon made by the Elder Gods. In The World Wakes, a quest all about gods and their followers, Armadyl's influence amounts to Kree'Arra briefly distracting you near the beginning. The return of Armadyl himself quickly changed this.
  • Hulkspeak: Goblins, trolls, ogres, Glod from "Grim Tales", etc.
  • Human Cannonball:
    • In "A Clockwork Syringe", firing yourself out of the cannon directly is too dangerous, so you weld a chain to the cannonball, attach a barrel to it, and ride in that instead!
    • "Between a Rock" involves a dwarf firing you out of a cannon.
  • Humanoid Abomination: The Mahjarrat, which look like skeletons in robes but are actually immensely powerful creatures from other dimensions. This is an indication that they need to perform The Ritual again, as directly afterward they are much more fleshed out.
  • 100% Completion:
    • The premise of the Completionist cape and its Trimmed version.
    • In the past, asking for a random objective after completing all possible random objectives would prompt the game to make fun of you, telling you to go outside instead.
  • Hurricane of Puns: Numerous instances, notably during the Hand in the Sand quest.
  • Hybrid Monster:
    • Make your own, courtesy of the Tower of Life!
    • Hobgoblins, the result of Bandos breeding Orks and Goblins to produce strong but agile footsoldiers.
    • Chaos Dwogres, the result of the Red Axe at creating Dwarf-like creatures who are genetically able to cast Magic, but with the natural strength of an Ogre.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism
  • I Can't Use These Things Together: "Nothing interesting happens."
  • An Ice Person:
    • Kamil.
    • The Ice Queen and her soldiers.
    • The Snow Queen
    • Glacies
  • Idea Bulb: An emote.
  • Idiot Hero: The Player Character often acts like this in quests and other activities.
  • Ignorance Is Bliss: In "Devious Minds".
  • I Have Many Names: Senliten, as seen below.
    Senliten, upon whom Tumeken shines and from whom his glory is reflected. Bearer of the vengeance of Amascut upon the unworthy, mistress of the Stern Judges. Queen of the desert lands and rightful heir to the glory and fertility of Elidinis. Daughter of the divinity through the royal blood of the deity. Reborn through Icthlarin into this realm as has been and will be.
  • Immortal Procreation Clause: The Dragonkin.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice:
    • Zaros.
    • And as of "Ritual of the Mahjarrat," Lucien. With the same artifact that skewered Zaros, on top of that.
  • Improbable Power Discrepancy: Apparently, giant ants are much more dangerous than barbarians wielding large axes, and blood-drained human prisoners are stronger than healthy human citizens.
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: This game has so many puns that it's often ridiculed. The Crawling Hand, for example:
    I need to make some furniture, could you lend me a HAND?
    Haha. Very funny.
  • Indy Ploy: Invoked to fight the mind-reading Vyrewatch. Because they can predict your next move by reading your mind, the solution to defeat them is to have no idea what your next move is going to be.
  • Infant Immortality: Averted and played straight. There are no attackable human, elf or troll children, but players can freely slaughter gnome children (another of the civilised races in game), calves and baby dragons.
  • Infinity+1 Sword: Chaotic weapons are a very straight example. More powerful than their Infinity–1 Sword equivalents in every area, but they can only be obtained by paying 200k dungeoneering tokens. That'll require dozens of hours of training, and once you obtain them, you'll need to spend wads of cash to repair them when they degrade after ten hours in combat.
  • Infinity–1 Sword:
    • The abyssal whip was once considered the best all-purpose weapon in the game. With the introduction of Dungeoneering, chaotic weapons have higher stats in every area, but require a whopping 200k dungeoneering tokens (equivalent to about two million dungeoneering xp, or just over level 80) to obtain and have to be recharged with gold every few hours. The abyssal whip is tradable at a relatively affordable price and can be equipped as soon as you have the required level to wield it.
    • The Crystal Bow, to the Zaryte Bow. The stronger model has slightly better stats, but it's many times more expensive and, where the Crystal Bow can be freely purchased after completion of a mid-level quest, the Zaryte Bow has a market price of tens of millions of coins and can only be obtained as a drop from one of the toughest boss monsters in the game.
  • Insurmountable Waist-Height Fence: The game is full of them.
  • Instant Death Radius: Several of the strongest boss monsters.
  • Instant Gravestone: Instant Gravestones (usually) protect your items when you die. Bigger and fancier ones can be purchased which hold your items for longer.
  • Interface Screw: Part of the Runescape 3 update was the New Interface System, a fully customizable interface system intended to allow players to view the parts of the HUD relevant to the parts of the game they wanted to play, and minimize unwanted clutter. Unfortunately, editing the interface itself can be confusing for some, and the default layout is different from the classic one.
  • Interface Spoiler: Akrisae's Barrows Set is easily viewable on the Grand Exchange while searching for Barrows Armour, despite it not making too much sense for those who haven't done "Ritual of the Mahjarrat".
