Reality Ensues / Video Games

  • Ace Combat:
    • The agility and tenacity of the Game Breaker QAAMs may be what happens when you put a real-world nigh-unbeatable heater, a la the Python 4/5, the AA-11/R-73, or the AIM-9X, against planes that usually encounter missiles sloppy enough to be outflown without needing countermeasures.
    • Likewise, when Captain Bartlett in Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War draws a missile away from Nagase, and then again when Nagase is targeted by a hidden AA position a few missions later, in both cases the missile stays right on them despite them pulling maneuvers that would have shaken off a standard missile in gameplay - must have been QAAMs.
    • Similarly in the Xbox 360 game Over G Fighters. Did you know that afterburner in the presence of heat-seeking missiles is a bad thing? On the other hand, unlike Ace Combat, the player (and also enemies) can sometimes break missile locks by turning enough to reduce their plane's radar cross-section.
  • AI War: Fleet Command: What happens when you make the AI with far more resources than you ever can have and no compunction against holding back sit up and decide you're a threat? You get flattened, that's what.
  • In Alice: Madness Returns, any time Alice falls out of Wonderland into reality tends to strike a nerve, as Alice is a helpless teenager wandering the streets of London and the game really drives that home; the second time you return, for example, Alice gets slapped unconscious by a pimp for trying to come to her friend's aid. Everyone is also aware Alice isn't entirely right in the head, a fact the Big Bad tries to use to pull a Karma Houdini; who would believe that a highly respected child pyschologist raped and killed someone's sister with only the word of a known mental patient? Alice also admits he's right, then takes it into her own hands.
  • Alone in the Dark: If you light up a molotov cocktail (accidentally or otherwise) in the 2008 reboot, it simply cannotbe stowed back in your inventory. Either you throw it away or it will explode right in Edward's hands after a few seconds.
  • Near the end of Ape Escape 2, Specter decides to fight the player in a gigantic robot suit. While trying to stomp the player, he has the suit balance on one foot, concentrating all its weight on one small area...and the robot promptly falls through the floor.
  • Assassin's Creed:
    • In all games, pickpocket victims who realise you're the culprit will try to punch you out. Problem is, the culprit is a battle-hardened warrior who goes through trained soldiers like a lawnmower. It doesn't end well for the civilian.
    • The first two assassinations from the second game are performed by someone who is A - completely untrained in the act of murder, and B - thirsty for revenge. Ezio doesn't kill his first victim with a single stab, he violently and repeatedly shanks him. And when killing Vieri, he angrily curses the dying victim before Mario angrily rebukes him.
      • Speaking of Vieri di'Pazzi, he's the only character who outright mocks the post-assassination conversations.
    • In every game from 2 onward when guns are introduced, the game treats them as an Infinity+1 Sword. Only the most durable of targets can survive even a single hit, and even as the arms race goes on and armor gets better to compensate for them it still remains one of the player character's most deadly and reliable weapons.
    • In Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood, Ezio gets shot at the start of the game and when he comes to he's seriously injured. At first he can't even run or climb properly because of the injury combined with his age, and even after getting cured by a doctor he doesn't get his full climbing ability back until purchasing a climbing harness. Even being the Living Legend that Ezio is, even he can't resist the passage of time with the mediocre at best and outright harmful at worst Renaissance-era medical techniques.
    • In Assassin's Creed III while fighting the Big Bad, Connor ends up in a burning shipyard and has rubble fall on him. Upon waking up, he finds that he's been impaled through the side by a wooden beam. The following segment has him limping at an arduous crawl to chase after the equally wounded villain (who he shot when he tried to gloat, defying another trope), who he confronts in a bar half-dead, shares a last drink with, and kills. He goes back to normal in the post-game, but from a story standpoint it's implied that even five years later in the epilogue, the injury crippled him for life and ended his career as an Assassin.
    • In Assassins Creed IV, Blackbeard, who is a One-Man Army deserving of his legend, dies when a British soldier stabs him in the back with a bayonet. That his death was so depressingly... quiet, leaves Edward in a slump for some time after.
    • In Assassin's Creed: Syndicate, Jacob successfully assassinates the corrupt Templars who are the medical, transportational, and economic leaders of Britain in rapid succession. Since these assassination targets had a complete monopoly on their given industries, this leads to medical supply shortages, transportation rackets, and an economic depression that Evie has to fix in order for London to not collapse on itself within a year.
  • Azure Striker Gunvolt, particularly its sequel, nicely deconstructs the ideas behind Revenge. Particularly where it concerns our two main characters, Gunvolt and Copen.
    • For Gunvolt, it turns out that killing someone out of vengeance, no matter how justified you may feel, won't make you feel better. Even after killing Asimov and avenging Joule, Gunvolt still can't find the will to forgive himself and is shown to be plagued by nightmares about it. However, he does learn from this and in his True Ending Boss Fight with Copen, attempts to teach this to him.
    Gunvolt: I've been in your position! Vengeance won't help! It's not noble! It's giving into the worst of yourself.
    • For Copen, dedicating your life solely for revenge is unhealthy, won't make you feel better, and can have detrimental and lasting negative effects on your life. During his fight with Desna, a known Fortune Teller, she warns him that if he continues on his path, he'll lose everything he holds dear. And during the final battle with Gunvolt in his True Ending, Gunvolt also attempts to dissuade him from his path, having been in his position himself. And sure enough, he learns this the hard way when he finds out that his beloved sister Mytyl, who he had been fighting so hard to save, is actually an Adept, the very thing he swore to destroy. This forces him to fake his death and cut ties with her and his family, so she won't be involved in his battles again and won't know the monster he's become.
  • Baldur's Gate:
    • In the first game, you finally get the chance to confront the supposed Big Bad, Rieltar, as he holds a meeting with his subordinates. Attacking and killing him results in being thrown in jail, because the only tangible evidence to his guilt are a few torn letters that may or may not even have been written by him.
    • Likewise, when you confront the real Big Bad, a Villain with Good Publicity, if you don't have any evidence against him, he points this out, calls you criminals out to start a war and frame him, and successfully turns every noble in the city against you. Come on, you're a Hero with Bad Publicity with a heavy bounty on your head, he's a respected soldier and duke of the city, who did you think they'd believe?
    • Walking around during a storm wearing plate armor? Get struck by lightning. What did you think was going to happen?
    • In the second game, Ellesime decides to exile her former lover, who has become a crazed megalomaniac Mad Scientist with a god complex, instead of killing him, hoping this act of mercy will cause him to seek redemption. However, when she does so, she also strips him of his soul, but not his magical powers. Long story short, he gets even stronger and comes back seeking revenge. Love Makes You Stupid at its finest.
  • The Bard's Tale:
    • The "good" ending ends with the Bard saving the world from an ancient and terrifying evil. However, as nobody aside from a small cult who don't really like him know this, he's soon back to hustling inns for free booze and sex.
    • The various "Chosen Ones" encountered during the game are victims of this. Bright, bold lads setting out to meet their destiny, they're quickly murdered by everything from wolves to trow to zombies. One sheriff took to locking them up for their own safety.
  • Batman: Arkham Series:
    • Batman can take out dozens of prisoners with delicate uses of flips, jumps, punches, and Batarangs. But try to take on a group of gun-wielding goons head on, and Batman will quickly be turned into Bat-paste. Especially when he fights mooks with high-powered sniper rifles.
    • It turns out that the formula that turns men into giant monsters developed in a prison by a bunch of lunatics and a corrupt doctor with nothing even vaguely resembling proper testing had unforeseen long-term side effects. You don't even actually defeat the first boss so much as he keels over from a heart attack two minutes into the fight.
    • The series' approach to super-villains. Yes, they are dangerous but the problem lies in finding them or dealing with their gimmicks. Once that's all done, things go how you'd expect when Batman, an Olympic-level athlete/expert combatant in full body armor and specialized weapons, fights people who aren't all this.
    • Batman can Offhand Backhand individual mooks easily. But when faced with multiple mooks, he has to pull his punches so he can be sure he won't kill them. As his combos get longer, he starts leaping across entire rooms to strike foes, since they're hesitating - and giving him breathing room to think - after seeing him smash their pals into the pavement.
    • While for the most part the games have no true time limits, there is one point in Arkham Asylum where Zsasz takes a hostage, knowing full well that he has no hope in a fight against Batman. However, Zsasz is also a compulsive murderer with a penchant for killing women and his hostage is someone who has made his life hell for a long time. Players who linger for a while or let themselves be seen by him results in him killing the hostage instantly, which is Lampshaded by Joker. It's particularly jarring for experienced players, who usually assume that there is no time limit and want to listen to all of Zsasz's dialogue.
      • Early on in Arkham City, Batman is held at gunpoint by four mooks inside the church. If the player decides to wait around, the mooks will eventually shoot Batman dead.
    • When you call him in City, he says he has three hostages. Batman eventually needles the psychopathic murderer about his life choices during the course of tracking his location. When you get to him, he has two hostages and there's a corpse elsewhere. And he said Batman would regret pissing him off.
    • For most of City, there are an abundance of henchmen. After many of the inmates are killed in Protocol 10, there are a lot less heads to knock around.
    • Batman can pull metal grates off of walls. So can Joker, Nightwing, Robin, and Deathstroke since all of them are some degree of Badass Normal. Catwoman - who is more about agility and speed - is not able to do this, to the point she asks Batman just how he does it at all.
    • The ending of Arkham City shows that Joker Immunity isn't always a sure thing. Attacking someone that is holding the only cure to the poison that is killing you is not a good idea.
    • Also from Arkham City, Batman uses lethal force on both Solomon Grundy and Clayface. Considering they're both nearly impervious to physical damage (Grundy is literally an unkillable zombie, while Clayface is made of living mud) it's not surprising.
    • Harley Quinn's Revenge implies that, although not formally charged, the general consensus, at least among the remaining inmates of Arkham City, is that Batman killed the Joker. Murder by Inaction is still murder.
    • Origins has quite a bit:
      • Promotional materials for Origins mention "unconfirmed rumors" that Batman has personalized aircraft. When Batman discovers Bane's computer console and realizes Bane knows his Secret Identity, one of the monitors has a radar display. Bane figured it out by merely tracking the Batwing, and putting two and two together.
      • Letting Joker ramble on too long while he has Batman at gunpoint will result in Joker killing Batman with a single bullet at point blank range.
      • During the credits, Jack Ryder is having a live conversation with Quincy Sharp and various political experts over the game's events, debating over how effective the cops are, the state of the country if such criminals can actually exist, and the failure of Gotham's prison system. The only one to escape criticism is Batman.
    • In Arkham Knight, we see that this is what the Knightfall Protocol is all about at the very end: when the Scarecrow unmasks Batman live on television, that's it, Bruce knows it's over. Batman relies on superstition and fear to be effective, and having his identity revealed completely destroys that - not to mention as well that a successful vigilante like Batman, especially one prone to Arch Enemies due to his aversion to directly killing criminals, in a city as riddled with crime as Gotham, will have made a lot of enemies who absolutely will not hesitate to use any advantage they can get against him. He rounds up the last of the villains, races off back to Wayne Manor, and blows it all to kingdom come. It's uncertain if Bruce and Alfred died at the very end or not, but it's done to make sure no one goes after the other masked heroes connected to him.
  • BioShock:
    • With the sole exception of Fontaine in the first game, all the antagonists in the games are dispatched with one blow or in a cutscene. Sure, most of them are intelligent and charismatic people with a vast array of people and resources under their control, but they're still ordinary people that are no match for the One-Man Army main character.
    • BioShock has this trope as instrumental to the fall of Rapture. The city was built as a place with no laws or morals, so was filled with sociopaths and sadists only concerned with their own power. Despite the "everyone can make it" propaganda they still needed people to scrub the toilets and such, so there was a huge underclass disillusioned with the Rapture dream, furious at Ryan and his ilk. All this came to a head with the discovery of ADAM, the miracle substance that powers the game's plasmids (spells), and the city promptly tore itself apart fighting over this highly powerful and valuable resource, with those same sociopaths taking their chance to get more powerful.
      • Fontaine, being Genre Savvy, directly benefited from this trope: when nobody feels like doing menial work and yet some people are forced into it, who is the likeliest customer for goods that make menial tasks go away? Suddenly he went from a small-fry thief to one of the most influential people in Rapture because he saw something nobody else did and grabbed it with both hands.
    • So what happens when you build a massive city at the bottom of the sea? A hell of a lot of engineering problems, that's what. It's frequently mentioned that large parts of Rapture are leaking, especially since nobody's sane enough to do the upkeep. By the sequel, parts of it have just plain collapsed.
    • The penultimate level of BioShock 2 reveals that Eleanor has been seeing through Delta's eyes the whole time, which has dire consequences for the ending if you've been harvesting the Little Sisters. After all, what else would happen when your little girl wants to be just like daddy?
    • BioShock Infinite repeats the same scenario in Columbia that happened in Rapture. The city is a miracle of technology, presenting itself as a divine haven far from the sins of the world below... with the same racism, imperialism, antisemitism and xenophobia as 1912 America. So not only does it get used as essentially a floating WMD (more than once in the Bad Future), but despite in theory being only open to WASPs they still need labourers, hence the oppressed underclass of "negroes" and "potato eaters", and the inevitable civil war that boils over because of their treatment.
      • Songbird is big, he's powerful, he lurks as a threat in the background of most of the game, he's intimately tied to the backstory of the deuteragonist, and everyone with even a passing knowledge of Video Game Tropes expects him to be fought in a big Climax Boss or even Final Boss battle. But Booker, for all his tricks, is still just a single human, and Songbird is still a giant flying Lightning Bruiser that's Immune to Bullets, so every time they cross paths Booker barely escapes with his life, incapable of doing the slightest shred of damage to Songbird. He's only defeated by a temporary Heel–Face Turn and then by dropping him at the bottom of the ocean, since Songbird was not designed to withstand water pressure. Additionally, any timeline where Booker tried to fight Songbird directly quickly ended with Booker being torn to pieces.
