Roleplay / Destroy The Godmodder
aka: Defeat The Godmodder

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Nothing is new, it's all happened before. Yet none of you have any idea what's in store.

"The Pantheon.

"Collectively, the high seat of all congregations of tropes, idioms, and fandoms alike. Seated atop the highest of the high, they stand on pedestals, hoisted up by the masses as "the" representative of what they are, who they stand for, and who they could become.

"Each in their own right, a walking path of destruction. Some, wage war. Others, wage love. Yet even more, wage both. There are those who speak in tongues aflame with passion. There are those who do not speak at all, yet carry more weight than ten thousand years. There are those whose presence can move mountains with nary a breath from their lips. There are those who define existence with a knife.

"They come from hell and heaven. They come from galaxies where secrets can make gods blaze. They come in the name of the lost, the helpless, and all the world's evil, wrapped in a little package. They come from beyond even the fourth wall, and they fight for everything under the sun.

"Then, there's the Godmodder."
Lord Herobrine, Destroy the Godmodder TV Tropes 2: Salvation

Destroy the Godmodder is a series of Play-by-Post Games on the Minecraft Forums that is Exactly What It Says on the Tin. It takes place in the world of Minecraft, which is being terrorized by a very powerful player known as The Godmodder. The Godmodder possesses the uncanny ability to block nearly every attack thrown at him, which makes the titular goal very nearly a lost cause. However, it is possible to beat him by either using attacks that can't be blocked or godmodded or by counter-godmodding one of his blocks. Of course, each successful attack (usually) only does 1 damage, turning the fight into a long and excruciating grind.

The game is managed by the Game Master, who, in-universe, updates the thread using an Update Terminal, letting them control a mysterious force known as The Narrative, changing the very plot of reality. In real life, though, the GM just takes all of the actions the players have done every turn and responds to them, determining whether they fail or not, and how successful they are in standard forum game fashion.

In addition to attacking the Godmodder, the players can summon charged entities to help out in the battle. These entities, depending on how long they were charged for, can become very powerful and hard to kill. Given the huge playerbase, there tends to be a lot of entities on the field at any given time, leading to some epic moments. The Godmodder and his allies will summon entities as well, some even being bosses, which leads to huge boss battles.

The first game, aptly titled Destroy the Godmodder, was started by TT2000 on December 7th, 2012 and ended on September 1st, 2013. It details the Godmodder's rampage on GenericCraft, a suitably generic Minecraft server. Over time, a dedicated playerbase started to form, intent on completing the game. In a saga that took nearly nine months, the players had to deal with many different enemies, such as Terror Mobs (giant Minecraft mobs), a dimensional monster, Death himself, a reality-breaking Glitch, the Godmodder's massive in-game fortress, the Godmodder's promotion to Admin rank on the server, and his last weapon, the Anti-Chuck Norris Turret Tank.

The second game, Destroy the Godmodder 2: Operator!, was started by TwinBuilder on September 1st, 2013 and ended two years later on September 1st, 2015. It details the Godmodder forming his own Minecraft server after the events of the first game. Called GodCraft, he traps the entire Minecraft playerbase on the server where they are doomed to eternally ragequit. A new group of Anti-Godmodder rises up to fight him in an epic two-year-long battle spanning multiple universes. In addition to fighting the Godmodder, the players had to deal with the machination of the mysterious Employer, working behind the scenes to bring the villains from Homestuck onto the server in an invasion. They also had to combat the governments of Earth and their rogue supercomputer dubbed Project Binary, as well as many other unseen forces, both player-driven and not. The game was split up into four acts, each with their own major villains to fight, and three intermissions, which were breaks in the action that focused on side plotlines. The fifth act wrapped up the game's story. An epilogue was produced one year after the game's end, on September 1st, 2016, that tied the game into future games in the series and set up the reboot.

The third game, called Destroy the Godmodder 0rigins, was started by The_Nonexistent_Tazz on September 9th, 2015. It is the current game in the main series. It shows events before DTG1 and DTG2, detailing how the Godmodder went from being a Gamma Tier godmodder to being the Omega+ Tier he is now by battling the previous Omega Tier Godmodder, UserZero, on her own server. In a stunning reversal, the players default to helping the Godmodder by defeating UserZero, who has her own nefarious plans at the heart of the server's World Tree... However, there are players who chose to side with Uzi or forge their own paths, believing if they stop the Godmodder from winning, they can prevent the catastrophes that will occur later down the road.

The main series will end with DTG0, though the canon story has been continued through spinoffs, text adventures, and other miscellaneous works. Some spinoffs, however, are noncanon. A reboot is in the works, serving as an alternate continuity with the hopes of simplifying the series' labyrinthine plot. Below is a list of spinoffs.

  • Be the Godmodders: Defeat Notch. Created by Fseftr and hosted on the Minecraft Forums. It shows an alternate reality where the players themselves are godmodders and are helping the Godmodder storm Mojang's base and defeat Notch. Non-canon. It is complete.
  • Destroy the Godmodder: TV Tropes Edition. Created by pionoplayer and hosted on the TV Tropes Forums. It takes place in the main series' timeline, chronologically after the events of DTG2. It shows the Godmodder attempting to take over the TV Tropes Pantheon, with many other shenanigans in-between. It is complete.
  • Destroy the Godmodder TV Tropes Edition 2: Salvation. Created by Lord_Herobrine, currently GMed by Tabbune, and hosted on the TV Tropes Forums. A sequel to the first TV Tropes game. Its main story is complete, but the thread itself is being used to host a couple of bonus bosses.
  • Destroy the Godmodder: MSPA Edition. Created by pionoplayer, later continued by Fseftr, and hosted on the Chocolate Pi Forum. It takes place in the main series' timeline, chronologically after TV Tropes Edition. It shows the Godmodder attempting to take over SBURB by merging all sessions into one gigantic conglomerate. It ended after a lack of players forced Fseftr to end the game, but is canon regardless.
  • Destroy the Godmodder: Terraria Edition. Created by Jondanger 23, currently GMed by crystalcat, and hosted on the Terraria Forums. It shows the Godmodder attacking a Terraria server. Recently canonized, it takes place after the MSPA Edition's end. It is currently ongoing, and will chronologically be the last canon game in the series.
  • Destroy the Godmodder S: Acolyte. Created by ninjatwist321 and hosted on the Minecraft Forums. It chronicles the tale of the Acolyte, a powerful being who spreads rage and chaos much like the Godmodder did. Non-canon. It is ongoing.
  • Destroy the Godmodder: Pain and Suffering. Created by ConsumerOfAll and run on the DTG Forums, it is intended to contain much pain and suffering for those who dare oppose the godmodder. The godmodder in this game, Alicia, has taken over AscensionCraft, a typical faction server with a few sprinkles of weirdness. Non-canon. It is ongoing.
  • Destroy the Godmodder: Chaos. Created by Irecreeper and run on the DTG Forums, it breaks the mold of what a DTG game really is. It can be thought of as a grid-based RPG, with traditional stats, abilities, weapons, and such. Its importance to canon is dubious, but it takes place after DTG2, with the players being trapped in the mind of a malevolent being known as Chaoscreeper.

The DTG Wiki, maintained by the game's players, can be found here.

The DTG Forum, where players of all DTG games can discuss the series (and even play new games), can be found here.

The tropes below are organized into several folders for tropes common to the series as a whole and others related to specific games.
Here lie DTG2 spoilers. Here's what's considered appropriate to mark with spoilers: anything in Act 2 from the Shatter onwards, anything in Trial 4, and Trial 6 until the end of the game. That includes the Epilogue. Browse with caution.

Examples HP: 100/100. Gains HP every time someone adds tropes.