  • An Interior Designer Is You: Courtesy of the construction skill.
  • Interspecies Romance:
    • Many players' interpretation of their character's relationship with Zanik. The fact that her house has a double bed only adds to this. As does the player turning into a goblin during Land of the Goblins. Even Zanik ponders What Could Have Been in one of her letters to the player.
      Zanik: And I'd be lying if I said I didn't feel something for you. Back when we were about to face Bandos, when we were standing by the portal about to go through, a part of me really wanted to grab you and kiss you. But I thought that was crazy, I'd just had an evil god inside my head and I thought I was going to die and I wasn't thinking straight and so in the end I didn't do anything. But now it seems maybe you wanted me to, and now I have to tell you I can't, and I'm sorry, and I have to try to explain.
    • Also, Dororan and Gudrun from Gunnar's Ground.
    • One way to interpret Bob and Neite, since Bob used to be human... although it's an unusual case, as Neite was once a human as well.
    • The marriage of the King Black Dragon and the Kalphite Queen, to coincide with the real marriage of Prince William and Kate Middleton. This later turned out to be a marketing ploy by Diango.
  • Invincible Villain: Sliske the Mahjarrat is basically untouchable, thanks to his unparalleled mastery of "shadow magic" making him an unstoppable, unpredictable Karma Houdini — and that's before you add the possibility of newfound godhood on top of it all.
  • Involuntary Charity Donation: This is the plot of the "Let Them Eat Pie" quest. The peasants of the town are starving while the disgustingly fat rich glutton lives in luxury, so the Player Character poisons him with a disgusting pie made of rotten meat, steals from him while he's puking his guts out, and thus the citizens get their food.
  • Item Crafting
  • It Makes Sense in Context: One quest involves working with a gnome to commit terrorism for a group of secret government conspirators, which is done by infecting the people and livestock of an entire city with a virus by shooting dye-soaked toads at a farmer's flock of sheep. The plague is a hoax.
  • It May Help You on Your Quest: In the Christmas 2010 event, where Santa Cl—er, Thorvar Crittersmash—sent players into a Daemonheim dungeon he'd failed, giving them a bucket and telling them they'd know when to use it. After the third puzzle, that bucket became very useful because it was needed to catch the heim crab that stole Santa's hat.
  • It Will Never Catch On: Seen in "Meeting History".
  • Jerkass Gods:
  • Joke Item: Several, especially the holiday items. Ironically, some of these are now the most valuable items in the game.
  • Justified Tutorial
  • Kangaroo Court: Botany Bay, where alleged botters are tried. The verdict is always guilty, and other players vote on the sentence of the botter.
  • Karma Meter: At least two quests let you choose which god to side with. Subverted in that whatever you choose has no real impact outside of those quests.
  • Kid Hero: Dionysius/Wise Old Man started adventuring at the age of 15, and Philipe Carnillean becomes one after Carnillean Rising.
  • Killed Off for Real: Duradel, Turael, Cyrisus, Sloane, Ghommal and Hazelmere during While Guthix Sleeps, Sigmund in The Chosen Commander, and Prince Brand and Princess Astrid in the Blood Runs Deep. In the Ritual of the Mahjarrat, Idria, Akrisae, Jhallan and Lucien are killed and in The World Wakes, Orlando Smith, Cres and Guthix are killed as well.
  • Kill It with Fire:
  • King Arthur: Camelot is located just east of Seers' Village. King Arthur, Merlin, and the Knights of the Round Table can all be found there. Morgan le Faye lives in a tower to the south. A couple quests revolve around these guys, often referencing the Arthurian Legend.
  • Kleptomaniac Hero: So much that there's even a thieving skill for it.
  • Klingon Promotion / You Kill It, You Bought It: A blend of this is seen in how mortal beings have ascended to become gods — a sufficiently daring or Badass being can kill a god and gain their power in the process. Both Guthixnote  and Zamoraknote  utilized this method to attain godhood, and it is theorized that Sliske may have done so as well. Godly beings can also gain or lose part of their power by winning or losing in battle.
  • Knight Templar: Sigmund.
  • Knockout Gas: The quest "The Great Brain Robbery" has a section where Harmony Island is covered in knockout gas. You have to wear a scuba-diving helmet or you'll be knocked unconscious.
  • Large and in Charge: Kree'arra, K'ril Tsutsaroth, Nex and General Graardor are all very large, command the armies of their gods in God Wars Dungeon and are very powerful boss monsters. Inverted with Zilyana, who is just slightly taller than a human, but is just as lethal as the others.
  • Large Ham:
    • Yk'Lagor the Thunderous.
    • Sigmund from the Cave Goblin series. It doesn't help he gets a hammy voice upgrade in the Dominion Tower.
  • Last Ditch Move: Nex uses the Wrath prayer upon death. Also, the Ring of Life will teleport a player who is critically wounded from battle, destroying itself in the process. Similarly, the Sign of Life item resurrects a player whose lifepoints have been reduced to zero with 25% health, also destroying itself in the process. Some conditions apply.