      • The US government were not aware that Columbia had weapons capabilities. When the city got involved in the Boxer Rebellion, Congress was not happy with Comstock, and ordered him to return to the US. And when Comstock refused to return, the government declared that the entire city of Columbia had gone rogue, and cut all official ties with it. Even in the early 20th century, such a massive weapon would be a major liability to any sane government.
    • After Elizabeth killed Daisy Fitzroy, the Vox Populi don't simply pack up and surrender. Not only did the character's death fail to stop the Vox Populi's actions, but they are now even a bigger threat since Daisy is no longer controlling them.
  • The Blackwell Series: In the course of her investigations Rosa repeatedly breaks into homes and businesses, harasses multiple people well past the point where they want anything to do with her, and is in close proximity to a lot of dead bodies. By the time of Epiphany she's banned from a hospital and two campuses, has multiple restraining orders put out against her, and being near to yet another freshly dead body gets her arrested, with the officer perplexed that she hasn't been arrested before, and the only reason she escapes being sent to prison is because of her Friend on the Force (a deleted scene shows that Police Commissioner Alex Silva has been protecting Rosa from police scrutiny for her own ends, but it isn't clear in the final product if that's still the case).
  • BlazBlue has several examples, as part of its overall Darker and Edgier tone.
    • Ragna destroying countless NOL divisions has made him a wanted criminal with a bounty worth trillions.
    • Following the Dark War, humanity had to relocate to the mountains due to the seithr concentration being too lethal for them. The only way they're able to build settlements is through weather control devices, and when one of them no longer functions, as shown with Akitsu-Kō, the place becomes bitterly cold.
    • Hibiki Kohaku being raised as nothing more than to fight has rendered him very psychologically unstable, to the point that he was willing to kill Kagura to become the ultimate killing machine.
    • And then you have that if the main characters would have tried to reach out each other, realize the threat and work together instead of fighting constantly and minding their own businesses, much of the villains' goals would have been averted. This is underscored in one of Makoto's story modes, where she ends up in an alternate timeline; while she does some damage by tipping people off to things they otherwise couldn't have known, she deals the deathblow to the villain's plans for the cycle with one well-timed pep talk.
  • In Breath of Fire III, Ryu, Teepo, and Rei attempt to pull a Robin Hood on the nearby McNeil family, who is oppressing the villagers with outrageous taxes. The heroes bravely break into the McNeil mansion, defeat the McNeilsnote , and rob the place, returning the ill-gotten gain to the villagers. Unfortunately, the villagers turn on the heroes, afraid of reprisals from the McNeil and the criminal syndicate he belongs to, forcing the heroes to flee.
  • Chrono Trigger: In the first area, Millenial Fair, you can pick up someone's lunch to replenish your HP. Just a classic bit of video game kleptomania which will have no further consequences? Not so, as later you're put on trial and the person in question testifies against you, lamenting that you've eaten their lunch right off the table.
  • In Command & Conquer: Generals, General Alexander is often considered the hardest General to fight by far, despite having assets not all that much greater than any other General. The reason for this is simple: Whereas every other General likes to take their time mocking your feeble attempts in the early game and gradually ramping up the level of force they use against you, Alexander comes at you full-force, immediately, when you are still at your weakest. This also works in reverse: Alexander may be incredibly dangerous on her own turf, but playing as her in any meaningful aggressive way is really hard because she specializes in defence based on existing infrastructure; take that away and she's easily crushed.
  • The Final Boss of The Darkness, Uncle Paulie, is built up as the catalyst for all of the misery in Jackie's life, from the death of Jackie's girlfriend to getting blown out of a window by a bomb. Jackie finally makes it to Paulie, and Paulie goes down just as easy as the Mooks Jackie had been slaughtering to reach him. After all, Paulie's a normal human being, and a rather overweight one, at that. Jackie has the personification of all evil living inside of him. If anything, it's more of a Curbstomp Battle Cutscene Boss than a final boss fight.
  • Darkest Dungeon is a deconstruction of living in the darker counterpart of a D&D style World Of Adventure; the explorers you hire to delve the dungeons are just normal people who happen to have strengths, they have fears and weaknesses, and fighting against abominations against nature like the undead and other monsters will cause them to develop new quirks that can either help or harm. The dangerous journeys themselves stress the heroes out, and if you don't help them recover after missions, you run the risk of having them break and letting the worst of their personality come out, which in a game where teamwork and strategy is the number one, can be fatal for all involved.
  • Dark Souls: Part of the reason the franchise (and its fellows) are Nintendo Hard is that they just don't pull punches. Think you'll run into a group of low-level Mooks without a plan and win? HAHAHA–No you won't. Think that the various giant armor sets will make you invincible? You'll be a Mighty Glacier unless you have the right stats and you'll always have SOME weaknesses. Want to challenge that dragon guarding that bridge? You'll need real superhuman stats, clever placement and/or the proper equipment/spells active just to survive its Fire-Breathing Weapon. It's only thanks to (sucky) Complete Immortality do you have any chance, as your many and varied demises will prove; you're a living hunk of jerky in a Death World and only artificially powering yourself up with countless souls can you even hope to survive the myriad horrors that await you...
  • Dawn of War:
    • There are several occasions when important characters get swiftly killed with little fanfare. Bale is easily killed by Angelos after the former's backup deserts him. In Winter Assault Sturnn is killed by Gorgutz in seconds by beating him into bloody pulp, because Gorgutz is a hulking green monstrosity and Sturnn is a normal human with fancy equipment. Retribution has Merrick go up against a Tyranid Hive Tyrant, and get killed even faster.
    • Dawn of War II and its first expansion Chaos Rising have the player achieving glorious victory over the enemies that threaten to engulf the subsector and destroy the Chapter, both ending in a triumphant speech by Gabriel Angelos about how heroic you are. The second expansion, Retribution, is set ten years later and shows that "defeated" is not the same as "gone"; remnants of all the different enemy factions are still making a mess of the subsector, all sides keep funneling in reinforcements to the point that all the planets are engulfed in constant fighting, and the situation has deteriorated so much the Imperial higher ups consider Exterminatus to be the best option.
  • Dead End Road: You can wish to be the grand ruler of the entire world. Too bad it doesn't mean you have the skills to maintain control over it.
  • Dead Rising 2:
    • People are strangely resistant to gunfire. Chuck, while not an invincible steel wall, can take a .50 caliber rifle bullet to the face and negate the effects with a bottle of whiskey. Psychopaths are even more bullet resistant, with some taking it to ridiculous degrees (Antoine, a celebrity chef with presumably no combat experience can take 200 rounds of LMG fire by blocking it with a frying pan). So when Sullivan pulls out his handgun and puts a hole in Rebecca Chang's forehead and kills her, it can be a bit stunning to a player to witness.
    • Chuck can recover health by consuming food or drink, but if he does this with alcohol several times in a row or with spoiled food, he'll get sick and throw up.
    • Marion Mallon is the true antagonist for all the games, a wealthy and corrupt pharmaceutical CEO whose employees have started at least 3 separate zombie outbreaks, and who has the cure, but refuses to release it to keep selling their treatment (the third game reveals that last one is a blatant lie). Despite this, she's still an old woman in a wheelchair, so Dead Rising 3 antagonist General Hemlock, a big, burly man kills her easily by just dumping her off a roof.
  • Deus Ex, a minor patron saint of deconstruction, lets reality happen quite a few times. At one point, The Dragon decides that it's much, much smarter to just order his troops to kill you, rather than actually having to go through the complicated business of waiting for the Explosive Leash to kick in. (Notably, he also activates said leash - which for newer models like you is a relatively slow and seemingly natural death rather than instant death by explosion.) At another point, you confront an enemy Obstructive Bureaucrat who realizes that trying to shoot the Super Soldier might not be such a good idea, so he waits until you turn around and leave, whereupon he shoots you in the back. At the "Realistic" difficulty level, there's a quite high chance that this will kill the player character in one shot. You can silently pick off the guards before he decides to sic them on you, resulting in a "You win this round, Denton."
  • Deus Ex: Human Revolution:
    • If you're cocky enough to act like Rambo or the Terminator, even basic mooks will make you regret it fast.
    • If you Take Your Time in getting to the Sarif factory, the terrorists occupying it will have killed off all the hostages, even though it's not explicitly a Timed Mission.
    • Similarly, a major named ally will die if you take too long to kill her attackers, even though there's no explicit timer here either.
    • In The Missing Link DLC, a Belltower commander makes mention that a number of their people that Jensen "peacefully" knocked unconscious by bashing them in the face with a metal fist are in comas. If you do a non-lethal and/or stealth run through the mission then the commander will point out that even though Jensen hasn't killed anyone, all that means is that the character is extremely resourceful and more dangerous than someone just shooting people, and that the soldiers under his command should be even more vigilant in the event Jensen decides to start taking lethal options.
    • When the head of a powerful mega corporation is approached by an intruder demanding information she doesn't just cave in, she talks until she can trip the alarm and run for the panic room.
    • Being invisible or transparent in real life would allow light to travel through you. Because of this Jensen can pass through laser wires while invisible without setting them off.
    • A random civilian tries to blackmail you, a cybernetically-augmented killing machine, by threatening to call the Belltower soldiers looking for you on the street while standing still in front of you? If you tell him how easy it would be for you to break his bones he will change his mind pretty quick. There's nothing keeping you from killing or knocking him out on the spot either.
    • An in-game example happens if you get jump enhancements (especially the ground-pound attack) before you get the Icarus Landing System will result in you being hurt for jumping too high; they only improve the force in which you lift off, not reducing it when you come back down. In extreme cases, this can actually kill a player who is unaware of this fact.
  • Dishonored:
    • Corvo may have a vast array of powers, but when it comes down to it, he's still physically an ordinary human - getting in a scrap with guards and getting shot, or falling a long distance without breaking it via blink will do substantial if not fatal damage to you. The same applies to every normal human too. Any fight you get in tends to be dangerous because of the numbers, but a single target will die quickly regardless of if you cut him down with your sword or just shoot him dead. This includes all of the major targets; most are no better than mooks when you fight, and even the tougher ones you can simply kill at range before they even know you're there.
    • The last assassination targets don't even try to fight Corvo; by this stage, whichever way you have played, they know all too well they can't win.
    • Killing every enemy you come across will not secure any kind of victory. The dead guards will just be replaced with less than savory new recruits, your enemies will increase security with more elaborate death machines sooner than they would in a pacifist run, and your own allies will get increasingly disillusioned and/or paranoid with you. And much like Eleanor Lamb above, Emily Kaldwin learns by watching you, so if you decide that violence is the way to go, so will she. She's also the rightful successor to the throne, so having a young Empress learn that violence is the way to go will not end well.
      • And what happens when there are corpses everywhere? Rats, that's what happens. Filthy rats, carrying the plague.
    • Corvo and Jessamine were secretly lovers, except it wasn't a secret to anyone, given everything from their obvious closeness to the daughter they had out of wedlock. The reason no one ever said anything about it (unless you let a dying Pendleton talk in High Chaos) is because of the sheer Refuge in Audacity of it all.
    • When trying to find information on Delilah, Daud has the option of getting it from Abigail Ames, either by helping her, or torturing it out of her. Should the player choose to help her, she'll sell a favor in a later level. Should the player torture her instead, she'll still sell the favor, except it will actually be an explosive trap. Abigail's not the forgiving type.
  • Divekick features The Baz, a fighter who's special moves have him shock his opponent with electricity. Final Boss S-Kill flat out tells him that this is blatantly illegal, and his ending has him barred from any future Divekick tournaments because his electric powers ended up putting multiple divekickers in comas. This is implied to be a big reason why he's been kicked out of countless other fighting tournaments.
    The game is called "Divekick", not "Electrocute People".
  • Dragon Age II:
    • The Amell Family Shield is virtually worthless (At least, by the time you find it). Unlike the other examples, it doesn't appear in any quest, and seems to just be an excuse to let the player actually equip one of the numerous Amell family crests they will have seen hanging up all over the city.
    • An example that crosses over with Jerkass Genie and Be Careful What You Wish For: Xenon, the owner of the Black Emporium, once wished for eternal life. He got his wish, but it didn't do anything to stop his body aging because he never took that into account, and by the time you meet him, he's an ancient, immobile and unhinged corpse.
  • Dragon Age: Origins:
    • Magic allows you to shoot lightning at people, raise the dead to work for you, or call down giant firestorms on your enemies... but is also feared and hated by most of the world, and doing magic outside of the strictly regulated circles is outright illegal.
    • The Dwarf Noble origin notes that the old Aeducan family shield they find is crude by their current standards and only of symbolic value.
    • Alistair is beyond pissed if the player tries to forge a grand redemption arc for Teryn Loghain by inducting him into the Wardens. Alistair is unable to forgive or forget Loghain's atrocities and storms off, leaving the party permanently.
    • In return for their aid during the blight the Dalish elves are given lands to settle. However tensions quickly arise with an independent elven state forming in the middle of Human lands. Things deteriorate faster if the Warden choose to ally with the werewolves, who are given those lands instead.
    • The epilogue is one big dose, showing the real consequences of choices and side quests.
    • Helping the Dwarven priest build a church in Orzammar for example leads to its destruction and his death, since the atheistic dwarves are outraged by him spreading foreign beliefs. These events draw the attention of the Chantry which is said to be considering a holy war against the city following this.
  • Dragon Age: Inquisition:
    • The Ferelden Nobility were sympathetic towards the Mages with Arl Eamon even allowing the mages shelter in his estate of Redcliffe. But if you side with the mages, once you complete their recruitment quest, the monarch of Ferelden, which can be either Alastair or Anora, will personally arrive to tell the mages to leave the country because they abused the hospitality of the monarch and Arl Eamon, supported a Tevinter cult responsible for the murder of the Divine (Thedas' equivalent to the Pope) and expelled the Arl from his own estate.