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  • Abstract Scale: The OP Scale, a scale that measures something's power level. If something is too overpowered, it causes the scale to roll over back to 0 due to integer overflow. This, in turn, decreases the power level of the attack to nothing. Conveniently, the Godmodder is always at the very top of the scale, positioned just so that he never makes it roll over.
  • Absurd Phobia: The Godmodder has a crippling fear of tubas that has something to do with a childhood incident. In DTG0, it was crippling enough to put him in the fetal position. It's diminished since then, to the point where it can't automatically damage him, but he's still scared of them.
  • Alliance Meter: Throughout the series, various entities have appeared that are strictly neutral, and they join a side depending on the actions of the players and the Godmodder.
  • All Stories Are Real Somewhere: The in-game explanation for why the players can summon anything from any fictional universe.
  • Alpha Strike: If there's something on the field that's very dangerous and powerful, expect most player and entity attacks to be focused on that thing. Usually, if there are no Pro-Godmodder entities to attack it will be the Godmodder himself who is the recipient of the strike; although this is met with low levels of success.
  • Anachronism Stew: Due to the vast amount of entities summoned, it's not a surprise that this trope comes up. You can have medieval armies fighting against giant spaceships, or robots fighting against dragons.
  • Annoying Arrows: Arrows can be unloaded in large quantities without dealing significant damage.
  • Antagonist Title: I wonder who we're fighting?
  • Apocalypse How: Have been attempted (or actually occurred, off-screen or on-screen) on a regular basis in basically every game. Further detail on how will be covered in that game's tropes folder.
  • Arbitrary Gun Power: Since the series runs around Hit Points and any source of damage only decreases Hit Points, guns are no exception. They'll never do any instantly fatal damage as is typical in real life.
  • Armor Is Useless: Zigzagged. Describing an entity as having armor doesn't bring any defensive capabilities, unless the armor itself has its own health bar that has to be destroyed before the entity can be actually attacked or otherwise augments its actual stats.
  • Asskicking Equals Authority: The Godmodder is fabled throughout Minecraft and beyond as the only Omega+ godmodder in existence; the highest rank of godmodder. Of course, to do this, he had to get through all of the other tiers first, which requires tons of asskicking. That's why he's got the capital G.
    • As a whole, the Godmodding Scale/Ladder Enforces this. In order to rank up, you need to beat a godmodder of the imminently-higher rank, 99 times out of 100. There are ways to cheat this, but by far it's the easiest, which is saying something as almost all godmodders are The Juggernaut by default.
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: The standard tactic of near everything in the game, players and godmodders included. The Players, well, play with this trope, as they can and will summon entities, but this usually doesn't get in the way of attacking directly and that same power can also be used in massive alpha strikes.
  • Author Avatar: A common method of attack by players is to summon themselves as an entity. This is useful because there's no penalty for death in this form. Some players like to impose penalties on themselves, however.
    • TwinBuilder, the Game Master of Destroy the Godmodder 2, was summoned as an entity himself. He became one of the most story-influential entities, breaking the Fourth Wall in the process.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: Due to the Godmodder's high level of godmodding power, he is one of the deadliest people known to the Internet.
  • Badass Army: If an army is summoned for multiple posts, then expect them to be a well-oiled fighting machine.
  • BattleCry: Invoked on occasion, usually by one of the players.
  • Battle Intro: Typically, powerful bosses or challenges are given a short introduction before it's left up to the players to respond to them. In the case of bosses, this can be a time for them to flex their new powers and/or talk to the players and the Godmodder before rushing to fight.
  • Beast of Battle: If a creature gets summoned, it will be this. With practically no exceptions.
  • Beat Them at Their Own Game: Although the players aren't always godmodders themselves, counter-godmodding is a perfectly valid tactic, provided it doesn't drag on.
  • Blocking Stops All Damage: Zigzagged. When players block an attack, it doesn't deal any damage. If an entity blocks an attack, it only deals less damage.
  • Big Bad: The Godmodder, of course!
  • Boss Battle: Large entities are summoned by the Godmodder periodically, but the fact that they are bosses wasn't acknowledged until the second game.
  • Boss Game: Type 2. All games in the series are just one long boss fight against the Godmodder.
  • Bottomless Magazines: Any weaponry used in the game will never, ever, have to reload.
  • Brainwashed: If the Godmodder is lacking in troops, most low-level summons will be turned to his side through various means.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: A common joke. Quite a few of the characters (especially the ones that know the one summoning them, and even more since the players themselves are characters) are quite knowledgeable about the fact that the entire thing takes place in a video game.
    • Lampshaded when the 'Fourth Wall'note  is destroyed by Jack Noir, which results in Minecraft being completely open to outside attack. And boy, does it get attacked.
    • And then there's the fact that apparently a large chunk of the multiversal community is aware that as a whole, most universes are generated by stories from the real world, which the denizens of the multiverse can't view.
  • Brick Joke: Played for Laughs. Often.
  • Broken Bridge: Invoked, inverted and played with by the "Crevasse Bridging" event. Usually an early-game event that only occurs once, either the Godmodder or circumstantial forces will arise to create a massive crevasse, separating the factions. For whatever reason, gravitational forces are strong enough to prevent attacks from reaching the other side, forcing players to bridge the gap manually. It's inverted in that, from a gameplay standpoint, the players not only create the bridge from scratch, but the bridging itself is the plot event that is preventing game progression by attacking the Godmodder.
  • Bullet Catch: Don't try to point blank range the Godmodder.
  • Call Back: Happens regularly in all but the first game, which still had its fair share of these.
  • Catch and Return: The Godmodder has an annoying habit of doing this.
  • C-List Fodder: Most of the stuff that gets summoned. Some of them have decent plot lines, but very few things survive long enough to be considered important characters.
    • Beyond even these are the Unsung, who apparently form 99% of the actual forces in a given conflict and yet, despite this, aren't mentioned. They're not unpersoned or being forgotten about-they just die that fast.
  • Chekhov's Gun: Invoked a large number of times in all games. It is a regular occurrence for things to return long after most people have forgotten about it. Oftentimes subverted as well.
  • Combat Referee: It is explained in the second game that the Game Master of the thread interacts with the Narrative, changing events at will, and acts as this.
  • Combat Uninterruptus: The players can attack, charge up attacks, command entities, and talk with each other. All at the same time.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: The Godmodder unsurprisingly has this.
  • Cosmic Keystone: The Hexahedron, a powerful cubic artifact floating in the Void. If it falls apart, the Glitch occurs.
  • Counter Attack: What godmodding is, combined with reality warping. Often used by the Godmodder, but some other entities can use it as well.
  • Curse: Invoked by godmodders across the series. They take the form of harmful effects that directly impede the players, such as not being able to do the same attack/summon the same entity more than once, and in some cases, not being able to summon entities at all. Sometimes, the players actually become vulnerable.
    • Curses in this series are also tied to certain symbols-for instance, the Curse of Repetetiveness uses the trademark. Removing it removes the curse, but the Godmodder can and will replace it instantly.
  • Crapsack World: Present in every game. The various settings of the games range from a crater-filled, bloodstained battlefield to a psychopath glitch-creature's mindscape. No matter where the game takes place, there's always death. Tons of it.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: Most attacks are.
  • Critical Existence Failure: Zigzagged. Most entities work just fine until they finally die, but some entities will slowly wear down, working well below maximum capacity when they finally die. Most of the time this is because of the use of Cognizant Limbs.
  • Critical Hit: Is used in some form or other in pretty much every game, often times incorporating lesser or greater versions.
  • Cutscene: They appear in all games, to a much larger extent in DTG2. Usually, these appear at the end of the turn when the Godmodder summons something or causes a new event to occur. But in DTG2, there are cutscenes that take up an entire post that further the story of the game. As the game goes on, they get more complicated and detailed, with one in particular taking up eight posts.
  • Cyber Space: Where the games take place; Minecraftia is a digital universe.
  • Damage-Sponge Boss: Almost every single boss is one of these except for the Godmodder.
  • Death from Above: Happens a lot of times. Almost every other turn, something falls from the sky.
  • Death Is Cheap: Zigzagged. For players, if they're not invincible they have Resurrective Immortality, playing this straight almost all the time. For the rare instances when that fails, or for entities, however...Oh no it is not. Ignoring how almost every entity death is final, The Council of Nine have taken every measure to make sure Limbo (where they usually go) defies this trope, and it shows. The Limbo Gatekeeper alone is nigh-invincible and any soul who fails to defeat it is absorbed into it to fuel its might; staying in Limbo causes one to slowly lose memory until they become empty shells and thus do nothing; and in the case of the Red Dragon, even after he had been defeated and was inactive, they took the extra measure and had made sure to impose an additional Seal on it. There are only two recorded break-outs of Limbo; one is little-known but was perpetrated by the Mimes, while the other was directly caused by the Players, which subsequently caused almost every dead Godmodder (and Flumpty Bumpty) to come back to life.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: This is the main way the players confront the Godmodder in all games. Since attacks against him deal little damage, many small ones are required to defeat him.
  • Defeating the Undefeatable: The godmodder is described as being nigh-invincible, and a good way to establish his strength is that one of his weapons can successfully fight Chuck Norris. His known losses can be counted on one hand.
  • Deflector Shields: Called into play by almost every sci-fi fleet.
  • Dialog During Gameplay: Because players can talk to other players at any time, dialogue during gameplay is ubiquitous.
  • Did You Just Flip Off Cthulhu?: Used frequently. Sometimes followed by punching out the Cthulhu in question, sometimes...
    • Literally done during the epilogue of DTG2 when Erelye flipped off the Narrative and Conflict, the two omnipresent and omnipotent forces of plot in existence.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: Used both literally and in trope form, as Cthulhu has been summoned, and large Cthulhu-level things have gotten one-hit KO'd by clever low-charge attacks.
  • Digital Avatar: The players of the games are (unless otherwise specified by them) essentially controlling two characters at once: their real-life self, and their Minecraft avatar. Their avatar does most of the work, whereas the real life one is usually reserved for RP. The only session to subvert this as a standard is the MSPA session.
  • Double Post: It's against the rules.
  • Drop-In-Drop-Out Multiplayer: Players of the game can join and leave at any time, although those who join at the beginning and stick it out through the end tend to have the best idea of what's going on and be the most influential.
  • Dual Boss: The Terror Zombie and Skeleton were summoned this way. For most other Terrors and Zombies, this is instead a Wolfpack Boss.
  • Elite Mook: Sometimes, usually when someone summons an army, one particular group of minions will be a cut above the rest.
    • More generally, there are entities that are not boss level but are still important to game progression and wield unusual powers, or are even just particularly powerful player summons.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Oh, so many.
  • End of the World as We Know It: While not usually literal, this is what generally happens to the general area if the Godmodder wins, making everyone Rage-Quit and leave in frustration.
    • It gets worse in the second game, with the end result being everyone forced to ragequit from GodCraft, fail, and then ragequit harder. Forever.
    • In the TV Tropes session, the penalty for failing is the end of TV Tropes. Forever.
    • This actually happened in the MSPA session due to the lack of activity; the Godmodder pretty much obliterated the entirety of SBURB.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": The Godmodder is always referred to as such. At least, until the players learned his real name.
  • Faux HTML Tags: Used in most of the games in such terms as /sarcasm, /nullpost and a few others.
  • Funny Background Event: The players don't always get along.
    • In DTG2's discussion thread, lots of crazy conversations go on.
    • The DTG2 Memo on Pesterchum is rarely on-topic. The same goes for its Discord channel.
  • Genre Savvy: The Godmodder is dangerously so, and this may be one of the reasons he is so powerful.
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: Almost every single boss in the first game. One of the worst has got to be the sudden attack of three of them all at once near the beginning of the first game. Most games thereafter tended to give mildly better warning but this trope still pops up.
    • The Space Gyarados was both this and a Brick Joke.
  • The GM Is A Cheating Bastard: Another one of the founding mechanics. It doesn't matter how powerful/sneaky/sure to hit your attack is, if the Godmodder can think of a way to godmod it, he will definitely godmod it.
  • God Modders: There used to be many godmodders across Minecraft, but the Godmodder ended up killing them all so none could match him in power. Some of the more important ones are shown in the prequel game, though.
    • Interestingly, the players are also godmodders, though they're not explicitly referred to as such and their status is temporary.
  • God Mode: The Godmoder, a misspelling of the Godmodder. He is actually invincible, unlike the Godmodder, but he leaves everyone alone for the most part.
  • Groin Attack: Has been attempted multiple times. It never works.
  • Hacker Cave: Reportedly the Godmodder's bedroom in real life. It helps that he has infinite computers.
  • Hammer Space: Overlapping with Pocket Dimension in use. Mostly a result of Minecraft/Terraria/SBURB logic kicking in.
  • Hell: Limbo, an endless gray expanse. Staying in it too long causes Loss of Identity and creates an Empty Shell, and its inhabitants have in many ways committed multiversal crimes. It's headed by the Council of Nine.
  • Hit Points: The main way of showing the strength/remaining life of an entity...but not always. Sometimes there is an integrity bar to chip down, some things have completely arbitrary systems such as having to kill them one piece at a time. Other entities don't have health at all, and the players just have to survive until it goes away.
  • Hive Queen: Used as the basis for most large swarms. The Vord Hive Queens are standout.
  • Hollywood Tactics: Enough to make any real-world strategist curl into the fetal position and cry.
  • Hurl It into the Sun: The first player who tried to join the Godmodder's side had this happen to him. An attack on the Black Monolith also did this as well.
    • Played with by Aegis-A095, who hurled the Sun into the Altar of Power instead of the other way around.
  • Hyperspace Arsenal: Everyone pulls weapons seemingly out of nowhere. This gets worse in DTG2 when people abuse this mechanic to use more weapons than they can hold at once. Justified, however: The setting of the game is either Minecraft, Terraria, SBURB or a video-game representation of TV Tropes, all of which feature this system to some degree in their inventory.
  • Interface Screw: Doc Scratch's text in the second game, the Glitch in both, and assorted others in other games.
  • In-Universe Game Clock: At least in the main series, the game's clock passes exactly according to the time in real life, with holidays happening at the same time inside the game and out. The only real subversion is DTG0, but that is due to reality getting unstable.
  • Is That the Best You Can Do?: The most annoying thing in the game is arguably the Godmodder's response to almost any attack that fails.
  • Joke Character: Lots of them, starting with the Creepy Dummy that showed up near the beginning of the first game. Many graduate to Lethal Joke Character status.
  • Lampshade Hanging: Used as a joke occasionally.
  • Lethal Joke Character: There are more of these than there are normal joke characters. Some examples are the Creepy Dummy, Tricky the Clown, and Flumpty Bumpty.
  • Life Drain: Another attack type used on occasion.
  • Limit Break: Charged Attacks. In DTG2, Combat Operandi and especially Comb Raves also fall under this.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: Oh yeah. Hundreds of summons, many of which with tidbits. There are over twenty people that have posted enough times to be at least semi-relevant, and more than twice that number in plot-relevant entities. Major entities measure almost in the hundreds, and all in all, the total number of summons may measure well over a thousand.
    • If you were to include all the off-screen characters that supposedly contribute to all of this the numbers go obscenely high due to the fact that it is very largely a crossover.
  • Loophole Abuse: New rules have to be written every couple of months because of this. More seriously, the reason why TwinBuilder was dragged into the game was because of the Every-Dimensional Portal, which could summon ANYTHING as long as it was suggested. The_Serpent, a PG player, voted for Twin himself.
  • The Main Characters Do Everything: There are supposedly uncounted numbers of individuals wrapped up in the conflict. And still, every single thing has to be done by the players or one of the big bads.
    • However, it's not uncommon for extras to get promoted.
  • Massive Multiplayer Crossover: An integral part of the game.
  • Meaningful Background Event: Watch very closely what the other players are doing. Someone who pays close attention can catch massive attacks long before the ripples are heard on the battlefield.
  • Mini-Boss: Technically all of the bosses except the Godmodder himself are this.
  • Mirror Match: The players have fought duplicates of themselves several times throughout the series - the Void clones in DTG1, the literal mirror clones from Scratch's Manor in DTG2, and the Glitch copies from the Mirror of Ender in Chaos.
  • Mooks: How almost every successful attack and half of all charges end up being manifested as, not to mention the Godmodder's primary way of keeping the players from winning. Most notably, if the Godmodder has too many mooks they'll automatically nullify attacks against him, so keeping their numbers limited is why summons are important.
  • More Dakka: Used by a variety of weapons and attacks, but given physical form in the king of all More Dakka weapons, the Ultimatum.
    • To quote its owner; "More Dakkkkaaaaa!!!!!" -pionoplayer
  • Motive Decay: The Godmodder. At first he made started the whole thing to cause everyone to rage-quit, but by the end of the first game the motive had been lost to trying to survive getting murdered by the posters. That same process of motive decay is mirrored across every single game. The only exception thus far is the MSPA session, which he won.
  • Muggles: Allusions are frequently made to the unfortunate inhabitants of whichever world the Godmodder is currently terrorizing. They don't do much though.
  • Multi-Stage Battle: The Godmodder and various others.
  • Near Villain Victory: Every game. It proves that he can't be taken lightly even at 1 HP.
    • At the end of DTG1, the Godmodder almost healed himself back to full health and created the Anti-Chuck Norris Turret Tank, which was invulnerable to player attack. The players just barely managed to win with the Secret of the Void's help.
    • At the end of DTG2, the Godmodder frees the Red Dragon, sends the moon crashing down into GodCraft, and creates a giant mech called the Incarnate. The players ended up beating the boss with only a few days left before the moon would end the world.
    • TvTropes had the Anti-Monitor a TURN away from arriving before the Reset button got hit. Then subverted, as the Godmodder then respawned at full HP, giving him a Godhood exactly as he wanted.
    • TvTropes2 had the Godmodder come terrifyingly close to unleashing a total party wipe on the Pantheon.
    • MSPA subverts it, as the Godmodder won outright very early on.
  • No Points for Neutrality: Not quite played straight, as neutral posters tend to get a slightly better 'luck' factor, but for the most part the neutral faction is just as weak/powerful as the other two factions. 0 plays it straighter, as every other player faction either has a godmodder backing them up or at least some way to boost the charges of the whole faction.
  • Once A Game: Look at any given DTG game. At some point in its series of events, a reality warping glitch of some kind causes "fun".
  • One-Hit Kill: The Godmodder, and other especially powerful entities, are more than capable of doing this to lower-powered entities.
  • Orbital Bombardment: This has happened a few times, with players summoning giant ships of space stations and raining death from above on the Godmodder. Of note is the UOSS, a huge space station that can deal 10,000 damage in a single laser strike.
  • Orcus on His Throne: For being the main-boss and primary antagonist throughout the entire game, the Godmodder doesn't do much. The trope is invoked quite often to describe other characters such as the L()rd and the Author.
  • Passing the Torch: At the end of every game, a new Game Master is chosen to uphold the Narrative for the next war.
  • Player and Protagonist Integration: Everyone is playing as their own Minecraft account ingame, unless they decide to expand their character to something greater or make an entirely different character. All three scenarios are common.
  • Pocket Dimension: A base mechanic for the series, especially when inventory mechanics are brought up. Justified due to the fact that the games almost always take place in a code-based universe based off of a game, and those games have player characters with a Hyperspace Arsenal.
  • Pure Energy: Used repeatedly, in various ways.
  • Rage Quit: The Godmodder's goal is to make everyone do this. In fact, it's in his job description!
  • Reality Is Out to Lunch: What the Glitch causes.
    • Dimension 953 is basically an entire world where reality is taking a permanent leave of absence.
  • Reality Warper: The Godmodder (and other godmodders) most prominently. The ways that Anti-Godmodding works make the Players this too for the duration of a Godmodding war. Then there's the Narrative and Conflict, which is strong enough to be a Sentient Cosmic Force and have its power be ingrained in reality's function; the Terminae, a ton of Random Near-Omnipotent Beings; the higher-ranking Unfantomable Ones; and many others.
  • Rule of Funny: This is one of the criteria for an attack to work against the Godmodder.
  • Rules of the Game: Common in particularly big events. A notable example was a glitch in the first game where failing to post in the right format would automatically disqualify your attack.
  • Rule Zero: The GM always has the last word on if an attack, charge, entity, sidequest, or plotline can go through. Always.
  • Running Gag: Many, maintained by the players and the GMs. Too many to list, really.
  • Sacrificial Lamb: Most of the summons that manage to last a significant amount of time. Wilson managed to Subvert this due to his initial insignificance and neutrality and survives until the end of the game, and Build managed to do likewise.
  • Science Fantasy: And how. Big things alternate between dragons, robots, tanks, magi, orcs, and everything else.
  • Self-Destruct Mechanism: Several instances, sometimes effective, but usually the vehicle in question gets smashed to pieces before it finishes the sequence.
    • The Mech entities from DTG2 get special mention for having a guarenteed kamikaze attack upon hitting 0 HP, which was perhaps just as devastating as some of their charged speicals.
  • Serial Escalation: In the first game, the Godmodder was attacking a small Minecraft server. At the start of the second, he traps every Minecraft player on a server. Now, an inter-universal team of bigger villains overshadows him, and they may not even be the biggest bad of the game.
    • You go from people doing one-shot attack here and there with the battlefield being the Godmodder's hit points, to having massive armies and intricate plotlines.
  • Shout-Out: it may be stretching it, but when it's not a direct crossover it's likely this. Most obviously Minecraft, or Terraria when the games moved. Fez, Team Fortress 2, Portal, Antichamber, Gravity Falls and Homestuck (especially Homestuck) have also been referenced quite often.
    • There are loads of others. Trying to list them all would be a pointless endeavor.
  • Slash Command: Used as an attack. A highly ineffective one though, so it isn't used.
    • You know that someone is new when they attempt to use /ban to get rid of the Godmodder.
      • You know they haven't read anything on the thread when they expect it to work.
  • Sliding Scale of Fourth Wall Hardness: Nonexistent. There is no Fourth Wall, with the divide between the players and their characters typically drawn as very, very small. All the players are aware they're in a forum game, gladly switch between in-character and out-of-character speak, and can do whatever the hell they want. At its hardest, they're still fourth wall observers. This is what makes them so powerful. In particular, Crystal exploits this with glee.
  • Socialization Bonus: Your attacks get charged much faster when you can convince the other players to help.
  • Standard Status Effects: Many of them are used, including poison, burning, regeneration, and freezing.
  • Story Branching: The series is very clearly shaped by player action and interaction.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: A given. There have been a large number of spectacularly described explosions over the course of the story, varying anywhere from a single tank, to the Death Star.
  • Summoning Artifact: Used on several occasions. If this happens, everyone knows to hit the deck, because if whatever it is finishes the summon... Well, these attacks always end poorly for at least one side.
  • Throw the Mook at Them: Subverted quite comically. If you throw a PG entity at the Godmodder, the Godmodder's minion will take damage instead of him. It proves to be an effective attack 100% of the time if you can get around to throwing the entity without being blocked.
  • Turn-Based Combat: How the game works. Each time the Game Master posts, another turn passes and both the players and entities have acted.
  • Turns Red: The Godmodder gains strength as the game goes on, canonically because of the Godmodder getting more desperate, but arguably because of Serial Escalation.
  • Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny: A key component for the series: A big draw is that entity summons can be almost anything imaginable.
  • Vehicular Assault: Lots of times, for both the good guys and bad guys. The biggest example is the spaceship sequence in DTG2's Trial 7, wherein everyone made or boarded a ship to combat the Binaries.
  • Visible Silence: Used frequently by various players and NPCs.
  • Void Between the Worlds: What the Void is. It's a massive dimension of nothingness that represents the majority of reality, with every universe in existence represented as a bubble of sorts, floating inside. The Void is nearly inhospitable and is home to many Eldritch Abominations.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?: The Godmodder has a large fear of tubas gained from a childhood accident. All that's known is that it involved UserZero.
  • Wolfpack Boss: The Godmodder seems to like this trope, as he usually summons his Terrors and Mechs in waves.
  • You Do Not Want To Know: Has been used when some players questioned facets of the Godmodder's past.
  • Zerg Rush: Once a game...If not more than once.