  • Last of His Kind:
    • Thurgo is said to be the last of the Imcando dwarves, although a second one, Ramarno is found later, and Thurgo claims more are alive as well.
    • Commander Zilyana is the last of the Icyene, winged humanoids that have been compared to angels. However, Safalaan is later confirmed to be at least part icyene, and it later turned out that there are still plenty of Icyene left in their home realm.
    • General Graardor is the last of the Ourgs, a race known for their immense brute strength.
    • K'ril Tsutsaroth is thought to be the last Elder-demon.
    • Char is the last Auspah, a race of fire-controlling humanoids.
    • The unnamed Phoenix is the last of her kind when her brother Si'morgh is killed by a dragon. However, players get to hatch baby phoenixes out of hidden eggs.
    • K'klik is the last known Fairy dragon.
    • Nex is the last of a race of unbelievable power, whatever that is...
    • It is unclear whether the Dramen tree is the last of its kind of the only one of its kind.
    • The White tree, however, is truly the last of its kind.
    • Fyburglars tree is also likely to be the last of its kind.
    • Enakhra is the last female Mahjarrat, a race that could have as few as 7 individuals depending on the player's choice.
    • Hannibus is the last of the dragon riders before he apparently died of old age in a cave in the midst of the godforsaken wasteland known as the Wilderness.
    • Before his ascension to godhood, Guthix was the last of the Naragi, a race of peace-loving humanoids who were wiped out by a god war.
  • Laughing Mad: Blink.
  • Leaked Experience: Taken to extremes in the Soul Wars minigame before it was updated. It allowed players to earn bonus experience in the slayer skill without doing any of the fighting in the game itself, up to the maximum level the skill allowed if one worked at it enough. This led to players who, with no combat experience whatsoever, are masters of a skill involving killing everything that moves.
  • Leitmotif:
    • The goblins have one, the H.A.M. members have one, and many others have one, too.
    • For areas, Daemonheim floors often have a single motif heard throughout most of the floors with the same theme.
  • Lethal Lava Land: The Karamja volcano, parts of the Wilderness, etc.
  • Level Grinding: The game is full of ways to do it, and it's the only way to really reach the higher levels. It's generally referred to as "training" by RuneScape players.
  • Life Drain: Several, including onyx-tipped bolts, Soul Split, the Guthan's armor set, the Vampyrism aura and scrimshaw, the Balanced Strike ability, and others.
  • Life Energy: All magic is based on Anima. Philosophers usually refer to this as a "soul". Anima is generated by all life, though sentient life generates the most. The Elder Gods create worlds with the intention of generating and harvesting it.
  • Light and Mirrors Puzzle: One of the hardest quests has quite a sadistic version of this: COLOURED lights and mirrors, which is much worse than it sounds, all the while being attacked by shadow monsters. The sequel features one as well, though in a much smaller area and without monsters attacking you.
  • Living Battery: The various worlds throughout the Runescape universe were created to serve this function for the Elder Gods. Freneskae and Gielenor are the "perfect" worlds for generating Anima, though Zaros has discovered that imperfect worlds tend to spawn sentient life, which generate more Anima than anything the Elder Gods intentionally create.
  • Load-Bearing Boss: Bork.
  • Loophole Abuse: Entrana forbids bringing weapons and armor, but never anything about bringing the materials to the island to make them right there (handy if you're doing Lost City). Subverted in that if you're in possession of any such gear long enough, a monk will come to knock you out and send you back to Port Sarim.
  • Lord British Postulate: Before the release of the Ivandis Flail, Vyrewatch couldn't be killed. This didn't stop players from trying, and succeeding.
  • Losing Your Head: A zombie pirate in "A Clockwork Syringe".
  • Lost Forever: Holiday item rewards, but every holiday event gives you the emote rewards from previous events. Holiday items that can be traded such as the party hats are worth millions of coins as a result.
  • Luck-Based Mission:
    • Stomp. Every time he gets down by a 1/3 of his health, the ceiling caves in, causing rocks to fall, as well as small lodestones that have to be used on larger ones to stop Stomp from healing that 1/3 of health you just took off. The problem? The rocks are impassible and can block off the large or small lodestones. This was eventually changed so that the rocks can be cleared out of the way.
    • Dungeoneering has a puzzle where you have to sneak past a purple orb in a sort of turn-based puzzle, but your character can randomly 'stumble' which gives the purple orb a free move on you, making it nearly impossible to complete if this happens more than once.
      • Speaking of Dungeoneering, the elite Daemonheim task set reward "Hard Mode" requires that all skill doors have a base level 90 requirement to pass. If you happen to attempt this with skills below level 90, you're tossing the dice as to whether you'll even be able to complete the floor. See "Fake Difficulty" entry.