      • There is no change based upon the above choice despite one crucial detail if Alastair is present in that scene - Fiona is his mother. She doesn't reveal the fact as he is unlikely to believe her, due to the lie she asked Maric to tell him.
    • Impersonating a Grey Warden is a very serious offense. You can lose Blackwall permanently as a result.
      • Two characters both show admiration for the Grey Wardens and believe them to be heroes who protect the weak and defenseless. It goes badly for both characters because their primary duty is to stop blights, not play heroes. Blackwall's is a major hint that he's lying right from the start as any Warden who invokes the right of conscription would use it not to train humble fishermen but to forcibly recruit new wardens from people who would be executed or killed otherwise. The other, while she is willing to seek out the Wardens to join, will end up dead unless the Inquisitor recruits her for themselves due to the Wardens being highly suspicious of them.
      • Related to the above, should the player use Blackwall's Grey Warden connections to obtain resources for the Inquisition, the people who provided the resources will demand reparations once Blackwall's duplicity is revealed, seeing as you pretty much committed fraud against them.
      • Another Grey Warden point; the Wardens are revealed to have effectively been tricked into summoning a demon army for the Big Bad. Is it any small wonder that some of your companions will call for you to exile them as a result of this?
    • Take a Third Option is not always the best decision. Out of the three possible candidates for Divine, Vivienne is arguably the worst.
    • Vivienne is initially presented as a possible romantic choice because of the option to flirt with her, but as revealed when you first meet her, she's already in a loving relationship with her lover Bastien. He dies from an illness, but you cannot attempt Comforting the Widow.
    • Being hailed as The Chosen One doesn't automatically mean you're The Hero - the first thing the Herald has to deal with is the Chantry declaring them and all those who support them as heretics.
      • People will be skeptical of your claim to being the Herald of Andraste if you're not a human. This is due to official teaching of the Chantry that humans, while still shunned by the Maker, were not nearly as shunned by other races, as well as being a mostly-human organization.
    • The Qunari Inquisitor, if they try to discuss what it means to be Qunari with The Iron Bull, will be coldly shot down - Bull states that the Inquisitor isn't a follower of the Qun so has no right to call themself a Qunari.
      • The Iron Bull, if declared Tal Vashoth, goes into a Heroic B.S.O.D. due to the teachings of the Qun saying that those who abandon the Qun are insane, which was the justification he used for killing deserters of the Qun. If he doesn't go insane then that means he killed a lot of innocent people.
      • Bull mentions that the Qunari are not fond of wearing shirts, given how much trouble it is to put one on when you have a large pair of horns growing out of your head.
    • One side quest has the Inquisitor collect pieces of an ancient sword and ask Dagna to reforge it, only for her to explain that you cannot remake a sword from its shards. She instead makes a new one using the collected pieces as inspiration.
    • The Revered Mothers of the Chantry are just old women - their most effective weapon is their unified voice and the Chant of Light. It's no wonder that Lord Seeker Lucius was able to completely shatter their illusion of power by assaulting one of them.
    • Trying to re-appropriate the culture of another civilization is highly offensive to those from the original culture, especially if you get it wrong. This is why Solas hates what the Dalish have become, especially when their Facial Markings, which they think is to honor the elvish gods, happen to be the equivalent of a Slave Brand.
    • According to Varric, Hawke had to go on the run after his game due to the events of the last chapter making him a scapegoat. Also the general corruption of the city alone was enough to have numerous calls for the city to be the target of an Exalted March even before the incident with the Qunari and an apostate committing a terrorist bombing of the local Chantry.note 
    • Related to the above, when Cassandra learns that Varric had lied to her about not knowing Hawke's whereabouts, she angrily confronts him over it. Varric asks her what she was expecting, given that she kidnapped him and interrogated him about the location of one of his closest friends.
    • As Dorian's backstory proves, even in a world where homophobia is practically nonexistent, being homosexual can be problematic if you come from a culture that emphasises strengthening and continuing your lineage.
    • A key plot point of the Trespasser DLC is that Ferelden and Orlais are unhappy about having an independent military organization like the Inquisition on their borders, with Ferelden calling the Inquisition out on some of their more controversial actions and wanting them disbanded, and Orlais wanting more control over the organization.
  • Dwarf Fortress:
    • The huge material properties overhaul resulted in a few of these, as a simple damage multiplier for each metal was replaced with actual stats for tensile strength, shear and compressive yields and so forth. Adamantine turned out to be incredibly strong and lightweight, making for excellent edged weapons, but when players forged warhammers and maces from it the results were disappointing.
    • You planning on subverting that river into your base for a fresh water supply? Water carries motion still, so without proper planning you might just flood your base. See that awesome battle on a mountaintop, with people fighting and dodging? Well, one combatant just dodged off a cliff, and is now plummeting to his death. Despite the odd, and often fun, physics of the game, sometimes it will start behaving realistically enough to realize that you've just screwed up.
    • The mechanics behind that most insidious of threats, the Catsplosion note  seems pretty ridiculous. But think about it for a second; how would you feel if someone killed your pet, even for "the greater good"?
    • The update that fixed the Bonsai Forest problem, instead giving out huge trees that yielded multiple logs, also showed one of the problems with the aversion of this trope; namely, that a giant tree's collapse can and will injure anyone it falls on, including the woodcutter if he's standing in the wrong spot. Don't give woodcutters pets if you don't want a tragedy.
  • Many of the cutscenes in Dynasty Warriors 7 invoke this with Annoying Arrows—In one scene, Pang Tong succumbs to a wound that resulted from taking an arrow intended for Liu Bei, Zhou Yu dies in a similar fashion, and another cutscene has the famous Eye Scream scene with Xiahou Dun (at least as much as can be shown in a T-rated game). To say nothing of Wu.
  • A cutscene in The Evil Within that starts with Julie pointing her gun at someone and Joseph trying to talk her down ends with an earthquake that causes Julie to accidently shoot Joseph, showing just how dangerous a gun can be.
  • In Fable II
  • Fallout 3: Colonel Autumn learns just what happens when you stand, pretty much unarmored, less than ten feet in front of someone in a fire fight. It'd be hard to find a player who didn't just turn on VATs and shoot him in the head.
    • The core game also ends with the player activating Project Purity and fulfilling their father's dream of supplying clean water to the entire Capital Wasteland. Then Broken Steel came along, acting as a Playable Epilogue, and if the player visits Project Purity they'll find that said dream isn't quite as glamorous as James made it out to be, as somebody has to deal with all the bureaucracy and paperwork that comes with running a massive water distribution network, and they're not happy about it.
    • It goes even worse if you proceed to activating Project Impurity. Not only you are not immune to the modified FEV, the ghouls and mutants who relied on your water resources are dying because of you.
    • Roy Phillips is one of the biggest assholes in the series, plotting to slaughter the inhabitants of Tenpenny Tower so he and his band of ghouls can move in (which he justifies by them being racist assholes, even though just being around him for 5 minutes makes it clear that he's no better than they are,) and even working out a peaceful solution in which the ghouls can live in the tower without bloodshed will still lead to Roy killing the humans at the first provocation. Unfortunately, unlike every other evil character in the game, killing him will award you negative karma, because the popular radio DJ Three Dog is convinced that Roy is the real victim in this scenario, making him a Villain with Good Publicity. The only way to avoid bloodshed is to negotiate an agreement between the two sides, and then assassinate Roy without being caught - with his influence removed, the other ghouls will settle down in peace.
  • Fallout: New Vegas: The First Battle of Hoover Dam showed Caesar's Legion exactly what happens when you use human wave tactics against an army with semi-automatics and explosives. Granted, the Legion's human waves had proven effective in the past against tribals with similar close-combat weapons.
  • Far Cry 4: At the start of the game, Pagan Min asks you to wait for a bit as he takes care of some business. The game expects you to leave the table and start the plot. If you do wait for a bit (around fifteen minutes)... he comes back and resolves the business he invited you for, which actually leads to an alternate ending of the game.
  • Racing game Fatal Inertia has the Time Dilator power-up, that slows time around you while leaving your craft immune, adding up to a few seconds of enemies stuck the wrong side of Bullet Time while you surge ahead at normal speed. However, the way the powerup in-universe means outside observers see everything still moving at normal speed, and the device's user suddenly going at several times their previous velocity. One of these outside observers is physics. So much as glance off a solid obstacle and one suddenly finds out where the title comes from.
  • Final Fantasy X. What, you thought you'd be branded as a traitor, waltz into their most sacred place in the city, and just waltz out of there without getting captured?
  • The Final Battle in Final Fantasy XII. Once it's done, everyone gazes thoughtfully at the sky to contemplate the villain's death and the implications of victory (and, in Fran and Balthier's case, to do a fist-pound) Then a destroyed fighter crashes in front of them because the two airship fleets have naturally been focused on the enemy ships, not tiny people running around on a stationary object, and don't magically know that they can stop shooting. Cue the heroes' frantic scramble to announce a ceasefire before any more lives are lost.
  • Fire Emblem: Path or Radiance plays out like a typical High Fantasy story, with a group of mercenaries and a secret princess going on a world trip and gathering allies before defeating the bad guy and liberating their hometown. Direct sequel Radiant Dawn then shows all the ugly aftermath of this. Crimea's nobles don't like suddenly answering to a Queen whose existence was a secret until she led the liberation, and her soft-heartedness leads to unrest and insurrection. Daein's citizens had no interest in the Mad King's war, and launch a liberation campaign of their own to regain sovereignty from an abusive suzerain. Begnion's apostle made a deep cut into the senate's corruption and openly pledged to do much more, all this did is consolidate them against her and end up with her removed from power, the senators feeling free to commit all sorts of atrocities with their overwhelmingly powerful military. The Laguz nations find themselves needing to fight a war while having no cultural knowledge of the logistics and consequences of doing so, and the lingering Fantastic Racism throws more fuel onto the fire. The unrest and upheavals in ever corner of the continent result in a world war or would have, if not for a timely Diabolus ex Machina.
  • Five Nights at Freddy's:
  • Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon:
    • Weapons degrade and break when used, with no means of repairing them. The end result of this is that you can end up wielding a broken stick against the Final Boss. On the other hand, it's still entirely possible to win under these circumstances.
    • The robot character PF dies when her batteries run out (as does Crow), since there's no way to recharge or replace them, and nobody who knows how to do so.
  • In Get Dumped, Michi's boyfriend Arashi has decided to break up with her and she's desperate to win him back on their last date. Except that it turns out there's no magical formula to do so; sometimes someone just doesn't love you the way you love them, as painful as it may be. In addition, Arashi points out to Michi in the true ending that her obsession with spending as much time as possible with him and putting him on a pedestal has left her with no time to have a life of her own and unable to act normally around him, and that she's more in love with her idealized image of him than with the real him.
  • Ghost Trick
    • The country the game takes place in hasn't used the death penalty for several years, with the result that when the need to carry out an execution arises, they have to use a very old electric chair. Said chair short-circuits and blows up when the guards try to fire a test charge through it.
    • At one point, you have to try to help an innocent man escape from prison. It's later pointed out that regardless of whether or not the escapee's guilty of the crime they were convicted for, escaping from prison is still a crime; had Cabanela not stopped Jowd's escape, it would have caused Jowd problems even if he did manage to prove his innocence.
    • Making a hard hat hit a guy in the face with the force of a moving bullet leads to exactly what you think will happen. Also, if you trick an item in front of Yomiel, he will notice and cut his monologue short, resulting in another non-standard game over.
    • As Cabanela and several others point out, if you want to become the head of a special investigation unit - or get any major unelected civil post really - you're going to need a pretty spotless career record to have any chance of getting the position. This ties back into the above about catching Jowd when he tries to escape from prison - Cabanela doesn't believe Jowd is guilty of what he was imprisoned for in the first place, and his obsession with his spotless record is because becoming the head of that special investigation unit is the best way Cabanela can think of to get Jowd off the hook legally.
  • In Grand Theft Auto IV, the game's Final Bosses are hardly any tougher than any of the other random Mooks you've been killing. They have slightly more health thanks to body armor, but other than that, they're no tougher, and will likely go down quickly.
  • In Grand Theft Auto V, after spending five years being a meth addict, Johnny from The Lost And The Damned was killed easily by Trevor.
    • In a more humorous example of this trope, pressing the jump button next to a surface too tall to climb will lead to you smacking off it and landing flat on your ass.
    • The Merryweather Heist. As badass as the crew are, even they know they won't survive if they keep the nuclear device they stole, because just about every military force in America would try to snuff them. They make the wise move to put it back.
    • The premise of the "Legal Trouble" mission is that a lawyer has taken the only analogue copy of a film Michael has been co-producing, prompting him to go and chase her down to get it back. At the end of the mission, Michael's co-producer points out that - in the age of modern filmmaking - they've got several copies of the film saved digitally.
    • Similar to the GTA IV example above, the final antagonists pose no threat and are killed in rather offhanded ways without any real build-up for final confrontation.
    • Constantly jumping into and out of cars means that the main characters don't wear seatbelts. Which means that if you hit something at high speed, you're going out the windshield.
  • The first third or so of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, the missions set in Los Santos, has CJ following in his predecessors' footsteps by doing whatever he's told by whoever tells him without question. The rest of the game, from his exile from Santos up to at least returning to it after San Fierro and Las Venturas, is all about him learning his horribly violent and destructive actions have actual consequences. Help his aspiring rapper friend by breaking into the mansion of a professional rapper, killing his entire security detail, stealing his lyric book, and later brutally murdering the rapper's manager and girlfriend? Said rapper attempts to commit suicide. Kill everyone who knew about a Dirty Cop's dealing? When said cop goes to trial, he gets off scot free due to the lack of evidence, resulting in riots. The first half also has this come up much quicker, possibly as foreshadowing to the above - one mission has you set a Ballas stronghold on fire, then immediately have to brave those flames to rescue an innocent woman you accidentally trapped in the building.
