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Rune Scape: Tropes A to G
aka: Tropes A-G
  • Abnormal Ammo:
    • The fixed device, which shoots dyed toads.
    • There are explosive squirrels called Chinchompas.
    • Salamanders that act as flamethrowers can be used, which use swamp tar mixed with herbs as fuel.
    • The Oddball Aura lets your Dwarven Multicannon shoot things like beer, squid, and brains.
    • During the Rocking Out quest, part of your plan to escape the island prison you get sent to involves firing a seagull from an accordion that you've improvised into a makeshift air cannon.
  • Absolute Cleavage: Magic robes like the batwing display this when a female avatar wears them. [1]
  • Absurdly Spacious Sewer: Under several cities, such as Varrock, Ardougne, Draynor village and Ashdale.
  • Achievements in Ignorance: The character TzHaar-Ga'al-Kot accidentally renders himself invisible with a miscast spell. The player can ask him what runes are used for the spell, only for him to comment that he doesn't use runes because he doesn't have pockets in which to store them. The player then calls him out on the impossibility of using magic without runes, at which point Kot states 'No one told TzHaar-Ga'al-Kot that.'
    • During a quest, an old man named Oziach sends you to kill the legendary dragon Elvarg in exchange for the secrets of smithing Rune Platebodies. The player is successful, and learns the secret, but later finds out in dialogue with a different character that Oziach never expected you to succeed - he just gave you what he thought was an impossible task so you would go away.
  • Acid Trip Dimension: The Cosmic Plane where starflowers grow, accessible through fairy rings. It looks like this.
  • Adam Smith Hates Your Guts: Most endgame items are thousands of times more expensive than their lower-level counterparts. Rings are a good example: a 2.7% range critical bonus will cost you around a million coins. And if you think that's tough, wait until you see the price tag on a spirit shield. On the other hand, the game has a real living, breathing, player-run, capitalist economy... so it's the community which isn't letting go of those rare items for a low price. And it's the result of that combioned with the continual influx of additional coins and low-grade items at an exponentially faster rate than the high-grade equivalents, so over a decade of alarmingly rapid inflation has contributed.
  • Addressing the Player
  • Adventurers Club: The Quest guilds: Champions' Guild, Heroes' Guild, and Legends' Guild.
  • Aerith and Bob: Bob the Jagex Cat, Bob's evil twin also named Bob, and Bob of Bob's Fabulous Axes all share a game with people called Zemouregal, Azzanadra and Zaros, although weirder names like those tend to pop up more with non-humans. Player characters' names can also have this effect.
  • Air Guitar: An emote.
  • Alas, Poor Villain: At the end of "Song from the Depths", you find the Siren who's been causing the trouble...and she turns out to be trapped inside the belly of the Queen Black Dragon, subject to a powerful illusion that's making her believe she's back home on her island. When you break the illusion, she's horrified. She's killed shortly after, and the player character has a brief moment of mourning.
  • Alcohol Hic: Found in the dialogue of many an inebriated character.
  • All Deserts Have Cacti: The Kharidian Desert is indeed full of cacti.
  • All in a Row: There's an option to "Follow" another player. A group of players can follow each other in a chain, resulting in this.
  • All-Natural Gem Polish: Notably averted. You can find gems while mining, and if you do, they have to be cut with a chisel using the Crafting skill before they can be added to jewelry. Some gems can even be destroyed accidentally when you try to cut them.
  • All Swords Are the Same: In Classic, all melee weapons have the exact same fighting animation: you just bash your opponent with it and that's that. The modern game has a wider variety of stances for different types of weapon, but there are still a limited number of animations for slashing, stabbing, or bludgeoning — the stabbing animations for a bronze dagger are the same as the ones for a pair of gardening secateurs.
  • All Trolls Are Different:
    • They're violent and warlike by nature, with thick, rocklike skin and low intelligence, and they're named after the first thing they try to eat (or, if they don't know what it's called, the sound it made), which leads to some unusual names like "My Arm".
      • "Dad"
      • "Cliff"
    • Mountain Trolls are able to change their bodies to adapt to their surroundings. In Troll Invasion, they've shown the ability to summon monsters and cast magic by consuming the flesh of Summoners (druids) and Mages, respectively.
    • Other than the most common mountain trolls, there are aquatic varieties of troll that sports fins and gills, as well as extra vicious ice trolls with thick fur.
  • A Load of Bull: Minotaurs appear both as a low-level enemy and as different summoning familiars.
  • Always a Bigger Fish: The dragonkin to Lucien in "Ritual of the Mahjarrat".
  • Amnesia Loop: A major plot point in the "Rise of the Red Axe" quest series. At the end of "Forgettable Tale of a Drunken Dwarf"note , the Player Character stumbles upon the secret base of the Red Axe and learns about their plan to create an army of Chaos Dwarves to invade Keldagrim. However, thanks to an ogre shaman working for the Red Axe, instead of making it back to Keldagrim to warn the Consortium, all your memory of the event is scrambled and you're left with an irresistible craving for beer and kebabs. After the resulting drinking party, the vital information has become slurred, drunken ramblings. In between quests, the same thing happens to Commander Veldaban, and the subsequent "Forgiveness of a Chaos Dwarf" quest revolves around re-discovering everything that was forgotten.
  • An Axe to Grind: In addition to regular battleaxes, hatchets and throwing axes, there's Dharok's Greataxe and Balmung.
  • Ancient Artifact: Recent quests have revealed that there are 12 Elder Artifacts, from which the gods draw their power and will be a major plot element of future quests. Each artifact is a source of power, and has a certain function. Unfortunately, they also have a downside to using them. The known artifacts are:
    • The Elder Sword: capable of opening portals at whim. Currently broken in Guthix's resting place.
    • The Staff: associated with the god Armadyl; Zamorak used it to kill Zaros and ascend to godhood, and now Sliske has used it to kill Guthix. Armadyl stated that he could use it to create life from nonliving material.
    • The Kiln: used to create the physical shell of the world. Since it utilizes the Tok Haar to achieve this, it can defend itself with ease.
    • The Stone of Jas: The source of all runes and a Phlebotinum Battery for the energy of the Elder Gods. Guthix used it to shape Gielenor and seed it with life. Using it if you are anyone other than Jas invokes a curse on the Dragonkin, enraging them and making them attack you. If you draw power from the stone as opposed to knowledge, they will gain an equivalent amount. Guthix, Sliske, V, and the player used it for knowledge, and so they aren't in immediate danger from the Dragonkin.
    • The Crown: this has been in the possession of Saradomin for as long as anyone remembers. It can locate all artifacts, but any gods can also locate the wearer.
    • The Horn: Guthix found it on Gielenor with the Staff and Stone. Quin, a seasinger from the Wushanko Isles, took over the Eastern Lands with its power, but was killed before she actually became a god. The monkey god Marimbo implies that she may have used this artifact to ascend.
    • The Measure: The weakest of the artefacts and currently in the possession of the Player Character. It has the ability to measure Anima.
  • Anchors Away: The Barrelchest Anchor, which can be used as a weapon.
  • And I Must Scream:
    • Poor Arrav; he was raised as a zombie by the very person he fought against. Said person also decided to keep him conscious, effectively forcing him to watch as his body fought his own people. the Void Pest in A Void Dance, and Akthanakos could be said to fit this role, since he was betrayed and turned into a guardian of his own imprisonment.
    • Pentyn in Enakhra's Temple has been trapped there for thousands of years in solitary isolation and was constantly tortured by Enakhra. To make it worse, he's been immortalized and can't move anything below the shoulder, meaning he can never leave the place.
    • Apmeken had her voice, sight, and hearing taken away, and she was forced to sit back and wait as her monkeys slowly died off and the people of the desert turned against one another and killed each other without her guidance.
    • The TzHaar, whose bodies are composed of rock and magma/lava, apparently remain fully self-aware as they harden into solid obsidian upon "death." Obsidian which is then broken up and made into TokKul, their currency. In The Elder Kiln, Ga'al-Xox is infused with the TokKul of a dead TzHaar champion, giving him all the memories of the dead champion. He reveals that turning into TokKul is crushing agony, unable to even think coherently through the pressure and the pain; Xox was nearly driven insane from being exposed to a few minutes of 'death'.
    • Skaldrun: his identity and all memory of who he was was destroyed to make him a human library. He was then made immortal and frozen in a block of ice for several hundred years, fully aware of his surroundings.
    • Mother Mallum's host, Lucy, in "Salt in the Wound". Stated to have been only a child when the slug queen possessed her and forced to spend decades in a semi-conscious, waking nightmare of an existence before finally being granted a proper death at the end of the quest.
  • And Your Reward Is Clothes: Reach level 99 in a skill? You get a cape. It has reasonable combat stats, yes, but still a fancy cape with a special emoticon. Finishing achievement diaries and quests, as well as many minigames/activities gets you pieces of clothing and armor. Much of it is unique or otherwise useful, but most of it is strictly cosmetic.
    • And then there's The World Wakes quest. Its rewards include eight experience lamps worth massive amounts of XP, access to a new mid-level slayer monster, use of the five highest-level combat abilitiesnote , one of the most powerful rings in the game, and... a shirt.
  • Angels, Devils and Squid: Recently, this might not apply as much with the morality of the different sides being less concretely good or evil. But nonetheless, we have:
    • Angels: Saradomin and his Icyene and knights. Armadyl and his Aviansie would also apply.
    • Devils: Zamorak and potentially Zaros, as well as the Avernic demons and Mahjarrat who follow them.
    • Squid: Cthonian demons, especially Cacus; the goddess Tuska and her Airut; potentially the Elder Gods who plan to devour the World Soul of Gielinor, killing everything that lives there.
  • Animated Armor:
    • The best example is the Warriors' Guild, where you can have your suit of armor brought to life as part of a minigame. Animated suits of armor appear in other places, as well.
    • Animated floating axes inhabit part of the dungeon just south of Taverley. In addition, the old Druidic Ritual quest involved going to the Cauldron of Thunder therein, which was guarded by a pair of suits of armour which came to life and attacked the player when they tried to pass by.
    • Animated spades and pickaxes are also found in several dungeons. The pickaxes pack a surprising punch.