    • In "Mourning's End Part 2", you have to cross a set of wall hand-holds with a ridiculously low success chance and a long run back when you fail. And you have to do this TWICE!
  • Luckily My Shield Will Protect Me: Shields are available to players, usable with one-handed melee weapons, crossbows, and wands. The abilities available to players using them usually revolve around reducing or reflecting damage, while higher level ones allow you to regain life, No Sell attacks, and even immediately come back to life.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father:
    • Invoked in "Salt in the Wound". When a mind-controlled villager asks you to identify yourself in order to gain entry to Mother Mallum's lair, one of the options in the Dialogue Tree is "I AM YOUR FATHER!" (If you select it, she'll look at you funny and tell you to go away.)
    • Bob the Cat tries it out if you speak with him while you have a cat with you. He and your cat will quote the Star Wars scene, with Bob as Vader and your cat as Luke. It's just a joke, of course.
  • Lucky Rabbit's Foot: A strung rabbit foot (worn as a necklace) is an item that gives players a better chance of getting a bird's nest when cutting trees or ivy; it also grants a better chance of getting long and curved bones in combat.
  • MacGuffin Delivery Service: You, usually during quests. Occasionally lampshaded.
  • Magick
  • Magic Staff: The basic weapon of a mage. Staves provide bonuses to magic, and some varieties also provide infinite quantities of elemental runes as well.
  • Magic Wand: The standard for one-handed magical weapons.
  • Man-Eating Plant: The stranger plant familiar.
  • Marathon Boss: Vorago, the team-based boss fight with a combat level of 10000. He has five phases of battle to go through, each having him with 250,000 hitpoints. (That's 1,250,000 total life points!) And unless the team knows exactly what they're doing and can achieve their teamwork perfectly, one phase can last much longer than needed. Oh, and he will summon minions in one phase. Let's not forget the hard mode version of this battle.
  • Marathon Level: The Underground Pass, a long trek through a cave filled with monsters, traps, and puzzles. Bring lots of food, you will need it.
  • Mass Monster Slaughter Sidequest:
    • Players who slay enough chompy birds with a special luring technique will be rewarded with fancy hats.
    • The Slayer skill is based around this. Slayer masters assign you to kill a certain number of a specific enemy type, gaining experience after each qualifying kill, and once you're done you'll have to get another assignment to keep training. Your reward for this is the ability to kill even more monsters.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: Some creatures could transmit "disease", which randomly decreases stats including constitution, which affects maximum life points. Barrelchest Mk II, a pirate zombie robot (It Makes Sense in Context) directly drains constitution as part of its special attack. Instead of eating various food, this kind of damage could only be restored quickly with much more expensive super restore potions.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • The evil pirate Rabid Jack's ship is named This Albatross.
    • From the "Fremennik Trials" quest: Swensen the Navigator's name is the solution to his maze. Notice how his name contains only the letters N, S, E, and W—the four cardinal directions.
  • Microtransactions: Players can pay cash to buy additional spins on the Squeal of Fortune, which gives item and xp rewards.
  • Midair Bobbing: Seen with the pets from "The Firemaker's Curse".
  • Mike Nelson, Destroyer of Worlds: Many of the gods tend to be this. Saradomin and Tuska destroyed Guthix's homeworld, and the God wars of Runescape would have destroyed it without Guthix's intervention.
  • Milestone Celebration: Recipe for Disaster, RuneScape's 100th quest.
  • Minecart Madness: At least one quest involves navigating a maze of minecart turnoffs.
  • Min-Maxing: Fairly common; characters who take this to its logical conclusion are known as "pures".
    • Frequently, PvP-ers will level Attack and Strength disproportionately while leaving Defence ridiculously low or untouched, turning their character into a Glass Cannon who can down more balanced characters of the same combat level. The introduction of Hit Points bonuses for all armour in 2012 made this strategy significantly riskier, since it simultaneously increased the penalties associated with this tactic (low-level armour now puts you at a much greater risk of being One-Hit KO'd by other players) and reduced the corresponding advantages (other players with increased HP are harder to take down quickly, and players with shields now have access to abilities that can block your attacks).
    • Skill pures also exist, whereby characters do not level combat skills at all while working one or more non-combat skills up to level 99. This can be a detriment, however, as many lucrative skilling areas are guarded by aggressive NPCs who can and will prey on low-levelled players who lack the sense to flee.
  • Missing Secret: Acts as a form of Gameplay and Story Segregation in that many more cities and civilizations exist in the background than have actually been coded into the game. As a result, an absurd number of major cities and entire nations (most prominently Prifddidas, Menaphos, and Arposandra) are in isolation, be it mythic or overtly enforced by snooty border guards who will tell you that the place is "closed to outsiders". If an update eventually rolls around that lets you in (as with Keldagrim or Meiyerditch), this becomes an example of Broken Bridge: you'll still have to do a quest to get in and the people inside will be fearful or distrustful of outsiders. And the city will still be full of places you can't access.