  • As is Rockstar tradition, the Final Boss in Bully also falls under this. You are Jimmy Hopkins, a scrappy Combat Pragmatist who's been spending the entire game time fighting constantly, and as a result, getting stronger and learning more ways to beat people up. Your archenemy, Gary Smith, is a Smug Snake who's been hiding behind the scenes making the other kids do his bidding. When you finally get to fight him, he's just as easy to beat up as anybody else. In fact, Elite Mooks Damon and Bif are tougher to beat in a one on one.
  • Half-Life:
    • Half-Life laughs at the Easily Thwarted Alien Invasion trope: the scientists come up with a Clever Plan to shut down the Xenian's teleporters and prevent them from sending additional troops over. Long story short: the Clever Plan fails. It turns out that advanced alien civilizations are also smart enough to cover the weak points in their invasion strategies and come up with Clever Plans of their own. Who knew?
    • Gordon Freeman kills a chunk of an alien invasion and almost a whole battalion of soldiers, fights through a warzone, and goes to the aliens' homeworld and kills their leader, all by himself. Unlike nearly every video game before, stories of his exploits spread to make him a living legend Shrouded in Myth, and by Half-Life 2 La Résistance instantly rallies around him, the Vortigaunts practically worship him, and the new alien invaders target him on sight and relentlessly try to kill him, because they know exactly what's coming for them.
    • The back-story for Half-Life 2 showed what would really happen if an advanced alien empire actually decided to invade Earth. It resulted in a Curb-Stomp Battle that lasted only seven hours before humanity surrendered. The only reason humanity survived afterwards was because Dr. Breen convinced the Combine that they were worth more as soldiers & slaves than as corpses.
    • Half-Life 2 is all about fighting back against an oppressive regime, taking the fight to them, killing their figurehead and destroying their main stronghold. Episode One is all about how severely damaging a colossal alien structure powered by an exotic, dangerous substance has destructively explosive consequences. Episode Two is all about how losing one leader and one stronghold is a mere inconvenience to an interdimensional empire, and that a counterattack would be swift and terrible.
  • Halo:
    • In Halo: Reach, most of the deaths of Noble Team count as this. Jorge blows up a Covenant super-carrier, and Carter crashes a dropship into a Scarab. Both of these have little effect on the overall Covenant war machine; they still keep coming (Jorge's instance in particular is demonstrated immediately - within seconds of him destroying the first super-carrier, at least a dozen more jump into the system in sequence). Emile takes down one Elite, and is then quickly killed by one behind him. Kat is a genius Super Soldier in high-powered armor, but if her shields are down and she's not paying attention to her surroundings, she can be shot in the head and killed like anybody else. Noble 6 is finally overwhelmed by the endless Covenant forces, and makes a Last Stand taking as many Covenant with him/her as (s)he can. Jun is the only member of the team to survive the events of the game, because he was sent to escort Dr. Halsey off the planet right away.
    • The backstory takes the time to explain a lot of the realities behind creating super-soldiers out of pre-teens. Two standouts come from the Powered Armor they wear - what happens when an unmodified human is told to move his arm while wearing a half-ton suit of armor that moves in response to their thoughts? Their arm gets liquefied when the armor moves its arm from one spot to another in a flash, and then they promptly paste the rest of themselves convulsing in pain from that. Spartans can only wear the armor safely because of advanced materials grafted onto their bones to make them virtually unbreakable - but that also came with the risk that the prepubescent candidates for the program could have their bones essentially pulverize themselves once growth spurts started hitting them.
    • This also comes up in regards to cloning. The quickest and most common manner is creation of "flash clones", which are designed to age at a hundred times the rate of a natural-born human - the result being a human that lacks the muscle memory of their progenitor and, within a month or so of creation, will begin degenerating until they invariably die of some manner of neurological or physiological disease. Flash cloning is as such usually restricted to the creation of new organs for someone in need of a transplant, programmed to start aging at the normal rate once they've been transplanted. The short life for flash clones comes up twice: one, it allows ONI to draw suspicion away from themselves for the kidnapping of the children that became the SPARTAN-IIs - for all their parents knew, their children suddenly died of natural causes early in their lives. Two, it allows for the only confirmed case in the series of there being both a live person (Dr. Catherine Halsey) and a "smart" AI based on them (Cortana) - creation of such AIs requires the destruction of a human brain. Normally, the brains of corpses are used for this, but a flash clone will work just as well.
    • In the wake of the defeat and dissolution of the Covenant, the alien species that formed it almost immediately begin suffering civil strife in the post-war aftermath, and many of the constituent species are suddenly having to adjust to the removal of what was the center of their culture, politics, religion and military. Both the Sanghelli and the Jiralhanane are dealing with civil wars, with the Sanghelli in particular dealing with a faction that wants to re-establish the Covenant. The only species to thrive after the end of the war are the Kig-Yar, who as Hired Guns had no real investment in the Covenant, and thus were able to adjust quickly to its fall.
  • A lot of the fails in the Henry Stickmin Series happen because of the titular character being hit with this trope which the fail screen often lampshades if you do:
    • One example is when being chased by prison guards in Complex. If Henry chooses to shoot back at them, he ends up crashing into a tree, because he wasn't keeping his eyes on the road.
    • When Henry tries to liquefy himself to bust through the walls in Diamond, he ends up becoming just a plain liquid water as he has no solid objects to hold his body firm and intact.
    • Henry tries to use a Falcon Punch to get past a guard in Diamond only for him to realize that he is not a superhuman capable of doing such feats and makes a normal, weak punch, promptly getting the guard's attention.
    • Henry likewise tries to use a Falcon Kick on the guard in the records room, and is actually successful in replicating the attack - the only problem is he then incinerates himself with it.
    • In one of the stealth options to take the diamond, Henry just drops to the ground, only to end up both injuring himself and alarming the museum. The game even mocks you for thinking it will work.
    • In the final stealth option, Henry attempts to use the guard's rifle to shoot him down, only to end up missing all of his bullets. After all, First-Person Shooter games never address the problems of inexperience with firearms, the recoil during firing, or even the shooter's requirement to retain proper aim of the weapon, making it look easy in the eyes of FPS gamers.
    • Another option one has Henry attempting to jump far away from the guard, but because he's carrying such a large diamond, he only manages to jump a small distance before falling.
    • In the epic option, Henry tries to use a gun from a museum exhibit to shoot down the two guards, only for it to fail because it is just a museum exhibit, meaning it has no ammo.
    • Diamond, when choosing the invisibility pill to get into the museum, Henry falls off the roof since he can't see a thing now - eyesight requires light to be reflected off the cornea, which naturally won't happen if you are invisible and the light goes straight through you.
    • In Complex, choosing to steal a boat has Henry using it to escape The Wall. Only for the crew on-board to realize they're in the middle of an unscheduled departure.
    • One of the options to get down an elevator shaft in Complex is for Henry to bungee-jump all the way to the bottom. He ends up ripping his own body in half because he used an ordinary rope, instead of the specialized bungee rope that can help sustain his fall.
    • During the Hallway Showoff segment, if you choose Henry with a sniper rifle and Ellie with a crossbow, Henry will try to snipe the guards by spinning (or rather, 360 noscope them), only to end up shooting Ellie, because spinning ruins accuracy.
    • Two of the options Henry could use to enter the Airship is to use either the C4 or the acid. Both of them fail, the former because Henry didn't take cover and got knocked off the airship by the blast debris, and the latter because the wind blew the acid onto Henry's legs.
  • In Hotline Miami the player character starts suffering some horrific PTSD hallucinations as a result of all the ultraviolence he takes part in.
    • On a larger scale, any single hit from a melee weapon or gun (barring the use of a certain mask) will insta-kill the player by pasting his skull. Likewise the mooks of the game all go down from a single hit to the head.
  • Iji:
    • Going One Woman Army and slaughtering everyone in your path, then asking the enemy leaders to leave peacefully goes about as well as expected, and does serious psychological damage to Iji. Even in a Pacifist Run neither the Tasen or the Komato are going to just pack up and leave, because they're fighting for their own reasons. And despite Iji's efforts she's still one person in a war, most people dying no matter what she does.
    • The horrible deconstruction of the Alien Invasion trope. There's no sneaky infiltration or Old School Dogfights with alien vessels or a heroic Last Stand against swarms of invaders. The Tasen do just what you expect of a civilisation capable of interstellar travel meeting an unfamiliar, possibly hostile world; they park their fleet in orbit and fire on everything at once, devastating the entire surface of the planet. And because No Biochemical Barriers is very much not in effect, they didn't even need to preserve the biosphere. Iji isn't fighting to save the Earth from destruction, she's fighting to save what's they missed.
  • In Famous 2 shows that Cole's best friend Zeke wasn't Easily Forgiven for betraying Cole to have powers from the first game. Showing that he's making up everything he can to make it up. In fact, it took near the end of the game for Cole to fully forgive him and reconcile.
  • Inside: During the final stage of the game, you become part of and take control of a giant Body of Bodies. While said monster may be able to smash its way through walls and windows, that doesn't mean that doing so doesn't hurt it- every time you do so, expect to hear a lot of moans and groans of pain. In addition, given how big and heavy said monster is, it manages to crush humans it lands on and break floors by sheer accident.
  • Kerbal Space Program, as an extremely accurate simulation of space flight, has plenty. Parachutes are realistically portrayed. They aren't foolproof. Parachutes won't deploy properly if you are traveling too fast (i.e: still firing off a rocket), aren't oriented properly and for reasons that should be obvious, don't work in a zero-atmosphere environment like space. It's recommended you don't try building your favorite Sci-fi show's iconic spaceships at first. Disappointment, and plenty of explodiness, will probably ensue.
  • In Episode 3 of King's Quest (2015), Graham learns from a magic mirror that his future wife is locked away in a tower on the other side of the world. He grabs a ring and sets off. When he arrives and climbs to the top of the tower, he finds two princesses and immediately proposes to one of them. She immediately rejects him on the not entirely unreasonable grounds that she has absolutely no idea who he is. When he goes to propose to the other one, she cuts him off by pointing out that she was present when he proposed the first time, and also points out that she doesn't really like the idea of being Graham's Plan B. Courtly true love just leads Graham to an embarrassing Epic Fail.
  • Some games in the The Legend of Zelda have hidden caves that you can access by chopping up a fern or blowing up part of a cliff. These areas are inhabited by old men who will typically give you a reward for finding them, but sometimes they will take some of your money as compensation for their destroyed door.
  • The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time loves this trope:
    • Early on Link has to prove his worth for Mido, but once this is accomplished, this doesn't endear Link to Mido one bit. It's not until a whole seven years later that Mido has anything remotely nice to say about Link.
    • The Chosen Hero (you) are too young and sealed away in a safe spot for seven years...which leaves the rest of the land vulnerable to being taken over by the evil overlord, who isn't about to do so polite a thing as to sit around waiting for you to be ready for the evil confrontation. (Ganon does get lazy eventually, though, and this is what makes it possible for him to be beaten.)
    • Epona is not an Automaton Horse. She tires if you drive her too hard, balks at jumps where she didn't have enough of a running start to clear, and won't dramatically rear for you outside of cutscenes.
  • The Indie RPG LISA is a complete Deconstruction of the No Woman's Land and a Post-apocalyptic world ala Fist of the North Star. With all the women mysterously died out under the "Great White Flash", society crumbled instantly, and the entire male population is doomed to eventual extinction of the human race. This leads the men to act insane, amoral acts as a way to cope themselves before dying off. Electricity is out, so all the health restoring items are jerky and other foods that doesn't require refrigeration. Water is now filthy and alcohol is now a safer choice. When party members die in battle, they stay dead. Campfires are more common than the safer tents, but leaves players open for predators, thefts, and kidnappings. The main character Brad himself isn't exactly an ideal father. Finally, Buddy being the only living female left on the planet leaves her an open target for nearly the entire population. While others want to keep her around to give hope by repopulating the Earth. Some, want her for some nefarious plans. Even worse, Buddy simply wants to have her own life around but everyone, no matter how well-intentioned they were, controlled her leaving quite resentful to most of the males.
  • Frequently in ''The Long Dark':
    • Fighting a wolf in hand-to-hand combat, even with a weapon, will almost always result in extreme injury or even death. It's impossible to fight back against a bear, which will just pin you down and rip you to shreds as your character screams in pain and terror.
    • Eating uncooked meat will result in getting food poisoning, and drinking untreated water will result in getting dysentry.
    • The cold is a constant threat and even just a few minutes of exposure can cause great harm. If you catch hypothermia, getting better from it will require several hours of rest and keeping your temperature above a certain level.
  • Drive around like a maniac like you do in that other open-world crime game while playing Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven and the police will chase after you. They won't just blow your head off for a traffic violation, though. Pull over and pay for a ticket and you can go on your merry way. Don't, and they'll start chasing you to arrest you. Pull out a gun or act too violent on the road, and they will use lethal force, just like cops in real life.
    • In Mafia III, you play as a (half) black man in 1960s southern America. Not only do normal white people not trust you, but no other race does, either. You can't even walk in front of the police without raising some suspicion, and they are all too happy for an excuse to beat you up.
  • Mark of the Ninja: Rock Beats Laser is averted, in gameplay and as a plot point. Elites can't be stealth killed with your sword unless you stun them first, but die easy if you trick a fellow mook into shooting them for you. The only reason your ninja clan has survived into the modern era, despite not using firearms and body armour, is because they have a trump card in the form of a poisonous flower that acts as a Psycho Serum that gives you magic powers.
  • Mass Effect:
    • Wrex's family armor, instead of being equippable and possibly the best piece of armor for Wrex, is obsolete by the time he retrieves it three centuries after his father's death. It turns out that he only wants it for sentimental reasons. In a setting where new advances in weapons and armor are constantly being developed, old pieces of technology don't hold up very well.
    • At the beginning of the game, Ambassador Udina attempts to expose Saren's operations and crimes to the council. However the only evidence to his argument is Shepard's "vision" and possibly one unreliable eyewitness. This goes about as well as you'd expect. Saren even points out the audacity of such a claim, since even if Shepard was their top spec-ops soldier instead, no civilized court could accept a dream as hard evidence. One dialog option can even have Shepard point this out. With that said, when solid evidence is obtained of Saren's crimes, the Council immediately dismisses him from the Spectres.