  • Another Dimension: Lots, but notably:
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • To avert Fetch Quest, quests will often provide some required items like spades or pickaxes or gems in the nearby vicinity, saving you the trouble of trekking away to find one yourself.
    • The Toolbelt provides you with pretty much every basic tool you'll need to do any skilling or quest task in the game, unless it is a very specific item needed for a quest. This saves players long treks or teleports back to the bank for a chisel. Even better, it holds everything without taking up an additional inventory space, which is a huge bonus in a game with only 28 spaces for non-equipment.
    • Quest items for newer quests have been made more clear with a small icon next to the name of the item. Prior to this point, it was hard to tell what was actually a quest item, especially once the quest was over.
    • Having trouble with the Sliding Puzzle in "Monkey Madness"? You can skip it by paying Glough a bribe.
    • Sometimes if a puzzle is annoying there's usually a way to just bludgeon your way through.
    • In player-owned ports, if you take too long locating the assassins in the Black Marketeer's random event, a hint arrow appears to point you in the right direction.
  • Anti-Grinding: To ensure that all clan members participate in the upkeep of the Clan Citadel there's a Cap; each individual player can only grind away at the resources until they hit the cap, after which it's impossible for them to continue.
  • Anti-Villain:
    • The Balance Elemental, whom you must kill to access the Stone of Jas. Which turns out to be a biiiig mistake.
    • The Easter 2011 event gave The Queen Of Snow just a touch of this. After you help cut down an evil holly tree to obtain the Year, it quickly became apparent that what you've fetched for The Queen Of Sunshine wasn't real. Turns out Snowie, one of the most endearing holiday characters in the game, stole the real one because spring is so foreign to her that she literally can't see anything beautiful in it; despite knowing spring has to come to maintain order, she wanted winter to go on a little longer because she's perfectly in tune with it — but still felt mighty guilty about it.
    • The Mahjarrat may be this, particularly the Zarosian variety. They were stolen from their home dimension and enslaved by a Jackal god, then freed by the Empty Lord (Zaros). They're generally nice. Sliske still tries to turn you into a Barrows Brother, and kills one of your friends. The others seem to not mind if you kill him, but he is rather powerful, so they like having him as an ally.
    • "Some Like It Cold" reveals that the penguins in the Motherland are slaves and food to both the seals and polar bears, and the penguins on the iceberg were originally a group of penguins who just wanted to escape, even if Pescaling is now bent on taking over the world.
  • Anthropomorphic Personifications:
    • The Queen of Snow and Queen of Sunrise are personifications of winter and spring respectively. The former once tried to make the world stay in winter because she cannot comprehend the beauty of spring.
    • The 2011 Halloween event the simply packed with these. Death apparently joined up with Pestilence, War and Famine to form a clan, and held the event involving Beauty and Fame, and Peace was mentioned during the event as well.
  • Anything That Moves: Ozan, who when quizzing Owen about his encounter with a supposed Icyene (essentially a gigantic, angelic human) asks "Was she hot?!". When told that not all Icyene are female, he replies "Well, was he hot?!"
  • Apocalypse How:
    • There are many instances of it, including Class 0, Class 1 (sometime during the Fourth Age), and Class 2 (after the God Wars). Classes 3, 4 and 5 can be found in some of the realms, and X4 is subverted at the end of the Temple of Senntisten and Recipe for Disaster quests.
    • Meta example: ClusterFlutterer (the so-called "bot nuke" of October 2011) was responsible for the deletion and banning of almost 40% of the player base over the course of a single weekend.
      • However, this was short-lived; Jagex wouldn't find a permanent solution to the bot plague until the release of Runescape 3.
  • Apocalyptic Log: You find one in the "Shades of Mort'ton" quest, where the writing gradually devolves into gibberish as the author slips into madness.
  • April Fools' Day: There have been several.
    • 2004 saw the long-awaited introduction of horses to RuneScape — toy wooden horses, that is.
    • In 2007, there was a fake "Behind the Scenes" update announcing that every update that month would be heavily cabbage-based. A similar "Behind the Scenes" prank was the April Fool in 2011, with a plethora of {Shout Out}}s.
    • In 2009, all the cabbages came to life and started bouncing around. Kicking one from one end of the map to the other resulted in the first appearance of Brassica Prime.
    • On other occasions, April Fools' Day heralded the fake release of new dragon items, including 2005's Dragon Plate (a toy spinning plate which you could spin and play with) and 2008's Dragon Kite (a toy kite that you can fly)note .
    • In 2010, they announced a RuneScape theme park.
    • For 2012, they proclaimed that "P-hats" would be dropped all around RuneScape for players to pick up for free. ("P-hat" traditionally refers to the ultra-rare party hats that are some of the most valuable items in the game.) True to their word, major cities were littered with Pea Hats: green peas that you can wear on your head.
    • In 2014 they Trolled players by announcing on the website that due to a technical error, a section of the forum that was not intended for players to see had become viewable and asked that players not look at it. If you actually fell for the prank you would probably think that Runescape was going to Jump the Shark with all the bad ideas they talked about adding to the game. They also changed the animation for throwing logs into a fire to look like you were throwing party hats into the fire.
  • Arm Cannon: The Barrelchest Mk II is equipped with a literal cannon on its left arm.
  • In 2014 the animation for throwing logs into fire was changed to burning party hats and sailing skill (which was rumored to be added to the game in future) was added to skill interface. On the forums mock Jagex employee forums became visible due to "technical glitch"
  • Armor and Magic Don't Mix: Wearing armor imposes a damage penalty on spells, to the point where most offensive magics are nearly or completely useless if you're wearing full platemail. However the penalty only applies to Hit Point damage: other spells work fine, and prayers are completely unaffected.
  • Armor of Invincibility: Torva, Pernix, and Virtus: the most powerful armor in the game, dropped only by one of the most difficult boss monsters in the game. They're tradable, but they'll set you back hundreds of millions of gold.
  • Armor-Piercing Question: 'But am I your enemy?' When the player character asks a mind controlled Zanik this question, it gives her the conviction she needs to break Bandos' control.
  • Artificial Stupidity:
    • None of the monsters can seem to figure out to just walk around the table from behind which the player is casting spells or shooting arrows at them. This was averted in later updates, as monsters from Dungeoneering will attempt to run or move around obstacles when they are attacked from a range. You can still pin an enemy into a corner with a little maneuvering, but at least the token effort is still there.
    • This is lampshaded in a rematch with the Tree Spirit, where the text before the fight mentions there are no mushrooms to hide behind.
  • Ascended Glitch:
    • Certain members-only items of clothing were made available. It was discovered that some of those items (the gloves) were actually usable on freeplay worlds (instead of being displayed as "member's objects" they were still wearable gloves). Because they could not be obtained on free worlds, some members would obtain them for low prices on their worlds and sell them to non-members for higher prices. They became a symbol of wealth on freeplay worlds, eventually forcing Jagex to keep it in.
    • An extremely early example (2001 or so) would be the now taken-for-granted feature that makes items only visible to the player who dropped them for about a minute before being visible to everyone else. It was originally a bug, but after it was removed, public demand brought it back.
  • Ash Face: During the Recipe For Disaster quest, a goblin cook accidentally blows up his own cauldron and gets this.
  • Asskicking Equals Authority:
    • One quest lets you join the White Knights of Falador and be able to purchase their equipment. For the Master rank, you have to kill hundreds of black knights. And "Ritual of the Mahjarrat" lets you see Sir Tiffy in action, the old man is TOUGH.
    • The Void Knights have this system. The better a fighter you are, the higher your rank.
    • Ogres like this, the most powerful are the leaders.
    • Sometimes justified in clans or minigames when individuals are chosen to be generals or other leaders just because they are the strongest and/or most skilled at the game.
  • Asteroids Monster: Tz-Keks split in two once you kill one.
  • Attack Reflector: One shield ability, aptly named reflect, does this for a few seconds.
  • The Atoner: Dr. Fenkenstrain after the Great Brain Robbery quest.
  • Audience Shift: The demographic grew older with the game, resulting in quest storylines becoming more mature, deaths becoming more graphic, and the profanity filter becoming optional.
  • Author Avatar: Several J Mods have made ingame appearances, most notably in the form of 'Jmod Clones' that spawned during the Battle of Lumbridge to fight for their chosen god, though Mod Osborne ('Mod Elfborne') and Mod Stu appear as easter eggs in Prifddinas to players who, respectively, give chocolate, bacon, and bread to Seren or prepare a stew while holding a mud pie. You earn titles for finding either of them.
  • Awesome but Temporary: At the end of "While Guthix Sleeps", you get to use the Stone of Jas to boost all your stats to insane levels during a boss battle, but Lucien steals the Stone and the boost wears off as soon as the fight ends.
  • Awesome but Impractical: The Ancient Combat abilities (except Ice Asylum) summon vaguely Eldritch Abomination -like tentacles to harm your foe, in a display similar to that once used by Zaros himself to conquer and enslave a lesser god. These have the potential to be among the highest-damaging abilities in the game (up to 500% regular weapon damage)... but also among the lowest (66% regular weapon damage, for the same ability), completely at random. And they do (potentially heavy) damage to their user as well, even if you completely miss your opponent.
  • Awesome Moment of Crowning: Veldaban in King of the Dwarves.
  • Awesome Yet Practical: Several things in both RuneScape 3 and the recent beta for Legacy Mode:
    • The aforementioned Ice Asylum takes a while to unlock, and needs 91 Constitution just to activate, but allows you to heal yourself AND your allies for up to 40% of your max HP. While it does have a cooldown of 5 minutes between uses, it affects everyone within a certain radius of the placable Ice Asylum, and has no limit to how many players can use it within those 5 mins.
    • Overloads and Saradomin Brews. The former raises all your combat stats to their maximum, and keeps them elevated by refreshing the boost over 5 mins. The latter heals you for a set amount of HP per dose, while lowering your offensive power and maximising your defensive power. Apply together, and you get the best healing item (per slot) in the game, with its negative side effects removed.
  • A God Am I: Every so often, one of the deities in RuneScape will make an appearance. It is generally made clear that they are, indeed, a god, or at least very, very, powerful.