  • Mithril: Downplayed. Mithril is stronger than steel, but still a rather low-level armour, at only 20 Defense to wear. In accordance with tradition, though, it weighs less than other metals.
  • Mix-and-Match Weapon:
    • The Ivandis Flail, a combination flail/sickle/magical staff designed to battle Vyrewatch vampyres.
    • The Devious Minds quest has players create a Bowsword, a bow made from a bent sword, for an NPC.
    • What do you get when you cross a bow with a shield? You get a shieldbow, which shoots arrows and provides the defensive bonuses of a shield.
  • Mobile Shrubbery: The penguin's disguises in Penguin Hide and Seek.
  • The Mole: Many.
    • King Lathas and one entire elf faction in the Plague City to Mourning's Ends storyline.
    • More obviously, Sigmund in the H.A.M. series, originally a sinister advisor to the Duke of Lumbridge.
    • The "Stranger" in Canifis, who is really Vanstrom Klause, a top lieutenant of the Vyrelords of Darkmeyer. He even manages to manipulate you into bringing the Myreque resistance movement to the brink of destruction.
    • Wizard Ellaron in Rune Mysteries and Rune Memories. His aim is to bring about the destruction of the Wizard's Tower for the alleged betrayal of his order most of a century earlier. In the meantime, he has lived and studied among his avowed enemies for decades while manipulating his former apprentice, Ariane, into becoming a conduit for the magical energies that would complete the conflagration.
  • Money Sink: The entire Construction and Summoning skills. Long overdue because of the billions high alchemy was bringing into the game.
  • Money Spider: Lots of enemies. Not really killed for gold, since nothing really drops a lot of gold. Rather, they are killed for items to be sold. A notable example of this trope played straight is the Grotworm; it drops exactly 5000 coins fairly frequently.
  • Monster Is a Mommy: Rocs and dagannoths in their respective quests.
  • Mordor: The Wilderness.
  • Motive Rant: The killer delivers one at the end of "One Piercing Note".
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous: All TzHaar and TokHaar. Four arms, three fingers. They even use a base twelve maths system. Not all of them use that many weapons, though.
  • My Death Is Just the Beginning: The player may not want Guthix to die, and Sliske may have thought it was a victory for the forces of Zaros, but Guthix intended his death to work into the eventual plan of setting Gielinor free from "oppressor gods" once and for all.
  • Names to Run Away From Really Fast:
  • Nay-Theist:
    • The cave goblins. Considering their former god was both a Blood Knight and a Jerkass, it's hard to blame them.
    • The Godless faction which arises after the events of The World Wakes and the return of the gods. They reject the gods, both aggressive and pacifist alike, believing that mortals should be free to choose their own path, and seek to protect the innocent.
  • Nature Spirit: One is found in God Wars Dungeon and the second is found in Mort Myre.
  • Necromantic: Melzar the Mad.
  • Neglectful Precursors: The Elder Gods left behind a variety of extremely powerful Ancient Artifacts and only took limited precautions to prevent them from being abused. Much worse, to the extent that they did take precautions, the security mechanism on the Stone of Jas is at least as dangerous as the potential for abuse.
  • Nerf: Several combat features were heavily nerfed on the introduction of the new combat system.
    • Ice spells used to inspire terror in any player that heard the signature sound effect of the spell being cast. However, in the combat update, their freezing effect was severely reduced, and the new system even allowed players to escape and become immune to it. Nowadays, they don't even have the iconic ringing sound anymore.
    • Prayers have also been hit by this. Originally, they blocked all incoming damage from NPCs of the corresponding type, and 40% of all player-dealt damage, which was invaluable in fighting many bosses. Now they deal a blanket 50% protection, offering only a slight improvement against players in exchange for utterly ruining them for combat against bosses.
  • A Nazi by Any Other Name: The Vampyres. They rule a city named Meiyerditch, where humans are held as slaves and treated as food. The city is even referred in-game as a ghetto.
  • Never Trust A Twitter: Every week Jagex releases a hint to the next update on Twitter. More often than not these hints provide no clues to the update whatsoever and make no sense until AFTER the update is released. The worst offender is the hint "Ruby Dragon" and the update was a thieving guild quest. There was no way the players were supposed to guess that based on the hint.
  • Nice Hat: The party hats. Their rare status makes them Serious Business. The rarer ones are worth literally billions of coins, in a game where earning a million an hour is very fast.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: The ends of Spirit of Summer and Enakhra's Lament. Certain parts of various other quests involve the player inadvertantly causing things to get worse before having to make them better. Some, unfortunately, are a result of stupidity being the only option.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: There are zombie monkeys, ninja monkeys, zombie monks, ninja implings, zombie pirates, zombie pirate robots ("barrelchests"), etc.
  • Nobody Poops: Lampshaded in the God Letters and the occasional NPC.