  • Mass Effect 2
    • You can ignore the loyalty sidequests, but what do you think will happen when you take a team of people who aren't properly motivated to fight millennia-old Eldritch Abomination servants?
    • Or if you ignore the upgrades, what do you think will happen when a mere frigate with little in the way of weapons and armor is going to do against a race of aliens that cleaved your ship in half at the beginning of the game? Or, if you're feeling extra stupid, make dumb choices about the roles each of your teammates have during the final mission?
    • Ashley and Kaidan show what happens when a close ally is left in the dark when there are people who want them out of the picture. After two years of mourning, they are not even remotely happy when everything available to them says that Shepard faked their death to join a known terrorist group and they're not inclined to believe that Shepard was the first proven resurrection in recorded history or that Cerberus really wouldn't do anything to alter Shepard even if it was true. Of course, this is the one time in the series when Shepard isn't even allowed to make a token verbal defense, like pointing out that they weren't in touch because they'd been in a medical coma for two years as their body was rebuilt due to all the damage they'd suffered from being spaced and crashing into a planet from orbit.
    • Ever wonder why real spacesuits have as much of their life-support system stored inside the suit as they can? The destruction of the Normandy and Shepards subsequent suffocation before re-entry shows you just how dangerous external air hoses would be in the off chance that they got snagged on something.
    • Not stopping the reckless teenager from joining an assault against a renowned vigilante leads to the poor dude unceremoniously biting it the second he enters the fray.
    • Delaying the final mission after your crew has been abducted leads to their messy liquefaction at the hands of the Collectors.
  • Mass Effect 3
    • In the Eva Core fight, if you fail to gun her down before she gets to Shepard, you catch a Hot Blade through the face... and die. No medigel, no Heroic Resolve, no barriers biotic or kinetic, nothing will save you.
    • The Extended Cut adds the Refusal ending, in which Shepard refuses to accept the options that the Catalyst provides. This promptly leads to the armada fighting for the Crucible to be completely wiped out, heralding the fall of galactic civilization once again at the hands of the Reapers. What else would you have expected from rallying the galaxy into devoting their resources into constructing and protecting a superweapon regarded as the last hope against the Reapers… and then deciding not to use it?
    • While Take Your Time is in full effect for most of the series, there are two notable exceptions in the third game, which drive home the fact that when you receive word that the enemy is besieging a school full of biotic students or searching for a bomb that can destroy much of a planet, you cannot afford to wait around.
    • Similar to the second game's suicide mission, you should not assume that Ashley or Kaidan will simply take your word that you aren't being controlled by Cerberus, especially not when Cerberus troops are being turned into Husks, or that they will simply accept you cheating on them in the second game. How much effort you put into regaining their trust determines whether they survive the standoff at the Citadel.
    • In preparation for the war against the geth, the quarians have armed every single one of their 50,000 ships, and some have the kind of guns dreadnoughts have. You'd think that'd be a hell of an advantage against the geth... except it isn't, because what the ships don't have is good armour, so they've just become even more vulnerable. Worse, by arming all the ships, the quarians forced the geth to target and destroy ships that they normally would have ignored if they hadn't been armed.
    • The finale of the game brought us the long-awaited confrontation between Shepard and Harbinger. Feeling pumped up and ready to take on the leader of the Reapers? Harbinger utterly massacres the entire assault team with little effort from miles away, Shepard included (though they survive, barely). What exactly did you think was going to happen when foot soldiers go up against a 2-km tall Reaper dreadnought?
      • The entire final battle is like this. No matter how many War Assets you've amassed, you're still facing an entire fleet of reapers. Even ground battles against their (expendable) husks go rather poorly, and the heavy weaponry intended to destroy the one(!) Destroyer in the way of the Conduit into the Citadel is mostly wiped out before it can even get into place, and interference prevents the few shots actually fired from landing on target until EDI finds a way around that. And then when you finally seem to be home free, guess who shows up?
    • As pointed out by Nyreen in Omega, Dating Catwoman might seem like a good idea, but that kind of relationship tends to result in conflicts because of the differing ideologies and often won't last long.
    • One might expect the different races to start cooperating once the Reapers arrive and it becomes apparent that everyone is royally fucked unless they start working together. Haha, nope. Just about every race Shepard asks for help wants something first: the turians want the krogan to help, the krogan want a cure for the genophage, the salarians want the krogan to not get the cure, the asari are focused on their own fight, the hanar, drell, volus and elcor are basically nonentities, the batarians want the humans to get fucked, the quarians are too focused on wiping out the geth and getting their homeworld back to care about the Reapers, and the geth would have helped, but the quarians trying to kill them all drove them straight into the arms of the Reapers, because it was that or get killed.
  • Max Payne:
    • Reality ensued all over poor Vinnie, a mob lieutenant with more enemies than friends and such an incurable fanboy for a cartoon Kid Hero that he'll cosplay without hesitation. Doing so straps him into explosives, and since that puts him in an Enemy Mine situation with Max, you figure The Hero should be able to save his life. And he did. Temporarily.
    • In the third game, the favela Gang Bangers can threaten Max because of their numbers and Max's Cutscene Incompetence. They are still an untrained rabble, however, and are utterly dominated by trained, better-equipped paramilitaries or military police special forces.
    • You could say that reality ensues every time you exit bullet time in the middle of a jump in 3 and land with an audible thud. Or when you don't consider your trajectory properly and, thanks to Euphoria, collapse over an inconvenient couch or slam roughly into a wall and drop straight out of bullet time, struggling to stand up while continuing to take pot shots. Max's experience in this game is much more tactile than the previous games.
      • Leap down a flight of stairs and Max will slide down them and smack into whatever's at the bottom.
    • At one point, a character suicide bombs some mooks. Rather than leave a few burnt corpses, it results in the victims going from mooks to messes.
    • Max spends most of the first two games popping painkillers in his mouth like M&Ms in order to restore his health. Sure enough, come 3, he's addicted.
    • After you defeat the final boss of 3, Max and DeSilva let him live because they already have more than enough to put him away for a while. He even gloats that he'll walk. Luckily, he's later found dead in his prison cell.
    • If you find a gun with a laser sight in 3, it will shake violently whenever you do anything, making it very difficult to aim with.
  • In the opening cutscene of MechWarrior 4, a lone pilot, the last remaining defence unit left, tries to pull a You Shall Not Pass on the enemy. Against their entire might, he alone lasts about twenty seconds.
  • Megadimension Neptunia VII plays this for laughs by applying it unexpectedly. Arfoire assumes direct control of a Dark CPU, a skyscraper-sized humanoid. The protagonists scout her out as she chases them, and find out she's moving a lot slower than they expected. Arfoire has no idea of her new body's physics and keeps tripping over.
    • Battling against one runs into this trope in a slew of ways as well. A special field is required just so the party can get high enough to take a proper shot at them. Dark CPUs are so big that basic attacks would be pointless, only special attacks can be used (and certain specials that require being grounded are still unusable). Despite violating the Square/Cube Law, the Dark CPU is still so massive that simply jumping straight up and falling back to earth produces enough of an impact to injure everyone present. And so on.
    • In another scene, the protagonists discover the villains have an airborne battleship and wonder how they were able to procure one. Cut to the villains having a Seinfeldian Conversation about having bought the thing on finance and its effect on their budget overheads.
    • A Cosmic Retcon is applied to the nations, changing their government structure. Lowee now has a lot in common with an RPG class system, with aptitude tests needed to get any sort of job, and when you do, it's all you do. This is a horrific dystopia that gives the guy on top far too much power and prevents those under him from organizing any ability to do something about it.
  • Mega Man Battle Network:
    • The need for proper computer security is hammered in repeatedly, as every almost single incident in the game is caused by black-hat terrorists hacking every element of the heavily networked and computerized world.
    • Megaman.Exe may be the strongest netnavi in the world, but Lan himself is just a normal preteen. Multiple times across all six games the usually thuggish, expertly trained and morally unscrupulous villains actively try to kill Lan with their own two hands or with deathtraps that Megaman can't save him from, requiring a Big Damn Heroes from a more physically powerful character. Battle Network 5 even explicitly opens with the villains ambushing Lan and his friends and stealing their Navis to make sure they can't interfere, Lan and Megaman only escape because the villains Failed a Spot Check because Lan passed out behind a dividing wall.
    • In the first sequel, Lan goes to a foreign country. At the airport a random NPC offers him a ride to the town. Lan takes it, and gets his battle chips stolen. This is why you don't go with strangers.
  • The Mental Series has the three protagonists kill their way through four games to get to where they need to be. This is all glossed over until the fifth and final game (befittingly entitled Murder Most Foul), where the three are now the most wanted criminals in the country after all the murders that they have committed.
  • Mega Man Legends 2 combines this with Bag of Spilling as Roll is forced to sheepishly admit that she had to sell all of Mega Man Volnutt's weapons and gear, all high-end and worthwhile, to pay for all of the repairs done to the Flutter, which was damaged near the end of Mega Man Legends. They're Diggers and they just came out of the last game empty-handed and broke (The Bonnes took the gigantic crystal for themselves)
  • Metal Gear:
    • In Metal Gear Solid 3 there's a point where you see one of The Cobra Unit out in the open and defenseless. If you're quick you can shoot him in the head, averting a boss battle with him later. Or since he's old, you can just wait a week (according to the PS2 internal clock) and he'll die of natural causes. On the other hand, the area is then manned by twenty guards instead of one boss character.
    • Also of note is the camo system, where if you decide to hide yourself in a bunch of tall grass but you still have that blue camo you used for the water, you are going to get spotted.
    • Any meat you keep in your inventory for too long will start to decompose, as Snake has no way of preserving it while on missions. Having him eat the rotten meat anyway will work as well as you'd expect.
    • Metal Gear Solid 4, even though one of the game's "features" was an expanded arsenal of firearms and associated controls, only on Liquid Easy (lowest difficulty) can Snake take enough damage to get away with anything approaching a stand-up or run-and-gun fight, as he's still one old operator against however many enemies, whether human or Gekko.
      • Mention also goes to the game's Final Boss, which goes from a two-part nostalgia trip, to a romanticist revisit of Snake Eater, to a sad scene of two ragged, tired old men slowly slugging their fists at each other.
    • Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance showed that just because Snake and allies shut down the Patriots and their System, the war economy couldn't stop cold. It just went on to the next leg of the arms race, cybernization and nanomachines.
    • Metal Gear Solid 2 had Solidus Snake point out that, while the huge Metal Gear/sea craft Arsenal Gear was an impressive weapons platform complete with an army of Metal Gear RAY's and a full complement of high-yield nuclear weapons in addition to its information control capabilities, without a proper naval and air escort it was completely useless. "A floating coffin", as he put it.
    • And of course there's the whole stealth aspect of the series. Super Soldier or not, and no matter how badass the previous cutscene made you look, you're still just one guy against a heavily-armed compound. You're not going last very long without some sneaking, trickery and guerrilla tactics.
    • Try rolling up stairs and you'll bash your head against them and tumble back down.
  • Mindshadow (an adventure game released in 1984) - At one point fairly early in the game, you tie a vine around some rocks near a cliff to climb down. If you're carrying too many items (which, given the genre's "take anything that's not nailed down" mentality, is fairly likely), the vine will snap under the load, resulting in a game over.
  • Minecraft. Swords can be made of (in order of ascending rarity) wood, stone, iron, gold, and diamond. For the most part, the rarer starting materials result in stronger weapons, except golden swords deal as much damage as wooden swords and break even faster. It came as quite a surprise when the players realized the second-rarest material made the weakest weapon, and a lot of people thought it was a bug... until they remembered gold is one of the softest metals in the world; just like in real-life, gold weapons are only good for decorative purposes. However, gold is also used in conjunction with redstone in a number of craftable items that are considerably more useful, such as powered track. This is because while gold is a terrible material to make armor, weapons or blunt instruments out of, it is well known as an integral component in precision electronic devices.
  • Monster Hunter 3/Tri/TriG/3U has a quest that pits you against the colossal Elder Dragon Jhen Mohran, chasing it down with a Sandship. Contrary to environmental damage not normally appearing in the game, Jhen actually can and will destroy the Sandship if you don't learn how to use its armaments to hold it off, resulting in a quest failure.
  • For all of its emphasis on Gorn, a tie-in comic to Mortal Kombat X shows some surprisingly realistic consequences for Kotal Kahn. He earned his nickname of "the Blood God" by drinking the blood of his enemies, even encouraging a tribe of Amazon warriors to do the same with Spanish invaders. When Kotal Kahn went into the future, he found the Amazons were all dead because they weren't used to the diseases in the Spaniards' blood, which effectively wiped out their civilization.
    • Brutalities, in general, are essentially what would happen if the special moves acted in real life (i.e. D'Vorah's and Reptile's acid burning the flesh off someone, Kotah Kahn's macahuitl cutting someone in half, etc.).
  • The MOTHER trilogy is no stranger to this either, being devoted to deconstructing the RPG genre:
    • Various adults will question the party's free-range nature, with some pointing out that they should be in school.
    • In EarthBound Beginnings:
      • The game pits Ninten and co. against three giant robots, each more powerful than the last. In a normal RPG, the heroes would defeat the robots with their strength & abilities alone after a challenging battle. As it turns out, giant robots tend to be very resilient and very powerful. These three can instantly KO a single party member, and can only be damaged by heavy artillery or another giant robot.
      • Related to the above, the fight against R7038 ends up leaving Teddy in critical condition, presumably dead in the original 1989 version. Being beaten to a pulp by a robot the size of a large building will do that to you.
      • The Bla Bla Gang stops attacking the party once Teddy joins. Sounds reasonable enough. However, as soon as Teddy leaves the party, the gang members go right back to assaulting the heroes at the slightest provocation. Just because Teddy was acquainted with you doesn't mean that his gang members will consider you an ally.