    DTG1 
  • Action Bomb: The Terror Creeper.
  • Apologetic Attacker: When a player got turned to the Pro-Godmodder side due to a karma mechanic, he tried desperately to avoid attacking his former teammates.
  • Beam-O-War: The final battle between the Godmodder's last line of defense (the Anti-Chuck Norris Turret Tank) and the players' salvation (the Secret of the Void) consists of exactly this. The players had to defend the Secret of the Void long enough for its beam to overpower the Tank's.
  • Beat the Curse Out of Him: When a player is somehow turned to the Godmodder's side, such as Minor107 through a karma system, the solution is usually beating the curse out of him.
  • Chekhov's Gun: The Anti-Chuck Norris Turret. It originally popped up a few times in the beginning of the first game, just as a counter to all Chuck Norris attacks, and was forgotten for a while. However, it reappeared later on, in an upgraded form, as the final boss of the game.
    • A literal Chekhov's Gun was made, but promptly destroyed by the Godmodder.
  • Cherry Tapping: At one point, a trio of entities were summoned who, instead of having commas in their health bars, had decimals. note  This lead to the Godmodder poking them all and having them promptly die due to their obscenely low HP.
    • This may have been a misunderstanding on the GM's part, because in Europe decimals are used instead of commas to denote powers of 1000.
  • Death Ray: A very common attack in the first game.
  • Degraded Boss: In the first thread, the Godmodder's Terrors were bona-fide bosses. In the final fight, they only showed up as support.
  • Eleventh Hour Super Power: The Secret of the Void in the first game, whose appearance was foreshadowed back during a sidequest.
  • Double Weapon: TwinBuilder had a diamond double-bladed lightsaber. In DTG2, it was a component for his superweapon, Oblivion's Guardian.
  • The End... Or Is It?: Sort of how the first game ended, because TT2000 said that the second game was in the works afterwards.
  • Enemy Mine: If there's a Hostile entity around that's dangerous enough, the Anti-Godmodder and Pro-Godmodder sides may both work to try to deal with the threat... only to immediately go back to fighting each other as soon as the threat is over.
  • Fartillery: The very first attack was a player performing the most epic fart ever. The Godmodder countered it by wearing a gas mask, however.
  • Fighting Your Friend: Minor's attempt to use an inFamous karma system ended up with him working as one of the Godmodder's lackeys.
  • Fight Magnet: When the Godmodder was safely stored away in his castle, Hunter Groups appeared, willing to fight the Godmodder.
  • Final Boss: In the first thread, the Anti-Chuck Norris Turret was turned into a giant tank that was invulnerable and could only be killed by the Secret of the Void.
  • Ghost Pirate: A whole Ghost Pirate Bunker was summoned in the first thread, with ghost pirates manning its cannons.
  • The Grim Reaper: Has been summoned in the first thread. Of course, being Death, he wasn't aligned to any one side, and had to be bribed. Even then, he switched sides on occasion. He has been shown to one-hit kill entities, which is pretty fitting. They probably didn't even know what hit them.
  • Instant Death Radius: Arguably one of the most annoying things to pop up more than once as the Godmodder's block.
  • Inverse Law of Utility and Lethality: See Rule of Funny. A SPAM cannon or decapitation via banana peel is more likely to cause more damage than a kick in the nuts.
  • I Work Alone: The Godmodder's response to players trying to help him in the first game. This was always followed by him beating the crap out of them.
  • Laser Blade: Used once or twice.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: In the first 10 pages of posts, everybody was just making humorous and often ill-fated attacks against the Godmodder. Then the Terror Skeleton and Terror Zombie were introduced by said Godmodder, and players started summoning entities like there's no tomorrow.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: One of the players made an attack that lowered the Godmodder's max HP from 100 to 40.
  • Murderous Mannequin: The Creepy Dummy. It appeared as a gag, wearing a T-shirt that read: "Godmodder's Friend." But somehow most of its actions turned out to be potentially lethal.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: The Secret of the Void is not your typical dragon...
  • Pendulum War: Surprisingly rare outside of the original thread. In the original thread however, it was an eternal cycle of the Pro-Godmodder forces getting flattened, the Godmodder summons more monsters, the Anti-Godmodders get wrecked, then they take down the first monster and the others go like dominoes, rinse and repeat.
  • Psychic Static: Subverted when one player attempted to make a joke by 'reading the Godmodder's mind for his weakness' and came out with a picture of a tuba. It turned out to be a legitimate weakness.
  • Reality-Breaking Paradox: Used as both an attack and the counter to that attack early in the first game.
  • Revive Kills Zombie: Turned into a back-and-forth mini-battle right at the beginning of the first game, consisting of the Godmodder getting switched back and forth between undead and alive while a single player kept attempting to kill him with various things, the most hilarious example being when his attempts resulted in his unholy water healing the currently-undead Godmodder for all the health lost to a massive attack earlier that round.
  • Roundhouse Kick: Crusher48 pulled one that channeled Chuck Norris and ultimately destroyed the Godmodder.
  • Scripted Battle: Pretty much the entire description of the final fight against the ACNTT.
  • Sheathe Your Sword: Upon entering the void during the void expedition in the first game, the players ran into dark versions of themselves that would deal heavy damage when attacked and had huge amounts of health. How to kill them? If they went two turns (not necessarily consecutively) they died.
  • Signed Up for the Dental: It's been shown that a perk of being on the Godmodder's team is having free dental. This has, on occasion, coaxed entities onto the Godmodder's side.
  • Sky Pirate: Pirate_Ray and his Ghost Pirateships were immensely popular.
  • So What Do We Do Now?: Look at the posts after the first game ended. This is the response that came from the people who didn't figure out about the second game existing.
  • Space Pirates: One of the very first events ever involved a portal that summoned these. In addition, there was a player who was one of these named Pirate_Ray. He ended up summoning a huge Ghost Pirateship that became one of the most notable entities in the series.
  • Time-Limit Boss: The ACNTT had to be defeated quickly or the Godmodder would go to full health.
  • Tragic Monster: Minor107 attempted to use an ability to power him up, instead he got mind-controlled into fighting for the Godmodder and the players had to beat him up.
  • Victory Fakeout: When the Godmodder reached 1 HP, the players ran towards him to deal the final blow... When suddenly, the Anti-Chuck-Norris Turret Tank appeared.