    • April fools 2014 featured mock forums with Jagex mods discussing, among other things, inclusion of more types of tea in the game and with that "allowing your character to relieve themselves after consuming too much tea", it was suggested to use trees or revitalizing construction with player built commodes "ranging from holes in the ground through to gold-plated masterpieces"
  • No Fourth Wall:
    • The barkeeper in the Blue Moon Inn in Varrock is aware that RuneScape is only a computer game and says as much if the player asks him for advice.
    • In the 2011 Easter Event, the player explicitly tells a squirrel to stop breaking the fourth wall.
  • No Hero Discount: Played straight most of the time. Occasionally averted when a quest reward gives you a discount—for example, after proving your merit as a sailor and defeating some pirates in Cabin Fever, you can charter ships at half price.
  • Non-Human Undead: While human undead are the most common type of undead, undead versions of goblins, ogres and trolls are not unheard of, and an old trailer implies that undead dragons exist as well. There are revenant versions of over a dozen races as well.
  • Non-Standard Game Over: Near the end of Missing, Presumed Death if you fail to release Death from his cage before Icthlarin's shield runs out Strisath will kill Icthlarin. You get the message "Icthlarin has died." in your chatbox before the screen fades to black and the sequence starts over.
  • Noodle Incident:
    • Marion the bartender said that she lost her skill in archery after an incident involving a Chinchompa named Fluffy and a butter churn. Also, there are these weird sea slugs called sluglings that you pick up to make rum. When asking Captain Braindeath why they call them sluglings, he responds that they call them sluglings because of "a long, complicated story involving three dead seagulls and a busted pipe". Why you even need slugs of any kind to make rum in the first place is a question better left unanswered.
    • The various misfortunes that befall the Varrock Museum's expedition barge.
  • No Pronunciation Guide: Until the 21st of February, when they actually added a Pronunciation Guide. The fact that they bothered to make it in the first place should give you an idea of how many instances of this trope exist in the game, such as the "Mahjarrat"note  race, or the city of "Ardougne"note .
  • Nothing but Skulls
  • Nothing Is the Same Anymore: After "The World Wakes" the Edicts of Guthix are broken and the gods can freely interfere on Gielinor. The player is a Guardian of Guthix with the power to defy the gods. And the world advances from Year 169 of the 5th Age into Year 1 of the 6th Age.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: The Wilderness. Particularly the deeper areas where there's hardly anything, save for a few NPCs, and you could be attacked by a powerful player-killer any moment. The ambiance does not make anything better...
  • Notice This:
    • When the game wants to mark an object as important, a blinking yellow arrow will often appear above it. This is used to mark posts in the Brimhaven Agility Arena, to mark destinations in the tutorials, and so on.
    • The pinball random event has glowing rings appear around the post you're supposed to tag.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity:
    • Traiborn, considering his role in Love Story, and the fact that one of RuneScape's legendary heroes has not yet robbed the Wizards' Tower because of him.
    • Wizard Grayzag. He summons little imps as part of his wizarding career, but there's a lesser demon in the room next to him... and then the quest The Void Stares Back brings even more surprises. Really. He accomplishes two things — being behind the whole quest line, and causing the real, irreversible death of an NPC.
  • Obvious Rule Patch:
    • The restrictions on where you can place a cannon. This is lampshaded in a Postbag from the Hedge by Nulodion, claiming that he just felt as if he wasn't permitted to set up a cannon in dangerous areas.
    • "You can't light a fire here."
    • The Flash Powder Factory was patched to give a 50% reduction in points whenever you leave with more than 2 minutes left on the timer, to promote players to play through entire matches. Previously, players would leave the game early to get around Diminishing Returns for Balance by starting a new round.
    • The Dominion Sword can only be wielded two-handed, despite obviously being only a longsword, in order to fit in with the other two-handed magic and ranged dominion weapons.
  • Off Screen Afterlife: There is at least one, if not many, but every ghost or otherwise dead character you encounter hasn't crossed over yet, and those who have come Back from the Dead (such as Zanik and, well, you) have no memory of it. The Spirit Plane that you summon summoning beasts from appears to just be a plane full of ghostlike critters rather than an afterlife for dead critters. Zanik herself describes the time period when she's dead as... nothing. The moments before she was revived were the moments just before her death.
  • Off with His Head!:
    • Done pretty nastily in the Dungeoneering dungeon. There are dinosaurs that you can kill for leather to make armour, and although it can be done through combat, it kind of destroys most of the hides you could have gotten. However, you can design a Hunter trap designed to get a lot more hides by invoking this trope when the dinosaur goes for the bait.
    • Stomp. The entire boss fight is an attempt to destroy the portal that Stomp's head is sticking through. When this is achieved (after enduring a mountain of Fake Difficulty), the portal acts like a guillotine, separating Stomp's head from his body in a bloody, gruesome mess.
  • Oh Crap: Many moments. Sometimes by NPCs during quests and the like (Garden of Tranquility's guard scene), and often by players (usually when finding a new room in Dungeoneering).