    • In EarthBound:
      • After Ness defeats Frank Fly and forces the Sharks to disband, he earns the key to the Traveler's Shack and can access Giant Step from there. After completing the dungeon, he is immediately arrested for trespassing. Then, given the trilogy's setting, Ness gets subjected to a police beating (he manages to defeat the police, though).
      • Jeff has a very strained relationship with his father, Dr. Andonuts, since the latter's been absent from most of his son's life. Anyone with a working grasp of human psychology (or has watched Neon Genesis Evangelion) will know that reuniting with an absent parent is a very strained process, as the parent is essentially a stranger to their kid.
      • Many of Ness's enemies show up in Magicant (a world inside Ness's mnd), calling Ness out for killing them and their acquaintances. This is inevitable, as what kind of mentally composed person in real life shows no remorse over harming others?
      • Near the end of the game, Giygas pulls a last-minute invasion on Onett, implied to be the start of his conquest of Earth. At this point, Giygas's men have been dropping like flies because of Ness, who's already awakened his true potential and is growing closer and closer to achieving victory. Given this, it's understandable that Giygas would panic and throw in everything he's got to try and stop the kid.
      • After Giygas is finally defeated, you'd expect Porky to be left at the mercy of Ness and his friends, begging for, well, mercy. Guess you forgot that Porky's a devious, borderline-psychopathic child who always finds a way to bail out. Porky proceeds to travel to a different era, and decides to taunt Ness about it twice, as expected from a kid of his nature.
      • After Giygas' defeat, a boy in Onett taunts Ness about all the homework he'll have to make up after skipping possibly weeks of school to go save the world.
    • In MOTHER 3:
      • After Lucas loses his mother, the trauma he experiences is portrayed disturbingly realistically. He is virtually catatonic for much of the first three chapters, seldomly talking and spending most of his time crying in solitude. As an adolescent, meanwhile, he has several flashbacks of his mom when she was still alive, and chapter six can be interpreted as a product of his grieving imagination. Overall, Lucas forgoes both Angst? What Angst? and Wangst, instead mourning his mother's death as any other person would.
      • On the subject of Hinawa's murder, Flint's immediate response to it is also very realistic for someone like him. He's not afraid to put up a fight and get his hands dirty, and spends the first half of chapter one literally fighting his way through a burning forest. So, when he hears that his wife was found mauled to death, his aggressive side kicks in and he physically lashes out at everything & everyone around him.
      • After Lucas learns that Claus is the Masked Man, the inevitable "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight occurs. However, Lucas can't do anything to fight back for most of the fight. This is a kid who's lost most of his family at a young age, and has been sent to hell and back trying to save the world, all because he is one of a select few people who can use PK Love. Seeing that his final challenge is to relive one of his darkest memories is clearly gonna trigger something in him.
      • Then, when Claus finally regains his senses, he kills himself. Why? His mother died when he was young, his own life nearly ended during a failed revenge attempt, and for most of his life he was the mindless slave of a Psychopathic Manchild. Given the fact that he is still a youth with a developing brain, he instantly jumps to the first (and easiest) solution he can come up with: suicide.
  • The entire plot of No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle kicks off because Travis killed most of Jasper Batt's relatives. This was something that happened in the first game in a bunch of copy-pasted side missions with almost no fanfare, and neither Travis nor the player expected it to come up again or have any real consequences.
  • Myst III: Exile: Saavedro's plan hinges entirely on Atrus being the one to come after him, and he's so certain that this will be the case that he never bothers to check once the player has followed him. When he's finally confronted with the reality, he flips his shit.
    • Similarly, the fact that you're not Atrus doesn't mean Saavedro's just going to let you go. Once in Narayan, you have to find a solution that works for all parties, because if you don't, this trope will hit you hard: and in most of the options, literally. If you go back to Tomahna without finding a solution, Saavedro will follow and kill you, Atrus and his family. If you leave Saavedro on the platform but go back to him, he'll kill you. If you do as he asks and flip the switches, he'll throw the Releeshahn book into the water and leave. If you get the book back but leave him stuck between the platforms, Atrus will call you out for it. You have to get the book back and let Saavedro go home to get the ideal ending.
    • After Myst firmly established Sirrus and Achenar as a pair of psychopaths who tortured and murdered hundreds of people, is it really so surprising that there's at least one person out there who came looking for revenge?
  • The bad endings of the Oddworld games certainly qualify: making less than a token effort to save a group of people/creatures in dire straits will make them much less willing to help you when you're in trouble, if they don't decide to just screw you over beforehand.
  • Papers, Please has the player working border security, determining who can or cannot enter the country, and morality frequently comes up against practicality. You can let people in who are desperate but don't have the right forms, but too many penalties mean you won't have enough money to care for you and your family. You can accept bribes, but the extra money will get the authorities suspicious of you. Denying someone you've been warned about entry when their paperwork is in order will get you a penalty, but letting him through will result in him killing the young woman who warned you. And revealing that you have evidence linking you to the local subversive element will get you arrested.
  • In Peasant's Quest, the humble peasant hero Rather Dashing goes through a bunch of trials to prepare himself to fight Trogdor the Burninator. When he finally reaches Trogdor's cave he's immediately flash-fried, because he's one ordinary guy trying to fight a giant fire-breathing monster.
  • Desert Bus from Penn and Teller's Smoke and Mirrors is Reality Ensues incarnate, made as a response to the violent video game controversy and meant to be the most realistic video game ever made. The entire game is about driving a bus from Tuscon to Las Vegas. For eight hours. Of real time. There's no pausing the game ("Does real life have pause control?"), and you can't just hold down the gas button with something while you do something else because the bus constantly veers to the right, and if you crash, you have to get towed back to Tuscon. Also in real time.
  • Persona 4 has, as mentioned under Anime, a scene where the player characters gather weapons to defend themselves in the TV-world... and are arrested by mall security because they were waving them around in public, in a town that recently had one of its residents murdered. The only reason that the protagonist and Yosuke weren't interrogated by the police was due to the protagonist having a relative on the force.
    • At the end of Yosuke's Social Link, Yosuke confesses that he'd always been jealous of the protagonist, and they work out their issues with a fist fight. Unfortunately, someone saw Yosuke and reported him to the police, resulting in Yosuke getting in trouble for fighting.
    • The Inaba police hire Great Detective Naoto Shirogane to help investigate the serial killer case. Naoto is an Insufferable Genius who continually contradicts and questions the police... which causes them to remove Naoto from the case entirely late in the game. Turns out you can't piss off your bosses over and over and get away with it. That said, it's also implied that not only is the male-dominated police force somewhat dismissive of Naoto as a high school student (as well as a woman, which is why she hid her true gender), but they also didn't want to admit that the juvenile suspect they arrested didn't actually kill the first two victims, an unfortunate reminder that some public authorities prefer to save face rather than do what is right.
    • When the School Festival rolls around, the protagonist is given the option of voting for what the class will be working on. But Thou Must! make a Group Date Cafe, because the protagonist is one individual in a class and is in no position to decide.
  • Persona 5 has the protagonists inflict Heel–Face Brainwashing on corrupt adults. Eventually, they successfully manage to do this to the Big Bad who's been leading a political conspiracy to exploit the Palace to become Prime Minister. However, this doesn't immediately solve everything. The evil conspiracy ends up covering for the Big Bad because they would also be screwed over, and due their control over the media, the public doesn't care. In order to ensure the Big Bad can be found Guilty by society and that the conspiracy won't continue to exploit the Palace, the Thieves decide to destroy Mementos, the Palace of the Collective Unconscious and the source of all other Palaces, even if this means not being Phantom Thieves anymore. Furthermore, even after Mementos is destroyed and society starts moving to convict Big Bad, he can't be found guilty without evidence. And since the Palace is gone, The Dragon is (presumed) dead and the conspiracy obviously unwilling to testify against themselves, the only person left who can testify against the Big Bad is the Protagonist, who will surely have to confess to being the leader of the Phantom Thieves and be sent to Juvenile Hall due to his prior record.
  • Pokémon gives us Deoxys, one of the Olympus Mons who travels through space in... a meteor. In most stories the obvious consequences of this are ignored for the sake of the plot - except in Omega Ruby / Alpha Sapphire, where the meteor(oid) in question is six miles wide and would likely make not only Hoenn (the predicted impact point), but the whole world go the way of the dinosaurs. And when you succeed in destroying it? Deoxys emerges from the rubble and, the uncomprehending alien being that it is, attacks you for destroying what could reasonably be called its interstellar wheels.
    • In Alpha Sapphire, if one has Kyogre, and Surf around the general Sootopolis area on their Kyogre, nobody will challenge him/her to a battle, since the trainer is riding on the very same legendary Water Pokémon that nearly destroyed the Hoenn region a short while ago.
  • In the first Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games, the main plot culminates in the heroes adventuring to the sky to get Rayquaza to destroy a meteor that will destroy the world if it impacts. Not only does the backlash from Rayquaza destroying it nearly kill you, the meteor ends up breaking into lots of little pieces, some of which naturally go everywhere and end up causing subplots (one piece hits Latias, breaking her wing and making her fall into a dungeon, driving Latios to go a little crazy in the process of trying to rescue her; another piece hits a cave and fills it with one real Deoxys and a bunch of phantom Deoxys).
    • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity has the player character, who's called to the Pokémon world to save it. After the main plot concludes and the player returns to the human world, they get a message via the partner's Frism that says, among other things, that while the partner wants the player to stay, he's also realised that in all likelihood, the player has friends and family in the human world who must be worried sick about them, and he thinks it'd be selfish to ask the player to stay and leave all their loved ones wondering if they're even alive, so he won't protest the player's leaving. Later, when the other main characters suggest that he could wish for the player's return, he says that it'd be unfair to pull the player away from their loved ones again, and they suggest changing the wish to making the player able to move between the two worlds at will, so nobody will have to suffer from the player's absence.
    • In Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon, it's not established how old the player character actually is, but you look like a child- and the partner actually is a child. Free-Range Children is firmly subverted in the first part of the game- you and your partner have to go to school, the adults refuse to let you do anything dangerous and get mad when you do, and nearly everyone in the village thinks you're too young to leave it... at least at first.
  • Pokemon GO is an Augmented Reality game that lets the players walk around the world catching Pokémon that appear nearby. Sounds neat, right? Unfortunately for everyone in this world, in real life, players do not have Surf to go on water, cars may be nearby, people may trip over rocks nearby, people will lose cell phone reception if they try to climb mountains or go spelunking (just like in the games). Worst of all, players will find mostly Com Mons around since they can't just walk to another ecosystem in half an hour like they can in a video game.
    • Due to Pokéstops and Pokémon often showing up inside businesses (And police stations), naturally they begun to get annoyed at the influx of non-paying customers and unwanted foot-traffic. Private property are also completely nonexistent in the games - and Pokémon GO will often spawn Pokémon inside private property such as inside peoples' yards. Naturally, you can get in trouble for trespassing.
    • Pokémon GO was also released for smartphones - unlike a Game Boy or a Nintendo DS , which are optimised to run games, smart phones don't handle resource-heavy apps well. Naturally the game can and will crash.
    • People who walk in strange neighborhoods, distracted, with an expensive smartphone out, are an ideal target for ordinary muggers.
    • The game was also released in July - the hottest month of the year in most of the northern hemisphere. Since the game requires you to go out and walk physically, you start experiencing the effects of walking around for prolonged amounts of time in 35+ degree weather - whereas trainers in the games could run all day in both deserts and in cold.
  • In Pokémon Reborn, the titular critters are directly used to attack people. A Chandelure burns a woman's soul out of existence, and a Garchomp kills another woman with one move.
    • Amaria is very depressed, and Titania only dated her because she was afraid that Amaria would kill herself if she didn't. When Amaria finds out that Titania never loved her, she jumps off a waterfall. Worse, while Amaria survives, she wakes up with amnesia, having forgotten the last few days. Titania doesn't take it well.
    • The game makes no bones about the fact that Pokémon are weapons of mass destruction. Using the PULSE machines, which can power up even weak Pokémon, Team Meteor lays waste to parts of cities, causing earthquakes and massive damage to both people and buildings. A single Tangrowth makes vines and trees grow everywhere, including through the roads.
    • Corey's story shows what happens if you take away someone's reason to live: either he's exposed as a Meteor Admin and his daughter runs away because she's horrified by his actions, or he's not exposed and his daughter runs away because she's sick of his controlling nature. Either way, having lost the only thing keeping him alive, he throws himself off a bridge. The result is not pretty.
      • Worse, one of the people in the crowd who found the body is another Gym Leader... who's 12. The poor girl has a breakdown from the sight.
    • During Team Meteor's attempt to use a PULSE Camerupt to make Pyrous Mountain erupt, Cal pulls a Heel–Face Turn and saves the day by destroying the PULSE before it fires up. Unfortunately for him, he does this after it's revealed that he was working for Team Meteor and he was forced to throw Kiki's Medicham into a pit of lava, so he's remembered not as a hero but as a coward who betrayed both his friends and Team Meteor. By the time you meet him again, he's been forced to work as a third party, unable to reveal that he sabotaged the PULSE when he installed it. Solaris even lampshades this:
    Solaris: Do you thing such a reckless act redeems you? On the contrary, it condemns you.
    • When you storm Yureyu HQ to free your friends, two Grunts threaten to cut Shelly's throat if you get closer. As later pointed out by Charlotte, you can easily make someone lose control simply by making them believe that they don't have any: after telling the Grunts that she didn't care if they killed Shelly and just walking up to the panel and unlocking the gate, the Grunts were left with no idea of what to do, giving Charlotte an opening to rescue Shelly.
    • Team Meteor hooks an Abra up to a PULSE machine to see if they can amplify its teleportation powers enough to get them where they want to go. But as it turns out, the Abra doesn't want to play along, leading to it randomly teleporting things that it wasn't meant to teleport. Worse, they can't turn it off because as soon as they try, it just teleports them away from the machine.