    • The quest called "Missing, Presumed Death" is made of this trope. After Sliske gathers most of the other gods (along with the player) in Armadyl's former fortress, the various gods quibble amongst themselves as to the purpose of the assembly - supposedly it is to announce that Sliske has become a god thanks to his recent activities. He subverts it, however, by announcing that the real reason he kidnapped Death was to start a free-for-all amongst the gods.
  • A Wizard Did It:
    People who have never met him have his image transferred into their minds by those that have by, erm, magic and wizards.
  • Baba Yaga: She's a major character in several quests and runs a magic shop. She lives on Lunar Isle in her chicken-legged hut.
  • Badass Bookworm: Lexicus Runewright in Dungeoneering. He summons books that hit you with all kinds of attacks, and some that explode that do an almost guaranteed 500 damage (back when 990 was the max HP a player could have, this was a BIG problem).
  • Bad Boss: Kal'Ger the Warmonger, who opens every battle with a cutscene in which he kills one of the lower-level Kal'Gerion demons.
  • Bad Is Good and Good Is Bad: Subverted by Evil Dave, who tries to swap "bad" and "good" in his speeches, but ends up getting very confused.
  • Bad Powers, Good People: The Zarosian Mahjarrat, who, while not uniformly good, are generally on the player's side for right now. The Ancient magicks that Zarosians use are quite dark, including spells that freeze opponents solid, steal their health, and drain their prayer. The Zarosian prayers (called "curses") are much more offensive than the other prayer sets, and drain your opponent's strength to enhance your own.
  • Bad with the Bone: The Dorgeshuun goblins are pacifists, but when they have to fight, they use weapons made out of bone, including a bone club (which is just a large, heavy bone).
  • Bag of Holding:
    • It is an adventure game with an inventory, after all. Also doubles as Hammerspace because you can hold large hammers, anchors, other weapons, and massive amounts of food and fish, all too huge to possibly keep within. At its most extreme, you can carry the components for seven full dwarf multicannons, each of which is twice as big as you are.
    • There's bags of holding for rune essence that you can place within the bag of holding, as well as a coal bag and gem bag available as Dungeoneering rewards.
    • The toolbelt enables you to store all kinds of tools without taking up inventory or bank space, while the money pouch keeps gold pieces safe even through death (though it becomes impossible to fill in the Wilderness).
  • Bag of Spilling:
    • All but one (up to five with the required level) of the hard-won items found in the dungeons of Daemonheim will disappear into Saradomin-only-knows-where once the dungeon is completed.
    • You drop most of your items when you die.
  • Baguette Beatdown: The Sandwich Lady. Don't make her angry!
  • Bait-and-Switch Boss: A hybrid of this and Trick Boss can be found in Araxxor and Araxxi: You fight Araxxor for the first three phases of the fight, but then Araxxi shows up and kills Araxxor, and you have to defeat her for the rewards.
  • Bald of Awesome: Saradomin, the Wise Old Man, and Sir Tiffy Cashien. Optional for the player.
  • Bank Robbery: The Wise Old Man pulled one of these in Draynor Village. He lives right across the street from the bank.
  • Barrier Change Boss:
    • Dagannoth and Gelatinnoth Mothers. They change colors depending on the type of attack you need to use.
    • Tormented demons, which change their protection prayer based on what you're hitting them with.
    • Astea Frostweb and the Skeletal Trio, who change their protection prayers randomly.
    • Some bosses invert this—the player puts up prayers to block attacks, and the bosses change their attacks to hit around them.
  • Batman Gambit: The entire plot of "Hunt for Red Raktuber". Pescaling Pax anticipates your every move, and by the end of the quest, you're teleblocked and left for dead on a deserted island.
  • Bat out of Hell: After a graphical update, now standard Vampires, angry Juvinates and Vyrewatch look like were-bats, the Vyrewatch having wings on their back and the other two having no wings to speak of.
  • Beam-O-War: Runescape 3 opened with one of these between Saradomin and Zamorak. Players could gather Divine Tears for either one, to help overpower the other (and earn loot).
  • Because You Were Nice to Me: In the lore, this is why General Viggora defected from Zaros to Zamorak. After being recruited into Zaros' armies, all the other races mocked him and humans in general, no matter what they accomplished. Except for Zamorak, who at the time was another general. After he overbuilt his fortress until it sank into the swamp he built it on, he remembered Zamorak's silence while the others mocked him and joined him in his (successful) attempt at usurping Zaros.
  • Bedsheet Ghost: Invoked in "Ghosts Ahoy", where you try to disguise yourself as a ghost by cutting holes in a bedsheet.
  • Belief Makes You Stupid: Invoked more and more in recent quests and lore, to the point that RuneScape is bordering on an Author Tract by Jagex's developers.
  • Big Bad: The Dragonkin. In the Ritual of the Mahjarrat quest, they returned out of hiding and showed their power by killing Lucien, who, at the time, was the most powerful Mahjarrat.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: There are more than 10 different types of giant spiders, Kalrag from the Underground Pass is the biggest attackable one. The Stronghold of Safety is packed with Giant Roaches. Giant Ants and Giant Wasps can be found in the Jade Vine maze on Karamja. There are Cave Bugs and Cave Crawlers underground. The largest insects however, are the Kalphites, which are like beetle-scorpion hybrids.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Played straight when you are the hero (usually in quests), averted when a group of heroes try to save you from Lucien.
  • Bigger Bad: The Elder Gods. Every one encountered so far has been a highly malevolent Eldritch Abomination, and they have a Cradle of their offspring waiting to hatch on Gielinor. If this comes to fruition, it can and will turn the planet into a Death World, much like what happened to the Mahjarrat homeworld of Freneskae.
  • Bigger on the Inside: Everyone's Player Owned Houses and Balthazar Beauregard's Circus are these; the latter can move it's current location in a box, once a week.
  • Big "NO!": When the player is kidnapped to Evil Bob's island. "No... what? Nooooooooooooo!"
  • Bilingual Bonus:
    • The Burthorpe Soldiers speak in Latin.
    • Latin appears to be the official language of Zaros. The book that teaches you the Ancient Curses is written in Latin, the Zaros area in the God Wars dungeon has Latin inscriptions, and several prominent Zarosian characters and items have Latin names:
      • Torva, Pernix, and Virtus armor are Latin for "fierce", "nimble", and "valor" respectively.
      • Nex, the Zaros boss, is Latin for "violent death".
      • Nex's generals Cruor, Fumus, Glacies, and Umbra are "blood", "smoke", "ice", and "shadow".
    • Daemonheim battle themes are also named Glacialis, Desolo, Adorno, Occulo, and Torqueo, translating to Glacial, Desolate, Adorned, Occult, and Twisted respectively.
    • The song called Norse Code includes a high flute. Its first series of notes is actually "RUNESCAPE" in Morse Code.
  • Bittersweet Ending:
    • At the end of the Blood Runs Deep quest, you manage to trap the Dagganoth Mother inside of the cavern and protect Rellekka, at the cost of losing Prince Brand and Princess Astrid, who died fighting the Dagganoth Kings. It doesn't help that you married the one opposite to your gender only a few moments before.
    • At the end of Ritual of the Mahjarrat, Lucien is dead, the Staff of Armadyl has been broken and thus rendered unusable, and the Stone of Jas has been placed somewhere where it won't be abused again. Unfortunately, Jhallan was used for the Ritual, effectively killing him, Idria was murdered by the dragonkin, a friend changed into a Barrows Brother, and the Dragonkin have wrecked Edgeville and intend to do the same to the rest of the world.
  • Black Comedy: At the end of the 2011 Easter event, you have to carve an ice sculpture to show the Queen of Snow why spring is a just as good a thing as winter. Out of the options of what to carve note , the one that sticks out the most is the last one: "Cute baby animals... impaled on swords." Choosing this choice works just as well as the others.
  • Bladder of Steel: When the Fight Caves minigame was first released, there was no way to save your progress midway through the fight. The only way to beat TzTok-Jad and earn the fire cape was to buckle up and sit at your computer for over an hour fighting your way through all 60+ waves of enemies. This was later remedied, and you can now save your progress by logging out in between waves.
  • Bland-Name Product: In the 2014 Halloween event, you go into Death's mansion to fight ghosts, to which end he equips you with a Proto Pack.
  • Blessed with Suck: Zanik. Chosen by the gods and raised from the dead to become a brainwashed slave-general of the war-god Bandos.
  • Bling of War: Dragonstone armour: while the armour set is very fashionable and is the best hybrid armour available in free-to-play servers, it is very expensive and its stats aren't that good compared to other armour sets at its level.
  • Blood Knight: Bandos is the "Big High War God" who teaches that fighting is the highest calling of all, and his followers are almost universally aggressive and love battle. He has specifically bred entire RACES for war.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: According to Zaros, the Elder Gods do not create conscious life on purpose and barely even perceive it. They would extinguish it without a second thought and have already done so countless times. Zaros also speculates that the Dragonkin were a race from a previous cycle that survived its destruction by hiding in the Abyss. They tried begging Jas for mercy, but ended up enslaved to her stone instead.
  • Bond One-Liner: Mr. Mordaut and his cheese-related puns in the Gielinor Games, when you fail in the Cheese Roll.
  • Bonsai Forest: The soil quality in Gielinor clearly isn't the best out there. Some graphics updates made the trees more reasonably sized, but many are still pretty small. In some areas, like the swamps south of Lumbridge and in Morytania or otherwise the various high mountain ranges, this is actually justified, of course.
  • Boogie Knights: The dancing knights in the Party Room.
  • Booze-Based Buff: Drinking certain types of beers will alter your stats, usually giving you a boost in one area and weakening you in another. Ordinary beer, for example, increases your Strength (attack power), but decreases your Attack (accuracy).
  • Border Patrol: Try to enter a dark area without a light source and little bugs will swarm all over you, draining your health.
  • Boring but Practical: Pretty much all of the skills. Training skills usually consists of using it over and over and over again. But once you get it high enough, you'll be able to summon a Pack Yak with an inventory bigger than your own, or make the best healing items in the game, or even cheat death.
  • Boss Banter:
    • Nomad. Among others.