  • Older Is Better: Equipment originating from the Barrows brothers or the Third Age is usually much better than any of the armor made during the Fifth Age.
  • The Old Gods: The Elder Gods.
  • Ominous Pipe Organ: Yk'Lagor's theme and several tracks in Morytania.
  • One-Gender Race: All of the Elder Gods are considered female, though given their transcendent nature, gender distinction is effectively irrelevant.
  • One-Handed Zweihänder: A mid-level slayer master Vannaka wields both a steel two-handed sword and Dragon square shield at the same time although not even players with maxed Strength can wield two-handed swords with a shield.
  • One Steve Limit: Parodied in some cases (an entire town where everyone is named Ali the Barman, Ali the Snakecharmer, etc.) and simply averted in others. Played straight with players' screennames.
  • Only Smart People May Pass: Has an entire quest dedicated to this trope, including a chemistry puzzle loaded with chemistry-related in-jokes like nitrous oxide (NO) and dihydrogen monoxide (water).
  • Only the Pure of Heart: The Wand of Resurrection is like this. However, it also involves some Pure Is Not Good. If someone is pure good, they can use the wand to bring someone back to life. If someone is not pure good or evil, the wand will bring them back as a zombie, which will try to kill the one who brought them back. But if someone pure evil uses the wand, they can raise zombies as much as they want, and not worry about them disobeying.
  • Oracular Head: Postie Pete.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Many villains. Literally with Nomad, whose Cool Chair really does make him more powerful.
  • Our Angels Are Different: They're Icyene, such as Commander Zilyana.
  • Our Demons Are Different: Those in RuneScape originate from different planes and resemble red humanoids with big teeth and tails. Stronger ones have wings.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: Created by a race known as dragonkin, which happen to look like Skeksis. Also, as well as various types of coloured dragons, there are dragons made entirely of metal.
  • Our Dwarves Are All the Same: The steampunk variety.
  • Our Goblins Are Different: The ordinary surface goblins have green skin. Their intelligence is as high as most humans', but the way they're raised, they usually never reach their full potential. There are also cave goblins which have pale green skin and large eyes and are far more intelligent than their surface-dwelling bretheren.
  • Our Gods Are Greater:
  • Our Homunculi Are Different
  • Our Liches Are Different:
    • "Skeleton Mages" are an attackable monster in a few places. There's also Iban, who was resurrected by a witch and has a phylactery in the form of a doll whose parts you have to gather and assemble in order to defeat him.
    • Subverted with the Mahjarrat, who are powerful mages with skeletal faces and a penchant for necromancy... but are actually just a separate species whose default form happens to look like a human skeleton.
  • Our Vampires Are Different: Vampires may not even be undead, as far as anyone knows. Also, see Phantasy Spelling below.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: Both averted and played straight.
  • Percent Damage Attack: Enchanted ruby bolts have a chance to take away 20% of target's health (with a few exceptions) at the cost of decimating player's health.
  • Phantasy Spelling: Vampires and vampyres both exist, but the two are fairly different. To be more specific, vampires are feral were-bats, while vampyres are more civilized, taking on a more human appearance the stronger they get. But that wouldn't stop either of them from chowing down on your neck, given the chance. An update changed standard vampires to also being spelled vampyre however, for unknown reasons.
  • Physical God:
    • The Mahjarrat, especially Lucien after he acquired two artefacts of the gods, both with immense power.
    • The Mahjarrat who invented Dungeoneering wants to bring Zamorak back into the physical world.
    • The younger gods are basically extremely powerful, unaging mortals as opposed to transcendent beings.
    • The Player Character briefly becomes this after touching the Stone of Jas and being infused with a FRACTION of it's power.
  • Pimped Out Cape: Skillcapes, with their ornate trimmings and over-the-top shoulderpads.
  • Piñata Enemy: The Living Rock Patriarch, which gives 30% more experience than a normal enemy and drops a number of noted items such as Diamonds, Rune Ore, Blood and Mud Runes as a 100% drop, totaling little over 200k for one kill, though it takes a couple hours to respawn per world and is surrounded by other aggressive monsters inside a single combat area.
  • Pirate: Loads of them, including a quest series based on them.
  • Pirate Parrot
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: Most of the pirates are this. They hang around in Mos'le'Harmless, talk like pirates, and drink 'rum', but don't do much actual piracy. Of all the pirate captains the player meets, only one of them still has a ship. You only see him steal something from another ship once, and the other ship in question was also full of pirates. Rabid Jack is the exception—when he started acting like a real pirate, he brought the wrath of the law down so hard on the whole pirate community that the rest of them had to organize themselves into an armada and hunt him down. Too bad he didn't stay dead...
  • Traveling-Pipe Bulge: Seen in the KGP Abduction home teleport animation when the player is sucked through the penguins' transport tube.
  • Plague Doctor: There is a set of quests set in West Ardougne collectively named the Plague City Quests that live this trope to a T. You learn to love Ye Olde Worlde hazmat suits.