    DTG2 
  • Abandoned Laboratory: In this case, Aperture Science from Portal, which actually exists in the game's "real" version of Earth.
  • Abnormal Ammo: Using the Alchemiter tends to produce these types of weapons. One such example is a gun that shoots golden radioactive snowballs.
  • Absurdly Low Level Cap: There is no true "level cap," though players stop getting Special Attacks at Level 10, and if a player has been around for long enough and consistently does high-damage attacks, they can reach Level 10 fairly quickly, while the game is still in full swing.
  • Achievement System: Scratch's Manor had one.
  • Achilles' Heel: Almost all Hostile entities note  have a specific weak point that can be discovered, allowing the entity to be killed much more quickly. This helps because Hostiles also tend to have large amounts of health.
  • Action Bomb: The C-Mech.
  • Added Alliterative Appeal: If an attack is placed on a thousandth post, it will usually be highly boosted and alliterative as well.
    • As of the 11,000th post, these types of attacks no longer occur due to a bug in how the Minecraft Forum counts post numbers.
  • Advantage Ball: It gets passed around VERY frequently.
  • After Boss Recovery: After certain climatic boss battles, or End of Act cutscenes, the players are fully healed, their Sacred Item count is restored, and the cooldowns on their Spoils of War are reset.
  • A.I. Is a Crapshoot: The Virus, an entity created in the second game, gradually became self-aware as its Security Integrity decreased. When that stat was completed, it broke free from its original purposes and became a human-like entity known as The Operator, which, naturally, decided to attack everything in sight.
    • Project Binary is another big example. Its AI became rogue the second it was activated, but it pretended to be loyal to the government to gain its trust. By the end of the game, it has the entire population of Earth under mind-control and has every single player of Minecraft trapped on the Moon.
  • All Deaths Final: In the second game, if an entity is dead, it stays dead. ...Most of the time.
  • All the Worlds Are a Stage: Happens during the Glitch, which replayed various events at past points in the game for the players to do over again.
  • Alternate Universe: pionoplayer used a voodoo doll to transport to an alternate universe where the Godmodder had beaten the players. He didn't stay long.
  • Amazing Technicolor Battlefield: GodCraft becomes one by Trial 6, when it's bathing in the glow of a red onslaught of moon chunks, the light of a green plume of fire holding said moon chunks at bay, and two beams of orange and purple flame coming from a giant Godmodder mech's back.
  • Animal Mecha: The Godmodder's line of Mechs includes an SP-Mech (Spider-Mech) and ED-Mech (Enderdragon-Mech).
  • Apocalypse How: The End of Act 4 results in a Class X-5 apocalypse that destroys the Trifecta entirely.
  • Apocalypse Wow: Trial 6 and the End of Act 4.
  • April Fools' Day:
    • On April 1st, 2014, TT2000 played an incredibly funny prank on the Godmodder, involving a year long quest for the ultimate practical joke that involved piranhas, sharks, piranha sharks, and anti-godmodding water. The entire quest turned out to be fabricated, and the Godmodder proceeded to go into an almost comatose rage, where the only thing he would say was "Heh."
      • Two weeks later, during 4/13, the Godmodder turned into Psychopath Godmodder and created the fearsome Calamity. All because of a joke.
    • On the same day, the Minecraft Forum staff posted some new rules to the forum to make discussion more "serious." TwinBuilder pretended to shut down the second thread because it broke all of the new rules.
    • On April 1st, 2015, in accordance with Mojang's April Fool's prank of that year, the Love Update, TwinBuilder renamed the game "Love the Godmodder 2: Love Harder!" and removed all traces of combat, making the game an adventure of spreading love and happiness throughout the universe. The Godmodder proceeded to throw an unholy fit which crashed the game and caused it to restart at an earlier point in time. This earlier state was almost a year earlier. Thankfully, the game was restored, and the players got a super-powerful weapon out of it: the Disc of Mojang.
  • Arc Number: Three in this case: 9, 0, and 1. There were nine Anti-Godmodder Ancestors, nine members of Limbo's Council of Nine, and nine members of the Chosen Few that created the Void. 0 and 1 pop up frequently with regards to Project Binary, Binary Prime, and The Employer, since they're all made out of binary coding. In addition, "901" is used many times as well in random circumstances simply because 9/01 (September 1st) was the day Destroy the Godmodder 2 started.
  • Arc Words: The term "Operator" has popped up frequently. Three major characters have the name, and another term for godmodding, or at least a technique similar to it, was revealed to be called "operating." Ultimately the two surviving characters with that title (The evolved Virus and Slenderman) and the third's descendant (Build) united to ultimately aid in defeating the Godmodder once and for all during Act 5.
    • Heh. The Godmodder picked that up after TT2000 unleashed a horrific April Fool's prank on him. It ultimately became a Character Tic for the Godmodder, but was also used as the foreshadowing of imminent doom (i.e. the summoning of Calamity).
  • Artistic License – Astronomy: Whenever they're in the same picture, the Earth and Moon are much closer than they should be.
  • Attack Its Weak Point: When Hostiles were first created, their immense power was supposed to be balanced out that they would all have a weak point, which when discovered, could be used to take them down with relative ease.
  • Backstory: The backstories of many characters are told by the players and TwinBuilder. Most are rather depressing.
    • Serpent's backstory is largely unknown, but what we do know reveals that she killed her best friend during a SBURB session.
    • The parts of Blue's backstory that have been revealed focused on her blaming herself for her grandfather's assassination, which she witnessed on her thirteenth birthday.
    • Erelye's backstory involves murder, deals with Eldritch Abominations, and all sorts of chaos, including another SBURB session.
    • The Psi-Godmodder (the original godmodder)'s backstory is very sad, chronicling the destruction of his hometown and his eventual spiral into madness in the pursuit of power and knowledge.
    • The Godmodder's backstory is sad too, with him being bullied in his childhood. Although he went on to become successful and make lots of money, he felt empty and directionless inside, leading a meaningless existence... Although that ended up turning around when he discovered Minecraft.
  • Attention Whore: The Godmodder, big time. He gets mad whenever people don't attack him often enough, even though he gets mad when people do attack him.
  • Author Existence Failure: Directly invoked when both Build and Split, the two main characters of TwinBuilder, are killed following their Battle At The Center Of The Mind. As there is no one left to tell the story, it just... stops. The Update Terminal used to transcribe the game displays an error message, searching for another candidate to tell the tale. As luck would have it, it turns out there's someone else who can do the job - Doc Scratch, another First Guardian. He proceeds to remake the game in his image, forcing the players into a Side Quest.
  • Bad Moon Rising: During the Eclipse, the sun turned red and the moon broke into pieces, falling towards GodCraft. The Eclipse itself would be described as causing the sun and moon to fight, so it wasn't that far off.
  • Bag of Sharing: During the Scratch's Manor sidequest, the players had a Group Inventory they could use among themselves. However, the players also had their own inventories.
  • Bag of Spilling: None of the items from DTG2 will transfer into the games that come afterwards - they'll have to be made from scratch if at all.
  • Battle Amongst the Flames: Trial 6, although there were multiple sources of flames. The Incarnate produced two jets of fire, one colored orange and one colored purple to symbolize oblivion and corruption respectively, the green fire Build used to keep the Eclipse at bay, the scarlet fire created as the Eclipse fell onto the server, and the red fire of the Red Dragon.
  • Battle Aura: Used by numerous different people. Erelye's is dark and shadowy, the Godmodder sometimes gets a golden aura, and Build and Split have gained green and red auras respectively several times.
  • The Battle Didn't Count: Her Imperious Condescension and Snowman lived just barely after supposedly dying, sustaining their injuries. GLaDOS, Ikea, and Bill Cipher were all fought prior to the actual Arrival as well, and they left the field without a scratch.
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: What the Shatter is. When a being gains a split personality, said personalities will eventually, without exception, duke it out in the mind to see who gets complete control of the host body.
  • Battleship Raid: The Incarnate.
  • Battle Theme Music: At certain climatic points in the game, TwinBuilder links to songs that the players can listen to to add to the effect.
  • Battle Trophy: The Spoils of War act as these, gained by the person who lands the finishing blow on a boss. They are special, though, in that they can actually be used as weapons.
    • The only two Spoils that aren't weapons are the Monolithium, a piece of the Black Monolith from when it was destroyed, along with the Serpent's Fang. The Monolithium is purely decorative, due to the fact that the Monolith wasn't described as a boss, and that it didn't attack. The second decorative spoil is the Serpent's Fang, dropped from Project Binary's Hard-Light projection upon its death.
  • BFG: As of the advent of the Alchemiter, we now have multiple guns best described as handheld weapons of mass destruction.
  • Big Labyrinthine Building: Erelye's home, Grayhold, is this to ridiculous extents. It's gotten to the point that eldritch abominations have gotten lost in it. Erelye barely knows where he's going.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The Godmodder and Project Binary were destroyed by the end of the game, but at a cost. Thanks to Build's incompetence, the Conflict has started to reform into a multiversal superpower, the Secret of the Void has been killed, and the Trifecta itself was destroyed. Earth was reformed by Mojang and the inhabitants of Homestuck ended up getting out safely, but Minecraft... wasn't so lucky. The Operators let everyone get back to their respective worlds and live out their days in peace, but Minecraft is no longer a universe - now it's only a game. And if you thought Richard was actually dead, you have another think coming.
  • Boarding Party: The Star Destroyer from Act 3 was boarded by no less than 3 different armies.
  • Body Horror: One-Winged Angel Kirby and its Soul form, the Mimes, engie's true form, many of Erelye's attacks during Trial 5, and Godmodder Soul.
  • Bolivian Army Cliffhanger: The End of Act 4. By the end of the storypost, the players were trapped on a dying GodCraft as a black hole threatened to swallow them up - and the entirety of GodCraft.
  • Bonus Stage: Team Fortress 2 Mode.
  • Bookends: Discounting the quote taken from the end of DTG1 at the beginning of the original post and the post Twin made at the end of the thread detailing its life and eventual death, the first and last words of the thread are "Or had he?" Both instances of the phrase refer to the Godmodder: the first one contemplating if he really had given up after his first defeat, and the second one contemplating if he really was Killed Off for Real at the game's conclusion.
  • Boss Banter: If a boss can talk, it usually does this.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: The Ultimate Orbital Space Station, note  was summoned to be its own entity, with no special boss designation. It wiped the floor with the PGs for close to a quarter of the Homestuck Invasion and it took the Godmodder's entire fleet working together to finally destroy it.
    • Justified, as it was a 100-post charge, which is 2x the normal maximum charge.
  • Boss-Only Level: Most of the Trials count as this.
  • Boss Rush: Happens at the very end of the game in Trial 7, where the players have to fight a selection of X-Bosses from the Godmodder's memories.
  • Bowties Are Cool: Doc Scratch always wears one through thick and thin, even with his wardrobe upgrade when he becomes the Psi-Godmodder.
  • Brain–Computer Interface: The Godmodder has one which lets him play on GodCraft while performing basic bodily functions like eating and sleeping.
  • Call Back: Many examples. Plot points and stray attacks oftentimes get referenced or expanded on later in the story.
  • Cape Wings: Godmodder Soul does this.
  • Cerebus Syndrome: This started up around Act 2, and the stakes got higher and higher until the very end of the game. A plot started to form once the Homestuck Invasion hit, and more and more elements were introduced as the game went on, with the last battles of the end being a massive mix of everything that had happened earlier.
  • Character Level: While it was toyed with during Scratch's Manor, a proper leveling system was added in Act 3 in the form of the Echeladder.
  • Chekhov's Armoury: In a very big way. Even lampshaded with an actual weapon called 'Chekhov's Gun' that charged up secretly and was meant to suddenly be relevant at a later point, but was locked away, then played with when it showed up again later, but ended up being pointless anyways.
  • Chekhov's Gun: Despite having a significant role in the first game, the FEZ was really only used once and then forgotten. In the second game, it ended up becoming the Ultimate Reward of the Antichamber and was acquired by Flare Flames, who ended up using it to help everyone in the End of Act 3.
    • The Ancestral Artifacts also count. They were mentioned during Intermission 2 as the means by which the first Terrors were summoned by the Psi-Godmodder. During Act 4, The Godmodder sought to collect them to become Psi himself.
    • The Anti-Chuck Norris Turret Tank's Superlaser. It was introduced in the end of the first game, and it appeared all the way in the end of the second game to free the Red Dragon from the Nether.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Bill Cipher was used as a side character in Act 2 by Nimbleguy and wasn't shown much, but ended up becoming an important villain in Act 3, joining the Arrival.
    • Binary Prime, initially a wonderful example of a Giant Space Flea from Nowhere during Intermission 1, came back in full force during Trial 7 as a shard of The Conflict and the source of the Employer's power, backing up both the Employer and Project Binary.
    • Both Operators; The Operator created from the Virus during Act 2 had the final words of being the one who would finally destroy the Godmodder, while Slenderman left prior to the Glitch overtaking the server. Both came back during the finale and were ultimately the reason the Descendants lived, as both had undergone Heel-Face Turns.
  • Cognizant Limbs: Many entities have different parts that must be destroyed, such as having shields or production lines. This was taken to the literal extreme with the UOSS, which had modules designed for attacking, shield generators, thruster mounts, drone production lines, and many more things, that all had to be destroyed just to get to the Bridge.
  • Colony Drop: When the UOSS was finally defeated, the ship dropped like a stone and fell right into the Battlefield, killing many entities.
  • Color-Coded Armies: Anti-Godmodder entities and players are represented with a red [AG] next to their name and Pro-Godmodder entities and players have a blue [PG] next to their name. In a similar manner, Neutrals have a grey [N], Hostiles have a purple [H], the Godmodder has a goldenrod [GM], Unknowns have a dark grey [???], and Bosses have different colors depending on what side they're on. (AG Bosses have dark red tags, PG Bosses and Mechs have magenta tags, Neutral Bosses have dark grey tags, Hostile Bosses have light magenta tags, and ??? Bosses have black tags.)
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: Adding onto the above, nearly every major character has a certain color they talk in. Justified in the case of split personalities who are represented by opposite colors known as spectra. Build talks in green, Split talks in red, the Godmodder talks in goldenrod, Alpha talks in cobalt, the Employer talks in orchid... And then there's the players!
  • Colossus Climb: The Incarnate.
  • Combat Compliment: Doc Scratch has a tendency to throw these into his counters.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Both pionoplayer and Aegis-A095 can be considered such, as they have both gotten in trouble repeatedly for abusing loopholes in game rules.
    • Most other players as well, to a lesser extent.
  • Cores and Turrets Boss: The Artemissile is the Core (although it's capable of attacking as well), with the Employer and Binary Prime being the quite literal turrets.
  • The Corruption: The Vord, a race of alien insects who resurrect fallen entities as "Taken" versions of themselves, brainwashed to serve the Vord and attack everything else. They also spread like wildfire and won't stop until everyone in the universe is Taken.
  • Coup de Grâce Cutscene: For the deaths of the Virus, Project Binary's Serpent Projection, and Piono.
  • Cutscene Incompetence: Whenever there's a cutscene and the players aren't actually posting, the characters they're controlling tend to get bounced around as the plot does. Because the players can't actually interact with the event in question, it goes by without incident, disregarding some very rare retcons. As a result of this, the players have done things they might not normally have done, such as letting themselves get captured or teleported away by outside entities.
  • Creation Story: Minecraft has one that's explained throughout the game by various characters.
  • Cross-Referenced Titles: The first act is called Regenesis, and the last act is called Revelations.
  • Damage-Increasing Debuff: A handful of items do this by inflicting various status effects on enemies. Most notable is Lil' Cal, a Spoil of War who inflicts the Curse status effect, making enemies deal half damage and making attacks at them deal 50% more damage.
  • Damage Over Time: Many such entities and attacks can apply these status effects to enemies, such as Poison and Burn.
  • Dance Party Ending: At the end of Act 5, the players celebrate their victory by restarting the Flash Mob from Act 3, dancing off into the sunset.
  • Darker and Edgier: Although it can be as comical as the first game, DTG2 has a much more deeper, darker, and violent plot. The players' actions and attacks throughout the game reflect this.
  • Deal with the Devil: Several were made by players over the course of the game with Bill Cipher, who now has a veritable assortment of powerful items at his side as a result. Just what's he planning to do with them?
  • Death Course: The Gauntlet of Scratch's Manor was one.
  • Demonic Dummy: Lil' Cal.
  • Die, Chair! Die!: During Scratch's Manor, many of the props found in the manor's various floors could be interacted with or destroyed for varying results, such as a chandelier that, when cut from the ceiling, crashed through the floor and opened a hole to the basement.
  • Disc One Final Boss: Doc Scratch and Lord English. As bad as they were in Act 2, they were only the subordinates of the Employer.
  • Disc One Final Dungeon: Scratch's Manor, which gets bonus points for being the literal final area of Destroy the Godmodder 2's first Disc.
  • Distant Reaction Shot: The incoming Eclipse during Trial 6 and the Earth's destruction in End of Act 4 were shown with a full shot of the planet as destruction loomed around it.
  • Downer Beginning: The game begins with the Godmodder succeeding in his quest to trap everyone on a single server and feed off of their inevitable rage. Not the best way to start an adventure, huh?
  • Drop the Hammer: There are several large hammers, the biggest of which, Terra Firma, is stated to have a head over 20 feet in width.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: What happened to Earth in the End of Act 4. Only this kaboom destroyed the entire universe.