    • One of the more humorous examples is found at the end of the "Lunar Diplomacy" quest where players have to fight a copy of themselves (simply called "Me"). "Stop hitting yourself!" indeed.
  • Boss Rush: The Dominion Tower, where you re-fight quest bosses you've already beaten.
  • Both Sides Have a Point: The Runescape gods all have different, conflicting worldviews, but all of them are valid.
  • Bottomless Bladder: Your character can eat all the food he or she wants, but never has to go to the bathroom. In fact, he/she has never seen a bathroom before, as a discussion with Ali the Barman reveals.
  • Bragging Rights Reward: A lot of the rewards, though more so with Level Grinding and minigame-type stuff than for quests. Typically overlaps with And Your Reward Is Clothes. More recently, quests award titles for those with higher than necessary levels.
  • Breakable Weapons: All sorts of flavors:
    • Some weapons gradually degrade until they break, and you can repair them back to 100% by paying a fee depending on how degraded they are. Barrows and Chaotic gear are good examples.
    • PVP weapons such as Vesta's Longsword and Statius's Warhammer have a set lifespan: after a certain amount of time in combat, they crumble to dust. The same goes for "corrupt Dragon" equipment; it offers the stats of members-only Dragon equipment to non-members, but crumbles to dust after a set amount of time.
    • Crystal equipment degrades in a fashion similar to Barrows and Chaotic, but as it degrades, it gradually decreases in power as well. When it's fully degraded, it reverts back to a crystal seed that can be shaped back into its more practical form for a fee.
    • The Hand Cannon has a rather annoying variant: it has a random chance of blowing up in your face, dealing you damage and destroying itself completely. Ouch.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall:
    • In the Runescape 2011 Easter event, a squirrel named the 'Antipodean Squirrel', is angry about how the Easter event is Northern-Hemisphere-Centric, and about how it is Spring in the northern hemisphere and how it is autumn in the southern hemisphere and it's not fair to have no autumn event. One response is to tell him to stop breaking the fourth wall; he replies, 'Yeah, like you stay in character all the time!'
    • Another example occurs when talking to the bartender in the Blue Moon Inn in Varrock. He states that Runescape is a computer game, but your character thinks that he is crazy.
    • You break the fourth wall in a way talking to the priest in Lumbridge, when you say that you are not from this world.
  • Breath Weapon:
    • Dragons have a deadly firebreathing attack that sticks to you like napalm, dealing lots of damage unless you have a special anti-dragon shield. Wyverns, close relatives of dragons, have a powerful ice breath attack that can freeze you for massive damage and requires an elemental shield to defend against.
    • "Dragon Breath" is a combat ability for the Magic skill, allowing you to spit out a cone of flame to damage enemies in front of you.
  • Breeding Cult: One of the guardians of Guthix, Ocellus, created The Order of Ascension, in an attempt to support Guthix's Naytheist philosophy. His first experiment was to create a race of highly independent humans, but the results were insolent and destructive. He eventually realized that worship was just a by-product of social order, so instead, he tried to close the gap between humans and the gods, using both breeding and magical augmentation.
  • Bribing Your Way to Victory: Buying Spins on the Squeal of Fortune, which can give cash rewards, valuable items, or EXP lamps, giving you a leg up on other players whichever way. This has since expanded to include:
    • Solomon's General Store - cosmetic overrides, pets and auras for real world cash or Loyalty Points.
    • Treasure Hunter - an Updated Re-release of the Squeal of Fortune, after many complaints that it wasn't worth the time to buy the spins for useless items. In this version, almost every prize is of use; between bonus experience, helpful items, cosmetic outfits, seasonal or promotional items, and the cash prizes, such as Large Cash Bags containing 500k to 1m coins, or the Jackpot of 200m coins.
    • Bonds - Items which can be bought off Jagex, sold in-game for in-game cash, or used to credit either Treasure Hunter or Solomon with keys or Rune Coins respectively. These were created as a direct way to combat goldfarmers, and it worked.
  • Brick Joke: A pretty grim one. After Sigmund uses a Ring of Life (an item which teleports the wearer to a spawn point when they're low on health) to escape death numerous times, Zanik finally cuts his hand off during The Chosen Commander to prevent him from leaving and kills him. After the quest is finished, if you go back to Lumbridge and talk to the Duke, he'll mention Sigmund's severed hand having teleported into the courtyard.
  • British Accents:
    • Most of the voice-acted characters have some form or other of British accent, since Jagex is, after all, based in the U.K.
    • All imps speak in a thick Cockney Phonetic Accent, complete with rhyming slang like "dragon's belly" (for "smelly").
  • British English: The game being produced in Britain and owned by a British company many terms for things are the British terms and that can and does cause some confusion among American players unfamiliar with both the game and British terminology. Easy examples are a 'Spade' (commonly called a shovel in America) and Treasure Trail 'Biscuits' (what Americans would call cookies). An especially confusing example is in clue scrolls that tell you to search the first floor of a building. What Americans know as the first floor is called the ground floor in Britain, so American players didn't know that the clue was telling them to go upstairs. A stickied thread was made on the forum to clarify this.
  • Broken Aesop:
    • The "Tower of Life" quest. The moral of the whole story is that meddling with creation is wrong, and life should be treated with respect. Your reward for completing the quest is access to a minigame where you can create new mutant life-forms, kill them, and harvest their organs.
  • Broken Bridge: See Missing Secret below.
  • Brown Note: The Stalkers' natural language. A quote from an unknown mage:
    "It calls itself Plane-freezer Lakhrahnaz in our language. I regret asking it to say it in its own, for the combination of audible and inaudible sounds from its many lipless mouths caused me a pounding headache and blood to cascade from my nose, which Lakhrahnaz then froze."
  • Bubble Gloop Swamp: Morytania, Lumbridge Swamp, Ullek ruins, Poison Waste, etc.
  • Build Like an Egyptian: There are four pyramids and one mastaba in the Kharidian desert.
  • Bullet Time: Seen in the Brimhaven agility dungeon when dodging the poison darts, as a Shout-Out to The Matrix.
  • Call On Me: The "Path of Glouphrie" quest ends with the Player Character stuck in a Death Trap. As you start to collapse from the poison gas, you cry out mentally for help. Lo and behold, the telepathic gnome Hazelmere from earlier in the quest hears you and teleports in to rescue you just in time.
  • Cannibalism Superpower: Cthonian demons are able to absorb the essence, and by extension, the power and cunning, of those they consume.
  • Canon Discontinuity: The Romeo and Juliet quest, which has been so thoroughly removed that most of the NPCs involved in the quest no longer exist in the game. They even deleted letters about it from the old Postbag from the Hedge archives.
  • Captain Obvious: Most item examinations merely state "a(n) [insert item name here]".
  • Capture the Flag: Castle Wars. Also available as part of the Clan Citadel's battlefield editor.
  • Cassandra Truth: The terrified Prison Pete rambles about some evil cat that appears out of nowhere and kidnaps people to a room with alive balloon animals with keys in them.
  • Cast from Hit Points: The Lunar spell Energy Transfer, which restores a friend's adrenaline at the cost of your Hit Points. There's also a set of Empathic Healer spells.
  • Catching Some Z's: A side-effect of a dream spell.
  • Censored for Comedy: Though changes of late have made this more of a Scunthorpe Problem, since definite "cuss words" are permitted more often, but certain others are not. (Example: "Phone") Of course, this may have been resolved, also.
    • A bit more of a subversion as what is being censored may have a reason other than the obvious, such as denying the ability to ask personal information.
  • Cerebus Syndrome: The game has increasingly been said to exhibit this as Jagex has moved away from Lighter and Softer elements like the penguins' quest line and the wacky random events in favour of Darker and Edgier quest lines and remakes of or sequels to existing quests. This has proceeded to such an extent that "Bringing Home the Bacon" was specifically advertised by Jagex as being conceived as a more comedic quest — and even it had the player aiding a character in all-but-explicitly committing murder and concealing the evidence.
  • Cessation of Existence: Runescape's actual afterlife is vague but existent, however this is implied to be the eventual fate of those whose souls are devoured by the Spirit Beast or Amascut, Goddess of Destruction. Fortunately, the former has been forced into the physical world where it can no longer do this. Unfortunately, the quest revolving around it had you planning to destroy it, as it had been feeding on the energy of the spirits of the deceased for years in order to build up enough power to claw its way into the physical world. That said, it wasn't a complete failure, because who knows how powerful it would have been if it had made its way over unhindered with all of the power it had consumed.
  • Chained to a Railway: Zanik in Another Slice of H.A.M.. Done intentionally to complete Sigmund's persona as a Dastardly Whiplash.
  • Chain of Deals: One Small Favour, and a shorter version in The Fremmenik Trials.
  • Characterization Marches On: In early quests and lore, Saradomin had a much more pleasant characterization and Zamorak and his followers were uniformly evil, effectively being the in-game equivalents to God and Satan respectively. In recent times, Jagex has put forward a lot of quests and lore that show Saradomin and his followers in a negative light, while playing up the positive aspects of Zamorak and his philosophies.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: With enough skill in combat, you can punch through armor with your fists, kill people unarmed, and block weapons with your bare hands. And let's not get started with the Evolution of Combat.
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • The clock in "One Piercing Note" becomes important at the end.
  • Chekhov's Gunman:
    • Baron von Hattenkrapper, whom you first met as the seagull you fired out of a makeshift bellows in "Rocking Out", later becomes a significant character in the sequel, "A Clockwork Syringe", when he teams up with you to destroy the barrelchest army by air-dropping cannonballs on them.
    • Denath is first seen summoning Delrith along with a few other dark wizards in Demon Slayer. In Shadow Of The Storm, he's revealed to be Agrith-Naar, a demon roughly five times as powerful as Delrith was, easily 100 times more powerful when the player helped dismiss him back to his home dimension.
  • Chekhov's Skill: Usually enforced in quests where something in a former quest is something you will need to know how to do. Having the skill levels required before a quest is released may also count.
  • The Chosen One: Zanik, a cave goblin chosen by the gods for an unknown purpose. She was chosen to become the Avatar of Bandos; essentially, a slave-general with no free will.