  • Planet of Steves: Pollnivneach, where everybody's name is Ali.
  • Plant Person: Ents, wood dryads and tree spirits.
  • Player Generated Economy: With the Grand Exchange, trading is much more organized and elaborate than most other MMORPGs.
  • Plot Coupon: You'll be collecting these a lot during quests.
  • Plot-Induced Stupidity: Several quests involve you being quite gullible. Of course, you can not be gullible, but you can't finish the quest by not being gullible.
  • Plotline Death: Quest NPCs seem to suffer from these. Others, including players, will be perfectly fine, except during the quests which need you to die.
  • Plot Tailored to the Party: In the final scene of "Salt in the Wound", you need Ezekial's explosives expertise to break through damaged walls, Kennith's persuasive abilities to manipulate a mind-controlled villager, and Eva's strength and combat skill to hold off the guards and deal the finishing blow.
  • Pocket Dimension:
    • The Runecrafting Guild was created within the 'shadow' of the old Wizard's Tower.
    • For the 2011 Christmas Event, a new Wizard's Tower was made for a Christmas Party in one. When asked about where exactly it is in relation to the original Wizard's Tower, the wizards will mention that you need to know the alphabet above Z to understand.
  • Poisoned Weapons: Daggers, spears, and ammo for ranged weapons.
  • Poor Communication Kills: Part of how the old wizard's tower was destroyed. The Green wizard stole the Red apprentice's idea, and the Red wizard told his apprentice to keep quiet about it as punishment for helping a non-Red. The idea resulted in the need for a second plane to use, so the Red wizard bargained with a demon for use of the abyss. When all 8 wizards started the ritual, the Blue apprentice saw the demon's hand in the spell, causing the truth to come out. The Blue wizard refused to participate in a spell involving Red magic, and walked off in the middle of the ritual at a crucial moment, causing a massive explosion, the only survivors of which were the Blue and Red apprentices.
  • Port Town: Several of them: Phasmatys, Port Sarim, Rellekka, etc.
  • Portal Cut: This is the fate of one of the boss creatures in Dungeoneering. The boss, simply called Stomp, is a large worm-like creature coming through a portal that calls down rocks during the fight. After the portal gets weakened several times, at the end of the fight the portal snaps shut, resulting in a surprisingly graphic death — the wall where the portal was gets rather bloodstained, and the monster essentially thrashes itself to death.
  • Posthumous Character: Tons of them.
  • Post-Modern Magik: A rare example: the Lumbridge Cook's magic cooking range.
    Cook: It's called the Cook-o-Matic 25, and it uses a combination of state-of-the-art temperature regulation and magic.
  • Post-Mortem One-Liner: Thok delivers one after each boss.
  • Power Crystal: Literal power crystals are found from Daemonheim and are used in puzzles, but the Four Diamonds of Azzanadra, lava crystals, and the crystals in Watchtower and Mourning's End Part 2 also count.
  • Powerful Pick: Played with; while pickaxes are wieldable, they are much less effective than weapons made of the same grade of metal (or even a couple of levels below them). However, they're not worthless in combat, as they are still stronger than some weapons made of lesser metals. Some bosses even have armor that has to be broken with the pickaxe before you can damage them with normal weapons (although you can still hack away at them with your pickaxe if you wish).
  • Power Trio: Saradomin, god of order (superego), Zamorak, god of chaos (id), and Guthix, god of balance (ego).
  • Protagonist-Centered Morality/Gameplay and Story Segregation: There's no Karma Meter in this game, so you could theoretically slaughter everyone attackable in a given city and still for all plot purposes be considered that city's greatest hero. The game pulls no punches in mocking this.
  • Psychological Torment Zone: Tolna's Rift.
  • Public Domain Character: King Arthur, Romeo and Juliet (gone), Robin Hood, etc.
  • Punctuation Shaker: Most of the demons have an apostrophe in their names.
  • Punny Name: A Running Gag with the White Knights. They all have names like Sir Amik Varze (ceramic vase), Sir Tiffy Cashien (certification), Sir Tendeth (certain death; guess what happens to him), Sir Vyvin (surviving), Sir Prysin (surprising), the list goes on and on. Apparently, it even extends to family members—Sir Tiffy Cashien's adopted daughter is named Eva (evocation). The only White Knight without a pun in their name is Squire/Sir Theodore.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: Except during the Recruitment Drive quest, where the player must be female in order to beat one of the challenges, as you must fight a character that no man can defeat. Males who have to pay for the switch get their money back and a free "makeover" voucher to make themselves male again.
  • Purple Is Powerful: Zaros.
  • Puzzle Boss: The Gluttonous Behemoth, which will rapidly heal itself by feeding on a nearby carcass if its HP drops to half. Put a player or a fire between the Behemoth and its food source.
    • Char from The Firemaker's Curse also counts. You can only damage her based on 100 times the number of fires you have lit in her arena.
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