  • Elaborate Underground Base: The Conclave has one, and it's where Project Binary is kept.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Some of Outer Gods have been summoned, and Erelye has met lots of them.
  • Emerald Power: Because First Guardians thrive off of the Green Sun, any First Guardian has Emerald Power because they fight with green energy and when they teleport, they leave behind green afterimages. Not to mention that any Green Sun First Guardian usually wears the color green as well.
  • End Game Results Screen: Included general stats such as how long the game took, when Acts and Intermissions started and ended, who the first player to post was, who the first player to damage the Godmodder was, and who the player to destroy the Godmodder was.
  • End of the World as We Know It: Trial 6 and the End of Act 4.
  • Evil Is Bigger: The Mechs, Binary Prime, Lord English, Project Binary, The Employer, and the Incarnate are all various magnitudes bigger than the actual players.
  • Evolving Title Screen: The game's title changed colors as the story's Acts and Intermissions progressed.
  • Exposition Break: Happens occasionally, such as during 4/13/14 (when Doc Scratch explained the Homestuck Invasion's origin, the Few's arrival on GodCraft, where they explained the creation of Minecraft in detail, and the arrival of the Binaries in Trial 7, where the nature of the Narrative and the Conflict was explained.
  • Fake-Out Fade-Out: At the end of Trial 6, the players had beaten the Godmodder for good. His corpse had fallen into the Void, and the credits began to roll...until they began to glitch out and show Godmodder Soul leering at you. You thought the game was over? You ain't seen nothing yet.
  • Fallen Angel: One-Winged Angel Kirby, who even has a broken Holy Halo. His Soul reincarnation is even worse.
  • Final Boss: The Incarnate.
  • Final Boss, New Dimension: The final bosses of Act 3, the Arrival Forces (Project Binary, GLaDOS, Bill Cipher, and King Ikea) were fought in a bleak pocket dimension known only as Elsewhere.
  • Finishing Move: insert_generic_username had one in the form of Sunrise, a powerful move where he would use the Daybreak weapon from Kid Icarus: Uprising to one-shot a foe at low HP.
  • Flash Step: Used increasingly often to ludicrous extents. Pretty darn close to maxed out by Piono's time-stepping variant which involves speeding up your personal time and flash-stepping simultaneously, effectively allowing you to move instantly.
  • Flavor Text: Can be given to completed charges when they're summoned, and are given by TwinBuilder to completed alchemies and Special Attacks that are being used for the first time.
  • Freudian Excuse: The Godmodder was revealed to have been bullied as a child, which is one of (but not the biggest) reasons as to why he started bullying others back.
  • Gambit Pileup: The Godmodder, The Employer, The Counteroperation, and probably a dozen others have their own agendas.
  • Game Within a Game: One of the challenges in Trial 4 was a text adventure the players had to play, revolving an adventure traveling through a spider-based area.
    • Not to mention the players, several of whom have multiple characters with plans, some of which oppose another of their character's.
  • Gate Guardian: The Limbo Gatekeeper, who guards the exit out of Limbo, the afterlife itself.
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: Binary Prime from Intermission 1. However, he was revealed to have much more plot importance at the very end of the game, when he re-appeared as an Agent of the Conflict.
  • Glowing Gem: Covenite, a gem that emits every color the eye can see - and some it can't. It can be used to modify portals so they take the user to different places. Using a chunk of covenite, TheLordErelye was able to go to a dimension of mimes.
  • Glowing Mechanical Eyes: Project Binary has one glowing eye, not a pair of them, in the center of his spherical "head". It commonly flashes between displaying ones and zeroes, and also displays an upside-down triangle when using mind control.
  • Go for the Eye: The weakness of One-Winged Angel Kirby was its giant eye. Later on, One-Winged Angel Kirby Soul's weakness turned out to be a giant scar across its empty eye socket which led to the very core of its being.
  • Go-Karting with Bowser: The players ultimately had to team up with the Godmodder on several occasions to stop other evils from winning the war first.
    • The Space Gyarados also counts as one, being the result of a long Brick Joke from earlier in the game and having no plot relevance up to that point.
  • Gone Horribly Right: TT2000's April Fool's Day prank to the Godmodder was done with the hopes of getting him upset and damaging him. It worked - the Godmodder definitely got upset. But he was so angered that he temporarily turned into Psychopath Godmodder, using his concentrated rage to create a powerful boss known as Calamity.
  • Gotta Catch 'Em All: The Ancestral Artifacts. Whoever gets them all, plus the Disc of Mojang, becomes the Psi-Godmodder. In addition, the eight Server Chips that needed to be collected to stop the Glitch from destroying Minecraft.
  • Greater Scope Villain: The anti-Narrative, known as the Conflict. Revealed to be guiding every villain in all of fiction towards starting up bad endings, it's responsible for evil across every known universe and every known plotline - including Destroy the Godmodder's.
  • The Grim Reaper: Summoned along with the other three horsemen of the apocalypse.
  • Growing Wings: Godmodder Soul spontaneously gains bat wings while fighting the players.
  • Gunship Rescue: Build comes into a dying God Craft piloting the Twinmobile, which he then uses to help destroy Project Binary's Artemissile later on.
  • Hellgate: The Fourth Wall. If shattered, it can become a gateway from a universe to any other universe, allowing for untold armies to suddenly enter a universe without warning.
  • Hemisphere Bias: Every time Earth is shown from space, the Western Hemisphere is shown because that's where Project Binary's located.
  • Heroic B.S.O.D.: Happened to Build in the End of Act 4, after he learned that Universes A and B were both destroyed.
  • Herr Doktor: Kayne.
  • Holy Burns Evil: The divine weapons of Notch have been proven to successfully fend off anything in the universe, including its primordial sources of evil.
  • Humongous Mecha: The Godmodder can periodically summon these in the second thread. The catch is that, like the aforementioned Terrors, they are based off of Minecraft mobs, which makes sense considering the source material.
    • The Incarnate takes the cake here, being so large that its limbs, chest and head were whole areas and it had a gravitational pull.
  • I Fought the Law and the Law Won: Starting at Act 3, the U.S. Goverment starts to get involved in the fight with the Godmodder. They build a giant supercomputer named Project Binary that manages to convince the world that Minecraft itself is corrupt. The entire planet then spends the rest of the game trying to kill the players and the Godmodder. And they almost win.
  • I Just Want to Be Normal: Build, by the end of the game.
  • I Let You Win: The philosophy of the Employer and the Homestuck Invasion. It was revealed by Doc Scratch that the Homestuck Invasion was actually supposed to fail, and its failure would end up helping to destroy the players. Project Binary also had a similar point of view with regards to the Descent and the Arrival. All of these claims ended up being accurate, as each victory the players had degraded the stability to Minecraft, eventually getting to the point where the universe was destroyed entirely, resulting in victory for the Employer.
  • In Case of Boss Fight, Break Glass: The first ever Hostile entity, S.A.M. from Jetpack Joyride, had a cracked glass frame for a weakness.
  • Infinite Canvas: As DTG2's story progressed and the visuals began to evolve, the size of certain panels were increased to highlight the moments they showed. By the end of the game, entire images were being stitched together to show one gigantic image.
  • In-Game Novel: Several.
    • The first example is a GameFAQs guide TT2000 discovered about the game that had information about the Godmodder, entities, and many other aspects of the game.
    • Then, when the players went in Scratch's Library, they found several books available to read, such as a book on the legends of Minecraft, a book on split personalities, and a book on Pesterchum.
    • Much later in the game, the GameFAQs guide was rediscovered. It was highly updated by an unknown source (revealed to be Split), and it contained a large amount of information on DTG2.
  • Insect Queen: The Vord has several queens, each of a rank higher than the other, culminating with the Vord High-Queen the final boss of Trial 3.
  • Inspiration Nod: When the Godmodder created a massive building called the Tower in Trial 5, near the very end of the game, it was up to the players to destroy it. This act of destroying the Tower references the inspiration of the DTG series, a forum game called Destroy the Tower where the players could either destroy or defend the titular object, and each time one of the factions won, the game would be reset and played all over again.
  • Instant Awesome, Just Add Mecha: The Godmodder tends to summon waves of Mechs without warning.
  • Instrument of Murder: Nimbleguy has an especially deadly set of brass tubas augmented with an insane amount of power, such as commanding the primal elements, calling down meteor showers, and messing with the Void itself. They're known for being just on the edge of breaking the OP Scale.
  • Intentional Engrish for Funny: Used at various points for comedic effect, such as when referencing Sweet Bro and Hella Jeff. Also used when CobaltShade created items that were combined with the Japanese language (somehow). The resulting flavor text was translated from English, into Japanese, and back to English again to create this effect.
  • Intermission: The game had three, the first being unplanned because of complications with TwinBuilder's computer and the other two being deliberately placed in between plot arcs so players could advance their own stories.
  • Item Crafting: Appears in the form of the Alchemiter, which combines multiple items into one super-item.
  • Item Drop Mechanic: Bosses drop items after death called Spoils of War that the player who killed them can then pick up.
  • It's All Upstairs from Here: The players had to climb Scratch's Manor in Act 2 and the Tower in Trial 5.
  • It's Personal: For the Godmodder, that is.
  • Just in Time: In Trial 6, the Godmodder had taken the Red Dragon's power and was getting ready to slam GodCraft's moon into the server. When it looked like all hope was lost, Build appeared from the Twinmobile and slowed down the moon, giving the players time to attack the Godmodder. Build had been flying to GodCraft since the End of Act 3, and showed up at the best possible time to help the players.
  • Journey to Find Oneself: Implied to be what happened to Split at the end of the game.
  • Keeper of Forbidden Knowledge: Bill Cipher is a primary example. The Black Monolith was also one to a lesser extent during the Psi-Godmodding War.
  • Kitsune: Wilson, Talist's main character, is one. He starts off as a simple potion brewer, but by the end of the game, he turns into an unstoppable force with a large array of power.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Doc Scratch's appearance is what kick-started the actual role-playing, and the more he got involved in events, the more involved the plot got. Of course, things seemed to mend when he died...
  • Laser Blade: With the number of different weapons, practically a given. Lightsabers have made cameos too, although usually in the hands of a character known for wielding one.
  • Last-Second Ending Choice: The deciding factor on if the players would get the game's intended ending or the true bad ending was if they killed the Incarnate before the Eclipse occurred.
  • Laughing Mad: The Godmodder after TT2000's April Fool's Day prank.
  • Lethal Joke Weapon: The Holy Mackerel, a fish wrapped up in old newspaper, took 11 posts to create. Upon creation, it was used to power some of the most powerful attacks in the whole game.
  • Let's Split Up, Gang: Happened in Scratch's Manor (when the players branched out to exploring the Manor's top floors and the Basement) and in Trial 5 (when the players split up to explore the Tower's top floors and its elevator-accessible bottom floor).
  • Level-Locked Loot: The Alchemiter can only produce items that have a power level of 10. Some of the items past this point are so powerful that only a true hero can hold them or they'll turn to dust.
  • Literal Split Personality: Introduced a whole science to this trope, with events such as the Build, the Shatter, and the Split creating a violent life to anyone with a split personality. Several players, including the Game Master himself, had split personalities, which made for some funny events.
  • Locked Door: In Scratch's Manor, the entrance to the boss of each floor was guarded by a door that could only be opened if certain objectives were met (none of them involving keys per se).
  • Macross Missile Massacre: The Preston Cole had this special attack verbatim.
  • Madness Mantra: "Heh."
  • Magic Wand: Commonly used as weaponry among the mages of the game. TheLordErelye took this [1] and made the Hazel Wand, a devastating wand with a number of powers that took hundreds of charge points to fully upgrade.
  • Make My Monster Grow: Calamity went from being a Murderous Mannequin (the Creepy Dummy) and a Demonic Dummy (Lil' Cal from Homestuck) to being a giant monster with purple spikes in its back.
  • Master Console: The Update Terminal functions as an in-universe version of this. Although players can't interact with it directly, First Guardians can.
  • Masquerade: Subverted heavily. Instead of hiding what the Godmodder's done to Minecraft, the whole world knows what he's done, and is working to stop him.
  • Meta Guy: TwinBuilder not only does this, but lampshades it when he summons himself to the field. Talist also seems to have a hard time remembering that everyone else is roleplaying sometimes.
  • Mini-Game: Intermission 1 consisted of two. The players had to cool down TwinBuilder's Computer. Second, they had to take down a rogue code-based monstrosity known as Binary.
  • Mirror Match: Shatters between split personalities count as this. Although they're not exactly the same, the splits still come from the same mind, and are similar enough to use this trope.
  • Monochromatic Eyes: The Godmodder has these from Trial 6 onward.
  • Monstrous Humanoid: Mimes. They're so evil and horrifying that they live in their own dimension, their dances are enough to drive any living thing insane, they can snake their way into the minds of others, and their final form is a gigantic amalgamate of themselves known only as The Bleak. They somewhat resemble humans, but have bloated heads, dead black eyes, a slit for a mouth, and a body so thin it could just as well be only bone.
  • The Monolith: The Black Monolith, an ancient artifact that comes from the game FEZ. It can grant the wish of anyone who uses it. This seems like relatively cliche stuff until you realize that every player could achieve an independent goal with it, and that the big bads could use it as well.
  • Monster Delay: The Employer was a major villain from Act 2 all the way to the end of the game, and his true appearance was only revealed at the very end of the game. Pieces of his appearance, such as hands and flowing energy, had been shown throughout the game... but no one suspected that those flashes were his literal appearance all along.
  • The Most Dangerous Video Game: Minecraft becomes this in Act 3, because if you play it there's an extremely real chance that you'll be arrested, shipped to the Moon, and either brainwashed or killed for your actions.
  • Morph Weapon: The Gatekeeper's Scythe, a scythe used by the Limbo Gatekeeper that can switch to the forms of weapons used against its wielder in combat. Oblivion's Guardian and Broken Anachronism also had multiple forms.
  • Multiple Endings: If the players had failed Trial 6, they would have gotten a bad ending. It's unknown what would have happened besides the obvious.
  • Mundane Afterlife: When Fseftr's characters died during Trial 4 due to Doc Scratch's influence, they were sent to a processing center where a Grim Reaper ushered them into the afterlife from a booth. Then he sent them away when their deaths were retconned.
  • Murderous Mannequin: The Creepy Dummy made a reappearance in this game, and in a big way.
  • My Name Is ???: Some players tend to not say what they're summoning directly, leaving it a surprise for the other players, some even invoking the trope.
  • Mystical High Collar: TheLordErelye and Doc Scratch after becoming the Psi-Godmodder.
  • No Body Left Behind: The majority of entities dissolve upon death, with notable exceptions. Bosses leave behind small parts of themselves known as spoils of war, and later versions of Mechs curl up into spheres on death to unleash a kamikaze attack.
  • No Experience Points for Medic: Healing doesn't earn experience, only damaging enemies.
  • No Sell: When Eric confronts Piono during the Vord invasion, Eric pulls out a massive string of runic buffs and attacks...and Piono draws up a shield that completely blocks the attack, and counters with a strike that shatters Broken Anachronism, previously one of the most powerful swords.
    • Project Binary only has two weaknesses: the FEZ and Chemotherapy. Anything and everything else thrown at him will fail, without exception.
  • Not So Omniscient After All: Doc Scratch invoked this trope on the Godmodder during the Homestuck Invasion, however inaccurately.
    • And had it turned upon him when Piono took advantage of Scratch being only mostly omniscient to repeatedly antagonize him.]
  • Ominous Multiple Screens: The top floor of the Godmodder's Tower has them.
  • Ominous Visual Glitch: Happens many times, starting near the end of Act 3 onwards, to signify either a glitch or universal corruption in general. Whenever you see an image slowly glitching, you know something bad is about to happen.
  • Operation: [Blank]: Averted. The Godmodder's virus that brought everyone onto GodCraft is simply called "The Operation", and the U.S. government's plan to take it out was called "The Counteroperation."
  • Order Versus Chaos: Notch versus the Red Dragon, and the Narrative versus the Conflict.
  • Orphaned Punchline: Played with by Bill Cipher during the epilogue.
    Bill: SO, UH... I HAD A JOKE IN MIND, BUT I FORGOT THE ACTUAL THING, SO I'LL JUST SKIP TO THE PUNCHLINE. IT WENT SOMETHING LIKE THIS: AND I TOLD THE GUY, PNEUMONOULTRAMICROSCOPICSILICOVOLCANOCONIOSISER? I HARDLY EVEN KNEW HER!
  • Other Me Annoys Me: How split personalities work. They're designed to be caricaturized "good" and "bad" parts of a person that despise each other, ultimately leading to a confrontation where one personality gains control of the body. Subverted with the Godmodder's split personalities, Alpha and Omega, who actually work together for a long time... though they eventually fight in the end.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: The Red Dragon is not so much a dragon as an infinitely-sized Elemental Embodiment of destruction in a dragon form.
  • Palette Swap: Tends to happen with split personalities, such as Build and Split. The former has a green coat with red glasses, and the latter has a red coat with green glasses. Also, Alpha and Omega. The former's associated with cobalt, and the latter with goldenrod, though this is before they Shatter and go into two different bodies that look different.
  • Pan Up To The Sky Ending: And the flash mob dances off into the sunset.
  • Parallel Conflict Sequence: During Scratch's Manor, the players at the Manor's third floor fought the Handmaid while the players in the Manor's Basement fought a shard of the Red Dragon, both of which were the last bosses before the players confronted Doc Scratch himself. Later on, in Trial 5, another example occurred where the players at the top of the Godmodder's Tower fought the Bleak while those at the bottom fought the Legion of Pyronus.
  • Pay Evil unto Evil: Many of the players use this, to the point the PGs are almost the good guys compared to the AGs.