  • Church Militant:
    • Used to peaceful Saradominist priests and monks? Try visiting the God Wars Dungeon, where those priests are armed to the teeth.
    • The Temple Knights, who are Combat Pragmatist Knights with great magic knick-knacks, a huge information network and no qualms about doing whatever they think is necessary. Be glad they're on your side.
    • The Missionary from Player Owned Ports tries to invoke this image, but his personality and approach to gaining followers in the East ends up backfiring when Zamorakians exploit his bad first impression.
  • Circling Birdies: Formerly used when anyone is stunned.
  • City Guards: Which don't have a very long lifespan.
  • Clap Your Hands If You Believe: The Runecrafting altars (or at least the Astral one) were created by making dolmens out of Rune Essence, and then by using a lot of focus from a lot of people, convincing the stone that it was something that it was not.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: Aside from combat skill levels, the attack and defense bonuses given by weapons and armor are a major factor in how well a player fares in combat. Some complete sets of armor also give additional increases to attack or defense alongside the normal bonuses.
  • Clucking Funny: A random event had you being attacked by the greatest Super Villain in all of Runescape ... the Evil Chicken. They milked him for all he was worth too, with emotes like "Buk, buk, buk, BWHAHAHAHA!" and the like.
  • Cobweb Jungle: Enforced in the 2009 Halloween event. The rules of Halloween say that the Grim Reaper has to have cobwebs in his house, so it's the Player Character's job to negotiate with the Spider Queen (who lives in her own gigantic, over-the-top maze of cobwebs) to decorate Grim's mansion properly.
  • Cognizant Limbs:
    • The Swamp Creature encountered during the Temple Trekking minigame is this. Poisoning one part effects all its limbs; however, you need to kill all 4 limbs and the head to continue.
    • Tolna is the quest boss of A Soul's Bane, who has 3 heads. Poisoning any of his heads poisons the rest; killing all 3 of them transforms him back to normal.
    • Har'Aken, the final boss of the Fight Kiln, is submerged in magma and must have its tentacles damaged until it raises its head, giving you an opportunity to strike it before submerging again.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: Player-owned port crew members are color-coded based on their stats. Blue clothes mean high seafaring; green, high morale; red, high combat.
  • Color-Coded Multiplayer: Seen in minigames like Trouble Brewing, Castle Wars, Soul Wars, and so on. Red team and blue team are the standard (to correspond with Zamorak and Saradomin), although the Great Orb Project uses yellow and green instead.
  • Color-Coded Stones: There are blue sapphires, red rubies, green emeralds, white diamonds, and black onyx. But there are also quest-related gems that are different in color (blood diamond is red, smoke diamond is gray, shadow diamond is black, ice diamond is light gray). Lastly, jade, opal and diamond are in ridiculously similar color. You can have a reference here.
  • Colossus Climb: Involved in the boss fight against Vorago. Players need to climb onto him to retrieve the pieces of the Maul of Omens, and the final blow is struck by leaping up to his head and embedding it in his face.
  • Combo Platter Powers: Sufficiently advanced players have abilities that include, but are not limited to: Super Strength, Super Speed, super stamina, super endurance, control over air, water, earth, fire, ice, blood, shadow and lightning, telepathy, telekinesis, Mass Teleportation, Resurrective Immortality, Improbable Aiming Skills, Green Thumb, and more.
  • Comedic Sociopathy: The player character is an expert.
  • Commonplace Rare:
    • An ordinary jug of wine is worth a small handful of gold if you're lucky. A half-full jug of wine is worth many millions of gp. This is because the ability to drink half a jug of wine was removed and wine jugs are now gulped down in one sip, so half-full wine jugs are no longer obtainable. Those that remain have become valuable collector's items.
    • Partyhats are some of the most expensive items in the game. They're little crown-shaped hats made out of paper.
    • Easter Eggs and Pumpkins are worth millions, and are still edible.
  • Continuing Is Painful:
    • Dying makes you drop your items. Mitigated slightly with gravestones, so you only have to dash madly to where you died to get your stuff back.
    • In Daemonheim, each death carries a large xp penalty.
  • Control Room Puzzle
  • Convection Schmonvection: But actually falling into lava doesn't do much damage, either. Lampshaded and Handwaved by a dwarf miner when questioned about it, in a huge lava reactor where you have to mine away cooled lava
    Lava Flow Miner Dwarf: Logically, convection should make the air in this chamber hotter than an oven, and we'd all roast alive. But for some reason that doesn't happen!
    • Averted big time when you visit Freneskae, where convection alone can and will kill you very quickly even if you manage to avoid getting hit by actual lava.
  • Cool and Unusual Punishment: Traditional methods of torture aren't working on the zombie pirate decapitated head in "A Clockwork Syringe". It's time to bust out the dreaded Twiblik Night Special. After much ceremony, you open the box and reveal...wigs, make-up, and women's clothing. O...kay? After being mercilessly dressed up in wigs, eye shadow, and lipstick, the distressed zombie finally tells you the location of the villains' secret island hideout.
  • Cool Chair: Thrones in Construction, such as skeleton thrones and demonic thrones.
  • Cool Helmet: The Helm of Neitiznot and The Relic Helm, just to name a few.
  • Corridor Cubbyhole Run: The Rogue's Den maze had a section like this. There's also one in the "Icthlarin's Little Helper" quest.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Subverted in "King of the Dwarves". The Consortium is accused of caring more about profits than the lives of their employees after several miners die in a collapse while rescue workers are instructed to repair the equipment. But it turns out, as the frustrated Consortium members later explain to you, if the equipment hadn't been repaired swiftly, it would have caused repercussions in the entire city's power supply, leading to even greater casualties, and the Consortium was only trying to control the greater damages.
  • Cosmic Horror Story: RuneScape sure seems to be shaping up into one of these, especially after the revelations in "Fate of the Gods". In short, the Eldritch Abominations known as the Elder Gods have a Cradle of their young on Gielinor, and whenever it starts to hatch it could easily invoke an Apocalypse How to turn Gielinor into a Death World much like Freneskae. To make matters worse, the goddess Tuska, a mindless and Nigh Invulnerable force of destruction, will soon be on her way to wreck Gielinor in much the same manner as she and her Mooks, the Airut, did to Guthix's homeworld of Naragun. On top of all that, the returned gods are still using Gielinor as a battleground to obtain the Stone of Jas, the merest usage of which brings down the Unstoppable Rage of the borderline-godly Dragonkin on the user and anyone else unfortunate enough to be nearby.
  • Cowardly Lion: Cyrisus, a fellow adventurer the player meets in Dream Mentor. He has maxed combat stats, despite being terribly afraid of fighting. He achieved his maxed stats by fighting nothing but 300 chickens a day for 30 years.
  • Crazy-Prepared: If you read the quest guide for "Love Story" and bring all of the required items needed to avoid banking in between parts, the Wise Old Man will note how it was rather convenient you had all the necessary items on you at hand the moment you two needed to create a device for that part of the quest.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: The obsidian armour unlocked after the Brink of Extinction quest. It has awesome stats, and reduces damage from creatures in the TzHaar area. But if you use it anywhere else, you take triple damage.
  • Critical Existence Failure
  • Critical Failure: There's usually some chance of horribly failing something; for example, you could formerly lose the head of your hatchet or pickaxe by apparently swinging it too hard ...and then losing the valuable head and having to buy it back from someonenote . You can also have some pretty silly accidents in Daemonheim:
    "You have a hilarious accident with the hammer and chisel, destroying the block in the process."
  • Crystal Dragon Jesus: Saradomin — stained glass, monks, even church organs.
  • Crystal Prison: The goal of the "Merlin's Crystal" quest is to rescue Merlin, who has been trapped inside a crystal by Morgan le Faye.
  • Crystal Spires and Togas: Crystal saws, chimes, seeds, and assorted weapons. Made by elves, of course. And formerly an enormous WALL around the elven capital.note 
  • Curb-Stomp Battle:
    • Guthix is implied to have curb stomped all other gods at the end of the God Wars. Actually, this act ended the God Wars.
    • Lucien versus Hazelmere, Turael, Duradel, Mazchna, Ghommal, Sloane, Harrallak, and Cyrisus in "While Guthix Sleeps".
    • Properly trained and equipped players can slaughter anything in their path, which can be a little awkward when you accidentally click on a man and crush his torso in one blow in the middle of a city.
    • Some players leave very easy quests very late into their game career, ends up having battles like lvl34 Count Draynor vs Lvl128 N00b Destroyer.
    • The above becomes very noticable in the Dominion Tower, where you are given random selections of bosses to fight. If you're prepared to fight Nomad, but instead get the aformentioned Draynor, it's pretty obvious what the outcome will be...
  • Cutscene Drop
  • Cutscene Incompetence: In the updated Wolf Whistle quest, your character runs from a group of trolls carrying a man hostage, and then goes on a Fetch Quest to turn the tables. If this quest is done when you are high level, running away makes your character look like the new Cyrisus.
  • Cutting the Knot: In "A Clockwork Syringe", you use all the stealth and cunning available to you to quietly sabotage the barrelchest factory by smashing equipment with a giant anchor.
  • Cutting Off The Branches: The "Temple of Ikov" quest has you choose whether to protect the Staff of Armadyl or steal it and give it to the bad guy. When the developers made the sequel quest, "While Guthix Sleeps", they realized the plot sort of hinged on the bad guy having the staff, so everyone who chose to protect it received a note from the guardians that it had been stolen by somebody else.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: Implied with the Black Knights (or, as they are formally known, the Kinshra), who have been known to perform nefarious deeds, but are also explained to be another political faction. Ditto with Red Wizards, who are claimed to be responsible of burning the First Wizard's Tower, even though other factions are just as much to blame.
  • Darker and Edgier: As time went on, quests and storylines started getting heavier, with characters Killed Off for Real and such. 'One Piercing Note', for example, is a murder mystery where you end up seeing corpses covered in blood, corpses heavily mutilated and maimed, you end up helplessly watching a woman die, and the whole thing perpetrated by an insane woman who would never have done it had she realised what she was doing.
  • Dark Reprise:
    • Shadow Forger Ihlakhizan's theme is that to Born To Do This track.
    • Temple of Tribes to the standard Goblin Village theme.