    • Team Meteor's attacks are designed to drive people out of the places they attack. Given that they don't care about killing innocents, they kill and hurt a lot of people. But while some of the Grunts are OK with that, others aren't, especially when it comes to the people they care about. Unfortunately for Eclipse, Sirius does not take desertion well.
    • Blake extorts the Ruby Ring away from the player and flees up the peak of Ametrine Mountain. At the top, once the player beats him, Shelly suggests that since Blake lost, he has to give the player the ring... only for Blake to refuse and mock her. Not only is he an enemy, but he's an enemy with no respect for the rules- why the hell would he play along?
  • Police Quest:
    • As police lieutenant Sonny Bonds, you have to follow police procedure by the book to avoid the myriad of ways you can get a game over. While some decisions are obvious (such as not shooting someone who has a gun drawn at you), some are not. Shoot someone who only might be reaching for a gun in his glove box? Turns out he was an unarmed FBI agent, and you're fired. Forget to frisk the raving lunatic? He'll draw a knife and kill you. Need to open a door with a battering ram? You have to get permission from a judge to use it first.
    • There are also non-fatal ways this shows up, too. In the third Police Quest, you can miss points if you fail to follow proper procedure when writing someone up for a ticket. You can question witnesses, some of whom lie or are uncooperative. Sonny's wife is also getting improper care in the hospital, but Sonny brings it to the attention of a trained doctor instead of fiddling with the machines himself like any other game of the genre would likely expect you to do.
  • In the backstory of Portal 2, Cave Johnson is the Crazy Awesome Pointy-Haired Boss of Aperture Science, who has no qualms whatsoever about working with hazardous experimental substances, blatantly ignores the advice of his scientists because Screw the Rules, I Have Money!, and wildly misapplies potentially revolutionary scientific breakthroughs because he doesn't realize what they could do. Unfortunately, it's not a cartoon, and these practices have the same result they would in real life, i.e., he dies slowly and agonizingly from exposure to dangerous chemicals while his company collapses into financial ruin.
    • Chell's boots are what happens when people apply this to a game during design. During testing of the first Portal, the playtesters refused to accept that a human being could survive the falls Chell has to survive on a regular basis, some pointing out that Gordon Freeman, the protagonist of Valve's earlier Half-Life series, would be pasted by the kinds of falls Chell has no problem surviving. The developers applied a Hand Wave by giving her boots that are described as diffusing the shock of landing and ensuring she lands on her feet. This restored the playesters' suspension of disbelief.
  • Radiation Island: Since it's a survival game, many common sense rules apply: starvation, infection, and radiation can all kill you; falls can break bones; sleep means you aren't eating, so you're going to wake up hungry; water will drown you if you stay submerged for too long. Other nasty realities:
    • Taking too long to root around in your pack or loot a chest gives mooks a fine opportunity to sneak up on you.
    • Escaping mooks by taking to the water in a canoe won't work—crocodiles just swim after you, zombies follow you by walking along the bottom.
    • Everything is out to kill everything else, not just you. It's common to wander the island and find random Organ Drops from animals killed by mooks. And what do you get when zombies can infect animals? Poison-spewing zombie beasts that are much worse than their mundane versions, and travel in packs.
  • Rainbow Six: Vegas 2, while the final villain of the game is delivering his Motive Rant, he pulls his gun on you, you pull yours on him in return... and then he continues ranting at you for a few more minutes before shooting, at any point during which you can shoot him in the face. This contrasts with the confrontation with one of the Co-Dragons much earlier in the game, where you're not given control back until almost the very end of the interaction with him - if you shoot him at any point before he pulls his gun on you, you fail the mission and have to restart; but at the same time, you've got maybe half a second to react once he does pull the gun before he blows you away with it.
  • Red Dead Redemption:
    • No matter how much of a badass you are, taking on the army in a standup fight won't end well. And that's how John Marston dies, when Edgar Ross decides that You Have Outlived Your Usefulness.
    • The game's epilogue. So you faced your father's killer and killed him in a duel? Hooray! After all these years, you finally got your revenge! Too bad your father is still dead and remembered as a brutal criminal even if he was a good guy, and no-one but you knows what Ross did so he goes down as a retired cop who was brutally gunned down while fishing. Oh, and also too bad that the days of the old west and vigilante justice have come and gone so you'll spend the rest of your life as a depressed loner on the run from the authorities. What? You thought you could get revenge and everything would be awesome? Nah, what do you think this is? An old western movie?
  • What happens when you put structures designed with mostly Rule of Cool in mind under real-world physics? According to Red Faction Guerrilla and its extremely robust destruction engine, they collapse. The game designers had to take a crash course in real-world architecture to create buildings that would stay up long enough for the player to destroy them.
  • Resident Evil 4:
    • Used amusingly at the beginning. How is the evil Umbrella corporation finally destroyed? Through a daring black-ops raid with soldiers fighting its myriad monsters in one final battle? The heroes of the previous games banding together and taking out it's leaders one by one? Nope! The U.S. government freezes its assets in retaliation for the destruction of Raccoon City, and the highly publicized disasters plaguing the company cause its stock prices to drop, sending it into bankruptcy! One statement from the developers in a Nintendo Power article says that there was no way the US government would have allowed Umbrella to continue operating after being responsible for a disaster that forced them to nuke one of their own cities.
      • That too gets a dose of Reality Ensues. Simply removing Umbrella from business does not magically evaporate all the data, personnel, research data and equipment. Their B.O.W.s and viruses are sold to the highest bidder on the black market, the highest level researchers are able to continue their viral weaponry without a traceable line, and the BSAA are formed to counteract the outbreaks that follow.
    • Apparently, Salazar believes Talking Is a Free Action. Too bad for him that Leon does not. Both times that Salazar tries Evil Gloating, Leon makes him pay for it, first by pinning his hand to the wall with a knife, and the second by seriously damaging his hearing.
  • In most video games, a weapon with a Laser Sight will always be steady as a rock so the player can see where the laser is pointing at. In Resident Evil 6, like in real life, attaching a laser sight doesn't magically remove the hand sway.
  • Riven: Gehn taught himself the Art, and as a result, his understanding of it is flawed. While he managed to successfully write Ages, writing an Age does not necessarily mean that it's a stable Age, and as a result, Riven is on the verge of collapsing. Atrus has to stay behind so he can edit the Riven descriptive book enough to keep it going while you're in there.
    • If you use the Trap Book to trap Gehn, and then link into it again, Gehn will just leave you in there. Why the hell would he free you, knowing what the book does?
  • Used wonderfully in Rudra No Hihou. A few days after the other protagonists have already received their magical Power Crystal, Squishy Wizard Surlent is still lacking his. Being a scholar, he finds it inside an ancient artifact he's set out to research. It promptly flies towards him to merge with his body... and the impact kills him. Instantly. He has to claw his way back up to the surface all the way from the realm of the dead.
  • In The Saboteur the final boss is just an average human that has gone insane due to your actions up to this point. He is left broken, drunk and just accepting death as even if you don't shoot him, he will just jump to his death on his own.
  • Saints Row IV: The Boss may have beaten countless numbers of gangsters, policemen, even a State Sec with futuristic weapons, but nothing prepares them for a massive alien overlord with superpowers. The Boss tries, oh do they put up a fight, but once Zinyak decides to stop playing around and use his powers the first fight quickly becomes a Curb-Stomp Battle in the villain's favour.
  • In Scribblenauts, you can create anything and put it next to anything, with fairly realistic results: people will eat food, run from wild animals, die when attacked; predators and animals who were attacked will fight back and kill each other; buildings will be destroyed if sufficiently damaged; putting two rabbits together will result in them breeding until they fill the item limit... and while you can put things like walls and fences in the way to hinder attackers, don't expect them to last long if the attacker's big enough or strong enough.
  • Senran Kagura: when the Homura Crimson Squad goes on the run as renegade Shinobi, their greatest threat turns out to be... getting enough to eat. They're assassins, not survivalists, and while they have a working knowledge of edible plants, they live in a city. Their only recourse is to find jobs - minimum-wage part-time jobs that don't mind the fact they have no legal papers or proof of education. Plus they're all busty, healthy young girls... you can imagine where this would go if this point was taken to its logical conclusion.
    • Shinobi are capable of some pretty outrageous stunts and special powers, but these require them to be at their physical peak. From a story perspective, the very first serious blow landed is the match ender, since being injured will slow a Shinobi down, making them easy to finish off. First blood means the loser has to choose between running or dying, with very few exceptions. The only exception to that, Murasaki, is armed with a special power that would make her The Dreaded if she were actually training.
    • The narration does occasionally mention that living with such huge breasts comes with its own problems - it's mentioned the girls only avoid back pain because they're physically strengthening themselves anyway, Asuka notes hers can get in the way and speculates the only reason Katsuragi's even bigger pair don't is because she doesn't use her arms, and Yumi laments that she'll never be able to wear a kimono properly (at the time they became popular, the female ideal was a slim, straight figure, so Yumi can't get one that fits which doesn't show enormous amounts of cleavage).
  • Seiken Densetsu 3:
    • Angela's prologue has her thrown into the aptly named Sub Zero Snowfield wearing nothing but a highly Stripperiffic leotard. Less than ten minutes later, she starts coming down with hypothermia.
    • In contrast to the Lovable Rogue type of mercenary, Duran is loud, brutish, uncouth, and smells bad. Also, the first time Duran goes up against the Red Wizard, he gets curbstomped, because Duran's never faced anyone who uses magic before.
    • Hawk is a thief in a gang of them. Once Hawk decides he no longer wants to be part of the gang because of their growing corruption, they don't graciously let him leave; they try to have him killed (it didn't help that he was framed in the murder of one of their own). When he returns to the gang as a hero trying to stop the end of the world, only two of them side with him and the rest are all Mooks who have to be cut down.
    • Kevin can transform into a werewolf and kick major amounts of ass, but he can't control it. The first time he transforms, Kevin kills his beloved pet Carl (or so he thinks), and spends the rest of the game hating his power.
    • Both Kevin and Carlie are Half-Human Hybrids whose genetics give them significant abilities, but also cause a fair share of problems. Both of them have some sort of brain deficiency as a result of being a mix of two species, with Kevin talking in Hulk Speak and Carlie still having the mindset of a small child despite being physically sixteen.
    • Lise is a Badass Princess, but she's not a One-Man Army. When raiders invade her kingdom, kill her people and kidnap her brother, she has to run in order to find help. She also never gets a chance to go on a Roaring Rampage of Revenge, instead having to find ways to stop the plans of the Big Bad while putting her kingdom's reconstruction on hold.
  • Shadow Complex:
    • The writers go through the trouble of fleshing out a personality for the evil quasi-Nazi Mad Scientist who has kidnapped your girlfriend... and instead of an epic boss fight or the scientist pulling out ninja moves or something to get away, he is Killed Mid-Sentence in one shot by the hero, right in the middle of saying that the hero "doesn't look like a killer".
    • At the end of the game, the Big Bad is not killed by the hero, whose family and loved ones he was threatening, but by the girlfriend, who is—surprise!—an NSA operative. Which explains what they were doing in the woods right by the enemy base, but she really should've captured the guy alive.
  • In Shadowrun Returns
    • Choosing to reveal you killed his community elders to Law causes the PC to pause and actually consider the consequences. Mainly, that informing a large and skilled hacker group that you killed their leaders is a great way to have all your secrets dug up and made public. It's so stupid that the PC decides ultimately not to do it.
    • The PC has the option to give Law some meta-data on their runs so he can post it on the Shadowland BBS. This lands him in hot water with Kindly Cheng, who is rather upset that he's been posting information about her team and their runs online, putting everyone at risk.
  • Shadow Warrior (2013): After spending a big part of the game chasing after Zilla, Wang duels him for about five seconds before simply cutting off his sword hand since, despite gaining Super Strength from his deal with Enra, Zilla is still just an old man who appears to never have held a sword in his life while Wang is a trained assassin.
  • The ending of the third game in the Sly Cooper franchise has the title character fake amnesia in order to be with his love interest. When she discovers his deception early in the fourth game, she pretty much dumps him on the spot, and it takes nearly the whole game for them to reconcile.
  • In Sonic the Hedgehog, with the addition of the Sonic Boost in later games, we see a more realistic take on what happens when an object gets hit by another object moving at the speed of sound.
  • Of all things, South Park: The Stick of Truth does this for its Infinity+1 Sword. As the game is a LARP, everyone uses weapons hodgepodged out of normal supplies. The Sweet Katana? It's an actual sword, purchased from a shop.
  • In the opening of Space Quest VI: Roger Wilco in The Spinal Frontier, Roger is court-martialed and bumped back down to a lowly space janitor for all the mayhem he caused and the regulations he broke saving the day in the last game, Space Quest V: The Next Mutation.
  • A key part of Spec Ops: The Line's project as Deconstructor Fleet is its use of this trope. At one point Capt. Martin Walker and his squad use a mortar to kill a large group of soldiers in a base barring Walker's way to an objective. The game cuts to an overhead camera depicting each soldier as a white blob, as the player gleefully rains down death from above upon the helpless foes. Then, you get to walk through the carnage you just caused, seeing and hearing your soon-to-be-dead enemies crawling around on their hands and knees, screaming in agony and begging to be put out of their misery. And that group of stationary enemies huddling in the back of the base? They were civilians.
  • Splinter Cell:
    • In Chaos Theory, Sam is facing down Shetland on the rooftop, with their guns drawn. Shetland goes on a Motive Rant, ending it by saying that Sam "wouldn't shoot an old friend" and putting his gun away. Sam can, at this point, opt to put his gun away, triggering an I Surrender, Suckers moment where Shetland draws his gun and catches a bad case of knife in the heart for his trouble. The other option is to just shoot him in the face the moment he puts his gun away.