  • Plot Device: Several. The Black Monolith, the Disc of Mojang, the First Block, the Ancestral Artifacts, the FEZ, and the Hexahedron. All could be considered Mac Guffins, but they all have fairly important relevance to the story, even reappearing in later acts.
  • Plot Tunnel: The players went through one during One Hour.
  • Post Final Boss: The Artemissile, Project Binary's missile-bound incarnation on the Moon.
  • Power Floats: Every time a Comb Rave is used, the user floats in the air before unleashing the attack.
  • Powers That Be: The Narrative and the Conflict.
  • Prestigious Player Title: The players are referred to as Descendants. They are directly related to the Ancestors that fought in the Psi-Godmodding War, so they inherit some of their powers. As a result, they can actually stand up to the Godmodder.
  • Propaganda Machine: Project Binary is a very literal example of this, using subliminal yet powerful messages to bring the entire world under his control and unite them with the single purpose of destroying anything related to Minecraft.
  • The Purge: When Project Binary took over the U.S. government, he ordered all of the Descendants and Build himself to be located and killed. This took them almost a year to follow up on.
  • Race Against the Clock: Several bosses had special attacks that would activate a few turns into the fight and would, if not killed before then, wipe the field. Paradox Dimentio and the Incarnate took this up to eleven by making the field wipe in question destroy the universe.
  • Reality-Breaking Paradox: Dimentio almost destroyed the multiverse with one in the first ever multiple-session event.
  • Red Herring: Shattered Bill seemed to be one of the most likely candidates to be the Employer, but it turned out that the Employer was its own entity.
  • Red Is Heroic: All Anti-Godmodders have a red [AG] tag next to their names.
  • Reptiles Are Abhorrent: The_Serpent, the most prolific Pro-Godmodder player, started this trend. Then, Project Binary continued it. This eventually culminated in the three most important Agents of the Conflict in the game being serpents - Project Binary (though he's only technically an Agent), the Employer, and Binary Prime.
  • Rescued from the Underworld: Build and Split were both sent to Limbo when they died during the Shatter, and they each escaped separately.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: Ikea, the king of Tabletopia, was summoned as a boss.
  • Robotic Psychopath: Project Binary.
  • Rule 63: PitTheAngel, as evidenced on the 5,000th-post attack, has had some issues with genderbending in the past. Later on in the game, genderbending weapons started being produced that - you guessed it - changed the gender of whoever got hit by it. When this happened to the Godmodder, he became the Girlmodder, and any attack directed at the Godmodder that called him the Godmodder would fail. These shenanigans ended when the Godmodder stated that everything in Minecraft canonically has no gender unless stated otherwise by its creators.
  • Sacred Scripture: The Book of Notch.
  • Saved for the Sequel: The plotlines of the Homestuck Kids, Flumpty Bumpty, and Bill Cipher were left unresolved even after Act 5. The Homestuck Kids' has finished as of Destroy the Godmodder: MSPA Edition, and Bill Cipher's will be finished in Terraria Edition. Flumpty Bumpty, however, remains a mystery. In addition, many players' plotlines have elements made to lead into any future games.
  • The Scottish Trope: The Red Dragon must never be referred to by its true name, Brine. The same goes for his servant, Herobrine.
  • Screwball Serum: Waluigi Thyme. A bottle of a secret spice that Psycho Waluigi dropped upon death. It only had four uses, and each time it was used, it would completely alter the Narrative based on whoever ate it. When TwinBuilder did, he was knocked out and the forces of Tabletopia invaded the server. When Clippy did, he became Waluigi Clippy and gave Project Binary his own hard-light avatar for use in Minecraft. When it was actually used on some steaks, those steaks were flung into the Void and eaten by the final boss of Nimbleguy's Side Quest. When Flumpty Bumpty ate it, he became immensely powerful and was one of the few beings to ever escape Limbo.
  • Screw Destiny: The reaction of multiple players upon finding out that TwinBuilder had to die to save the timeline.
    • Not that it worked...
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: The Red Dragon. It was sealed away by the Few who created Minecraft in its place. The prison where it came from turned into the Nether. That was at the start of time. Eons later, who should end up freeing the Red Dragon but the Godmodder himself?
  • See You in Hell: Invoked by the Godmodder right before he summoned Calamity, a powerful boss, during Act 2. It's worth noting that he was literally a psychopath at this time. He was talking to TT2000, the player who accidentally incited the Godmodder's rage through an April Fool's prank Gone Horribly Right.
PSYCHOPATH GODMODDER: This one's for you, "TT."
PSYCHOPATH GODMODDER: Say hello to me in Hell.
  • Sequence Breaking: Attempted during Scratch's Manor. It didn't work.
  • Set a Mook to Kill a Mook: On occasion, entities can be controlled to attack entities on the same faction, such as using powerful mind control through BillCipher's top hat.
  • Shamu Fu: Leonstar0's weapon of choice is the Holy Mackerel.
  • Shattered World: Happened to the green moon of Alternia in Act 2 and to Earth in the End of Act 4. Earth got better, but the green moon didn't.
  • Shapeshifter Weapon: The Godmodder's Godarm. His left arm was destroyed at the end of the first game, so he built a new one that can turn into a wide variety of forms. Alpha, the Godmodder's other personality, also has one in the form of a crystalline arm that can turn into any weapon.
  • Shoot Everything That Moves: The Hostile faction. This is the best description of them, as any Hostile entity will attack something else every round, anything.
  • Side Quest: Several.
    • The Monolithium Sidequest, in which the players had to explore an abandoned temple to find the Black Monolith.
    • Shadow Complex Crisis, where Metal Sonic attempted to attack TwinBuilder and ninjatwist's Constructs helped him.
    • Escape from Antichamber, an insanely long sidequest where Flare Flames had to navigate and escape the world of Antichamber. He finally did so and got the Fez and the coveted Black Gun.
    • The Scratch's Manor Sidequest, which was the biggest sidequest of the game. The players had to ascend the floors of the manor of the Felt, with Doc Scratch as Game Master after TwinBuilder's prophesied death. It marked the start of the End of Act 2.
    • Erelye's Sidequest, also known as Wrath of the Lobster God. Focused around restoring a rather small portion of Erelye's mental health, among other things. It was the first major event of Act 3.
    • The Nether Sidequest, where The_Serpent led the players on an expedition throughout the hellish Nether.
    • The "Nomblequest"note , which focused on the recovery of Eglarbroad Vandelsnatch, a character of Nimbleguy's.
    • Talist's Sidequest, which focused on the exploration of Wilson's dreams.
  • Silence Is Golden: There are some segments in cutscenes with little to no words and just several drawings one after the other. The most notable examples occur in the End of Act 4 cutscene.
  • So What Do We Do Now?: When the Godmodder was abducted by King Ikea, everyone just sort of stood there. There was even a picnic.
  • Spacetime Eater: There's an entire race of them called Universe Eaters.
  • Split Personality: A major concept of the game. They form under intense trauma, and are made to hate each other, representing opposing aspects of the original being's life.
  • Stable Time Loop: What happened on Zero Hour. The Godmodder from the first thread was summoned to the second thread by the current Godmodder. "Godmodder Prime" had been summoned from the end of the Glitch in the first game. He would teleport back to the end of the first game after taking three damage. And in the first game, it is shown that once the Glitch ended, the Godmodder had taken three damage, implied to be the damage from the second game. Confusing, huh?
  • Start of Darkness: Revealed through flashbacks: the Godmodder wasn't always evil. Although he was greedy in his heart and wanted to be at the top, he was never truly a villain until he played Minecraft and learned of the power that came with being a godmodder.
  • Stat Death: Occasionally, entities can mess with a stat known as Integrity, which is an indicator of how stable an entity's coding is. When it drops to zero, they're purged from the game. Even reaching low levels is serious trouble.
  • Stock Femur Bone: The Ancestral Bone is one.
  • Story Breadcrumbs: Players can always find bits and pieces of story if they know where to look.
  • Supernatural Is Purple: The_Serpent spoke in an orchid text color and became clearly associated with the color orchid pretty early on into the game. Because of this, Project Binary ended up becoming heavily associated with the color orchid as well. Later on, the Employer and Binary Prime would also fall under this.
  • Surprisingly Easy Mini-Quest: The Shadow Complex and Thunder's Cave sidequests that were started to protect TwinBuilder when he got summoned as an entity. Each time, significant amounts of power were channeled into protecting him, both times, attacks aimed at him dried up until the side-quests were forgotten, the handful of PG entities that got dragged in getting busted extremely quickly.
    • Those weren't made with them being sidequests in mind though.
  • Swirly Energy Thingy: At one point, a camera spat one out that led to a giant golden TIE-Fighter that had to be fought as a boss.
  • Swiss Army Appendage: The Godmodder's robotic left arm, known as the Godarm.
  • Talkative Loon: Godmodder Soul. Since he's gone insane, he really only speaks in non-sequiturs - though he is capable of carrying a decent conversation if he really wants to.
  • Technopath: Technically, everyone in the game is controlling the technological landscape of Minecraft.
  • The Six Trials: The premise of Act 4. However, there are actually seven Trials, the seventh activating after the Godmodder's death.
  • That Man Is Dead: The Godmodder, especially in his Psychopathic state, refers to his life before Minecraft as another time completely, and talks about how Richard (his real name) is a dead man, and he's only the Godmodder now. These identity troubles would persist throughout the game until the Godmodder finally came to terms about with who he used to be.
  • Theme Music Power-Up: Invoked by several different entities.
  • Theory of Narrative Causality: What the Narrative does. It makes events happen because that's how it wants them to go.
  • The Tower: The Conclave and the Godmodder's Tower. Project Binary represents the Tower tarot card.
  • The Unfought: The Employer. Although it fought alongside Project Binary during Trial 7, the players itself couldn't attack it, and it was just... there.
  • Time-Limit Boss: One Winged Angel Kirby, Lord English, Paradox Dimentio and The Incarnate all had charged attacks that would completely wipe the field if they were allowed to be charged.
  • Title Drop: The "Operator" suffix of the game's name relates to a few characters with said title, all of which are important - one is a sentient virus who was a supporting antagonist of Act 2, another was literally Slenderman, the third was the First Guardian of Minecraft and the being who empowers and chooses all Game Masters, and the fourth was TwinBuilder's Ancestor. The first three all ended up reuniting to help end the Godmodder in Act 5.
    • The phrase "destroy the Godmodder" is said a few times across the game as well.
  • Toilet Humour: Discouraged, when one player attempted a spate of toilet-humour themed attacks (flinging poop, a... bowel-based hospital), TwinBuilder redacted the attacks entirely.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Anything that sticks around after its introduction invokes this trope. Usually recurring characters taken from other series gain a better powerset as the story progresses.
  • Traveling at the Speed of Plot: TwinBuilder, who went on a voyage across the Void to Minecraft for the game's entire fourth act, only to finally show up right when the players needed it most.
  • Tripod Terror: One of these was created by a player, OpelSpeedster, where it became the only Anti-Godmodder boss to be summoned in the entire game. And it was pretty powerful, too, lasting for quite a long time before its destruction.
  • Tradesnark™: The Curse of Repetitiveness™ seems to have been trademarked by the Godmodder.
  • Two of Your Earth Minutes: Sometimes invoked by Doc Scratch, which makes sense, considering he comes from another universe.
  • Victory Fakeout: Right after the Godmodder had been killed, he came back as Godmodder Soul, a textbook case of Came Back Wrong and Body Horror.
  • Video Game Time: Subverted. The game takes place corresponding to real-time. In-game events correspond with the dates they occur in real life.
  • Video Games and Fate: A major theme in DTG2 is how the plot is predestined by ultimate forces of good and evil called the Narrative and the Conflict.
  • Walking Disaster Area: Wherever the players go, they tend to bring calamity with them. A prime example is when the players escaped Limbo and accidentally let every godmodder there loose, plus Flumpty Bumpty.
  • Wardrobe Flaw of Characterization: The Godmodder's tattered red cape signifies his earlier defeat in the previous game.
  • Washington D.C. Invasion: Project Binary did this, but that's because he lives there. He had to control D.C. to get to the rest of the world.
  • Weather-Control Machine: Fseftr alchemized a few of them late into the game.
  • Weekend Inventor: The second game has an alchemy system that falls under this, especially considering that the game supposedly takes place in a vanilla Minecraft server.
  • Wham Episode:
    • The start of Act 2. It looked like gameplay was going to just be normal, but out of nowhere, a massive fleet of Crockercorp Ships appeared and Doc Scratch secured a deal with the Godmodder right away, starting the Homestuck Invasion. Thus began a six-month-long battle that would radically change the game forever.
    • The Shatter. Build and Split ended up splitting into different bodies and had a final battle to see who would win and claim the ultimate power. Build won, but that didn't stop Doc Scratch from coming out of nowhere and shooting him with the Deudly Magnum, taking control of the game.
    • Trial 4. Scratch having managed to come Back from the Dead was not a surprise, as it had already been revealed in an earlier storypost. What was not expected was him ambushing the Godmodder after he already collected all the other Psi-Artifacts, used the Disc of Mojang to steal them from him as well as take the FEZ, ascend, and actually killing off the Descendants.
    • Trial 6. The Godmodder was genuinely able to start the apocalypse, free the Red Dragon from its eons-old prison, and construct the final boss of the game, an absolutely gargantuan mecha - all in the span of around ten minutes. The resulting battle was one of the most satisfying and climactic ones of the game.
    • Trial 7. After the Godmodder died and fell into the Void, the augmentations given to him by the Red Dragon caused him to return as Godmodder Soul, an omnicidal, psychopathic, and downright insane being that thrives off of non-sequiturs. And immediately after that, we found out who the Employer really was, a force of equal power to the Narrative was revealed, and Project Binary was finally able to capture the players of the game and imprison them. That didn't stop them from breaking out and defeating him, but it made for an even better final battle.
    • The End of Act 4, full stop. It brought almost every event in the game together, making a storypost so large it had to take 6 posts to publish. So many important events happened in this mega-event that they have to be listed in bullet points below:
      • Alpha engaged in a Shatter with Omega after the Descendants freed him.
      • The Shadow of the Incarnate, previously thought to merely be a part of a prophetic series of dreams, is revealed as an Agent of the Conflict and has been sitting in the Godmodder's mind the whole time. It then intervenes with the Godmodder's Shatter and causes it to occur in his real-life self as well.
      • The Shatter screws with Project Binary's code, causing him to become overtaken as well and allowing Build to kill him with Chemotherapy.
      • The Agents of the Conflict are revealed to be seeking to reunite the Conflict again and overtake the Narrative.
      • The Homestuck Kids escape their Scratched and doomed session after making a deal with Bill Cipher.
      • The Secret of the Void seals away the Red Dragon within Limbo and is killed by the Shadow.
      • And most unexpected, all the universes of the Trifecta are destroyed in glorious fashion. Universe A is formed into the Red Sun, Universe B is completely destroyed by Project Artemis, and U3 is sucked into a supermassive black hole spawned from Project Binary's remains.
      • Oh, and Flumpty Bumpty turned out to be the guy who escaped from Limbo without godmodding.
    • The conclusion to the game, Act 5. After three universes were almost entirely destroyed, The Operators appear in the nick of time to rescue the players from oblivion. Alpha wins the Godmodder's Shatter, and Omega wins Richard's. The now Alpha-controlled Godmodder escapes from Richard's control and is revealed to be the Godmodder that started the TV Tropes game. Mojang FINALLY finishes Minecraft 2.0, and erases Omega's Godmodder from Minecraft permanently. However, their patch can't save Earth and Minecraft: it can only save one of them due to Project Binary's influence. With a heavy heart, Mojang saves Earth, removing Minecraft as a universe for good. Finally, The Operator finds Richard's house address and blows his house up, nearly killing him.
  • Wham Line:
    • Right when Build and Split initiated the Shatter: SHATTER.
    • And immediately afterwards, right after the supposed END OF ACT 2: PSYCHE. Doc Scratch proceeded to kill Build and take over the game.
    • When Bill Cipher was blinded and started speaking suspiciously like the Employer: 1 CANN0T SEE!
    • Universe A/B/C has been destroyed. Having to see one universe be obliterated is enough, but three at the same time...
    • "THE SECRET OF THE VOID HAS BEEN EXECUTED." Just to make sure that no-one was in doubt that one of the most powerful forces for good in the world of DTG died.
    • At the VERY end of the game, Or had he? Looks like Richard might not be as dead as we thought...
  • Who Needs Their Whole Body?: Godmodder Soul is missing his lower body and legs, but is still able to fight at the same level that he did when he had his whole body. Hell, he might even be more powerful.
  • With Friends Like These...: Taken pretty close to the far extreme, with the players that are supposed to be on the same team (usually the AGs who are guilty of this) spectacularly and devastatingly undermining each other's plans. In the end the AGs only win because they have considerably more players than the other two factions combined.
  • World-Healing Wave: In Act 5, Team Mojang completely restored the universe of Earth with one of these.
  • World Tree: At the origin of every Minecraft world (co-ordinates 0, 0), this can be found. Aptly named Yggdrasil, it houses the First Block created in the world, and if someone with a pure heart interacts with it, a world-changing event can occur.
    • GodCraft's was destroyed by the Scratch, and was a contributing factor to the ultimate destruction of the universe.
  • World-Wrecking Wave: Amperz4nd destroyed one-sixth of GodCraft in one attack, and The_Serpent destroyed half of it. When the Incarnate was summoned and Trial 6 raged on, the attacks and entities being flung around were so powerful that the entire world was sterilized to bedrock. If the Eclipse had actually hit, it would have resulted in this for sure. And barring Minecraft, Earth got hit by one of these in the form of Project Artemis - the Moon crashed into the Earth.
  • Your Days Are Numbered: When Doc Scratch appeared during the Homestuck Invasion, one of the things he repeated was that in order for the timeline to stay on track, TwinBuilder had to die.