    • Creature Cruelty to Magic Magic Magic.
    • Demise of the Dorgeshuun to Dorgeshuun City.
    • Barb Wire to Barbarianism.
    • Return of Lucien to Temple Desecrated.
    • Slug Poison to A New Menace, which is itself a dark reprise of The Mollusc Menace.
    • Fight of the Dwarves to Land of the Dwarves.
  • Deal with the Mahjarrat: What caused the current state of the Barrow Brothers.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: In the Pest Control Minigame, death merely results in the player respawning at the entry lander of the Minigame, restoring their Life Points, Adrenaline, and Prayer at the mere cost of a bit of running to get back where they were. Similar things will happen if you die in any other "Safe" minigame, in which you keep all items on death.
  • Death Trap:
    • You get caught in one at the end of "Path of Glouphrie". Thick, sticky tar pours out onto the floor to stop you from moving. An enchantment prevents you from teleporting. Then comes the poison gas. And of course, at this point, the magical laser attacks start firing at you.
    • Most of the Brimhaven Agility Arena has these, including spikes, rocks, poison darts and spinning blades of doom.
  • Death World:
    • Ape Atoll, if you're a human. The monkeys are not friendly. If you stick to the tall grass, you can hide from their archers, but that won't save you from the poisonous snakes, spiders, and scorpions lurking in the weeds. You can create a talisman that will turn you into a monkey, but only if you travel through a lengthy, spiraling cave full of zombies, traps (also poisonous), and falling rocks. It's not a good vacation spot.
    • The abyssal plane, where everything is trying to kill you or impede you.
    • The Gorak's Plane, which is filled with many (of the same) powerful creatures who just want to kill you.
    • Also the Mahjarrat's home plane, Freneskae.
    • Cheiftain Brundt implies that Acheron, the Penguin Motherland, is this.
  • Degraded Boss: TokTz-Ket-Dill has it's own eponymous quest; however, you fight a number of them throughout The Elder Kiln as well.
  • Deity of Human Origin / A God Am I:
    • Zamorak used to be a Mahjarrat, but gained godly power when he betrayed and defeated Zaros prior to the God Wars.
    • Guthix was a mortal Naragi, but gained his power when he slew the god Skargaroth, who had fallen on Guthix's home in the middle of a battle and killed his daughter Aagi.
    • Saradomin was formerly human, but the means of his ascension to godhood is unknown.
    • Except for Zaros and Seren, and the Elder Gods such as Jas and Ful, all gods were mortal at one point. They are technically just mortals with absurd amounts of power.
  • Dem Bones: There are plenty of animated skeletons in the game.
  • Department of Redundancy Department:
    • From Elemental Workshop III: Body body.
    • When you leap onto a stepping stone near Tears of Guthix: "You leap across with a mighty leap!"
  • Despair Event Horizon: After Guthix's death, his followers go in different directions. Some are encouraged and form the Godless faction as per his last request, and some merely continue to follow his teachings the way they had been. But others fall into despair and lose their path, seeking to recreate him.
  • Desperation Attack: Dharok the Wretched's armor set effect. Many a player has died with a sudden 700 damage to the face thanks to this.
  • The Dev Team Thinks of Everything: Aubury, the purveyor of the magic shop in Varrock, hands out freebies of the basic Wind and Mind Runes. The obvious scam is to take the freebies and sell them back to his shop, right?
    The shopkeeper thanks you for returning the samples.
  • Didn't Need Those Anyway: The Skeletal Horror can keep fighting just fine with the loss of its limbs, though they'll hop around on the ground and heal it if they manage to get back on.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?:
    • In "The Chosen Commander", Zanik and the Player Character punch out The avatar of Bandos, god of war, although it helps that you have to disrupt its link with Bandos to be able to actually kill it. It has since been confirmed this boss is on the lowest tier of Godhood.
    • Especially appropriate in "Salt in the Wound", where the mind-controlling horror you defeat was directly inspired by the HP Lovecraft. The Slug Queen is killed by an average (although exceptionally skilled) woman by cutting a huge statue and having it fall on said queen.
  • Disappeared Dad: Bolrie, Golrana's father, in The Prisoner of Glouphrie. He's been locked up in a cell in Arposandra for centuries.
  • Disconnected Side Area: The island off the coast of Catherby. It looks like it's so close to the coastline that you could easily just swim to it, or even wade through the water to it. To get there, you have to travel across some mountains and then through a long and difficult underground dungeon. You can get back to Catherby with a Grappling Hook Crossbow — but you can't get to the island from Catherby.
  • Discontinuity Nod: The Romeo & Juliet quest no longer exists, but you can still ask the Apothecary to make the potion used to put Juliet in a coma.
  • Divine Ranks: There are seven "tiers" of godhood, which approximately measure how much raw power each god has in comparison with the others.
  • Dog Stereotype
  • Doppelgänger Attack: Combined with Doppelganger Spin in the fight against Nomad. Each of his clones is just as dangerous as the original...
  • Doppelgänger Spin: ...but damaging a copy makes Nomad lose focus and forces him to dismiss it, and damaging the real one breaks the spell completely.
  • Downer Ending:
    • One Piercing Note. Anna had gone completely insane, believing herself to be guided by St. Elspeth. The first victim was someone else, mistaken for Anna due to having her face slashed off and being dressed in her robes. In the end, three innocent lives have been lost to her madness, and if you decide to spare her, she throws herself off the tower anyway, believing the Icyene are coming to take her to Saradomin, leaving behind an Abbey on the verge of collapsing.
    • The Tzhaar series ending starts off bittersweet, but turns into a downer if you take the time to do some talking afterwords. After finally finding the cause of why the Tzhaar are being born as the weaker, simple minded Ga'al and putting a stop to Tokhaar-hok's plans, you're forced to say goodbye to your friend Ga'al-Xox, as he can no longer live with the pain of knowing how it feels to be trapped in tokkul. You get to watch a surprisingly poignant cutscene, followed by a ceremony celebrating your triumph over the Tokhaar, and then the quest ends, and you're left to believe that you've saved the Tzhaar. However, if you take the time to go back to Tokhaar-hok, he'll begin to tell you his side of the story, and it isn't a pleasant one. The Tzhaar gradually lose the memories of their past with each generation, and, seeing this, Tokhaar-hok went out of his way to try to draw their attention to this problem, and possibly get them to return to the sacred lava as they were destined to in order to save them. Unfortunately, a certain adventurer came along and choose to aid the stubborn Tzhaar instead, foiling his plans. Tokhaar-hok flat out tells you that the Tzhaar are now destined for extinction, and that unless they willingly choose to be absorbed into the sacred lava, there isn't much of anything anyone can do about it.
  • Dragged Off to Hell: An alternate home teleport animation available in Solomon's General Store has a fiery pit open beneath the player so that hands can grab them by the ankles and drag them down.
  • The Dragon: The leader of the Kal'Gerion demons, Kal'Ger the Warmonger, is this to the Mahjarrat Bilrach.
  • Dragon Hoard: Many dragon lairs are littered with piles of gold.
  • Dramatic Wind: While holding a two-handed weapon.
  • Dressed to Plunder: All of the stock traits appear on various pirate NPCs: bandanas, tricorner hats, eyepatches, a hook-hand, a captain's hat with a skull-and-crossbones on it, etc. Most of them are also available as wearable equipment, and there is a parrot...well, a zombie parrot ("ex-ex-parrot") available as a pet as a reward for a pirate-related quest.
  • Driven to Suicide: In one possible ending for the One Piercing Note quest, Anna throws herself off of the abbey's clock tower to her death. That is, if she isn't kicked off by the player first.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Him:
    • Guthix's death at the end of The World Wakes at the hands of Sliske, a mortal Mahjarrat who just happened to have acquired the Staff of Armadyl (this after it was shattered by the Dragonkin).
    • Akrisae's death and enslavement as a Barrows Brother, also via Sliske. Doubles as a Senseless Sacrifice in protecting the Player Character, who cannot truly die until destiny says so.
  • Drop the Hammer: In addition of regular metal warhammers and mauls, there's the Torag's Hammer and the Maul of Omens.
  • Dual Wielding: Most one-handed weapons have offhand equivalents that allow two weapons to be wielded at once. Doing so allows the player to attack with both weapons for increased damage, even mixing and matching combat styles (e.g. dual-wielding a sword and a crossbow), and enables special dual-wield abilities like Havoc and Frenzy.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect??: Averted and played straight at different points. Average citizens never say thanks for averting the latest doom on the land, though. This was the Wise Old Man's motivation to ransack the Draynor Bank of its money, snatch up a Blue Partyhat, and attempt an assault on the Wizard's tower.
  • Dummied Out: When the ability to poison weapons was removed from the game, poisoned weapons automatically had their poison removed, and weapon poison was turned into a new drinkable potion that applies poison to your attacks for a limited time. However, the old items weren't removed entirely—for some time after the update, poisoned arrows could still be received as drops from certain enemies, and baby trolls named after poisoned items retained the (p) tag at the end of their names.
  • Dump Stat:
    • Agility used to be way more useful, before faster run-recharge rates and the Lodestone Network diminished its utility significantly.
    • Defence is treated as this by "combat pures", left at Level 1 while other stats are raised towards the cap. This has been largely thwarted in the post-EoC era as armour and shields make a huge difference in both defensive capabilities and Hit Point totals, though the developers have capitulated somewhat to pure-enthusiasts in that the effectiveness of armour will be scaled back with the release of Legacy Mode.
  • Dungeon Bypass: The Tarn's Lair dungeon is a convoluted maze filled with traps and aggressive zombies. If you solve the maze and fight your way to the end, you can challenge Tarn for XP and a power-up to your Salve Amulet to make it more effective against the undead. Defeating Tarn allows you to fight his pet Terror Dogs in the final chamber. Of course, you'd have to go through the whole maze again to get there, so, as a convenience to Terror Dog slayers, Jagex released the Slayer Ring, which can teleport you back to the final chamber. However, an unintended consequence of this teleport was that it worked even for players who had never completed the maze in the first place, thus allowing savvy players to simply buy or make a Slayer Ring and waltz straight into the boss chamber, bypassing the entire dungeon.