    • Conviction. Normally, EMP devices in media are depicted as being rather benign, temporary things. Even a large EMP bomb only takes about a minute or so to recover from. The game even includes a small EMP device that only temporarily disables electronics. But when two of three EMP bombs go off in Washington DC, the results are horrifyingly realistic. The traffic grid immediately breaks down, all the lights go out and in general, anything electronic including cell phones and defibrillators go out and stay out.
  • Star Citizen prides itself on its (relatively) realistic physics for space combat. However, it pairs these realistic physics with fanciful Space Fighter designs, leading to some glaring design flaws in many ships. The Mustang is one of the most glaring, as it has the main engines mounted off-center from the center of mass, which means that it continuously nosedives unless its ventral thrusters are firing.
  • StarCraft:
    • The Terran Campaign of the original game has as its main focus a classic story of rebels trying to overthrow a corrupt confederate government. As it progresses however, it becomes increasingly clear the Rebel Leader, Arcturus Mengsk, isn't quite the idealistic revolutionary he appeared to be. The campaign ends with him crossing the Moral Event Horizon by causing an Alien Invasion on the Confederate homeworld, resulting in billions of death, and the new government he establishes ends up being just as bad the the old one.
    • The Protoss campaign in the first game ended with Tassadar comitting a Heroic Sacrifice to kill the Overmind, leaving the Zerg Swarm without a leader and putting an end to their invasion of Aiur, the Protoss homeworld. Right at the beginning of Brood War, it's revealed that, even without a leader, the Zerg are still rampaging everywhere on Aiur, just in a more disorganized way, and the Protoss are forced to leave anyway to ensure their survival.
    • In Starcraft II, Rory Swann discusses how he and some fellow miners rose up against the Kel-Morians oppressing them... and almost got themselves all killed but for an intervention by Jim Raynor, because they were hopelessly out-gunned.
    Swann: Havin' right on your side ain't no match for Gauss guns and combat walkers.
    • The Nova campaign ends not with a Boss Battle but Nova executing the Big Bad since she's the best ghost in the Dominion and her opponent is an elderly general.
  • The later games in the S.W.A.T. series are realistic shooters, much like Police Quest above is realistic to police procedure. You play a member of a SWAT team, who realistically must break down doors with specialized ammo, not fire on civilians, and must secure a scene, including all evidence in it such as dropped weapons, before moving on. The game is even set in the same universe as Police Quest, with Sonny Bonds being a SWAT captain in the fourth game. That said, the game does go a little too far in its portrayal of what SWAT officers are expected to do; for instance, in SWAT 4 you're penalized for "unlawful use of deadly force" if you shoot a bad guy with a regular firearm at any point before he shoots (at) you - in a game in which you can barely survive taking five bullets across a mission.
  • In Super Paper Mario, The fourth world you visit is in outer space. And maybe Batman Can Breathe in Space, but Mario can't! The first time you enter it, you have to be taken back to Flipside because of this, where you obtain a "helmet" of sorts. If you repeatedly refuse to put the helmet on when you go back, you will get a Non-Standard Game Over. What else did you expect to happen?
  • Tales of the Abyss
    • What happens when you take a ten year old noble who recently lost all of his memories, motor skills, and general knowledge about the world, throw him back home and tell him he can't leave until he's almost twenty? As the game shows us with Luke, it causes them to grow up into a Jerkass with no social skills, no friends, and nobody to truly turn to. Then, when Luke gets teleported outside the city, he's completely ignorant about simple things, like buying food requiring money.
    • Also, being totally sheltered and ignorant about the world around him makes Luke incredibly easy to manipulate. This is exactly what Luke's sword teacher, Van, was counting on. By setting himself up as the only person Luke could trust, Van makes Luke into an Unwitting Pawn.
    • Luke refusing to own up to his mistakes, even if he wasn't entirely responsible, doesn't mean his new friends will just ignore his behavior, forgive him, and be happy to talk to him. Instead, they abandon Luke in disgust for his attitude. While Luke does genuinely start trying to make up for his mistakes later in the game, and becomes much nicer and respectful, not everyone forgives Luke for what he's done. For a while, even Luke doesn't think he ought to be forgiven, no matter how much he tries. Luke's depression and guilt briefly turns him borderline suicidal.
  • Tales of Xillia
    • What happens when Milla loses the Four Spirits of the Elements, on whom she has relied for all sorts of things, ranging from being able to swim, fight or use magic? She can barely do things on her own. She can't swim, has no idea how to properly use her sword and can't do any proper combos during battle, until she gets a little instruction on how to fight. Once she does get that part down, her natural ability lets her improve very fast.
    • Alvin has repeatedly backstabbed the party, but keeps getting let back onto the team. While this mostly is allowed and shrugged off by Jude, who is rather idealistic and naive, the rest of the party keep their suspicion about Alvin. Eventually, they do allow him to return, but only because they know that he'd follow them, anyway, and willingly taking him in would give them the advantage of being able to keep a close eye on him. Easily Forgiven? Think again. The sequel proves that he is still trying to better himself, so that people can trust him again.
    • Once again for Alvin, he is trying to shake Jude out of his Heroic B.S.O.D., while rather suffering one of his own, by trying to egg him on into getting angry. During this event, Alvin accidentally shoots Leia and almost kills her. Contrary to it being dropped after Leia is healed up, their interactions become extremely awkward, stilted and they try to avoid each other. Things took some time to get better between them.
  • In the Thief series Garret is, well, a thief, and not equipped or trained for a stand-up fight, something the player will painfully learn if they try going One-Man Army like in so many other games.
  • Tomb Raider (2013) depicts Lara's transformation from an optimistic university student to a Shell-Shocked Veteran after besting the horrors of Yamatai. The trailers for the sequel Rise of the Tomb Raider show Lara in therapy to treat her PTSD.
  • Trillion: God of Destruction. The eponymous antagonist is a world-destroying mass of a trillion curses. Your Overlords are going up against it solo, with short-notice training and limited opportunities to retreat. They're going to die. It is hammered into the characters, and then the player, that going up against Trillion is a true Suicide Mission and the best they can hope to do is do enough damage before their inevitable demise that they might be able to wear it down before they run out of time or candidates. This realization, especially the first fatality, horrifies everyone and morale starts to become a serious problem.
  • In Uncharted 4: A Thief's End, Captain Avery's utopia of Libertalia goes exactly as well as you'd expect from a society run by ruthless, cunning, and greedy pirates. The concept was a great way to lure wealthy pirates into joining, which made them easier targets to track down. Libertalia's founders hoarded all the wealth for themselves and forced the rest of the population into poverty and enslavement. Eventually, the founders turned on each other in a brutal Gambit Pileup that resulted in everyone getting slaughtered, and their massive treasure was lost to history.
  • Shopkeepers in Undertale won't let you sell items to them. The first shop you visit even lampshades the absurdity of buying random junk from people who walk in. You can sell items at one specific shop, but it's said outright that it's because that shopkeeper is both really bad with money and desperate for patronage.
    • Poor Sans the Skeleton. When he realizes he is too tired to outfight a player on a No Mercy Run, he resorts to an alternate tactic: trying to trap you in battle forever by never finishing his turn. Unfortunately, he fails to factor in the fact that standing around forever is pretty damn boring and falls asleep within minutes, giving you the opening needed to finish him. But, to be clear, he was trying to bore the player into quitting the game.
    • Undyne on a Pacifist Run is defeated by failing to factor in the fact that that big heavy suit of armour may protect her from all sorts of attacks, but it just becomes a wearable oven when she's trying to chase some little kid through Lethal Lava Land. She quickly gets exhausted and collapses from heat stroke, which is where you come in to dispense a nice cool glass of water and a dose of Defeat Means Friendship.
    • A No Mercy Run overall can be seen as this in regards to playing as a Villain Protagonist. Most games that have the option of being "evil" often try to play it off for Rule of Cool, Rule of Funny, or still have you in a "lesser of two evils" situation. Not Undertale. To do a No Mercy run, you need to go out of your way to hunt down and kill absolutely everything you can, and the game will make you feel horrible for it. The quirky humor of the game vanishes, replaced by a dark and dreary ambiance. The NPCs treat you like the despicable scum you are. All the encounters are either pathetically easy or hair-pullingly hard so that you never get to actually enjoy yourself in battle. Your sympathies throughout the whole thing will lie with the victims. All of the game's puzzles are automatically solved, and all non-essential areas are warded off by force fields, so you can't do anything except fight. And most importantly, if despite all that you still go through with it, you can never "reset" your way out of the consequences - short of tampering with your computer, your sins will remain with you forever.
    • If players accept Sans' offer of mercy in the No Mercy fight, he then kills the player in an unavoidable attack. What? You'd think Sans would simply forgive you for killing his brother and the others?
    • Killing anyone, even if it's just one person, will net you consequences: Sans will call you out for it, Undyne will refuse to make friends with a murderer, and a lot of the NPCs will react if you murder their loved ones.
    • Undyne's cooking lesson goes exactly how you'd expect it to: pounding the vegetables for the sauce just covers you and all available surfaces in crushed vegetable matter, using energy spears to stir the pasta dents the pot, and turning up the heat sets the whole place on fire. As Undyne herself admits, "Man, no wonder Papyrus sucks at cooking."
  • Until Dawn: The end of Matt and Emily's section in one chapter has them cornered on a cliff by a herd of deer. The next chapter promptly defuses the cliffhanger when Matt points out that they're deer, not predators, and he and Emily calmly walk through the herd, which (unless you trigger the QTE where you attack one) just back away peacefully.
  • In Utawarerumono, the rabbit-people bring out their ultimate weapon: Humongous Mecha. The best anyone else has amounts to pointy sticks. They slaughter their enemies en masse, and are completely invulnerable to you, the player, fighting spirit be damned. Well, until you become a giant divine monster yourself.
  • Early on in The Walking Dead: Season Two, you meet and befriend a Post-Apocalyptic Dog. Unlike most examples of this trope, it's a starving animal which has been living in the wilds with no human contact, and it has absolutely no sense of loyalty to it's new-found human friend. When Clementine attempts to share a can of beans with it, the dog snatches the whole can and then attempts to maul Clementine when she picks it up. This is Truth in Television, as taking food away from a dog is a really good way to get bitten, even in the case that the dog in question is not particularly hungry and thoroughly domesticated and friendly with most people.
  • In Wasteland 2:
    • While pistols are the only firearm which can be used at close-range with no accuracy penalty, that's the only range they're really useful at, and they're usually not packing much power either. Pistol specialists will soon find themselves being horribly out-ranged and out-gunned by practically everybody else by the time the mid-game rolls around, and the player who decided to try and build one will feel very silly.
    • Of the recruitable companions you can get later on besides your initial squad of four, one is a ruthless raider who only wants to join you for the chance to kill people, one is a deranged alcoholic hobo who wants a life of adventure and danger, and one is an old wannabe-badass with delusions of grandeur. That is, they're all crazy fucking idiots with no sense of team-work or discipline and hence have absolutely no place in your professional military outfit. You'll need a very high Leadership skill to stop them from going rogue and getting themselves or your teammates killed at every turn.
  • The '_____' ending of The Witch's House is achieved by this. The titular witch is a bloody torso who is also missing her eyes. If the player just waits at the opening screen for an hour, the witch dies from her wounds, and the player can leave without ever entering the house.
  • The Witcher franchise is known most for its dark and more serious take on fantasy. What happens when you're an alchemically enhanced mutant trained to hunt monsters which are far less of a problem than they were before? Work is hard to come by and people call you a freak and monster for being a mutant. Geralt may have abilities greater than a regular person but he's still a man, Run head long into enemies with no planning and expect to be killed.
    • In a shout-out to Assassin's Creed, Altair appears dead in a cart in The Witcher 2. Turns out a small amount of hay isn't enough to cushion the impact from falling several stories.
    • The Witcher 3, it doesn't matter how much of a Kavorka Man Geralt is, how impressive his bedpost count is, he is not in a Dating Sim. If Triss and Yennefer find out Geralt's been romancing them both they will dump him, permanently, after they humiliate him.
    • Geralt's choices in the third game can also be this, if you assassinate Radovid and allow the Nilfgaardian Empire to conquer the Northern Kingdoms, rather than helping Radovid win the war. Turns out that, if the player believes it so, a mad tyrant of a king that allows a cult to persecute people for no good reason is far worse than allowing an empire to roll in and conquer the unstable and nearly constantly-warring Northern Kingdoms.
  • In Wolf, you're perfectly capable of killing cattle - if you don't mind the rancher showing up and shooting you (and, naturally, killing you very quickly; no Almost Lethal Weapons here). You can also attack human hunters, assuming you're feeling suicidal. The smart thing to do is exactly what real wolves do: avoid humans if at all possible.
  • XCOM:
    • UFO Defense has you command a hopelessly underequipped and out gunned force of humans fighting against endless hordes of alien monstrosities. Most of the soldiers die early. The most likely cause of death even for a battle-hardened Colonel is some random mook with a plasma cannon.
    • Enemy Unknown, but in the player's favor, mostly by averting With This Herring: the member nations of the XCOM project know it's their last hope, and supply it accordingly. Good-quality Earth-native equipment is free and standard issue. Your soldiers are also properly trained and very competent with said gear, they're the member nation's best of the best; since they're all that good though, they use XCOM's internal rank and specialization hierarchy.
  • Stardew Valley opens with you learning you inherited a farm property from Grandpa who died XX years ago. Since it's been abandoned for over a decade (at least), the property has become overgrown with trees, shrubs, grass, and erosion-exposed rocks, which you will have to clear away if you want to do anything useful with the land.
    • Raiding trash cans for items will disgust anyone who sees you at it (except Linus, who does the same).
    • Fixing up the Community Center and driving the cheap but oppressive Joja Mart out of business doesn't do any favors for Jodi or Pam, who shop at Joja because they can't afford Pierre's high prices, or Shane, who worked for Joja and consequently loses his job.
    • A lot of characters with severe personal problems simply can't be fixed by The Power of Friendship or The Power of Love. You're a farmer, not a therapist.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/RealityEnsues/VideoGames