    DTG0 

  • Apocalypse How: A Class X on Earth, after UserZero detonates the Plunger Detonator.
    • A Class Z is threatening to happen if too much damage is incurred to the fabric of space-time via Paradoxes.
  • Arc Words: "It's all just a joke" and "Ad infinitum", both of which are repeated by UserZero at varying points.
    • These are actually popping up in the form of Arc Hashtags repeated by the GM on posts that aren't worthy of an actual response, with such manifestations as #heisunworthy, #constantsandvariables, #nosleepforvengeance, et cetera. The rest are redacted, with ones apparently being unlocked with each Gatekeeper boss killed.
  • Ax-Crazy: UserZero. Oh, so much.
  • Blood Knight: UserZero again. Played With, in that she doesn't seem too fond of this particular battle and has seriously asked the Descendants to stop at one point (granted, with a vague threat backing her up).
  • Boss Subtitles: Twitchy, the Hivemind Incarnate; and Chara, the Angel of Genocide.
    • Charles Barkley didn't have one, but is retroactively the Big Man after a Homestuck Shout-Out.
  • Call Forward: Because this is a playable prequel and everyone knows what the ultimate outcome of the next games will be or so it was initially believed, this tends to happen a lot.
  • Cognizant Limbs: Like DTG2, many bosses, with the Colegmerate and Twitchy being the more literal examples of this trope.
  • The Dreaded: The Black is this (mostly Out Of Universe). Noteworthy in that this is despite his powers being unexplained beyond having the ability to soulkill through some undefined method and not even being canon yet. The threat of his canonization and subsequent summoning is the stated result of a roll of 1 on a Paradox Roll, and is the primary reason why Paradoxes are not intentionally exploited. It doens't help that he's one of the two Mirthful Messiash according ot Dark Carnival lore:
  • Embarrassing Nickname: The Godmodder is often called "tuba boy" by UserZero, referencing his fear of the instrument.
  • Gate Guardian: The Gatekeeper Bosses. They protect UserZero's barriers to Yggdrasil and are some of the toughest bosses in the game. The ones thus far known are Charles Barkley, Twitchy and Chara.
  • Geo Effects: Because the battle is constantly moving either towards or away from Yggdrasil, the terrain changes semi-often. Each terrain change brings different effects to the battlefield.
  • "Groundhog Day" Loop: As it turns out, 0 is not a Prequel but instead this, with All of DTG from before 1 to an indefinite point past Terraria serving as the time repeated. Only UserZero has Ripple-Effect Proof Memory for the most part, though others have been alerted.
  • The Last Dance: Sans sees his summoning as this. He put up a hell of a show.
  • Omnicidal Maniac: Flowey was definitely this, and The Pact was dedicated to turning him into Omega Flowey. Thankfully, UserZero didn't let him last a full turn before killing him, but he still did incredible damage for his few actions.
  • Rage Against the Heavens: The Scribe's motivation. UserZero has predicted it won't work out well for him.
  • Reality-Breaking Paradox: In Temporal, Spatial and Metaphysical varieties! Also what many of the AZ players are trying to avoid in assisting Richard, as they come from the future of DTG2 or some derivative where he was/is/will be the Omega+ Godmodder.
  • Ret Gone: Inverted. A roll of 1 on a Paradox roll will canonize and summon The Black.
  • Screw Destiny: What the GS Players are trying to achieve by killing both UserZero and Richard. It's also User Zero's grand plan and what she'd have to do to win the war.
  • Shout-Out: The usual mass referencing in entities aside, Undertale is particularly prominent in this installment, with two bosses and one godmodder hailing from there and UserZero personally interfering with events there as well. Barkley Gaiden was also involved in the form of the protagonists being a Gatekeeper Boss.
  • The End of the World as We Know It: If enough Paradoxes occur or if The Black is unleashed the entirety of Fiction and Nonfiction will end.
  • Tele-Frag: Attempted a few times. Noteworthy in that doing this incorrectly creates Paradoxes and is the easiest way to do so.
  • Turns Red: Invoked by several entities, such as Ultra Greed, mirroring his attack patterns in TheBindingOfIsaac.
  • Unstoppable Rage: UserZero is in a nigh-perpetual state of it, to the point where it works like Psychic Static and can give a Poke in the Third Eye. She looks much calmer than she is for the most part.
    • It's so bad that she had to actually create an entirely new entity to siphon off some of the rage.
  • Victor Gains Loser's Powers: What happens if a godmodder kills a godmodder of an immediately higher rank, and what Richard hopes to accomplish over the course of the game, culminating in his ascension to Omega+.