  • Dying Curse: Zaros, in the events described in the Ghostly Robes miniquest.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: Runescape Classic has many differences. See the trope page for a detailed explanation.
  • Easter Bunny: Played around with. In the 2009 Easter event, it turned out that the Easter Bunny was actually a rabbit wearing a rabbit costume.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Many. The Chaos Elemental is a textbook example. Other good examples are the monsters from Dream Mentor, the Muspah (which are myths made real), the Spirit/Corporeal Beast, and the Stalkers (one of them fires an eyeball twice the size of you at your party as an attack).
    • "Fate of the Gods" gives us the worst example to date, when you find out that Zaros was created by Mah, a deformed, half-stillborn elder-god-fetus who lies in a state of perpetual nightmare-afflicted fitful sleep after clawing herself halfway out of the volcano in which she was hatched. What somehow makes this even worse is that she created him and Seren out of desperate loneliness after the other Elder Gods abandoned her on the bleakest planet in the cosmos for eons. No matter how miserable her life is, Mah is still so powerful that even Zaros can do nothing but grab you and run for his life when she wakes up. Sweet dreams!
  • Eldritch Location:
    • Daemonheim, an immense, random dungeon complex that came into existence out of nowhere, is filled with horrific extradimensional monsters (see Eldritch Abomination), and has a 'taint' within that could irreparably damage the world should it escape.
    • The Abyssal plane, where everything seems to have eyes or tentacles, or both.
    • The Runespan, a maze of floating islands filled with nodes and creatures of elemental energy.
  • Elemental Embodiment: There are plenty of elementals in Runescape: the regular fire/water/air/earth found in the Elemental Workshop, ice elementals found in Daemonheim and Chaos Elemental, a high-level boss in the Wilderness. The strongest elemental is however Balance Elemental, a quest boss fought during While Guthix Sleeps.
  • Elemental Crafting
  • Emote Animation
  • Endless Game
  • Enemy Scan: The monster examine spell.
  • Enemy Summoner: Quite a few monsters, such as Nechryael.
  • Energy Beings: Light Creatures and Killerwatts.
  • Energy Bow: The Crystal and Zaryte bows.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Brassica Prime (the God of Cabbages) was originally intended as an April Fools joke, but it became so popular that it's now an officially recognized part of the Gielinor pantheon, and even has a minigame based on it, alongside the ape goddess Marimbo.
    • In a similar vein, a new god, Loarnab was introduced in a lore book, meant as an in-joke (the name is a corruption of 'Lore-noob'). However, it too (despite originally being mentioned only by name) gained so much popularity among players that it got a full description in another lore book, and was apparently supposed to actually appear (albeit as a statue) in the upcoming quest 'Broken Home' before being cut due to time constraints.
      • Rumor has it that Loarnab is even going to appear in some capacity in the upcoming, as yet unnamed 200th quest.
  • Enthralling Siren: The Anti-Villain of "Song from the Depths" is a Siren who sings the eponymous song.
  • Epic Fail: General Viggora wanted to prove to the world that humans could achieve greatness. So he built a massive fortress. That only caused the other races to nickname it "Viggora's Folly", so he kept adding on to it. Eventually, it sank into the swamp he built it on, which convinced him that the nickname was, in fact, accurate.
  • Epic Flail:
    • Verac's flail is a powerful weapon used by one of the Barrows Brothers. It has an effect when the armour is worn with it that allows it to occasionally ignore enemy defences.
    • The Ivandis flail is basically an Ivandis rod with a silver sickle attached with a chain. It is completely impractical and unwieldy, but until you get blisterwood weapons, it's the only thing that can hurt Vyrewatch and Vyrelords.
    • One of the signature heroes, The Raptor, wields a massive, heavy, spiked flail.
  • Escort Mission:
    • The Temple Trekking/Burgh de Rott Ramble minigame involves protecting refugees on their journey from Burgh de Rott north to the safety of the temple at Paterdomus and escorting mercenary adventurers on the opposite route to battle evil. Should be noted as being different than other escort missions, as your companions can level up, some of them could probably do the trek themselves with sufficient leveling.
    • Blood Runs Deep has the Player Character escort King Vargas through the Waterbirth Island dungeon. He's wounded and moves slower than walking speed, and the dungeon is filled with high-level aggressive monsters that pummel you with all attack styles, although no explanation is given as to why you can't just teleport out.
    • Inverted in Within the Light, where Arianwyn escorts you through the Temple of Light, killing any shadows that attack you.
    • Played for Drama with Zanik, according to this Postbag from the Hedge.
      "It's like... all the time we were adventuring together, it was all about you, you know? You were the hero, and I was the sidekick. I kept getting into trouble and you kept rescuing me. Even at the end, when we defeated Bandos, I got knocked out and you finished it alone. And in a way, I kind of resent that. I wish I'd done it myself. I don't want my whole life to be like that. I want to prove to myself that I can be an adventurer in my own right, be a hero, not just someone's sidekick, not even yours."
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Inverted in the Cave Goblin quest series; Sigmund says Screw This, I'm Outta Here! to his boss, Johannes, essentially because Johannes has too many standards.
  • Every Proper Lady Should Curtsy: The standard bow emote for girl players. Males can also use it by right clicking.
  • Everything's Better with Penguins: Someone at Jagex definitely likes penguins too much.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: Ninja monkeys, even.
  • Everything's Better With Platypi: Pet platypode, even.
  • Evil Chef: The Culinaromancer from "Recipe for Disaster".
  • Eviler Than Thou: After seeing the horrible acts the demon Agrith-Naar is capable of in Shadow of the Storm, Evil Dave decides that it's too evil even for him.
  • Evil Versus Evil: The Godless faction have shown up at both god battles in the Sixth Age, and have taken enthusiastically to describing the warfare as this.
  • Evolving Weapon:
    • The Flail of Ivandis and weapons crafted from the branches of the Blisterwood tree gain power as you cremate Vyrewatch corpses.
    • Silverlight: originally an iron sword blessed by Guthix, later becoming Darklight after imbibing the blood of the defeated Agrith Naar in "Shadow of the Storm".
    • Excalibur and Ancient Staff can be upgraded to Enhanced versions with the completion of Hard Seers' Village Tasks and Elite Desert Tasks, respectively.
    • Multiple weapons from the Squeal of Fortune, such as Starfury weapons and Shark Fists can be upgraded to a higher tier once you have the levels to wield the upgraded version.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin:
    • If you hold you mouse cursor over the achievements at the end of a Dungeoneering run, a small tooltip pops up, telling you what you need to do in order to get that achievement. The tooltip for "Most Deaths" reads, "Exactly what it says on the tin."
    • One quest's MacGuffin is the "Idol of Many Heads". Examining the idol gives this text: "An idol. It has many heads."
    • A lot of examine texts end up as this.
  • Exact Words: In "Thok Your Block Off", Thok decides to spare "Boney Face" and mentions he'd kill him if he saw him again. Unfortunately for Boney, that included going into a dead-end room and coming out again to see him walking about.
    • In "Missing, Presumed Death", Sliske invites the Runescape pantheon to an event he calls his "Grand Ascendancy". Most of them show up, expecting to find out whether he has achieved ascension to godhood (a reasonable expectation since Sliske had just acquired an Elder Artifact and killed Guthix). However, he then refuses to answer any questions and instead demonstrates his ability to manipulate them into doing exactly what he wants...thus proving his ascendancy.
  • Experience Booster: Lots. The Runescape Wiki has a list.
  • Expy: Jagex says Zanik is essentially Starbuck, and her voice is that of Regina Spektor.
  • Extreme Omnivore: Trolls, who are usually even named after the first thing they tried to eat (or the sound that thing makes, in case they don't know what it is). Can be amusing as 'My Arm' to as foreboding as 'Cliff'.
  • The Extremist Was Right: During the TzHaar quest series, you find out that the reason the Ga'al are being born instead of proper TzHaar is because the TokHaar have cut off the flow of sacred lava to the city, thus dooming the TzHaar to extinction. What a bunch of jerks, right? Well, it turns out this would have happened anyway. When TzHaar are born, they don't inherit all of their memories, as you discover during the quest. What the TokHaar did was speed up the process of extinction in the TzHaar, thus spurring them to take action. The TokHaar also wanted their former bretheren to return to the Elder Kiln as TokHaar.
  • Eye of Newt
  • Face-Design Shield: Dragonfire shield.
  • Fake Difficulty: Mourning's End Part II is considered one of the hardest quests, involving a huge Light and Mirrors Puzzle and multiple floors, and it's full of hard-hitting monsters. But even with all of this, someone at Jagex apparently thought that it still wasn't enough and decided to throw in an agility obstacle that is entirely based on luck with a high failure rate. Every time it's failed, the player falls down to the lower level and takes even more damage.
    • Invoked with Dungeoneering's "Hard Mode" setting, which is a reward for completing the Daemonheim Elite task set. To wit:
      • Soloing a Dungeon automatically causes the first floor spawned to be large-sized. All subsequent floors are forced to medium-sized.
      • All doors, whether they are puzzle doors or skill doors, act as Guardian Doors.
      • All monster spawns do so at maximum possible combat level.
      • All skill doors have a base level requirement of 90. Out of a possible 99. note 
      • Teleportation out of the boss fight is disabled.
      • Food is harder to come by.
  • Falling in Love Montage: "Love Story" has one between Zenevivia and the Wise Old Man. Then they proceed to invade the Wizard's Tower and fail.
  • Fan Fiction: The Runescape Fanfiction Wiki, consisting of mostly Crossovers. Runescape's own Stories forum also contains a lot of fanfiction.
  • Fantastic Caste System: The TzHaar, who divide into four castes: one consists of hunters, one of guardians, one of scholars and mages, and one of workers and architects.
  • Fantastic Racism: H.A.M., oh so much. Humans are also considered little more than food to Vampyres.
  • Fantastic Slurs: The Bandosian epithet for Armadylians is "Bird Lover".
  • Fantasy Pantheon: Saradomin, Guthix, and Zamorak are the main gods. Armadyl, Bandos, and Zaros are more obscure. There's also the Menaphite pantheon of desert gods, the elves' crystal nature god Seren, and the monkeys of Ape Atoll worship a monkey god named Marimbo. As a joke, there's also a God of Cabbage named Brassica Prime.