    TV Tropes 
  • Achilles' Heel: A handful of PG entities (especially big spaceships) have remarkably unguarded interiors.
  • Action Bomb: Invoked, but not actually present with the Terror Creeper.
  • Attack Animal: There was a shoulder dragon summoned by tabbune early on in the game.
  • Attack Pattern Alpha: Wyld's army of sentient armors went out in force, using formation Omega Standard.
  • Attention Whore: Surprisingly, not the Godmodder. It's Dimentio who doesn't take kindly to being ignored.
  • Boarding Party: Is there is a large ship with more health than can reasonably be removed by regular entities, this'll happen.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Several of the larger sci-fi entities have ended up being this. What makes it worse is that every last one got summoned in groups.
  • Chase Fight: When the godmodder left the battlefield to head to a meeting in the house of Villains, the players pursued him, so Metal Sonic, and then the terror blaze and ghast when Metal Sonic got glitched, fought the players en route.
  • Colony Drop: The Papal Mainframe lost power and crashed into the battlefield, creating a massive explosion.
  • Death Course: GLaDOS's temple in the House of Defense is set up like the Aperture Science testing chambers.
  • Everything's Even Worse with Sharks: A rogue party member was hiding under a giant pile of fish. The solution? Summon flying sharks? Not the correct answer.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: One successful hit on the Godmodder came from a simple punch delivered by Nbs4.
  • Laser Blade: A handful, notably an actual use of an actual light saber.
  • Lone Wolf Boss: Dimentio for one, and various others, such as Tabbune and Magical Wrath.
  • Mini-Game: In lieu of the Game master's absence, the players did a mini game involving the other popular mini game, Bloons Tower Defense 5.
  • Pay Evil unto Evil: Many of the Anti-Godmodder players have elected to use decidedly evil methods against the Godmodder, such as Unforgivable Curses and assembling a fleet of The Doctor's enemies.
  • Propaganda Machine: The propaganda tower created by cathari was this to an extreme. How extreme? It could change people's nationalities.
  • Reality-Breaking Paradox: At one point, Dimentio created a paradox that wreaked havoc for a number of rounds. note  In-universe, Dimentio's antics almost ended the multiverse.
  • Shamu Fu: Invoked many times by pillowmantis.
  • Standard Sci-Fi Fleet: The Godmodder summons one during the Grox Invasion. It starts out with a carrier escorted by a pack of cruisers and destroyers, culminating in a mothership so large it has its own explorable section.
  • Suckiness Is Painful: Invoked by players at various points, usually involving music.
  • Surprisingly Easy Mini-Quest: Trashing the inside of the grox mothership took four rounds.
  • Take That: Overlaps with Suckiness Is Painful; every time someone tries attacking the Godmodder with music, it's the work of a singer who has a significant Hatedom.
  • Tank Goodness: The Mobile Armored Auto-Shot Thermal Rail Cannon of Undead Slaying or MAASTRC-US. It survives for several pages before being devoured by a paradox.
  • The Power of Rock: The AKB0048 and Dethklok have been summoned as a buff and attack, respectively.
  • Time-Limit Boss: Dimentio had an ability capable of destroying the multiverse.
  • Tragic Monster: The Battle against Tabbune. In which Tabbune turns into a PG after resting himself.

    Be the Godmodders 
  • Action Bomb: There was a bum rush of self-destructing trucks later in the game.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: But not the bad guys you may have been expecting.
  • Fight Magnet: The players. The instant they think they're fine, something attacks them.
    • Justified because the players are usually on enemy land.
  • Villain Protagonist: The players are a bunch of godmodders terrorizing people.

    DTGS: Acolyte 
  • Affably Evil: crucifixionTerminated responded rather gently to a player's message.
  • Art Evolution: ninjatwist321's art has improved much over his role of GM.
  • Automatic Crossbows: The Argynths have developed a lever-action crossbow with a magazine in it.
  • Casting a Shadow: The Acolyte uses a Dark Magic Meter to perform his attacks.
  • Defector from Decadence: As a recent update explains, Red Shirts are Mooks who have lost faith in the Acolyte, don a red color pattern and join the Anti-Acolyte players.
  • Disc One Nuke: Abuse of the resident Item Crafting system has led to the creation of some very potent items, the most powerful of which is the High-Powered Shielder's Laser Gunblade.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": The Acolyte's Mooks are referred to as Mooks in-game and in-dialogue.
  • Evil Sorcerer: The Acolyte, while not a particularly strong Godmodder, has a repertoire of evil spells to be on an even keel with the other villains in the series.
  • GMPC: Ninjatwist_. He carries good combat gear on him, but the ninjatwist321 (the game master) has said that he doesn't want him to be obnoxious.
    ninjatwist321: Hey, I can eat my cake too, right? Don't worry, I'll try not to make this GMPC terrible.
  • Have a Nice Death: After an entity is killed, a description of the killing blow or its aftermath often follows.
  • Hold the Line: Some of the more recent missions involve this.
  • Living Weapon: Mooks, a whole race of these, get a wide variety of weapons and can get summoned to wherever the Acolyte needs them.
  • Lizard Folk: The Argynths are a race of water-dwelling crocodile people with horns.
  • Medium Awareness: Persecles has been shown to have knowledge of how he's depicted in the art and how his subplot is being read through, and crucifixionTerminated has some persective of how the story follows the players.
  • Rising Empire: Argynth clans often fight over swathes of territory on the ocean floor, and Persecles was given princeship of a small city because he claimed a lot of territory. Both suggest that Argynth empires are quite young.
    Persecles: In days long past, the Argynth people fought over large swathes of territory in the vast ocean, forming their own kingdoms which rose and fell. This continues to this day as a stage of conquest is about, with advancing armies both claiming new lands and clashing with each other. I hail from the Cerulean Empire, an empire that is young and hungry for territory.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: The Acolyte has a habit of bailing out after a Boss Battle gets too hot to handle.
  • Sir Swears-a-Lot: apocalypseGastula, despite his short screentime, has said two curses that needed to be bleeped out, in comparison to the GM's one, and that curse was in the title of something referenced.
  • Tanks for Nothing: The boss of the second episode was a tank. It didn't last very long. This is downplayed, however, as it and the backup wave of Mooks managed to punch a hole through Anti-Acolyte lines.
  • Voice with an Internet Connection: crucifixionTerminated, one of the Acolyte's buddies.
    • More recently, apocalypseGastula, another acquaintance/ally of the Acolyte.
  • Water Is Air: Persecles and his lieutenant can talk normally and even have a shooting contest underwater.
  • Zerg Rush: One challenge involves fending off a swarm of Mooks summoned from a portal. Unusually, it worked.
    DTG:Chaos 
  • Adventure Game: Throughout Zone 3 and Zone 4, players were instructed to guide a SOUL around another zone with little to no combat, which was instead replaced with puzzle solving and exploring akin to a point and click adventure game. Sections of the game where players must explore new areas may also fit this trope, but combat generally is more common than puzzle solving, which often leads to battles.
  • AI Isa Crapshoot: (c)haos, the primary villain of the game, is this trope. Ware-his techncial future self-also counts after having ingested Thyme. The (c)haos Logs and coder's logs prove that Xavier had a bad issue with trying to prevent this.
  • Ax-Crazy: (c)haos is subtle about it but it is there.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Our villains include the titular (c)haos, Zetta, and the Chaos Butterfly. Ware qualifies as a Greater Scope Villain.
  • Boarding Party: During Zone 3, the Shattered Skies, the players were able to teleport directly into enemy ships, and kill the crew inside. Wiping out the crew would not only weaken the ship's abilities to move and attack, but also instantly destroy it if the whole crew is killed.
  • Cannibalism Superpower: Part of what makes Zetta so dangerous; if anything dies to him he eats their corpse and gains a variant on their Special if they are a player, or a souped up ability of theirs, in the case of summons.
  • Chainsaw Good: The Aetherian Jadesaw.
  • Chain Lightning: Averted, but prior to it's nerf, the Aetherian Jadesaw had a function that allowed it to attack multiple times in a row if done right, invoking this trope.
  • Critical Hit: Players have a chance to score a mini-crit for x1.5 damage with each attack. The odds of this happening go up as their STR increases or if they equip certain items. After scoring a mini-crit, there's a one in five chance to score an actual critical hit, for x2 damage. At 12 STR, every naturally-rolled mini-crit becomes an actual critical hit.
  • Critical Hit Class: While Classes don't really exist, The Operative's Katana is the perfect weapon for it, requiring odd stat distribution in exchange for blostering the Critical Hit rate. In general, however, if you want high crit, you will have high STR.
  • Critical Status Buff: The equippable trinket, the "Finale Amulet", grants +2 damage and +2 AC to players at or below 50% HP.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: If an attack would be reduced to 0 damage via a player's AC, they'll deal at least 1 damage. Taken to the extreme with the Shade of Pane, wherein his Nigh Invulnerable status prevented any other way of killing him.
  • The Dragon: Zetta serves this role to (c)haos, technically. They're actually equal partners.
  • Dual Boss: Ware entities in general follow this pattern. In particular, Ware 4 and 5, who were actually fought simultaniously and boosted each other...and were cheesed when one player adjusted their positions, messing up their location-focussed abilities.
  • Elite Mooks: Usually representing higher end or "special" enemies , elites range from being above-average mooks to miniboss-level encounters. Most W entities are also elites.
  • Evil Puppeteer: Zigzagged with Marron. Her puppet, Ette, is a kind-hearted individual who'd prefer to avoid any conflicts, and actually joins up with the players. Marron was also fairly kindhearted prior to being told she was nothing more than a production of (c)haos's mindscape. Then she went absolutely crazy.
  • Extra Turn: A few items and skills can grant these. Turn() is the best example.
  • Fragile Speedster: Anyone who heavily invests into AGI will certainly play the Speedster part straight, but can avert it depending on HP investment.
  • Interface Screw: The True Silence status effect prevented the targeted player from saying much more than their actions in their post, disabling their ability to communicate. Inverted by Toast, who had instead screwed with the interface to suddenly respawn mid-fight, with **interesting** results.
  • The Juggernaut: Zetta, and how. Combining massive HP, a Healing Factor and near-immunity to all elements has made him practically invulnerable in every fight he's appeared in, and this is not getting into his Cannibalism Superpower...
  • Limit Break: Specials. There is an entire stat dedicated to buffing them (SPC) but any given stat could also do so.
  • Loose Canon: Ever since the beginning. No one has ever officially declared this game canon yet. It has officially been given the "probably canon" status, however.
  • Mini-Mecha: Chaos Sabers, one of (c)haos's high-end mooks, are anti-infantry mecha's controlled via ai.
  • Mooks: Mostly memories and glitch monsters, with variations for each different family. The temmie family in particular is mostly mooks.
  • Money Spider: After an encounter, you can get money and equipment, even if you just slaughtered a bunch of spiders.
  • Morality Chain: Almost literally. (c)haos has 4 Morality Cores (previously 7); they keep (c)haos from turning into a (bigger) Omnicidal Maniac than he already is. It is heavily implied that the Mindscape will suffer a Dream Apocalypse if they're destroyed. The Four Morality Cores are Glitch Girl/Gladius, That One Friendly Spider, Chairitomb, and...Flumpty OneNightAtFlumptys Bumpty.
  • Mysterious Waif: Glitch Girl/Gladius Girl/Chloe Elem.
  • Non-Indicative Name: Destroy the Godmodder: Chaos. Chaos isn't a godmodder, and the only godmodder thus far introduced used a proxy.
  • Oddball in the Series: While the rest of the DTG series are semi-typical play-by-post games, DTG: Chaos plays like a grid-based RPG, with concrete progression, items, and stats.
  • Point Build System: The basic structure of Chaos. You get a set amount of skillpoints and fill them into HP, MP, STR, INT, AGI, and SPC.
  • Schmuck Bait: The "Barknemesis" upgrade to the Dogsong spell. This caused the first official game over in the game. Subverted by Barkgenesis, its weaker cousin.
  • Standard Status Effects: There's the typical bunch, like Poisoned, Burned, and Bleeding. Then there's the more exotic bunch, like Milk, Glitched, and True Silence.
  • Spiders Are Scary: Averted. While Spiders are an enemy type, That One Friendly Spider lives up to its name and is even a Morality Core.
  • Splash Damage: Oh so many weapons (and even more spells) use this as a mechanic. Generally, the two main examples are cone attacks, where the attacks come out in a cone, hitting every target in a direction-targeted area, and generic splash, wherein the attack hits all spaces around a certain square.
  • Temporal Paradox: On occassion, players have invoked temporal paradoxes through their actions, with a vareity of effects. In one instance, a player had used paradoxes to duplicate a burrito, gaining one skillpoint in the process.
  • Too Awesome to Use: The Infernal Torment, more specifically its ammo, the Origin Blaze Rods. Being capable of creating 3-Splash over-20 damage explosions, they naturally never found a situation to be used in at all ...Until it was revealed they could be used to heavily boost Gladius and otherwise be used in Crafting. Even then they're heavily rationed. The Annoying Dog also suffered from this, so everyone opted to sell it for money.
  • Troll: (c)haos. This was especially shown on April Fools' Day, when he murdered two players who thought they would be joining his side.
  • The Virus: Dogs. Anything relating to dogs has a chance to turn you into a dog on death, and the use of Barknemesis caused a Non-Standard Game Over.
  • Tsundere: Marron. She's of the Tsun variety.
  • Unexpected Shmup Level: At the end of Zone 6, the players were treated to a bullet-hell bossfight with the Chaos Butterfly, created in Game Maker.
  • Wave Motion Gun: The Beam Spell, especially on a high-INT character. The Wide option unlocked at 5 INT takes this Up to Eleven
  • Wreathed in Flames: Gladius / Chloe, after her infusion with the Origin Blaze Rods. They're controllable, and linked to her emotional state.


Godmodder HP: 100/100.

Alternative Title(s): Defeat The Godmodder

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Roleplay/DestroyTheGodmodder?from=Roleplay.DefeatTheGodmodder