  • Fate Worse Than Death:
    • Summer and her family, who were busy having their souls devoured by the Spirit Beast up until the point the player killed it.
    • Arrav, who is now Zemouregal's undead slave and who has almost no control over himself, forced to slaughter the people he once protected. Eventually does get some peace, but his wounds are too severe and when he has no more magic to sustain him, he dies.
    • Becoming a Barrows Brother is also rather unpleasant, the originals becoming deathly ill, then dying, then having their spirits wrenched from wherever they were to fight again for their new master. Now you just get hit with an incorporeal maroon skull and die in horrible agony.
  • Feathered Fiend: The Evil Chicken. There's also a giant Roc that attacks you in the "My Arm's Big Adventure" quest.
  • Feather Fingers: Notably averted with the penguins. Ping and Pong are looking for musical instruments, but since they have no fingers, they can't play most instruments—you have to find them bongos and cowbells.
  • Fetch Quest: Occasionally Played With:
    • Exaggerated in One Small Favour, in which you are asked something of the typical fetch quest, to get logs from a forester... who then asks you to get his axe sharpened at an axe store, and the owner asks you to ask a favor from a witch, who in turn asks something else of you, and so on. The quest ends up having you traverse almost the entire continent that the game takes place on.
    • Lampshaded in Rune Mechanics, where the characters make disdainful remarks about fetch quests.
  • Fifteen Puzzle: Actually a twenty-four puzzle.
  • Final Boss, New Dimension: Several:
    • The Culinaromancer can only be fought in his private dimension.
    • The Spirit Beast in "Summer's End" is fought in its Spirit Realm.
    • "Dream Mentor" has you enter the dream world to battle Cyrisus's inner demons.
  • Fireballs: Several versions, ranging from little fire spits to huge inferno blasts.
  • Firewood Resources
  • Fisher King: The Fisher King from "Holy Grail".
  • Fishing for Sole: Boots and gloves can be caught while fishing with a big net.
  • Fishing Minigame: In addition to fishing as a skill, there's also the Fish Flingers minigame, where you use trial and error to determine the correct hook, bait, and weight to catch different types of fish.
  • Flunky Boss: Quite a few instances:
    • TzTok-Jad summons four healers when he reaches half his life. If you don't kill or distract the healers, they heal him.
    • The pest queen from "The Void Stares Back" summons healers to restore her health and defilers to attack you and your NPC allies.
    • Eruni from "Do No Evil" summons demons to attack you and draws on their power to make herself invincible.
    • In Dungeoneering, Astea Frostweb summons ice spiders. Lexicus Runewright summons animated books.
    • Bork summons Ork Legions.
  • Floating Continent: Clan Citadels. Avalani mentions that they're "bastions of Armadylian power from an era long lost to us".
  • Flying Books: Found in Daemonheim as minions of the wizard Lexicus Runewright.
  • Fox-Chicken-Grain Puzzle: In the Recruitment Drive quest.
  • Freemium: Many skills, quests, and runes are only available to those who pay; actually, "many" would be the understatement of the year. The free part of the game is probably less than 5% of the total game, and free players have severely limited options when it comes to training and bank space, and they get an update once in a blue moon. On the upside, Jagex is a lot better than most games. There's still a fair bit to do in the free game, and they've started doing a lot more free content than they used to. They also advertise free-to-play content as an entire free game, with the pay-to-play content as a super expansion pack.
  • Frictionless Ice: "Myths of the White Lands" uses it for puzzles. It's also a stage hazard when fighting the Dungeoneering boss Plane-Freezer Lakhrahnaz and as a random room puzzle on Frozen floors.
  • Friendly War: The king and queen of the neigboring island nations of Miscellania and Etceteria amuse themselves by constantly declaring war on each other. It's also a case of Belligerent Sexual Tension: they eventually get married in "Blood Runs Deep".
  • Fun with Acronyms: A few, including:
    • The Humans Against Monsters association. (Their logo is a ham.)
    • The Livid Vine, or "Lokar's Infernal Vine of Incredible Death"
    • Ladies Of Lumbridge
    • New Order Occult Bookists
  • Game-Breaking Bug: Quite a few, although they're generally fixed within a day at most, and intentionally exploiting a bug usually earns you a permanent ban:
    • One infamous bug allowed some players to kill other players outside of normal PvP zones. This led to the Falador Massacre, wherein hundreds of players were killed; many of them lost millions of coins' worth of items.
    • When the Hand Cannon was first introduced, it was possible for multiple people to attack the same person in one-on-one PvP areas, resulting in instant death for that player.
    • An update to the game engine made it possible to attack monsters without being attacked back, allowing lots of players to solo the Corporeal Beast (strongest monster in the game, had never been killed by a single person before up to that point) and other normally Nintendo Hard boss monsters.
    • An update to the Dungeoneering skill briefly caused runecrafting to give 1,000 times as much experience as intended.
  • Game Over Man: During the Halloween season, Death will make personal appearances to collect your soul whenever you die.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: Often played straight.
  • Gargle Blaster: Anything labeled 'Rum'. Drinking it can have your character exclaim "My liver is melting!" and then mysteriously wind up on Mos Le'Harmless. Normal 'Rum' just gets you a message in the game log stating "You try very hard not to die"
  • Gas Mask Mooks: Mourners.
  • Gemstone Assault: Crossbow bolts can be tipped with gems and then enchanted for varying special effects.
  • Gender Bender: The Makeover Mage magically changes his/her gender every minute or so. He/she will offer the same service to you for free. This gets lampshaded if you made the change between finishing "Throne of Miscellania" and starting "Royal Trouble."
  • Genie in a Bottle: A random event. Seen also as a villain in the "Spirits of the Elid" quest.
  • Genius Ditz: How much of each varies between quests, but overall this is how the Player Character is presented.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar:
    • "Jubbly" is British slang for "breast".
    • During the quest Carnillean Rising, you tie up a teenage girl so an NPC can "rescue" her as part of his "quest." If you attempt to use a feather or abyssal whip on her while tied up, you get the message "Runescape isn't that sort of fantasy game."
  • Get Back Here Boss: The giant mole. Fortunately, it has been altered to still target you after it burrows. This still doesn't make it simple to find, though.
  • Get on the Boat: Want to visit Daemonheim? Take a boat from Al-Kharid or Taverley. Want to visit Karamja, the Void Knight Outpost, or Entrana? Take a boat from Port Sarim. (And to actually participate in the Void Knight activity you have to get on another boat.) Want to visit Braindeath Island, Dragontooth Island, or Mos Le'Harmless? Take a boat from Port Phasmatys. And so on.
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: Some of the boss fights are rather unexpected. For example, at the end of the "My Arm's Big Adventure" quest (where you have to teach agriculture to a troll), you're attacked out of nowhere by a giant roc who randomly happens to be nearby.
  • Giant Spider: Several variations of giant spiders appear, the largest one being Kalgar in Underground Pass.
  • Global Currency Exception: Tokkul in the Tz-haar caves, Trading sticks in Tai Bwo Wannai village, etc.
  • God Mode: After touching the Stone of Jas in "While Guthix Sleeps", all your stats are boosted to 255.
  • Gods Need Prayer Badly: It was once stated that depending on their domain, most of the gods gained strength from the prayers of their followers. This seems to have been Retconed with the revelation of the Elder Artifacts, which bestow godhood on those who linger near them for long enough.
  • Golem: Clay golems, rock golems and golems made of rune essence called 'rune guardians' exist, but the knowledge to make clay and rock golems has been lost, while the ways of constructing Rune Guardians are rediscovered during the quest Rune Mechanics. There are also obsidian golem familiars and multiple types of golems that can be hired as crewmembers in Player-Owned Ports.
  • Gold Makes Everything Shiny: Gilded armor is rune armor, but golden. You can also upgrade your dwarven multicannon to a golden version, which is functionally identical, but is definitely shinier.
    • Averted due to an update, the golden multicannon now doubles its cannonball capacity.
  • Gotta Kill Em All:
    • The "cute critters" in "The Eyes of Glouphrie". It turns out they're secretly evil, and you have to find and kill them all.
    • A side quest involves killing many various creatures and getting their bones for an old man.
  • Gradual Regeneration: You have ordinary Regenerating Health (approximately 1 life points per 1000 max life points every six seconds). Additionaly, there are also items and prayers that can increase your health regeneration rate.
  • Grappling Hook Crossbow
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress: In one possible ending to the One Piercing Note quest, Anna jumps off of the abbey's clock tower, believing that she has been redeemed and can fly with the Icyene. Unsurprisingly, she dies.
  • Great Offscreen War: There's several, but by far the most prominent is the God Wars.
  • Green Aesop: "Perils Of Ice Mountain"
  • Green-Eyed Monster: The Do No Evil boss Ayuni is a literal example. What this implies of Amascut is unclear.
  • Grim Up North: "The North" is referenced in several quests. Not to mention the Wilderness, formerly the most dangerous area in the game, and still pretty frightening. In the days when Runescape was entirely free, the instructions to reach the Wilderness were simply "go north".
  • The Guards Must Be Crazy: This is acknowledged during a cut-scene in the "Garden of Tranquillity" Quest, where a "veteran" guard explains to a new recruit that the life expectancy for a Falador guard is about 30 seconds. Right on cue, a high-levelled "player" comes and slaughters both of them.
  • Guide Dang It: In order to read a bookcase near the Fight Cauldron, players must find a Ga'al known as TzHaar-Ga'al-Kot, which requires them to donate TokKul to a coffer outside the Fight Cauldron, and then use a Ring of Visibility on a Ring of Stone while wearing an uncharged Tokkul-Zo with a seemingly arbitrary amount of obsidian shards in their inventorynote . None of this is even hinted at in game, and he was only found after 5 months thanks to hints from a Jagex Moderator.
  • Guns Akimbo: Achieved by dual-wielding two crossbows. Wielding ranged weapons in both hands enables the "Unload" ability, which can deal massive damage against an unwary opponent.
  • Guns in Church: Averted with Entrana, where weapons and armour are banned. Played straight everywhere else.
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